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16 SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 HOME & GARDEN

Garden 2020

The Dispatch
Sunday, March 29, 2020
2 SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com HOME & GARDEN HOME & GARDEN The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 15

Stuffed Sweet Potatoes with Salsa


4 People 20 min prep. 1 hour

Ingredients: Prep:
4 sweet potatoes • Wash all produce
1 TBSP olive oil • Chop cilantro leaves and
1 TBSP butter stem
1/3 cup cilantro • Chop feta cheese
2/3 cup feta cheese • Dice tomatoes into medium
3 tomatoes sized pieces
1 small diced onion • Dice onion into small pieces
1/2-1 small green chili • Cut chili pepper in half and
pepper remove seeds, then dice into
1 lime small pieces
Salt & pepper • Cut lime in half

Preheat the grill to medium high heat. Rub sweet potato in olive oil, use a
paper towel or pastry brush for help. Lightly salt the potato.
Wrap sweet potato in heavy duty aluminum foil and leave on the grill for
an hour.
Make the salsa by combining tomatoes, onion, chili pepper and 3 TBSP
cilantro in a bowl and squeeze lime juice on it. Mix all ingredients and
season with a pinch of salt.
Take the sweet potato off the grill and slice open lengthwise, taking care
not to cut all the way through. Mash a little of the inner potato with a fork
and mix it with butter, salt, pepper and almost all remaining cilantro (leave
a small amount for garnish). Top off with cheese, salsa and to finish, sprin-
kle the remaining cilantro on top.
14 SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com HOME & GARDEN HOME & GARDEN The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 3

Index of Advertisers
Adventure ATV........................................................................... 5
Bedzzz Express........................................................................... 2
Biddy Saw Works, Inc............................................................... 14
Bloomers Nursery and Garden Boutique.................................... 11
Green Bean Stew with Cheese Crye-Leike Properties Unlimited – Caroline Bromley.................... 3
Friendly City Mini Warehouses.................................................. 16
12 People 15 min prep. 2.5 hours
Hancock Hardware Home and Garden Center........................... 7
Hollis Brothers Heating and Cooling.......................................... 13
Ingredients: Prep: Ja-San Carpet Distributors.......................................................... 14
10.5 oz navy beans • Soak dried navy beans in wa- Lowndes Farm Supply............................................................... 11
4.5 lb beef stew meat ter overnight or drain canned Military Hardware..................................................................... 12
10 cups green beans navy beans Palmer’s Interiors....................................................................... 15
7 cups carrots • Wash all produce Penny Bowen Designs, Inc........................................................ 13
5 TBSP margarine • Trim ends of green beans, S&K Door and Specialty............................................................ 15
3 onions then cut in half Smith Landscaping...................................................................... 3
1/2 gal vegetable broth • Peel carrots and slice them Southern Fireplace...................................................................... 5
2.5 cups shredded • Peel and dice onion into The Granite Guys........................................................................ 5
gouda small pieces Twigs Nursery and Landscaping................................................. 15
Salt, pepper & nutmeg • Softly pat beef dry with a pa- Walton’s Greenhouse................................................................ 12
per towel and cut into 3/4”
cubes
About the cover: Hannah Knepp looks at azaleas at Busy Bee Nursery
in Macon in this file photo

Melt margarine in a big pot and brown the beef in it (add beef slowly in
small portions). Once all the meat is in, add onions and season with salt
and pepper.
Add dried navy beans and fill up with some of the  broth. (If you are using
canned beans, don’t add them until later.) Let simmer for 60 minutes.
Add green beans and carrots to the stew (as well as canned or fresh navy
beans) and let simmer for another 40 minutes.
Season lightly with salt, pepper and a big pinch of nutmeg to taste.
Serve stew in bowls and top up with cheese.
4 SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com HOME & GARDEN HOME & GARDEN The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 13

A bit of a fixer-upper, not when it comes to selling homes Gardening


Continued from Page 12
By Isabelle Altman for the first time. For Tuggle and Lawrence, that means lots of questions.
ialtman@cdispatch.com “They want to know, ‘How do I do this? How do I plant that?’” Tuggle
said. “A lot of them are trying to get vegetables that it’s a little too cool for

W
hen the average home buyer in the at the moment. So we kind of walk them through all that.”
Golden Triangle walks into a house, Lawrence agreed.
they want it to be move-in ready. “We’ve had people coming in as far back as two weeks ago looking for
vegetables we don’t even get in until April.”
Columbus real estate agents Caroline Bromley, with
Tuggle and Lawrence said their best tip for first-time gardeners is to
Crye-Leike Properties, and Colin Krieger with RE/ have your soil tested and prepare the beds with well-drained and fertil-
MAX Partners agreed the trend over the last few ized soil.
years is younger couples moving into homes in “The first thing I want to know is if they’ve had their soil tested,” Tuggle
Starkville and Columbus without the time, budget or said. “If they are from the area, we usually know what the soil is like. For
inclination to immediately start on big projects. example, in the New Hope area, it’s a heavy clay soil, so you’ll need to
“That doesn’t necessarily mean brand-new or add lime to the soil. Bottom line is you need to know what you’re working
perfect, but [...] they’re not looking for a fixer-upper with when it comes to your soil. That’s going to make a huge difference
quite as much as we saw three or four years ago,” in how well your garden does.”
Krieger said. Lawrence said it’s also important to plant in the proper season.
For sellers, that means sticking to smaller ren- “A lot of your greens do well now, but for a lot of garden vegetables –
peas, beans, tomatoes it’s still a little early. We’ve had an early spring so
ovations such as painting, replacing light fixtures,
far, but my step dad told me years ago that if you get lightning in February
updating thermostats and especially, cleaning and it’s going to get cold in March. Well, we had lightning in February, so me,
de-cluttering. personally, I feel like we’re going to have a cold snap in April. Hopefully,
“De-clutter, de-clutter, de-clutter,” said Penny it won’t be too bad.”
Bowen, an interior designer and decorator who Tuggle also praised the effects gardening has on the body and soul.
owns Penny Bowen Designs in Columbus. “Get outside. Enjoy the sunshine,” she said. “You’ll feel better. And
The current trend in homes is light, airy and when you start a project and see it through, you’ll feel like you accom- Photos by Claudi Arrington/Dispatch Staff
spacious. Bowen said most people can’t even plished something that you’ll be able to enjoy through the summer.” Columbus AFB resident Mackenzie Dwoznik enjoys planting vegetables and flowers.
visualize their furniture in a room if it’s filled with


other people’s knick-knacks, so the best thing to do

Don ‘t personalize renovations.


is clear out everything unnecessary before showing
your home.
Often sellers who do major, expensive remod-
els don’t see a return on investment, Bromley said, “Try not to be too specific to your exact taste if you’re not keeping (the house).”
particularly if they’re doing things like putting in —Caroline Bromley, Crye-Leike Properties


top-of-the-line appliances or, as Krieger pointed
out, adding unnecessary wine cellars, shops, “man
Clean.
she said. “But maybe the house isn’t really a farm-
caves” or even storm shelters. If a seller does decide house-style home, yet they decorate it that way.
to go with a larger remodel, they said, he or she Or they have some of their old things, but they put
should focus on the kitchen and master bathroom. some of this new in because they think that’s what
“Clean, crisp and nice is what a lot of our buyers
people want. But they’re just sending a mixed mes-
What to avoid are looking for.”
sage[…]it needs to be cohesive.”
The biggest thing to avoid – which Bromley, — Colin Krieger, RE/MAX Partners
Quick easy fixes include some gardening out


Krieger and Bowen all agreed on – is personaliz- front for curb appeal or installing something like a

Paint.
ing the home too much, whether by painting walls “smart doorbell” to give the home the appearance
bright, loud colors or adding intricate interior deco- of being high-tech, Krieger said.
rating specific to your own taste. That’s probably the For those with more of a budget, Bromley recom-
biggest mistake Krieger’s seen, he said, along with mended hiring a home inspector to check out the “A fresh coat of paint is the least expensive and
doing major renovations to only part of the house house and ensure there are no maintenance issues. easiest way to make your home more marketable.”
and leaving the rest looking older and out-of-style. “When I get an offer on a house, the very next — Penny Bowen, interior designer
“For example, they’ll do new cabinets and granite thing we do is have a home inspection,” she said.
in the kitchen,” he said. “The bathrooms are still “Everybody asks for one. I have personally lost more
from the 1970s. Sometimes we’ll see people do the sales not (because) we can’t agree on a price but house move-in ready.
flooring but not the paint.” because[...]the repairs scare the buyer.” “If somebody’s going around and they’re looking
Similarly, Bowen said, people often mix and A seller can keep the house from being on the at five houses, and yours stands out as clean, pretty,
match styles. market too long if they take care of those issues move-in ready, it’s going to be at the top of their
“A popular style right now would be farmhouse,” before the seller even walks in, she said, leaving the list,” she said.
12 SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com HOME & GARDEN HOME & GARDEN The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 5

COVID-19 virus produced a


spike in vegetable gardening
Gardening interest picking up as more and more people stay close to home
By Slim Smith to his store to stock up on livestock feed, pet food, garden
ssmith@cdispatch.com seeds and plants.
Mary Tuggle, manager at Walton’s Greenhouse said,

T
he continuing impact of the Coronavirus is certain aside from increased traffic, she’s noticed a difference in
to be seen and felt in myriad ways now that spring what customers are looking for, something she attributed to
has arrived. One sign may be that homes may look COVID-19 concerns.
a lot more colorful and greener than in past springs. While “In this area, there’s always been pretty heavy demand
the virus had a negative effect on many businesses, nurser- for shrubs and flowers,” Tuggle said. “Now, we’re starting
ies and farm/garden supply stores have seen a definite boost to see more people coming in for vegetables. It’s probably
in sales. At Lowndes Farm Supply, business was up 40 per- about 50-50 now.”
cent in May compared to May 2019. General Manager Jeff Debbie Lawrence, owner of Bloomers Nursery in Steens,
Hays said much of the increase is related to the concerns has noted that trend, too.
generated by the COVID-19 virus. “I think people are worried about jobs and money,” she
“Regular customers are buying a little more than usual said. “Now, more of them are asking themselves if plants
and new customers are driving sales, too,” he said. “I think and flowers are a necessity. So they’re looking for vegetable
they don’t know what might happen to the supply chain.” plants.”
Hays said with more and more people working from A lot of customers who are familiar with decorative plants
Photo by Claudi Arrington/Dispatch Staff
home or, perhaps, out of work, residents have more time are suddenly turning their attention to vegetable gardening
Columbus AFB resident Mackenzie Dwoznik planted some
to spend in the lawns and gardens. Customers are flocking See GARDENING, 13 lavender in a raised bed.
6 SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com HOME & GARDEN HOME & GARDEN The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 11

Salvaged materials, still hot trend in home renovations and decorating Sustainable
Continued from Page 10
By Slim Smith
ssmith@cdispatch.com
ry, they need less water, less fertilizer, mobility issues keep their gardens
less pruning, less maintenance over- healthy, he said.

T
he market for reclaimed lum- all,” said Wilson, who is also the state The survey showed that gardeners
ber and other building materi- master gardener coordinator. “That’s are also interested in environmen-
als continues to grow. Accord- what most home gardeners are looking tally friendly pesticides and planting
ing to the market analyst group Market for, not necessarily what’s more native trees in strategic places around their
Research report, the global market for or environmentally friendly, but some- homes to reduce their electricity bills.
these materials is expected to reach thing that (needs) less maintenance.” Mary Tuggle, the manager at Walton’s
$12 billion by 2025. Conservationists The demand led to the creation Greenhouse in Columbus said custom-
sing the praises of reclaimed materials, of Mississippi Smart Landscapes, or ers have told her that both methods
too. Home and furniture stylists say garden landscapes that combine and are important to them.
the trend will continue to be popular lay out plants strategically to conserve “They’re paying more attention to
through the foreseeable future. water, encourage wildlife, save on the way the house fits toward east,
Mike Quinn wasn’t thinking of any energy costs and still be aesthetically west, north and south, and then do
of that a couple of years ago when pleasing, according to the MSU Exten- the windbreak on the north side and
he and his wife were shopping at the sion website. the shade plants on the west side and
Habitat for Humanity Resale Store in “It really came out to a lot of prac- south side so they’re not spending
Columbus. tices people can use to minimize the extra money for heating and cooling,”
“I don’t even remember what amount of effort involved, but also to Tuggle said.
we were looking for,” said Qunn. “I maximize the benefits as you create Customers are also interested in
walked in the back of the story and gardens and landscapes, doing it in a organic fertilizers and soils and bio- Photos courtesy Mississippi State University Smart Landscapes

way that doesn’t become burdensome degradable mulch in order to keep Plants and landscaping can provide relaxing outdoor rooms.
saw these huge stacks of old flooring.”
As it turned out, what Quinn was to the person,” Brzuszek said. unnatural substances out of the soil, larity since some people do not want and lower-maintenance, but you’re
looking for was what he hadn’t been The low maintenance level of Smart she said. Low-growing, low-mainte- to have to trim their plants, she said. not going to get something that is
looking for – a large stock of 100-year- Landscapes helps older adults with nance plants have increased in popu- “New hybrids are bred to be shorter no-maintenance,” Tuggle said.
old-plus floor, perfect for the renova-
tion of his grandfather’s 19th-Century
home in Lowndes County.
“The house had this great old pine
floor, but we discovered the floors
were nailed down to the joists. There
wasn’t a subfloor. So we had to take
up the floors to put down subfloors. A Photos courtesy of Mike Quinn
lot of the boards were damaged.” Above: Mike Quinn works on installing a
Quinn said as much as 80-percent subfloor in his house. Right: Unpolished
reclaimed wood floor.


of the flooring in his grandfather’s
house comes from the flooring he
bought at the habitat store.
“It was perfect [...]. It blends in per-
fectly with the original flooring. You The house
had this great old pine floor, but we
really can’t tell the difference. It still
has the old imperfects and coloring discovered the floors were nailed
of the original. You can’t get that at a down to the joists. There wasn’t a
lumber yard.” subfloor. So we had to take up the
Habitat director Kathy Arinder said floors to put down subfloors. A lot of
she had a pretty good idea that the the boards were damaged.”
salvage materials her organization sal- — Mike Quinn
vaged from a donated home in 2017
would be popular. another supply of salvaged materials
“I thought we could sell it, but I form another donated home.
had no idea it would be as popular Jacob Pannell turned the demand of
as it turned out to be,” she said. “So old materials into a business.
when we had another opportunity, we
didn’t hesitate.”  Habitat currently has See MATERIALS, 7
10 SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com HOME & GARDEN HOME & GARDEN The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 7

Sustainable gardening practices provide less work for the gardener


include the river birch, Florida maple are wonderful for Mississippi, but we
Mississippi gardeners are looking for native plants, low- and Southern magnolia. The MSU do try to educate (people) that for
Extension promotes the use of native the most part, native plants are more
maintenance landscapes, environmentally friendly pesticides plants, though not exclusively, Wilson adapted to growing here, and in theo-
and more ways to keep gardens both natural and beautiful. said.
See SUSTAINABLE, 11
“There are non-native plants that
By Tess Vrbin three priorities nationwide. 
tvrbin@cdispatch.com Gardeners also want to attract
wildlife including birds, bees and

G
ardeners in Mississippi and butterflies to pollinate the surrounding
nationwide want to get back plants, said Bob Brzuszek, a professor
to basics. A 2017 national of landscape architecture with the
survey by the American Society of Mississippi State University Extension
Landscape Architects included re- who conducted the survey. Pollinator
sponses from 256 Mississippians about gardens have been “a hot topic” in
what they want most in their gardens the gardening community for about
and neighborhoods. A large majority the past three years, MSU Extension
said they encourage wildlife such as assistant professor of horticulture Jeff
butterflies and bees on their proper- Wilson said.
ty, use compost or recycle organic “It ties in with native plants, with
debris and are “somewhat interested” sustainable landscapes, proper land-
or “very interested” in learning how scape design, installation, mainte-
to minimize their use of pesticides. nance, all of it.” Luther Shields/Dispatch Staff Luther Shields/Dispatch Staff
The survey showed that native plants, Flowers that are native to Mississippi The finished floor in the living room of the home of Mike and Laura Quinn. Mike and Laura Quinn.
low-maintenance landscapes and veg- include coneflowers, butterfly weed
etable gardens were respondents’ top and the blue flag iris, and native trees

Materials


Continued from Page 6
“I’ve been doing this for about four
years now,” Pannell said. “Demand is
pretty steady. People want bricks and
floor boards, but something else that’s
I’ve been
doing this for about four years now,”
really popular are the floor joists, Pannell said. “Demand is pretty
which they have plained down and steady. People want bricks and floor
turned into farm tables. In fact, I’ve boards, but something else that’s
made a few farm tables myself, even really popular are the floor joists,
though I never considered being a which they have plained down and
furniture-maker.” turned into farm tables. In fact, I’ve
Pannell said customers like Quinn made a few farm tables myself, even
often want old materials to match though I never considered being a
what they already have in their older furniture-maker.”
homes. The materials are also still in — Jacob Pannell
fashion as accent pieces.
“People want old barn wood to put waste to tear old buildings down and
on the wall as art or exposed beam,” haul it off to the dump. So he started
Pannell said. “A lot of people like hav- collecting it and I have, too. Every
ing the old wood. It’s a conversation now and then people come around,
Photos courtesy Mississippi State University Smart Landscapes piece.” see something they want and I’ll sell it
ABOVE: Plants can create interesting sunscreens on porch rooftops. Justin Shelton has a store of old ma- to them. It’s the kind of stuff you can’t
LEFT: A row of Crepe Myrtles adds beauty and shade to your landscape. terials, even though he doesn’t have a find at a lumber yard.”
project in mind.
“It’s something my dad started
doing,” he said. “It seemed like such a
8 SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com HOME & GARDEN HOME & GARDEN The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 9

2020-2021 Gardening Calendar Full


moon
New
moon

April 8 23 May 7 22 June 5 21 July 5 20 August 3 19

Beets Pole Beans Corn Corn Carrots Cabbage Snap Beans


Cantaloupe Pumpkins Parsley Peas Cherry Tomatoes Cauliflower Squash
Corn Snap Beans Peas Sweet Potatoes Collards Beets
Cucumbers Squash Sweet Potatoes Watermelons Cucumbers Broccoli
Eggplants Sweet Potatoes Lima Beans Brussels Sprouts
Lima Beans Tomatoes Peas Eggplants
Okra Watermelons Pole Beans Kale
Peanuts Pumpkins Lettuce
Peas Rutabagas Mustard
Peppers Potatoes

September 2 17 October 1 16 31 January 13 28 February 11 27 March 13 28

Radishes Green Onions Asparagus Onions Carrots


Spinach
November 15 30
Lettuce Beets Potatoes Corn
White Onions Shallots Cabbage Shallots Parsnips
December 14 30 Cauliflower Spinach Radishes
Celery Turnips
Green Onions Garden Peas Zucchini
Shallots Green Onions
Kohlrabi
Leeks
Mustard
* Planting dates
10 SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com HOME & GARDEN HOME & GARDEN The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 7

Sustainable gardening practices provide less work for the gardener


include the river birch, Florida maple are wonderful for Mississippi, but we
Mississippi gardeners are looking for native plants, low- and Southern magnolia. The MSU do try to educate (people) that for
Extension promotes the use of native the most part, native plants are more
maintenance landscapes, environmentally friendly pesticides plants, though not exclusively, Wilson adapted to growing here, and in theo-
and more ways to keep gardens both natural and beautiful. said.
See SUSTAINABLE, 11
“There are non-native plants that
By Tess Vrbin three priorities nationwide. 
tvrbin@cdispatch.com Gardeners also want to attract
wildlife including birds, bees and

G
ardeners in Mississippi and butterflies to pollinate the surrounding
nationwide want to get back plants, said Bob Brzuszek, a professor
to basics. A 2017 national of landscape architecture with the
survey by the American Society of Mississippi State University Extension
Landscape Architects included re- who conducted the survey. Pollinator
sponses from 256 Mississippians about gardens have been “a hot topic” in
what they want most in their gardens the gardening community for about
and neighborhoods. A large majority the past three years, MSU Extension
said they encourage wildlife such as assistant professor of horticulture Jeff
butterflies and bees on their proper- Wilson said.
ty, use compost or recycle organic “It ties in with native plants, with
debris and are “somewhat interested” sustainable landscapes, proper land-
or “very interested” in learning how scape design, installation, mainte-
to minimize their use of pesticides. nance, all of it.” Luther Shields/Dispatch Staff Luther Shields/Dispatch Staff
The survey showed that native plants, Flowers that are native to Mississippi The finished floor in the living room of the home of Mike and Laura Quinn. Mike and Laura Quinn.
low-maintenance landscapes and veg- include coneflowers, butterfly weed
etable gardens were respondents’ top and the blue flag iris, and native trees

Materials


Continued from Page 6
“I’ve been doing this for about four
years now,” Pannell said. “Demand is
pretty steady. People want bricks and
floor boards, but something else that’s
I’ve been
doing this for about four years now,”
really popular are the floor joists, Pannell said. “Demand is pretty
which they have plained down and steady. People want bricks and floor
turned into farm tables. In fact, I’ve boards, but something else that’s
made a few farm tables myself, even really popular are the floor joists,
though I never considered being a which they have plained down and
furniture-maker.” turned into farm tables. In fact, I’ve
Pannell said customers like Quinn made a few farm tables myself, even
often want old materials to match though I never considered being a
what they already have in their older furniture-maker.”
homes. The materials are also still in — Jacob Pannell
fashion as accent pieces.
“People want old barn wood to put waste to tear old buildings down and
on the wall as art or exposed beam,” haul it off to the dump. So he started
Pannell said. “A lot of people like hav- collecting it and I have, too. Every
ing the old wood. It’s a conversation now and then people come around,
Photos courtesy Mississippi State University Smart Landscapes piece.” see something they want and I’ll sell it
ABOVE: Plants can create interesting sunscreens on porch rooftops. Justin Shelton has a store of old ma- to them. It’s the kind of stuff you can’t
LEFT: A row of Crepe Myrtles adds beauty and shade to your landscape. terials, even though he doesn’t have a find at a lumber yard.”
project in mind.
“It’s something my dad started
doing,” he said. “It seemed like such a
6 SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com HOME & GARDEN HOME & GARDEN The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 11

Salvaged materials, still hot trend in home renovations and decorating Sustainable
Continued from Page 10
By Slim Smith
ssmith@cdispatch.com
ry, they need less water, less fertilizer, mobility issues keep their gardens
less pruning, less maintenance over- healthy, he said.

T
he market for reclaimed lum- all,” said Wilson, who is also the state The survey showed that gardeners
ber and other building materi- master gardener coordinator. “That’s are also interested in environmen-
als continues to grow. Accord- what most home gardeners are looking tally friendly pesticides and planting
ing to the market analyst group Market for, not necessarily what’s more native trees in strategic places around their
Research report, the global market for or environmentally friendly, but some- homes to reduce their electricity bills.
these materials is expected to reach thing that (needs) less maintenance.” Mary Tuggle, the manager at Walton’s
$12 billion by 2025. Conservationists The demand led to the creation Greenhouse in Columbus said custom-
sing the praises of reclaimed materials, of Mississippi Smart Landscapes, or ers have told her that both methods
too. Home and furniture stylists say garden landscapes that combine and are important to them.
the trend will continue to be popular lay out plants strategically to conserve “They’re paying more attention to
through the foreseeable future. water, encourage wildlife, save on the way the house fits toward east,
Mike Quinn wasn’t thinking of any energy costs and still be aesthetically west, north and south, and then do
of that a couple of years ago when pleasing, according to the MSU Exten- the windbreak on the north side and
he and his wife were shopping at the sion website. the shade plants on the west side and
Habitat for Humanity Resale Store in “It really came out to a lot of prac- south side so they’re not spending
Columbus. tices people can use to minimize the extra money for heating and cooling,”
“I don’t even remember what amount of effort involved, but also to Tuggle said.
we were looking for,” said Qunn. “I maximize the benefits as you create Customers are also interested in
walked in the back of the story and gardens and landscapes, doing it in a organic fertilizers and soils and bio- Photos courtesy Mississippi State University Smart Landscapes

way that doesn’t become burdensome degradable mulch in order to keep Plants and landscaping can provide relaxing outdoor rooms.
saw these huge stacks of old flooring.”
As it turned out, what Quinn was to the person,” Brzuszek said. unnatural substances out of the soil, larity since some people do not want and lower-maintenance, but you’re
looking for was what he hadn’t been The low maintenance level of Smart she said. Low-growing, low-mainte- to have to trim their plants, she said. not going to get something that is
looking for – a large stock of 100-year- Landscapes helps older adults with nance plants have increased in popu- “New hybrids are bred to be shorter no-maintenance,” Tuggle said.
old-plus floor, perfect for the renova-
tion of his grandfather’s 19th-Century
home in Lowndes County.
“The house had this great old pine
floor, but we discovered the floors
were nailed down to the joists. There
wasn’t a subfloor. So we had to take
up the floors to put down subfloors. A Photos courtesy of Mike Quinn
lot of the boards were damaged.” Above: Mike Quinn works on installing a
Quinn said as much as 80-percent subfloor in his house. Right: Unpolished
reclaimed wood floor.


of the flooring in his grandfather’s
house comes from the flooring he
bought at the habitat store.
“It was perfect [...]. It blends in per-
fectly with the original flooring. You The house
had this great old pine floor, but we
really can’t tell the difference. It still
has the old imperfects and coloring discovered the floors were nailed
of the original. You can’t get that at a down to the joists. There wasn’t a
lumber yard.” subfloor. So we had to take up the
Habitat director Kathy Arinder said floors to put down subfloors. A lot of
she had a pretty good idea that the the boards were damaged.”
salvage materials her organization sal- — Mike Quinn
vaged from a donated home in 2017
would be popular. another supply of salvaged materials
“I thought we could sell it, but I form another donated home.
had no idea it would be as popular Jacob Pannell turned the demand of
as it turned out to be,” she said. “So old materials into a business.
when we had another opportunity, we
didn’t hesitate.”  Habitat currently has See MATERIALS, 7
12 SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com HOME & GARDEN HOME & GARDEN The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 5

COVID-19 virus produced a


spike in vegetable gardening
Gardening interest picking up as more and more people stay close to home
By Slim Smith to his store to stock up on livestock feed, pet food, garden
ssmith@cdispatch.com seeds and plants.
Mary Tuggle, manager at Walton’s Greenhouse said,

T
he continuing impact of the Coronavirus is certain aside from increased traffic, she’s noticed a difference in
to be seen and felt in myriad ways now that spring what customers are looking for, something she attributed to
has arrived. One sign may be that homes may look COVID-19 concerns.
a lot more colorful and greener than in past springs. While “In this area, there’s always been pretty heavy demand
the virus had a negative effect on many businesses, nurser- for shrubs and flowers,” Tuggle said. “Now, we’re starting
ies and farm/garden supply stores have seen a definite boost to see more people coming in for vegetables. It’s probably
in sales. At Lowndes Farm Supply, business was up 40 per- about 50-50 now.”
cent in May compared to May 2019. General Manager Jeff Debbie Lawrence, owner of Bloomers Nursery in Steens,
Hays said much of the increase is related to the concerns has noted that trend, too.
generated by the COVID-19 virus. “I think people are worried about jobs and money,” she
“Regular customers are buying a little more than usual said. “Now, more of them are asking themselves if plants
and new customers are driving sales, too,” he said. “I think and flowers are a necessity. So they’re looking for vegetable
they don’t know what might happen to the supply chain.” plants.”
Hays said with more and more people working from A lot of customers who are familiar with decorative plants
Photo by Claudi Arrington/Dispatch Staff
home or, perhaps, out of work, residents have more time are suddenly turning their attention to vegetable gardening
Columbus AFB resident Mackenzie Dwoznik planted some
to spend in the lawns and gardens. Customers are flocking See GARDENING, 13 lavender in a raised bed.
4 SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com HOME & GARDEN HOME & GARDEN The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 13

A bit of a fixer-upper, not when it comes to selling homes Gardening


Continued from Page 12
By Isabelle Altman for the first time. For Tuggle and Lawrence, that means lots of questions.
ialtman@cdispatch.com “They want to know, ‘How do I do this? How do I plant that?’” Tuggle
said. “A lot of them are trying to get vegetables that it’s a little too cool for

W
hen the average home buyer in the at the moment. So we kind of walk them through all that.”
Golden Triangle walks into a house, Lawrence agreed.
they want it to be move-in ready. “We’ve had people coming in as far back as two weeks ago looking for
vegetables we don’t even get in until April.”
Columbus real estate agents Caroline Bromley, with
Tuggle and Lawrence said their best tip for first-time gardeners is to
Crye-Leike Properties, and Colin Krieger with RE/ have your soil tested and prepare the beds with well-drained and fertil-
MAX Partners agreed the trend over the last few ized soil.
years is younger couples moving into homes in “The first thing I want to know is if they’ve had their soil tested,” Tuggle
Starkville and Columbus without the time, budget or said. “If they are from the area, we usually know what the soil is like. For
inclination to immediately start on big projects. example, in the New Hope area, it’s a heavy clay soil, so you’ll need to
“That doesn’t necessarily mean brand-new or add lime to the soil. Bottom line is you need to know what you’re working
perfect, but [...] they’re not looking for a fixer-upper with when it comes to your soil. That’s going to make a huge difference
quite as much as we saw three or four years ago,” in how well your garden does.”
Krieger said. Lawrence said it’s also important to plant in the proper season.
For sellers, that means sticking to smaller ren- “A lot of your greens do well now, but for a lot of garden vegetables –
peas, beans, tomatoes it’s still a little early. We’ve had an early spring so
ovations such as painting, replacing light fixtures,
far, but my step dad told me years ago that if you get lightning in February
updating thermostats and especially, cleaning and it’s going to get cold in March. Well, we had lightning in February, so me,
de-cluttering. personally, I feel like we’re going to have a cold snap in April. Hopefully,
“De-clutter, de-clutter, de-clutter,” said Penny it won’t be too bad.”
Bowen, an interior designer and decorator who Tuggle also praised the effects gardening has on the body and soul.
owns Penny Bowen Designs in Columbus. “Get outside. Enjoy the sunshine,” she said. “You’ll feel better. And
The current trend in homes is light, airy and when you start a project and see it through, you’ll feel like you accom- Photos by Claudi Arrington/Dispatch Staff
spacious. Bowen said most people can’t even plished something that you’ll be able to enjoy through the summer.” Columbus AFB resident Mackenzie Dwoznik enjoys planting vegetables and flowers.
visualize their furniture in a room if it’s filled with


other people’s knick-knacks, so the best thing to do

Don ‘t personalize renovations.


is clear out everything unnecessary before showing
your home.
Often sellers who do major, expensive remod-
els don’t see a return on investment, Bromley said, “Try not to be too specific to your exact taste if you’re not keeping (the house).”
particularly if they’re doing things like putting in —Caroline Bromley, Crye-Leike Properties


top-of-the-line appliances or, as Krieger pointed
out, adding unnecessary wine cellars, shops, “man
Clean.
she said. “But maybe the house isn’t really a farm-
caves” or even storm shelters. If a seller does decide house-style home, yet they decorate it that way.
to go with a larger remodel, they said, he or she Or they have some of their old things, but they put
should focus on the kitchen and master bathroom. some of this new in because they think that’s what
“Clean, crisp and nice is what a lot of our buyers
people want. But they’re just sending a mixed mes-
What to avoid are looking for.”
sage[…]it needs to be cohesive.”
The biggest thing to avoid – which Bromley, — Colin Krieger, RE/MAX Partners
Quick easy fixes include some gardening out


Krieger and Bowen all agreed on – is personaliz- front for curb appeal or installing something like a

Paint.
ing the home too much, whether by painting walls “smart doorbell” to give the home the appearance
bright, loud colors or adding intricate interior deco- of being high-tech, Krieger said.
rating specific to your own taste. That’s probably the For those with more of a budget, Bromley recom-
biggest mistake Krieger’s seen, he said, along with mended hiring a home inspector to check out the “A fresh coat of paint is the least expensive and
doing major renovations to only part of the house house and ensure there are no maintenance issues. easiest way to make your home more marketable.”
and leaving the rest looking older and out-of-style. “When I get an offer on a house, the very next — Penny Bowen, interior designer
“For example, they’ll do new cabinets and granite thing we do is have a home inspection,” she said.
in the kitchen,” he said. “The bathrooms are still “Everybody asks for one. I have personally lost more
from the 1970s. Sometimes we’ll see people do the sales not (because) we can’t agree on a price but house move-in ready.
flooring but not the paint.” because[...]the repairs scare the buyer.” “If somebody’s going around and they’re looking
Similarly, Bowen said, people often mix and A seller can keep the house from being on the at five houses, and yours stands out as clean, pretty,
match styles. market too long if they take care of those issues move-in ready, it’s going to be at the top of their
“A popular style right now would be farmhouse,” before the seller even walks in, she said, leaving the list,” she said.
14 SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com HOME & GARDEN HOME & GARDEN The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 3

Index of Advertisers
Adventure ATV........................................................................... 5
Bedzzz Express........................................................................... 2
Biddy Saw Works, Inc............................................................... 14
Bloomers Nursery and Garden Boutique.................................... 11
Green Bean Stew with Cheese Crye-Leike Properties Unlimited – Caroline Bromley.................... 3
Friendly City Mini Warehouses.................................................. 16
12 People 15 min prep. 2.5 hours
Hancock Hardware Home and Garden Center........................... 7
Hollis Brothers Heating and Cooling.......................................... 13
Ingredients: Prep: Ja-San Carpet Distributors.......................................................... 14
10.5 oz navy beans • Soak dried navy beans in wa- Lowndes Farm Supply............................................................... 11
4.5 lb beef stew meat ter overnight or drain canned Military Hardware..................................................................... 12
10 cups green beans navy beans Palmer’s Interiors....................................................................... 15
7 cups carrots • Wash all produce Penny Bowen Designs, Inc........................................................ 13
5 TBSP margarine • Trim ends of green beans, S&K Door and Specialty............................................................ 15
3 onions then cut in half Smith Landscaping...................................................................... 3
1/2 gal vegetable broth • Peel carrots and slice them Southern Fireplace...................................................................... 5
2.5 cups shredded • Peel and dice onion into The Granite Guys........................................................................ 5
gouda small pieces Twigs Nursery and Landscaping................................................. 15
Salt, pepper & nutmeg • Softly pat beef dry with a pa- Walton’s Greenhouse................................................................ 12
per towel and cut into 3/4”
cubes
About the cover: Hannah Knepp looks at azaleas at Busy Bee Nursery
in Macon in this file photo

Melt margarine in a big pot and brown the beef in it (add beef slowly in
small portions). Once all the meat is in, add onions and season with salt
and pepper.
Add dried navy beans and fill up with some of the  broth. (If you are using
canned beans, don’t add them until later.) Let simmer for 60 minutes.
Add green beans and carrots to the stew (as well as canned or fresh navy
beans) and let simmer for another 40 minutes.
Season lightly with salt, pepper and a big pinch of nutmeg to taste.
Serve stew in bowls and top up with cheese.
2 SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com HOME & GARDEN HOME & GARDEN The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2020 15

Stuffed Sweet Potatoes with Salsa


4 People 20 min prep. 1 hour

Ingredients: Prep:
4 sweet potatoes • Wash all produce
1 TBSP olive oil • Chop cilantro leaves and
1 TBSP butter stem
1/3 cup cilantro • Chop feta cheese
2/3 cup feta cheese • Dice tomatoes into medium
3 tomatoes sized pieces
1 small diced onion • Dice onion into small pieces
1/2-1 small green chili • Cut chili pepper in half and
pepper remove seeds, then dice into
1 lime small pieces
Salt & pepper • Cut lime in half

Preheat the grill to medium high heat. Rub sweet potato in olive oil, use a
paper towel or pastry brush for help. Lightly salt the potato.
Wrap sweet potato in heavy duty aluminum foil and leave on the grill for
an hour.
Make the salsa by combining tomatoes, onion, chili pepper and 3 TBSP
cilantro in a bowl and squeeze lime juice on it. Mix all ingredients and
season with a pinch of salt.
Take the sweet potato off the grill and slice open lengthwise, taking care
not to cut all the way through. Mash a little of the inner potato with a fork
and mix it with butter, salt, pepper and almost all remaining cilantro (leave
a small amount for garnish). Top off with cheese, salsa and to finish, sprin-
kle the remaining cilantro on top.
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Garden 2020

The Dispatch
Sunday, March 29, 2020

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