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Basic Exterior Scene

Settings
Written by Corey Rubadue
Thursday, 08 February 2007
Objective
This tutorial helps to set up a basic exterior architectural scene using Physical Sun and Physical Camera.
Basic Settings
Global Switches>Gamma 2.2 (all other values default)Camera>Physical Camera enabled>Still
Camera>Shutter speed 125>Film Width 36>Zoom 1>F-number 12>Film Speed(ISO) 200>Exposure
enabled>Vignetting enabledEnvironment/Sky>GI enabled 1.4>Texture Editor (double click on “m”)
Common>Type Sky>Multiplier 1.5 (all other values default)Image Sampler>Adaptive QMC>Min 1 Max
16> Antialiasing enabled>Area 1.5Color Mapping>HSV Exponential>Dark 1 Bright 1Indirect
Illumination>GI enabled>Primary engine Irradiance MapSecondary engine Quasi Monte-CarloIrradiance
Map>Min-3 Max –2>HSph. Subdivs 50>Samples 20 (all other values default)Quasi Monte-Carlo>Subdivs
8>Secondary Bounces 3
Global Switches

Camera
Environment/Sky

Image Sampler
Color Mapping

Indirect Illumination

Irradiance Map

(For faster test renders you can reduce the HSph. Subdivs to 30)(To increase the quality you can change
the Min Rate to –2 and Max Rate to 0, however this will increase render time)
Quasi-Monte Carlo GI

Scene Setup
Image 1 shows an architectural exterior scene. The goal is to render the exterior using a physical sky and
physical camera available using vray. It’s important to note that vray takes the sun location and time of day
from the SketchUp shadow settings as shown on Image 2. In this SketchUp scene, the only Vray specific
material applied is to the glass. The rest of the materials are SketchUp applied materials. This is important
to note since a lot of users will have existing SketchUp models that they want to render without spending
too much time re-applying materials and this example is meant to illustrate exterior render settings only.
Nonetheless, it still demonstrates the speed and quality that can be achieved with a simple and fast
setup.
Image 1: Exterior Scene in SketchUp

Image 2: SketchUp shadow settings

NOTE: If you enable “Show Calculation Phase” under the Irradiance Map Rollout>Basic Options,You will
get a preview of the IM calculation and lighting distribution as shown on Image 3

Image 3: IM Calculation Phase


Image 4: Final Rendering using VfSU setting listed above.

Render time approx. 12 min 800X500 The VfSU render options can be saved to be used on other scenes.
Open the Render Options toolbar, select File>Save, Load or Restore Defaults. VfSU comes with preset
settings for low, medium and high quality renderings. The above method is just one way of many, I
encourage everyone to experiment with their own settings based on their own scenes. I hope this serves
as a good starting point.
Basic Interior Scene
Settings
Written by Corey Rubadue
Thursday, 08 February 2007
Objective This tutorial helps to set up a basic interior architectural scene using V-Ray Rectangular Light
and Physical Camera in Vray for SketchUp

Basic Render Option Settings

Global Switches>Gamma 2.2 (all other values default)Camera>Physical Camera enabled>Still


Camera>Shutter speed 125>Film Width 36>Zoom 1>F-number 10>Film Speed(ISO) 800>Exposure
enabled>Vignetting enabledEnvironment/Sky>GI enabled 1.4>Texture Editor (double click on “m”)
Common>Type Sky>Multiplier 1.5 (all other values default)Image Sampler>Adaptive QMC>Min 1 Max
16> Antialiasing enabled>Area 1.5Color Mapping>HSV Exponential>Dark 1 Bright 1Indirect
Illumination>GI enabled>Primary engine Irradiance MapSecondary engine Light CacheIrradiance
Map>Min-3 Max 0>HSph. Subdivs 50>Samples 20 (all other values default)Light Cache>Subdivs
750>Sample Size 0.01>Scale Screen>Num. Phases 2 (Eq. # Processors)

Global Switches

Camera
Environment/Sky

Image Sampler
Color Mapping

Indirect Illumination

Irradiance Map
(For faster test renders you can reduce the HSph. Subdivs to 30 as well as reduce the Max Rate to –2)

Light Cache

(For faster test renders reduce the Subdivs to 500 and increase the Sample Size to 0.02. The Num.
Phases should be equal to the number of processors on your machine)

Scene Setup
Image 1 shows an architectural interior scene. The goal is to render the interior using a Vray rectangular
light and physical camera using vray. It’s important to note that vray takes the sun location and time of day
from the SketchUp shadow settings.

Image 1: Interior Scene in SketchUp

For this interior scene, a Vray rectangular light was placed directly outside the window as shown on Image
2. The color of the rectangular light is light blue to simulate the color of the sky. Multiplier 30, Invisible
enabled (to the camera), No Decay enabled, Ignore Light Normals enabled.

Image 2: Vray Rectangular Light


NOTE: If you enable “Show Calculation Phase” under the Irradiance Map Rollout and Light Cache
Rollout, you will get a preview of the calculation phases and lighting distribution as shown on Images 2 & 3

Image 3: Light Cache Calculation Phase


Image 4: Irradiance Map Calculation Phase
Image 5: Final Rendering using VfSU settings listed above.

Render time approx. 20 min 800X500 The VfSU render options can be saved to be used on other scenes.
Open the Render Options toolbar, select File>Save, Load or Restore Defaults. VfSU comes with preset
settings for low, medium and high quality renderings. The above method is just one way of many; I
encourage everyone to experiment with their own settings based on their own scenes. I hope this serves
as a good starting point.
Church of Light
Tutorial
Written by Damien Alomar
Wednesday, 16 May 2007
This tutorial explains the settings and steps used to set up the scene "Church of Light by Tadao
Ando" using Vray for SketchUp

Basic Render Settings

Global Switches>Gamma>Output 2.2 (all other values default)


Camera>Physical Camera enabled>Still Camera>Shutter speed 125>Film Width 36>Zoom 1> F-
number 10>Film Speed(ISO) 800>Exposure enabled>Vignetting enabled
Environment/Sky>GI enabled 2.4>Texture Editor (double click on "m") Common>Type
Sky>Multiplier 1 (all other values default)
Image Sampler>Adaptive QMC>Min 1 Max 16> Antialiasing enabled>Area 1.5
QMC Sampler>Adaptive Amount 0.9>Noise Threshold 0.01> Min Samples 6
Color Mapping>HSV Exponential>Dark 1 Bright 1
Indirect Illumination>GI enabled>Primary engine Irradiance Map
Secondary engine Light Cache
Irradiance Map>Min-5 Max-4>HSph. Subdivs 50>Samples 20 (all other values default) Detail
enhancement Enabled
Light Cache>Subdivs 500>Sample Size 0.02>Num. Phases 2

Global Switches
Physical Camera

Environment/Sky

Image Sampler
Indirect Illumination

Irradiance Map
(For faster test renders you can reduce the HSph. Subdivs to 30)
Light Cache
Sample Size 0.02 was used to reduce noise in the scene. Since this scene does not contain a high
level of detail this number was acceptable. Num. Phases was also set to 2 to ensure a low amount
of noise in the scene.

Lighting Set-up

Images 1 & 2 show the basic scene exterior and interior. The goal is to render the interior using
the physical sky/sun and physical camera available with Vray for SketchUp. It's important to note
that Vray takes the sun location and time of day from the SketchUp shadow settings as shown on
Image 3.
Image 1: Exterior View of Model in SketchUp

Image 2: Interior Camera View in SketchUp

Image 3: SketchUp shadow settings


Image 4: Sun Location in the model is set to be perpendicular to the exterior wall with cross
opening for this specific scene where we want the light to come in directly behind the wall. Note
the shadow direction which is perpendicular to the wall with the opening.

Image 5: One Vray rectangle light was located directly outside the cross opening of the model to
supplement the sun light entering the space and ensure the light rays would enter the space
perpendicular to the room. This is typical for a lot of interior scenes. In some cases, where light is
entering through glass, you may position a rectangle light next to the glass on the interior.
Image 6: Vray Rectangle Light Settings
Materials Setup

In this scene, SketchUp materials with no textures were replaced with new Vray materials.
Textured elements in the SketchUp model were brought into the material editor as Linked Vray
materials. This is important to note since a lot of users will have existing SketchUp models that
they want to render without spending too much time re-applying materials and also, it's very easy
to apply and adjust the textures on objects using SketchUp controls

Image 7: Material Editor shows the Vray materials as well as the Linked Vray materials. Most
elements have a certain amount of reflection. This adds to the level of realism in a scene since
most materials have reflectivity in real life, even if it's barely noticeable sometimes. This image
also shows the specific settings for the Linked Walls material, it's important to note the level of
reflection noted by the level of grey (22) as well as the Glossiness factors (0.6). The glossiness
was turned down to create the blurring effect of the light and the reflection on the material.

Here is the final scene rendered by Vray for SketchUp using the rendering and material settings
described above.
The VfSU render options can be saved to be used on other scenes. Open the Render Options
toolbar, select File>Save, Load or Restore Defaults. VfSU comes with preset settings for low,
medium and high quality renderings. The above method is just one way of many, I encourage
everyone to experiment with their own settings based on their own scenes. I hope this serves as a
good starting point.

Basic Architectural Glass Material


Settings
Written by Corey Rubadue
Thursday, 08 February 2007
Objective
These settings create a glass material suitable for architectural exteriors and interiors. It is a clear glass
which lets light through as well as reflects the surrounding environment.
Basic Settings

Sample Rendering
Lighting in V-Ray for
SketchUp
Written by Damien Alomar
Thursday, 08 March 2007
This tutorial goes over the different types of lighting within V-Ray for SketchUp. These include Global Illumina
images, point lights, rectangular lights, and emissive geometry.

There are several different options for adding light in VfSU. The simplest is GI or Global Illumination. T
within V-ray, and lastly we have light emitting geometry. So let’s get on with it.

For these tests I am using a model of the new Camaro which I downloaded from here http://sketchup.g
mid=a3da1cce792763fd33898df841c4de85

Global Illumination

Global Illumination (GI) is by far the easiest way to add light to a scene in vfsu. Basically GI simulates a
emits an even light from all directions. The result is a very soft light that does a great job at providing a
In order to be able to use GI you must enable Indirect Illumination. If you don’t the side of the car facin
black because it isn’t visible to the Sketch Up Sun. After enabling Indirect bounces in Global Switches
the Environment Rollout and enable GI, this is what allows us to set the illumination for our scene. For
values where they are.
And here is the result.

You’ll notice the nice soft shadows at the base of the car, and the nice light coverage on the front grill.
coming from all around the model. GI is very useful for providing quick tests and visualizations becaus
good feedback on how the geometry will react to light. In this case this is an exterior scene and the mo
environment, so this is giving us a very even light.

Using HDRIs

With VRay we also have the option of using an image to light our scene. Although we could use any im
are best suited for lighting are HDR images, or High Dynamic Range Images. Basically what this mean
contains information that is brighter than white, and we can use this information to add lighting to our s
image from here (http://gl.ict.usc.edu/Data/HighResProbes/) (this image is not the actual HDR, but a jp
So let’s put this HDR to use. In the Environment rollout click on the little “m” next to the GI multiplier. T
Editor. On the left next to type there is a drop down list. From the list select bitmap option and all of th
the right. Now you can add the map by clicking on the “m” towards the bottom of the window and find t
to be used correctly for either GI or environment backgrounds the must be mapped using the Environm
texture editor. Now we need to specify the mapping, and In this case we know that our image is a sph
sure that the spherical option is selected from the list to the right. Go ahead and repeat the same proc
and then go ahead and render.
Go ahead and repeat the same process for mapping the background and then go ahead and render.

You might notice your image is a bit noisier now, which is due to the sampling on the hdri (the example
quality settings which are in the frame stamp). You can also see how the shadows themselves look a
if the lighting is a bit more directional. This is because the illumination from the image is mostly directly
by the sharper shadows along the side of the car, the elongated shadows in the front of the car, and th
view mirror. Below is the same rendering with a jpeg version of the same file, and as you can see the
aren’t really as distinct as they were in the rendering with the HDR image.
Adding Lights

V-Ray supports both rectangular lights and omni lights (or point lights). We are going to go over some
first. In the V-Ray toolbar the yellow ball icon will add an omni light.

After clicking the icon simply pick a point in your scene then position the light in your scene. Omni ligh
so remember that when your placing in you scene. Also depending on the size of your scene the omni
actual size of the light doesn’t affect anything, but it’s a good idea to have it be a size that doesn’t effec
anything in your scene. After adding the light you need to edit the light properties. You can do this by
and at the bottom of the menu will be an option for VRay for SketchUp. From that option select edit lig
main menu bar by going to Edit > VRay for SketchUp >Edit Light.

This will bring up the Light properties box, and there are several key parameters that we must go over.
In the intensity section there are parameters for both color and the multiplier. Color is fairly self explan
the multiplier will control how brightness the light. Under the Options section is a little option that says
the right. This option will control how the intensity of the light changes based on how far away the light

The default setting is Linear which basically means that the intensity of the light will not change at all. T
because in the real world lights decay. The second option is Inverse, which decays the light based on
The third option is Inverse Square, which decays the light based on the inverse of the distance squared
decays in the real word, so it is recommended that you use this setting. You don’t really need to know
that each option, from linear to inverse square, will need a progressively higher multiplier to achieve the
Here are some sample images to show different decay. The only thing changed in each image is the t

The Sampling section allows you to control how V-Ray samples the light. Unless you are creating cau
settings are best left alone, so we will leave them for another tutorial. The Shadow section has some o
option to enable or disable shadow. The Radius feature will allow you to control the sharpness of the s
shadow edges. Omni lights by their nature create very sharp shadows, so if you would like to minimize
this feature.

Be careful as this can increase render times and if you set too large of a value your shadows may disa
control the quality of the shadows. A lower value will allow the render to be quicker, but may have lowe
better quality, but will take longer. Only adjust this value if you are not getting the quality that you woul

Rectangular Lights

Rectangular Lights are the other lights supported by V-Ray and have their own distinctive characteristic
The intensity of a rectangular light is related to their size. For example, a very small light with an intens
effect, but if the size were tripled or quadrupled then the intensity would be greatly increased even thou
Here are two images with the light at two different sizes.
The size of a rectangular light also has an affect on the shadow quality. A small light will usually have
the omni light though) compared to a light which is bigger. Because the blurriness of the shadows are
itself we really only have the ability to turn shadows on and off. Rectangular lights do have many of the
lights with several differences. The Intensity controls are the same, but under Options we find many m
to the No Decay option. This is similar to the decay options of the omni lights. However, we only have
Square decay. Having No Decay check will make the decay linear, while having it unchecked (the defa
means that the decay will be Inverse Square.

Double-Sided will allow the light to emit light from both sides, not just the front face. Invisible will make
camera and any reflections in the scene. Enabling Ignore Light Normals allows for an even distribution
this feature will force the light to be emitted predominantly in the direction normal to the front face. The
the light intensity and color to be taken from the environment behind it. This is mostly used in windows
not entirely effective or accurate. Store with Irradiance Map allows for the direct light to be calculated w
speed up calculations. In this mode quality is controlled by the IR settings. Within the Sampling section
not in the omni light settings. The subdivisions value will control the number of samples that are taken
value of 8 is usually sufficient, but with interior scenes more subdivisions may be required.

Light Emitting Geometry


In V-Ray it is also possible to have objects emit light, which provides a lot of flexibility in how we can ad
neon signs, glowing objects, and other things are now possibilities by using light in this way. We will ac
material editor, so click on the M in the V-Ray toolbar. This brings up the material editor, and if we look
the materials in the scene. Right click on Scene Materials then Add Material > Add VRay Material. Th
material which is named Default Material. Right click on this material to rename it if you like. Now click
name of the material. This will open the material layer structure. As you can see there currently there
material right now. To add a light emitting layer, right click on Emissive Layer and click Add New Laye
rollout over in the material options.

There are 3 simple options within the emissive layer; color, intensity, and transparency. Color and Inte
regular light do. The transparency will be useful to allow other layers that are underneath the Emissive
be visible in the material. Keep in mind that making the material more transparent will decrease the int
BUAT BIKIN RUMPUT

caranya pake displacement.

1. edit material

2. buka option map


3. centangi option displacement

4. klik huruf m disampingnya

5. typenya ganti dengan bitmap

6. Multiplayer ganti ma angka 5

7. terus muncul option bitmap-file

8. klik hurup m sampingnya lagi

9. pilih gambar versi hitam putih dari materialnya (biasanya sih bikin dulu)

10. Aply materialnya

11. kalo kurang muncul tambahin multiplyyernya jadi 10 kek