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The Chicago Annenberg Challenge
1999 Annual Report
To The Annenberg Foundation
January 31, 2000
322 Sout h Green Street, Suite 108
Chicago, Illinois 60607
(312) 413-5869 General
(312) 355-0856 Fax
Background:
On December 31, 1999 the Chicago Annenberg Challenge completed the fifth year of its
work implementing a school reform program in Chicago public schools, under a contract
with the Annenberg Foundation. The Foundation awarded a grant of $49.2 million to the
Challenge contingent on the Challenge raising matching. The Challenge is using
Annenberg Foundation funds to support many Chicago public schools' efforts to improve
student achievement and to build resources to continue support for improving the
educational opportunities of all Chicago students .
The following report summarizes both organizational and programmatic progress for the
Chicago Annenberg Challenge for calendar year 1999. Our report is completed with a
number of attachments accompanying it.
Appendix A, attached, is a year-by-year summary of the Chicago Annenberg Challenge
for the years 1995 through 1998.
Report on activities and progress for 1999:
By way of summary, the Chicago Annenberg Challenge entered 1999 focused on a set of
goals and issues, as stated in the conclusion to our 1998 report:
1. Secure an extension of the contract with the Annenberg Foundation through years
2000 and 2001 to complete the program and grant making work of the Challenge.
2. Identify networks and schools that are improving significantly, to concentrate
remaining CAC funds on them. Phase out some networks.
3. Expand program work to increase the skills and capacity of external partners,
practitioners, Collaborative members, consultants and school personnel working with
schools.
4. Complete private and public matching fund requirements by December 31, 1999.
5. Focus the evaluation program to better serve CAC and schools and use research data
to assist schools in their reform plans .
6. Identify and communicate successful outcomes. Identify the evidence of change and
the constituents to whom the evidence should be communicated.
7. Communicate best practices to Annenberg networks and to all Chicago public
schools.
8. Complete establishment of the Chicago Public Education Fund.
9. Commit remaining grant funds to networks, schools and programs by December 31,
1999.
10. Plan for winding down the Challenge and capturing the findings and learnings of its
stakeholders.
11. Hold a major public event highlighting CAC networks' efforts and successes in May
1999.
2
Our report covers progress on the above goals and issues and provides a set of goals for
the remaining period of the Challenge.
Board of Directors :
At the end of 1999 the Board of Directors numbered ten. Three new directors joined the
board while two others resigned. The three new directors who took office in January
1999 are: Victoria Chou, Dean of the College of Education, University of Illinois at
Chicago; John W. McCarter, Jr., President of The Field Museum of Natural History;
and Jim Reynolds, President and CEO of Loop Capital Markets. By the end of 1999 two
original CAC board members resigned due to personal and professional commitments:
Arnold Weber and Ray Romero. At the end of 1999 only two of the founding eight
board members of the Chicago Annenberg Challenge remain on its board. Eight of the
current board members are new since the founding of CAC.
Leadership of the Board of Directors also underwent change with the resignation of
Barack Obama from the Presidency of the board due to his campaign for the U.S. House
of Representatives. Mr. Obama remains on the board but chose to step aside from his
position as President in which he served for the first four and one-half years of the
Challenge. He is the founding President of the Challenge. At the September 1999 board
meeting Edward Bottum was elected President of the board and Victoria Chou was
elected Secretary-Treasurer to fill the position previously held by Mr. Bottum.
The board of directors met quarterly during 1999, in March, June, September and
December. An additional Executive Committee vote was taken in May 1999 on a set of
grant proposals that needed expediting.
Chicago School Reform Collaborative:
By the middle of 1999 regular meetings ended for the Chicago School Reform
Collaborative, the advisory committee that assisted greatly in implementing the
Challenge from its inception. Collaborative members individually were taking on
responsibilities for working with Challenge networks, with external partners or with
specific program aspects of the Challenge and no longer elected to meet as a
"committee." During the first six months of 1999 it became more and more difficult to
draw a quorum at meetings. In addition Collaborative members are invited to and
participate in the various working groups of the Challenge.
3
Staff:
The Chicago Annenberg Challenge staff has been reduced to eight people at the end of
1999. Three of the eight are part-time (3 to 4 days/week). We are working to retain core
staff through at least the early Fall of2001 when the most essential work of the Challenge
will be completed. Reduction in the Challenge staff during 1999 took place only in the
clerical staff. Program staff remained intact.
Fundraising: Matching Funds
By the end of 1999 the Chicago Annenberg Challenge completed its matching grant
requirements to qualify for the $49.2 million grant awarded from the Annenberg
Foundation. A total of$13,848,000 in private matching funds was certified in August
1999 bringing the overall total of pri vate matching funds raised by the Challenge to date
to $51,691,400. The Challenge will complete one final round of private matching funds
in 2000, to count private matching funds awarded through calendar year 1999. It is
expected that the final certification will add between $10 and $15 million in additional
private matching funds to the Challenge's total, far exceeding the required private
matching funds requirement of $49.2 million. Significant increases in 1999 over 1998
private matching funds were noted in several private and corporate foundations :
DeWitt/Wallace; R.R. Donnelly Co.; Lloyd A. Fry Foundation; New Prospect
Foundation; Northern Trust Company; Prince Charitable Trusts; The Joyce Foundation.
The Challenge also completed its public matching funds requirement in 1999 by
certifying $18,399.000 in public funds . The total amount of public matching funds raised
by December 31, 1999 was $50,655,500.
A significant part of the Challenge's fundraising efforts in 1999 was dedicated to the
implementation of the Chicago Public Education Fund (CPEF), a new citywide public
foundation created by the Challenge to carryon system-wide school reform. The
Challenge secured close to $2 million in new commitments and grants for the new Fund
by the end of 1999, in addition to pledging $2 million towards its creation. All funds
actually committed to the new Fund by December 31, 1999 will be counted as matching
funds by the Challenge in its final private matching funds certification in early 2000
The Challenge also raised an additional $500,000 during 1999 to support completion and
some expansion of its evaluation program. Those funds will be counted as matching
funds in our final private matching grant certification in early 2000. Funds were awarded
by The Spencer Foundation, The Joyce Foundation, and Woods Fund of Chicago to
support expansion of the evaluation work in two critical areas: continued assessment of
student tasks and work products, and continued school visits and research to identify
successful school improvement efforts. It is expected that the John D. and Catherine T.
MacArthur will join the other three foundations in early 2000 with a final $50,000 grant
to complete the evaluation funding.
4
Chicago area foundations, both corporate and private, as well as individuals continue to
provide significant financial support for the work of school reform in public schools. The
Chicago Public Education Fund is focused on increasing the number of new supporters -
foundation, corporate, individual- for continued school reform in this city.
Chicago Public Education Fund:
The Chicago Public Education Fund (CPEF) was established and incorporated by the end
of 1999. The Challenge organized and raised funds for the new Fund over the past two
years. Scott Smith, Publisher and CEO of the Chicago Tribune, and a member of the
Challenge's Board of Directors, took the lead in establishing the Fund and now serves as
Chairman of its board. The Challenge's work on behalf of the Fund ended in December
1999 as planned, since a President has been hired and the main work of the Fund has
been transferred to her and her new board. In addition, all funds raised and received for
the Fund have been transferred to it. The new Fund has an active board often members
and a Leadership Council of thirty supporters. More supporters are being recruited even
as the Fund is setting its program priorities and is working towards a formal, public
announcement of its existence in Spring 2000.
The Challenge takes pride in the development of the new Fund. It is one of the clear
legacies of the Challenge, having drawn together significant new, citywide support
including cooperation with Mayor Daley and his school leadership team, Gery Chico and
Paul Vallas . Both the organizing efforts to set up the Fund as well as the early financial
commitment of $2 million from Annenberg funds were essential to its creation. The
CPEF is now independent of the Challenge. [Enclosed are materials about the Chicago
Public Education Fund.]
Grant Program:
During 1999 the Chicago Annenberg Challenge completed awarding of its grant dollars
to networks of Chicago public schools. A total of $8 million in grants was awarded
during 1999. Another $4.5 million was approved by the board of directors to be
distributed to a reduced number of networks (up to 29 of the current 47) for a final grant
period covering the 2000-2001 school year (ending June 30, 200 I). Each successful
network will receive a portion of their current grant for that period. The final amount for
each will be determined when the final grant amount available is determined in early
2000. All grants are scheduled to end June 30, 2001.
5
The Challenge's grant commitments made since the beginning of the Challenge are as
follows :
1995: $2.7 million
1996: $2.7 million
1997: $19.8 million
1998: $5.9 million
1999: $8.0 million
1999: $4.5 million committed for 2000-2001
Total : $43.6 million
A breakdown of the Challenge's grant support at the end of 1999 is as follows:
Number of Implement ation Grants: 47
Number of Leadership Development Initiative Grants : 7
Other grants supporting principal and teacher
Leadership, communications, and Local
School Council elections: 5
The number of currently supported networks - 47 - is down from a high of 60 (involving
250 schools) . The number of networks supported by Annenberg dollars will decrease
even further as we determine those to receive final year grants , for the period July 1,2000
through June 30, 2001.
The networks of schools supported by the Challenge involve 215 schools with
approximately 150,000 students enrolled in them. Approximately 10,000 teachers work
in those schools. 38 different external partners assist the networks.
An important component of the Challenge's grant program is the direct program work
undertaken with various Challenge constituents. Regular meetings, trainings and reviews
take place with an active committee of External Partners. The committee is coordinated
by two of its members and staffed by the Challenge. The External Partners Committee is
specifically charged with designing and carrying out inquiries, training, and consulting to
strengthen the capacity of all external partners in their work for whole-school change. For
example, as the year 2000 gets underway the committee has in place a six-month training
and inquiry process (in collaboration with the Annenberg Institute) for external partners
and their schools to determine their research and action agenda for the next period . The
networks are moving away from dependence on the Challenge and more toward their
own capacity and resources to continue their work beyond the life of the Challenge. The
Challenge provides resources, training and consulting to assist both the external partners
and the schools themselves. The External Partners Committee also plans and carries out
special events for all networks.
6
Additional working groups staffed by CAC include the Leadership Development
Initiative grantees and a committee of principals. Special consultants are deployed to
work through planning and implementation issues with individual networks.
A particular emphasis of our work with grantees, external partners, and other participants
is on active use of data. Much of the technical assistance and training supported by the
Challenge centers on assisting schools to better understand data and how to use it in their
reform efforts. This is particularly true for the Challenge's briefings and trainings for
schools on the data contained in their individual school report s recently provided to
almost 400 schools through our evaluation project.
A special grant and technical assistance program is the Challenge's "Breakthrough
Schools" program in which schools which have been identified as particular models of
school reform strategies, are provided additional resources to expand their practices and
to share them with other schools inside and outside their networks. Eighteen schools have
been identified as "Breakthrough Schools" and have received special funds to further
their work through June 2001 .
CAC's program work is focused on building the capacity of networks of schools and their
external partners to continue their reform work beyond the life of the Challenge. A
component of the work to build capacity is to develop fundraising skills for external
partner and local school representatives as well as to introduce them to sources of funds.
Particular emphasis was placed on communications in 1999. The Challenge published
School Works and began a new publication, The Challenge Reporter, to focus on specific
issues covered by our evaluation report s. The first issue interpreted and expanded on the
"Intellectual Quality... " report. It was circulated widely and received many positive
comments for its treatment of the issue. The next issue of the Reporter is well underway.
It will focus on active use of data in schools. The 1999 Annual Report will be printed
within the next few weeks.
CAC Operating Budget:
The Challenge's operating budget for calendar year 1999 - for administration, program,
and communications came in $210,000 below budget for the year. A large portion of the
savings came from lower-than-expected costs for running events and meetings in 1999.
In addition, development costs for establishing the Chicago Public Education Fund were
less than anticipated as the new Fund picked up some costs earlier than expected.
Restricted funds raised for communications and for development efforts of the new Fund
were turned over to it before the end of 1999. An audited financial statement for 1999 for
the Challenge is being prepared and will be sent to the Foundation as soon as it is
completed.
7
Evaluation:
The work of the Challenge's evaluation program - The Chicago Annenberg Research
Project - is proceeding as planned, though more slowly than anticipated. Year three of
the six-year work plan ended June 30, 1999. Massive amounts of data have been
collected from surveys , interviews, school and classroom observations, collection of
student tasks and work products, and test results . A series of reports (listed below) will
be published in the first months of 2000 . While a number of the reports are arriving later
than anticipated, briefings on their preliminary findings provided to CAC Board of
Directors and staff indicate important findings and models of change which will help
drive deeper and more effective school improvement in Chicago and perhaps elsewhere
in the country . In some ways the massive amount of data leads to late arriving reports. As
evaluators draw near to developing findings and conclusions they often discover new
angles and implications based on the huge amount of data that has been gathered for the
Annenberg Research Project.
At the same time the Challenge's Board of Directors and cooperating funders find the
research and documentation work in two areas especially important and have urged an
expansion of the evaluation work in those areas. Specifically, the Board commissioned
expanded research and documentation of student tasks and work products in Chicago
public schools (focused on raising the intellectual challenge of teacher and student work) ,
and an expanded, longitudinal study of school and classroom practices to determine
effective school improvement practices leading to improved student achievement. As
mentioned earlier, four Chicago area foundations are providing funds to support
expansion of the evaluation in these two areas .
One of the Research Project reports, "The Quality ofIntellectual Work in Chicago
Schools, " published in October 1998 took on a life of its own in 1999. (Some experts
around the country now refer to it as "The Chicago Report. ") The report studies and
makes explicit the intellectual challenge of tasks given students and the work they
produce in response to the assignments. The findings of the report as well as the process
used to arrive at them have gained widespread notice and usefulness. Several school
districts are circulating and using the report. The report has clearly demonstrated not only
the poor quality of intellectual work in schools , thus shortchanging poor and already
under-achieving students, but also helps teachers better assess their teaching methods and
the content of the work they expect of students. The report has resulted in training
programs in Chicago - more than we have the capacity to handle - and has started a
number of local schools on serious assessment of their teaching and learning approaches.
An update on the report is almost complete and another major report will be done in the
2000-2001 school year with the additional financial support we have raised.
8
The following critical evaluation reports will be published in the next few months :
1. Year 3 School Development Report -- A summary of progress to date
covering years 1 through 3 of the Challenge;
2. Teacher Professional Development;
3. Chicago Annenberg Challenge Networks and External Partners;
4. Update on "Intellectual Quality. .. " report analyzing three-year classroom task
trends ;
5. Instructional Program Coherence and Student Achievement;
6. Report on Instruction methods.
In addition almost 400 Chicago public schools received individual school reports based
on a citywide survey of all schools conducted in the Spring of 1999. (The 1999 survey is
the second citywide survey sponsored by the Chicago Annenberg Challenge Research
Project, the first taking place in 1997.) The 1999 individual reports, sponsored by the
Chicago Annenberg Challenge Research Project and partially paid for by the Chicago
Public Schools, provide trend data going back to 1994 for over half of the schools . The
remaining schools had trend data at least for 1997 through 1999. These reports, provided
by the Challenge both in 1997 and 1999 (and to be provided again in 2001) have become
an important source of data as schools prepare their annual school improvement plans.
The Evaluation Advisory Committee consisting of John Witte, Jomills Henry Braddock,
and Charles Payne continues to play an important advisory and quality control role in our
evaluation. The advisors continue to review all research and findings and advise the
research team on central questions to explore and methods to do so. In addition we have
used the Committee to help us interpret findings and plan ways to better disseminate
them. The Committee met on its regular schedule in February and September 1999. It is
supported by a grant from The Spencer Foundation. The next meeting is scheduled for
February 25, 2000.
The Chicago Annenberg Research Project is scheduled to end with a final, summative
report in August 2002.
Transition Plans:
The Chicago Annenberg Challenge plans to end December 31, 200 1. It is likely that its
grant monitoring and program work with schools and networks will end in September or
October, 2001 since all grants are scheduled to end June 30, 2001. The Challenge
budgeted for program and operations through December 31, 2001. The evaluation
program is budgeted to end in August 2002 with a final report due at that time. Some
plans for transition or closing down the Challenge's operations are underway, with more
to be determined by late summer 2000. Our transition plans include efforts over the next
18 months to publicize our learnings drawn both from our evaluation program and from
staff and board experiences over the past 5 to 7 years . The Challenge has already drawn
9
up and continues to refine a set of "Legacy" points it is highlighting and for which it is
gathering data to support.
Part of the transition has already taken place with the creation of the Chicago Public
Education Fund. While the Fund is an important and notable legacy of the Challenge it
addresses just one aspect of the Challenge's legacy. We are also engaged in ways to
convince local funders to support the work begun in over 200 schools. And we are
assisting the schools and their external partners with fundraising strategies and skills .
Plans and Goals for 2000-2001:
At their December 1999 board meeting the Challenge Board of Directors approved a set
of goals and plans for the next period . They include:
1. Complete the grant program, including:
A. Awarding the final $4.5 million in grant funds for the final grant year
July 1,2000 through June 30, 2001.
B. Monitoring and managing current and continued grants to 47
networks; Leadership Development Initiative grants; Breakthrough
Schools grants; the Chicago Public Education Fund; other special
grants. There remains up to $16 million in grant funds yet to be paid
out and accounted for, as of January 1,2000.
C. Compile in-depth reports from all networks as part of the Challenge's
legacy.
2. Maintain and expand program work with External Partners , Teachers and
Principals, and CAC network participants through August 2001;
3. Increase communication and dissemination of findings and conclusions from
the evaluation and other documentation;
4. Complete the evaluation program and disseminate findings ;
5. Develop a comprehensive set of policy recommendations for Chicago Public
Schools, based on CAC experience, documentation, and evaluation;
6. Manage the organization and its resources through the year 2001.
Conclusion:
1999 was a year of consolidation and strengthening the work of the Chicago Annenberg
Challenge. Emphasis was placed on targeting remaining grant funds and on
strengthening the capacity of external partners working with schools. In addition,
particular emphasis was placed on developing the messages of the Challenge's legacy in
Chicago -the impact , outcomes and policy implications of the Challenge's work.
We are please to provide this 1999 report of activities and progress in gratitude for the support of
the Annenberg Foundation.
10
Appendix A
Summary of the Chicago Annenberg Challenge 1995 -1998:
The Chicago Annenberg Challenge began with an announcement of the Annenberg
Foundation grant commitment in January 1995. The Chicago Annenberg Challenge was
announced as the newest and largest ever private commitment to Chicago school reform
joining the existing city wide effort of school reform organizations and funders who had
been engaged in a wide range of notable school reform efforts for close to ten years.
The Challenge's founding board began implementing the proposal by organizing itself,
hiring a director to begin September 1, 1995 and initiating an RFP process to invite
many Chicago public schools and their resource partners to both analyze the academic
achievement needs of their schools and to prepare plans to address them. Much of
calendar year 1995 was spent negotiating the grant agreement with the Annenberg
Foundation; organizing and incorporating the Challenge including identifying an eight-
person board of directors and a twenty-three member advisory Collaborative; hiring
initial staff (two in 1995: A Director and an assistant); developing grant making criteria
and guidelines which included program expectations of schools and their external
partners who wished to be part of the Challenge; soliciting and reviewing over 170
letters-of-intent in July and August from potential networks of schools throughout the
city; securing matching funds of $9 million; and reviewing and approving $2.7 million in
grants for 35 networks of schools in December.
The second year of the Challenge, 1996, was dedicated to deepening the grant making
process by soliciting additional networks of schools for Challenge support; adding
program staff by August 1996 - specifically, a program director, grants program officer,
and a chief financial officer - to work with the growing networks of CAC supported
schools; completing a first round of public matching grant funds and a second round of
private matching grants; implementing a transition from a fiscal agent handling CAC's
financial management to an in-house operation; obtaining a 501-c-3 ruling status from
the Internal Revenue Service; organizing and implementing a five-year evaluation of
Chicago school reform and the Challenge's role in it; increasing the number of planning
and implementation networks funded to almost 60 involving 250 Chicago public schools;
awarding another $2.75 million in grants for a total of $5.5 million in grants awarded by
the end of 1996; sustaining monthly meetings and participation of the Collaborative and
additional meetings of its committees.
By the end of 1996 CAC had raised a total of $11 .5 million in private matching funds and
$7.2 million in public matching funds and had drawn down $4.3 million from the
Annenberg Foundation.
11
As the Challenge entered 1997 it reconsidered its approach both to grant making and
program work with the networks. It instituted a more flexible and less traditional
foundation approach to accepting and reviewing requests from new and renewing
networks. The Challenge's staff, with strong endorsement from the Board of Directors,
concentrated on working with schools and their networks to raise expectations for
specific programs focused on whole school change and increased participation by all
adult stakeholders in each school - principals, teachers, parents. CAC also required
stronger matching funds participation from each school and network as evidence of the
networks "ownership" of school improvement efforts they were undertaking. In addition
the Challenge expanded its collaboration with other active school reform organizations
and at least thirteen foundations in Chicago through support for and active participation
in the "Successful Schools Project" a year-long (and still continuing) effort to report
successes and lessons learned from the past ten years of Chicago school reform: what
works; what doesn't; where school reform is headed next to build on its successes.
During 1997 CAC implemented another phase of its original plan, the "Leadership
Development Initiative," to organize and prepare parents and community residents to be
active participants in the educational improvement of their schools. At the same time the
Challenge developed a new fundraising effort to add to the already strong support
received from Chicago's corporate and private funding community.
By the end of 1997 the Challenge's board numbered ten with the addition of four new
board members who both replaced resigned board members and increased the size of
the board. The Challenge's staff was augmented with development and communications
personnel. The advisory Collaborative restructured itself to increase the number of
participants from funded groups and to involve other active school reformers and to
increase their work with networks and schools including assisting CAC staff in
monitoring the progress of networks and reviewing new proposals. Collaborative
members also became regular participants and advisors for the evaluation project.
A total of $19.8 million in grants was awarded in 1997 with the majority of that amount
made in multi-year commitments to run through June 2000. The number of Chicago
public schools in active networks was reduced to 220 (in 50 networks) as some planning
and implementation networks could no longer sustain their work. And the CAC staff
began programs to strengthen the work of the external partners, which were increasing
in importance as "keepers of the mission" for each network.
The Challenge further expanded its city-wide efforts in 1997 by collaborating with
Chicago's leading business organization, the Civic Committee and a set of foundations
to support principal recruitment and development efforts for schools who needed to hire
new principals.
By the end of 1997 the Challenge had raised and certified $35.4 million in matching
grant funds from both public ($13.4 million) and private sources ($22 million) towards its
goal of $98.4 million required to earn the full $49.2 million grant from the Annenberg
Foundation. More than thirty foundations and corporations were supporting the work of
the Challenge with their matching grants. A development committee of the CAC board
of directors and CAC staff was focused on plans for raising even more funds through the
eventual establishment of a public education fund.
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The Challenge began to clarify its outcomes and learnings by the end of 1997: 1.] An
expanded and strengthened number of external partners could be identified throughout
the city - up to 50 partner organizations had increased their work with improving schools
in qualitative as well as quantitative ways. At least 25 of those organizations were
identified as "strong" partners for schools as they were able to bring organizational and
educational resources to bear on school improvement in identifiable ways. 2.] Small
"learning communities" were identifiable throughout the city due to the Challenge's
support ; collaboration was identified in surveys as a key factor in schools' own
perception and communication of their success; it became reasonable to believe the
learning communities would outlive the life span of the Challenge and be a vehicle for
ongoing reform; 3.] The Challenge's evaluation reports were indicating that qualitative
improvements in teacher/professional development were taking place in Challenge
networks and schools. While the difference in structured professional development
between Annenberg and non-Annenberg schools was not huge, professional
development was significantly better in Annenberg networks and became a source of
hope that school improvement in that critical area is taking place. 4.] The Challenge's
evaluation provided detailed data on each school for 470 Chicago public schools in the
Fall of 1997 and provided opportunities for 30 school communit ies to interpret and plan
to use the extensive data collected on their schools.
1998
As the Chicago Annenberg Challenge ended 1998 its board numbered nine persons with
the resignations of two founding board members. The grant program awarded $5.9
million in new and renewed grants. The number of networks receiving support totaled 46
implementation networks and 3 planning networks. The Challenge raised a total of $66
million toward its goal of $98.4 million in required matching funds. That amount included
funds raised for the newly organized Chicago Public Education Fund which the
Challenge created as both a fundraising vehicle and as a way to extend its impact on
citywide school reform following the end of the Challenge.
The Challenge's program work focused more heavily on external partners for schools
with the organizing of a committee of external partners who took responsibility for
assisting each other and the rest of the partners.
The Challenge published Schoo/Works for the first time and expanded its
communication work, especially around the Chicago Public Education Fund, which
remained a work-in-progress throughout the year.
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Chicago Annenberg Challenge
1999 Report to the Annenberg Foundation
Attachments :
Chicago Annenberg Challenge Documents :
1. Board of Directors list;
2. Chicago School Reform Collaborative list;
3. CAC External Partners list;
4. List of Chicago public schools and their CAC network affiliation;
5. Map locating schools in CAC networks;
6. Minutes of Board of Directors' meetings: March, June, September, December 1999;
7. 1999 Private Matching Grant certification;
8. 1999 Public Matching Grant certification;
9. December 31, 1999 unaudited financial statement;
10. Status Report: Certification of Matching Funds
11. "Chicago Annenberg Challenge Accomplishments " - Legacy.
Evaluation Documents :
1. " Social Support, Academic Press, and Student Achievement: A ViewFrom the
Middle Grades in Chicago";
2. Internal Research Memo: "School Program Coherence and Student Achievement",
June 1999;
3. Internal Research Memo: 'Teacher Professional Developmen t", May 1999;
Chicago Public Education Fund (CPEF):
1. 9/23/99 Memo to CAC Board of Directors;
2. December 20, 1999 memo to Leadership Council from CPEF;
3. "A Final Report and Fundraising Plan for The Chicago Public Education Fund,"
December, 1999 - Ter Molen Brandt &Associates ;
4. Excerpt from Chicago Tribune 1999 Community Relat ions Report.
Publications :
1. School Works - Winter 1999 - "Professional Development: Building a Strong
Learning Community";
2. School Works - Winter 2000 - "Throwing Down the Gauntlet: How Quality Curriculum
Challenges Students";
3. Directory of Grantees;
4. The Chicago Annenberg Challenge Reporter, Summer 1999;
Other Publications:
1. "Leave No Child Behind: A Baker's Dozen Strategies to Increase Academic
Achievement," The Chicago Schools Academic Accountability Council, partially
sponsored by the Chicago Annenberg Challenge;
2. "Leave No Child Behind: An Examination of Chicago 's Most Improved Schools and
the Leadership Strategies Behind Them," The Chicago Schools Academic
Accountability Council, partially sponsored by the Chicago Annenberg Challenge;
3. "Ending Social Promotion: Results from the First Two Years," Consortium on Chicago
School Research.
CHICAGO ANNENBERG CHALLENGE
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Edward Bottum,Managing Director
Chase Franklin Corporation
1200 Central Avenue, Suite 306
Wilmette, IL 60091
Victoria Chou, Dean
UIC College of Education
1040 W. Harrison Street
Chicago, IL 60607
Connie Evans President
Women's Sell-Employment Project
20 North Clark Street, 4th Floor
Chicago, IL 60602
Patricia Albjerg Graham, President
The Spencer Foundation
875 North MichiganAvenue, Suite 3930
Chicago, IL 60611
John W. McCarter, Jr., President
Ihe Field Museum
Roosevelt Road at Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, IL 60605
Susan Blankenbaker Noyes
1046 MichiganAvenue
Wilmette, IL 60091
Barack Obama, State Senator
13th Legislative District
1741 East 71st Street
Chicago{ IL 60649
Barack Obama
Miner, Banthill & Galland
Jim Reynolds CFA
President and CEO
Loop Capital Markets
175 W. Jackson St., Suite A635
Chicago, IL 60604
Nancy S. Searle
675 Arbor Drive
Lake Bluff, IL 60044
Scott C. Smith
President, publ isher
Chicago Tribune
435 North Michigan, TT300
Chicago, IL 60611
UPDATED December 9,1999
Phone : 847-920-1673
Fax: 847-920-1681
Phone : 312-996-5641
Fax: 312-996-6400
E-mail VChou@uic.edu
Phone : 312-606-8255
Fax: 312-606-9215
Phone : 312-337-7000 ext. 6519
Fax: 312-337-0282
phone: 312-665-7210
Fax: 312-665-7216
E-mail jmccarter@fmnh.org
Phone: 847-251-6903
Fax: 847-251-6993
Phone : 773-363 -1996
Fax: 773-363-5099
P!lOne: 312-751-1170
Fax: 312·751-9490
Phone : 312-913-4901
Fax: 312-913-4928
Phone: 847-615-1875
Fax: 847-615-5406
Phone : 312-222-3232
Fax: 312-755-0410
CHICAGO ANNENBERG CHALLENGE
Chicago School Reform Collaborative List
Patricia Anderson
Program Director
The Chicago Academy for School Leadership
221 N. LaSalle St.
Chicago, IL 60601
Phone: 312-658-0358/Fax: 312-658-0361
Bill Ayers
Professor
University of Illinois at Chicago
College of Education
1040 W. Harrison St.
Chicago, IL 60680
Phone: 312-996-9689/Fax: 312-996-6400
Allen Bearden
CTU Quest Center
222 Merchandise Mart Plaza, Suite 400
Chicago, IL 60654
Phone: 312-329-6270/Fax: 312-329-6203
Carol Briggs
Harlan High School
9652 S. Michigan
Chicago, IL 60628
Phone: 773-535-5415/Fax: 773-535-3811
Sheila Castillo
Phone: 312-663-3863/Fax: 773-663-4023
Warren K. Chapman
Program Officer
The Joyce Foundation
Three First National Plaza
70 W. Madison St., Ste. 2750
Chicago, IL 60602
Phone: 312-782-2464/Fax: 312-782-4160
James Deanes
Director
School and Community Relations
Chicago Public Schools
125 S. Clark St., 5th FI.
Chicago, IL 60603
Phone: 773-553-1400/Fax: 773-535-3915
01127/00
Lafayette Ford
LSC Facilitator
Chicago Public Schools
125 S. Clark St., 5th FI.
Chicago, lL 60603
Phone: 773-553-1400/Fax: 773-534-6398
Anne Hallett
Executive Director
Cross City Campaign for Urban School Reform
407 S. Dearborn, # 1500
Chicago, IL 60605
Phone: 312-322-4880/Fax: 312-322-4885
Joan Jeter-Slay
c/o Designs for Change
6 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 1600
Chicago, IL 60602
Phone: 312-857-9292/Fax: 312-857-9299
Dr. Sokoni Karanja
Executive Director
Wendell Phillips Academy
Bronzeville Redev. Strat
Centers for New Horizons
4150 S. King Dr.
Chicago, IL 60653
Phone: 773-373-5700/Fax: 773-373-0063
Peter Martinez
Senior Program Officer
John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
140 S. Dearborn St., Ste. 1100
Chicago, IL 60603
Phone: 312-726-8000/Fax: 312-917-0334
Eric Outten
Schools First
8835 S. Clyde Ave.
Chicago, IL 60617
Phone: 773-978-3478/Fax:
Amanda Riveria
Principal
Ames Middle School
1920 N. Hamlin
Chicago, IL 60647
Phone: 773-534-4970/Fax: 773-534-4975
CHICAGO ANNENBERG CHALLENGE
Chicago School Reform Collaborative List
Karin Sconzert
Consortium on Chicago School Research
1313 E. 60th St.
Chicago, IL 60637
Phone: 773-834-0093/Fax: 773-702-2010
Martha Silva-Vera
Arnold Mireles Academy
13244 Avenue L
Chicago, IL 60633
Phone: 773-535-6360/Fax: 773-535-6303
Bernard Spillman
1060I S. Hoyne
Chicago, IL 60643
Phone: 773-233-8901/Fax:
Carol Sutton-Burnett
Hope Community Academy
7526 S. Cregier Ave.
Chicago, IL 60649
Phone: 773-535-3160/Fax: 773-535-3811
Beverly Tunney, Ph.D.
Chicago Principals and Admin istrators
Association
221 N. LaSalle St.
Chicago, IL 60601
Phone: 312-263-7767/Fax: 312-263-2012
Mildred Wiley
Bethel New Life Inc.
367 N. Karlov
Chicago, IL 60624
Phone: 773-826-5540/Fax: 773-826-5728
01/27/00
CHICAGO ANNENBERG CHALLENGE
External Partners List
Nancy Aardema
Logan Square Neighborhood Association
3321 W. Wrightwood Ave.
Chicago, IL 60647
Phone: 773-384-4370/Fax: 773-384-0624
Francea Adama
Partnership in Learning Network
Principals Scholars Program at UIC
IIIini Center
200 South Wacker Drive
Chicago, IL 60606
Phone: 312-575-7850/Fax:312-575-7808
Susan Adler Yanun
Logan Square Neighborhood Association
3321 W. Wrightwood Ave.
Chicago, IL 60647
Phone: 773-384-4370/Fax: 773-384-0624
Karl Androes
Whirlwind ArtsLab Network
65 E. Wacker PI., Suite 820
Chicago, IL 60601
Phone: 312-357-9463/Fax: 312-357-0130
Patrick Baccellieri
Education and Technology for Citizenship
Facing History and Ourselves
222 N. LaSalle, Suite 1414
Chicago, IL 6060 I
Phone: 773-535-5582/Fax: 312-726-3713
Allen Bearden
Professional Practice Schools Network
Chicago Teachers Union Quest Center
222 Merchandise Mart Plaza, Suite 400
Chicago, IL 60654
Phone: 312-329-6270/Fax: 312-329-6203
Marilyn Bizar
Best Practice Network
National-Louis University
Center for City Schools
2840 Sheridan Rd.
Evanston, IL 6020 I
Phone: 847-256-5150/Fax: 847-432-8252
December 15, 1999
Dr. Camille Blachowiez
T.LE.S. Partnership
National Louis University
1000 Capitol Drive
Wheeling, IL 60090
Phone: 773-534-9170/Fax: 773-534-9110
Bliss Browne
Urban Imagination Network
Imagine Chicago
35 E. Wacker Dr., Suite 1522
Chicago, IL 6060 I
Phone: 312-444-1913/Fax: 312-444-9754
Lois Butler, Co-Director
Confederation of Select
Chicago Essential Schools
Research Tower
10 W. 35th Street , 16th Floor
Chicago, IL 60616
Phone: 312-326-0242/Fax: 312-326-0267
Mary Charles
Alliance for Community Education
Loyola University
Dept. of Curriculum Instruction and Ed. Psych
Mallinckrodt Campus, 1041 Ridge Rd.
Wilmette, IL 60091
Phone: 847-853-3342/Fax: 847-853-3412
Kymara Chase , SAS Director
South Side Writing Coalition
DePaul University
Levan Room 200
2322 N. Kenmore Avenue
Chicago, IL 60614-3298
Phone: 773-325-7000/Fax:773-325-7542
Marie Cobb
South Shore African Village Collaborative
Coalit ion for Improved Education in South Shore
1809 E. 71st St.
Chicago, IL 60649
Phone: 773-684-6070/Fax: 773-684-1430
CHICAGO ANNENBERG CHALLENGE
External Partners List
Steven Craig
Education Connection Network
Great Books Foundation
Art Resources in Teaching
35 E. Wacker Dr., Suite 2300
Chicago, IL 60601
Phone: 312-332-5870/Fax: 312-407-0334
Suzanne Davenport, Acting Executive Director
Network for Leadership Development
Designs for Change
6 N. Michigan Ave., Ste., 1600
Chicago, lL 60602
Phone: 312-663-1600/Fax: 312-857-9299
Dr. Victoria Davis
Chicago Regional Learning Network Hub
Illinois Learning Partnership
1222 S. Jefferson St.
Lockport, IL 60441
Phone: 815-588-3560/Fax: 815-588-3571
Brigitte Erbe
Project TEAM
Near Northwest Neighborhood Association
2750 W. North Avenue, Suite 210
Chicago, IL 60647
Phone: 773-489-0383/Fax: 773-489-6360
Betsy Foxwell
STIR Network
Illinois Future Problem Solving
7007 N. East Prairie Rd.
Lincolnwood, IL 60645
Phone: 847-329-1440/Fax: 847-329-0283
Matthew Frazel
Flower Cluster Network
Garfield Park Conservatory Alliance
300 N. Central Park
Chicago, IL 60624
Phone: 773-638-1766/Fax: 773-638-1777
Gina Gamboa, Director
hACE: Art and Culture in Education
Chicago Teachers' Center
770 N. Halsted St., Suite 420
Chicago, IL 60622
Phone: 312-733-7330/Fax: 312-733-8188
December 15, 1999
Marilyn Guild
Associate Director of Education
Teaching & Learning for the
21st Centruy (TL-21)
Kohls Childrens Museum
655 West Irving Park Road, Apt. 3117
Chicago, lL 60613
Phone: 773-529-9345/Fax: 773-665-2764
Dr. Else Hamayan
New Schools Multicultural Network
Illinois Resource Center
1855 Mt. Prospect Rd.
Desplains, IL 60018
Phone : 847-803-3112/Fax: 847-803-2828
Susan Hepker
Stone Soup : The Multicultural Literacy Network
Hug-A-Book
Dawson Skills Center
390 I S. State St.
Chicago, IL 60609
Phone: 773-451-2178/Fax: 773-451-2179
Deborah Kasak, Executive Director
Chicago Middle Grades Network
Association of Illinois Middle Schools
P.O. Box 11076
Champaign, IL 61826-10761
Phone: 217-333-7104/Fax: 217-333-2440
Mike Klonsky
Small Schools Network
115 S. Sangamon St., 1st FI.
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: 312-413-8066/Fax:312-413-5847
Pauline Kochanski
Chicago Community History Collaborative
Chicago Metro History Education Center
60 W. Walton St.
Chicago, IL 60610
Phone: 312-255-3661/Fax: 312-266-8223
Dr. Zafra Lerman
Networks in Science Education
Columbia College
600 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60605
Phone: 312-663-1600/Fax:847-803-2828
CHICAGO ANNENBERG CHALLENGE
External Partners List
Vivian Loseth, Associate Director
Chicago Comer School
Development Program Network
Youth Guidance
53 W. Jackson Blvd. , Ste. 950
Chicago, IL 60604
Phone: 312-435-3900/Fax:312-435-3917
Jack Mitchell
Confederation of Select
Chicago Essential Schools
Research Tower
10 West 35th Street, 16th Floor
Chicago, IL 60616
Phone: 312-326-0242/Fax: 312-326-0267
Lourdes Monteagudo
West Pullman Elementary Network
Teachers Academy for Math & Science
3424 South State Street
Chicago, IL 60616
Phone: 312-949-2420/Fax:312-808-0103
Jackie Murphy
Lakeview Education and Arts Partnership
(LEAP)
Chicago Teachers' Center
770 N. Halsted Ave., 4th FI.
Chicago, IL 60622
Phone: 312-733-7330/Fax:312-733-8188
Linus Ogene
Center for International Technology
458 Nantucket Rd.
Naperville, IL 60565
Phone: 708-235-2 I72/Fax: 630-637-9469
Dr. George Olsen
Woodlawn School/Community Network
Roosevelt University
College of Education
430 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60605
Phone: 312-341-3706/Fax: 312-341-4326
Adeline Ray
Beverly/Morgan Park IB Middle Years Program
Beverly Area Planning Association
10233 S. Wood St.
Chicago, IL 60643
Phone: 773-233-31 OO/Fax: 773-233-0869
December 15, 1999
Dr. Sam Redding
Alliance for Achievement
Academic Development Institute
121 N. Kickaboo St.
Lincoln, IL 62656
Phone : 217-732-6462/Fax: 217-732-3696
Kris Reichmann
North Lawndale Learning Community
1229 S. Central Park, 3rd Fl.
Chicago, IL 60623
Phone: 773-277-2724/Fax: 773-534-1355
M. Saungktahu Richey
Success for All Network
10231 S. Lowe Avenue
Chicago, IL 60621
Phone: 773-779-2878/Fax: 773-987-0712
Cappy Ricks
West Town Learning Network
Chicago Teachers' Center
770 N. Halsted St., Suite 420
Chicago, IL 60622
Phone: 312-733-7330/Fax:312-733-8188
Jeanne Salis
I.M.P.A.C.T. Network
Chicago Children's Museum
700 E. Grand Ave., Ste. 127
Chicago, IL 60611
Phone: 312-464-7702/Fax:312-527-9082
Daniel R. Scheinfeld
Farren, Beethoven, Seward Network
Erikson Institute
420 N. Wabash
Chicago , IL 60611
Phone :312-755-2250/Fax:312-755-2255
Diane Schiller
Alliance for Community Education
Loyola University
Dept. of Curriculum Instruction and
Education Psychology
Mallinckrodt Campus, 1041 Ridge Rd.
Wilmette, IL 60091
Phone: 847-853-3342/Fax: 847-853-3412
CHICAGO ANNENBERG CHALLENGE
External Partners List
Zanelle Sibanda
Director of Education
West Pullman Elementary Network
Chicago United, Inc.
30 West Monroe, #1650
Chicago, IL 60603
Phone: 312-977-3066/Fax: 312-977-3066
John Simmons
Learning and Sharing Connection
Participation Associates
2555 N. Clark, #1903
Chicago, 1L60614
Phone: 773-935-5858/Fax: 773-935-3588
Sara Spurlark
Center for School Improvement
University of Chicago
1313 E. 60th St.
Chicago, IL 60637
Phone: 773-702-0555/Fax: 773-702 -2010
Anne Stapleton
Middle Schools Initiatives Network
Chicago Teachers' Center
770 N. Halsted, Rm. 420
Chicago, IL 60622
Phone: 312-738-2646/Fax: 312-733-8188
Kathleen Stringfield
Executive Project Director
Success for All Foundation
200 W. Towsontown Blvd
Towson, MD 21204
Phone: (800) 548-4998/Fax: (410) 324-4444
RaeLynne Toperoff
Executive Director
Making Education Better Network
The Teachers' Task Force
407 S. Dearborn, Suite 515
Chicago, IL 60605
Phone: 312-986-9238/Fax: 312-986-9239
Cindy Valenciano
CPS/CSU: Schools-Within-Schools Network
Chicago State University
950 I S. King Dr.
Chicago, IL 60628
Phone: 773-995-21 I4/Fax: 773-995-4532
December 15, 1999
Robert Valle
Coordinator of Program Development
Network for Experiental & Adventure Learning
Chicago Teachers' Center
770 N. Halsted St., Suite 420
Chicago, IL 60622
Phone : 312-857-9292/Fax:312-733-8188
Peggy Wise
MRSSA Network
Suzuki-Orff School
1148 W. Chicago Ave.
Chicago, IL 60622
Phone : 312-738-2646/Fax: 312-738-0285
Brain Wunar, Education Coordinator
Alliance for Community Education
Adler Planetarium
1300 South Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, 1L60605
Phone: 312-922-7827/Fax: 312-322-2257
Julie Yurko
Primarily Arts Network
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
220 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60604
Phone: 312-294-3 I92/Fax: 312-294-3450
CHICAGO ANNENBERG CHALLENGE
List of
Schools in Active Networks
Network Name School Name
Small Schools Network Academy of Communications and Technology (ACT Charter)
Chicago Middle Grades Network Albany Park Academy
Logan Square Collaborative Ames Middle
Success For All Network Andersen
Center for International Technology Anderson Community Academy
Chicago Comer School Network Anthony Branch (Burnham)
Teaching & Learning for the 21st Century (TL-21) Ariel Community Academy
STIR Network Armstrong G
Success For All Network Attucks
Lake View Education and Arts Partnership (LEAP) Audubon
Beverly/Morgan Park IB Middle Years Program Barnard
Network for Leadership Development Barton
Network for Leadership Development Bateman
Primarily Arts Network Beasley Academic Center
Farren, Beethoven, Seward Network Beethoven
CPS/CSU Network BEST (Bennett)
Best Practice Network Best Practices High School
Alliance for Achievement Bethune
Lake View Education and Arts Partnership (LEAP) Blaine
Education and Technology for Citizenship Bogan Tech H.S.
South Shore African Village Collaborative Bouchet Academy
South Shore African Village Collaborative Bradwell
Logan Square Collaborative Brentano
Chicago Community History Collaborative Bright
Chicago Comer School Network Brown
West Pullman Elementary Schools Network Brown Academy
Making Education Better Network Burke
Project TEAM Burr
Urban Imagination Network Byrd
.•
Learning and Sharing Connection Calhoun North
Center for School Improvement
-- -
Cameron
Updated December 21, 1999
Sm.Sch.= SmaJl School
Ch= Charter School
AII.= Alternative School
Schools in Active Grants.1-7-99
CHICAGO ANNEN BERG CHALLENGE
List of
Schools in Active Networks
Network Name School Name
Whirlwind ArtsLab Network Carson
Network in Science Education Cather
Chicago Comer School Network Chalmers
Chicago Comer School Network Chase
Confederation of Select Chicago Essential High School Chicago Vocational H.S.
Network for Experiental & Adventure Learning (NEAL) Chicago Youth Connection Charter School #1121
Project TEAM Chopin
Flower Cluster Clark Middle
Chicago Community History Collaborative Clinton
Beverly/Morgan Park IB Middle Years Program Clissold
South Shore African Village Collaborative Coles
Small Schools Network Connections (Piccolo)
hACE: Art and Culture in Education Cooper
Learning and Sharing Connection Corkery
Urban Imagination Network Corliss H.S.
West Pullman Elementary Schools Network Curtis
Network for Experiental & Adventure Learning (NEAL) CYCC-Community Christian A. Academy
Network for Experiental & Adventure Learning (NEAL) CYCC-Latino Youth Alternative H.S. #1121
Logan Square Collaborative Darwin
STIR Network Decatur Classical
Network in Science Education Dett
Urban Imagination Network Dewey
Chicago Regional Learning Network Hub Disney Magnet
Chicago Comer School Network Dixon
Center for School Improvement Donoghue
I.M.P.A.C.T. Network Drummond
Education Connection Network DuBois Elementary School
Woodlawn School/Community Network Dumas
Center for International Technology Dunne -
Community Dvorak Academy
...--_.._-" --- - _..-. -.. " .._._- I-c---- ...- - ..-.---- - - -.-- - .- .-- - - -- -- --...-----.-...- ... - ... • .- -.--. .• - - .- --- . .- -.
Education Connection Network Earhart
Updated December 21, 1999
Sm.Sch.= Small School
Ch= Charter School
AII.= Alternative School Schools in Active Grants.1-7-99
CHICAGO ANNENBERG CHALLENGE
List of
Schools in Active Networks
Network Name School Name
Education and Technology for Citizenship Eberhart
Small Schools Network Education in Action (Douglass Middle)
Making Education Better Network Ellington
Beverly/Morgan Park IB Middle Years Program Esmond
Farren, Beethoven, Seward Network Farren
Center for School Improvement Fernwood
Best Practice Network Field School
Flower Cluster Flower Vocational High School
Chicago Community History Collaborative Foreman H.S.
Professional Practice Schools Network Foundations
Logan Square Collaborative Funston
Network for Leadership Development Galileo Scholastic Academy
Network for Leadership Development Gallistel Language Academy
Small Schools Network Generations Global (Piccolo)
Network in Science Education Gladstone
West Pullman Elementary Schools Network Gompers
Small Schools Network Great Expectations (Piccolo)
Chicago Comer School Network Gresham
Education Connection Network Guggenheim
Chicago Comer School Network Haines
South Side Writing Coalition Hamline
Woodlawn School/Community Network Harte
T.I.E.S. Partnership Hawthorne
Alliance for Community Education (A.C.E.) Network Hayt
T.I.E.S. Partnership Healy School
Small Schools Network Hearst Higher Learning Center
Flower Cluster Hefferan
Best Practice Network Hendricks Community Academy
North Lawndale Learning Community Herzl
.•
West Pullman Elementary Schools Network Higgins
Center for School Improvement Holmes
Updated December 21, 1999
Sm.Sch.= Small School
Ch= Charter School
AII.= Alternative School
Schools in Active Grants.1-7-99
CHICAGO ANNENBERG CHALLENGE
List of
Schools in Active Networks
Network Name School Name
Urban Imagination Network Hope Community Academy
CPS/CSU Network HOTS (Bennett-Shedd Branch)
Primarily Arts Network Howland
Woodlawn School/Community Network Hyde Park Career Academy H.S.
Middle School Initiative Network Irving Park Middle
Best Practice Network Irving School
I.M.P.A.C.T. Network Jahn
STI R Network Jamieson
Chicago Comer School Network Jefferson T.
Small Schools Network Jemison (Esmond)
Best Practice Network Jenner School
North Lawndale Learning Commun ity Johnson
Chicago Comer School Network Jordan Community
Beverly/Morgan Park IB Middle Years Program Kellogg
Alliance for Community Education (A.C.E.) Network Kelvyn Park H S
Austin On-Line Key
Whirlwind ArtsLab Network Kinzie
New Schools Multicultural Network Lara Academy
North Lawndale Learning Community Lathrop
North Lawndale Learning Community Lawndale Community Academy
Education and Technology for Citizenship Lee
Austin On-Line Leland
South Side Writing Coalition Libby
T.I.E.S. Partnership Lincoln
Confederation of Select Chicago Essential High School Lindbloom Tech H.S.
New Schools Multicultural Network Little Village Academy
Urban Imagination Network Locke
Middle School Initiative Network Lovett
West Town Learning Network Lozano Bilingual .-
Chicago Middle Grades Network Madero Middle
South Shore African Village Collaborative Madison
Updated December 21, 1999
Sm.Sch.= Small School
Ch= Charter School
Alt.= Alternat ive School Schools in Active Grants.1-7-99
CHICAGO ANNENBERG CHALLENGE
List of
Schools in Active Networks
Network Name School Name
North Lawndale Learning Community Manley Community Academy
South Shore African Village Collaborative Mann
Stone Soup: The Multicultural Literacy Network Marconi Community Academy
Success for All Network Marquette West
Chicago Middle Grades Network Marshall Middle
North Lawndale Learning Community Mason
Small Schools Network Mason 21 (Mason)
Small Schools Network Mason SOAR (Mason)
Confederation of Select Chicago Essential High School Mather H.S.
Success For All Network McCormick
Woodlawn School/Community Network McCosh
Making Education Better Network Melody
Center for School Improvement Mireles Academy (formerly named Sheridan)
I.M.P.A.C.T. Network Mitchell
Logan Square Collaborative Monroe
MRSSA Network Moos
Beverly/Morgan Park IB Middle Years Program Morgan Park High School
Chicago Comer School Network Nash
hACE: Art and Culture in Education Newcomer's Center
Small Schools Network Nia (Cregier)
Chicago Comer School Network Nicholson
Urban Imagination Network Nobel
Center for School Improvement North Kenwood-Oakland Charter School
Professional Practice Schools Network Norwood Park
South Shore African Village Collaborative O'Keeffe
New Schools Multicultural Network Ortiz de Dominquez (formerly New Gary)
West Town Learning Network Otis
West Pullman Elementary Schools Network Owens
North Lawndale Learning Community Paderewski
-
CPS/CSU Network PAF (Bennett-Shedd Branch)
Center for School Improvement Park Manor
Updated December 21, 1999
Sm.Sch.= Small School
Ch= Charter School
AII.= Alternative School
Schools in Active Grants.1-7-99
CHICAGO ANNENBERG CHALLENGE
List of
Schools in Active Networks
Network Name School Name
South Shore African Village Collaborative Parkside Community Academy
West Town Learning Network .... Peabody
Small Schools Network Peace School (Spry)
Small Schools Network Perspectives Charter Middle School
Alliance for Achievement Piccolo Elementary School
Primarily Arts Network Pierce
North Lawndale Learning Community Pope
South Shore African Village Collaborative Powell
Teaching & Learning for the 21st Century (TL-21) Price
CPS/CSU Network PRIDE (White)
Project TEAM Pritzker
Project TEAM Pulaski Community Academy
Lake View Educat ion and Arts Partnership (LEAP) Ravenswood
Project TEAM Reilly
South Shore African Village Collaborative Revere
Confederation of Select Chicago Essential High School Robeson H.S.
MRSSA Network Rocha Early Childhood Center
STIR Network Rogers
Network for Leadership Development Roque de Duprey
Stone Soup: The Multicultural Literacy Network Ruiz
Education Connection Network Sabin Magnet
hACE: Art and Culture in Education Salazar Bil Ed Ctr
Learning and Shar ing Connection Saucedo School Academy
Center for School Improvement Sawyer
MRSSA Network Schneider
Small Schools Network SCOPE (Whitney)
CPS/CSU Network SENDAS (PUllman)
Farren, Beethoven, Seward Network Seward
T.I.E.S. Partnership Sheridan, M -
South Side Wr iting Coalition Sherman
Alliance for Community Education (A.C.E.) Network Solomon
Updat ed December 21, 1999
Sm.Sch.= Small School
Ch= Charter School
All.= Alternat ive School
Schools in Active Grants. 1-7-99
CHICAGO ANNENBERG CHALLENGE
List of
Schools in Active Networks
Network Name School Name
West Pullman Elementary Schools Network Songhai Learning Institute
Professional Practice Schools Network Southside Academy
Austin On-Line Spencer
Alliance for Achievement Spry
CPS/CSU Network STAR (Pullman)
Confederation of Select Chicago Essential High School Steinmetz H.S.
STIR Network Stone Academy
CPS/CSU Network STRIVE (Bennett)
CPS/CSU Network SUCCESS (White)
Urban Imagination Network Suder
Teaching & Learning for the 21st Century (TL-21) Sullivan
Confederation of Select Chicago Essential High School Sullivan H.S.
Flower Cluster Sumner
Beverly/Morgan Park IB Middle Years Program Sutherland
Alliance for Community Education (A.C.E.) Network Swift
Middle School Initiative Network Taylor
Small Schools Network Telpochcalli
Urban Imagination Network Terrell
South Side Writing Coalition Tilden Community Academy H.S.
Chicago Comer School Network Tilton
Center for International Technology Van Vlissingen
Woodlawn School/Community Network Wadsworth
Stone Soup: The Multicultural Literacy Network Ward, J
Chicago Community History Collaborative Washington High School
Best Practice Network Waters
West Town Learning Network Wells Community Academy
Small Schools Network Wells Prep (Phillips)
West Pullman Elementary Schools Network West Pullman
West Pullman Elementary Schools Network Whistler
.-
Chicago Regional Learning Network Hub White Career Academy
West Pullman Elementary Schools Network White Elementary
Updated December 21, 1999
Sm.Sch.= Small School
Ch= Charter School
AII.= Alternat ive School
Schools in Active Grants.1-7-99
Network Name
Chicago Regional Learning Network Hub
Updated December 21,1999
Sm.Sch.= Small School
Ch= Charter School
AII.= Alternative School
CHICAGO ANNENBERG CHALLENGE
List of
Schools in Active Networks
School Name
Woodson South
Schools in Active Grants.1-7-99

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