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Chartered Institute of

Architectural Technologists
formerly British Institute of
Architectural Technologists

Architectural Technician
Professional and Occupational
Performance Record
Contents

The role of a professional Architectural Technician (TCIAT) 3


The role of a Chartered Architectural Technologist (MCIAT) 4
Guidance notes 5
Frequently asked questions 7
Knowledge maps 8
Chartered Architectural Technologist and Architectural Technician
POP Records 9
S/NVQ 4 qualification 10
HNC/D (post 2002) qualification 11
HNC/D (pre 2002) qualification 12
SQA HNC qualification 13
SQA HND qualification 14

Architectural Technician POP Record

Developing the Architectural Project Units A, B, C, D 16


Architectural Design Management Units E, F, G 32
Contract Management Units H, I 44
Professional Practice Units J, K 52
Case studies
Case Study 1: No exemption for underpinning knowledge 62
Case Study 2: Partial exemption for underpinning knowledge 66
Case Study 3: Complete exemption for underpinning knowledge from
an accredited degree course 70
Case Study 4: Complete exemption for underpinning knowledge from
Higher National Units (progressing from TCIAT to MCIAT) 74

Results Schedule 79

Chartered Institute of Architectural Technologists


397 City Road London EC1V 1NH

T. +44 (0)20 7278 2206


F. +44 (0)20 7837 3194
E. membership@ciat.org.uk
www.ciat.org.uk

© CIAT 2002, this amended version 2006


The role of a professional Architectural Technician (TCIAT)
Architectural Technicians are specialists in the application of technology to architecture, building design and
construction. Technician members of CIAT (TCIAT) are an integral part of an architectural design service, working
alongside fellow Architectural Technicians in support of Chartered Architectural Technologists, architects, engineers,
surveyors and other professionals within the construction industry. Whilst Technician members of CIAT (TCIAT)
cannot practise on their own account, they are an integral part of the architectural design process.

Developing the architectural project Contract management


Architectural Technicians are specialists in the collation,
Architectural Technicians can participate in the process
organisation and investigation of technical information for use
during the development of the project design
Making site visits
Collating and organising technical information Obtaining tenders for construction work
Investigating technical information and factors that affect Contributing to meetings and document preparation
developments, including user needs, site and building surveys
and regulatory requirements
Preparing regulatory applications Professional practice
Whilst Technician members of CIAT (TCIAT) cannot
practise on their own account, they are an integral part of
Architectural design the architectural design process. As architectural
professionals they must adhere to a Code of Conduct
Architectural Technicians specialise in the application of
technology to architecture, building design and construction.
Liaising between members of the design and
They are recognised as having specialist skills enabling them
construction team
to use their technical knowledge and skills to provide
innovative solutions Providing professional technical guidance to design and
construction teams
Preparing design proposals using CAD and traditional Undertaking structured Continuing Professional
methods Development (CPD), possibly progressing towards
Contributing to the detailed design process and co-ordinating Chartered Membership of CIAT (MCIAT) and a career
detailed design information as a Chartered Architectural Technologist
Preparing specifications for construction work
Preparing drawings, plans and documents for statutory
approvals
Contributing to design stage risk assessment

g the ct
l o pin proje
ve al
De ectur
r c hit
a
Ar des
ch ig
ite n

Professional
ctu

practice
ra
l

C
ma ontrac
nag t
em
ent

3
The role of a Chartered Architectural Technologist (MCIAT)
Chartered Architectural Technologists provide architectural design services and solutions. They are specialists in the
science of architecture, building design and construction and form the link between concept and construction. They
negotiate the construction project and manage the process from conception through to completion.
Chartered Members of CIAT (MCIAT) may practise on their own account or with fellow Chartered Architectural
Technologists, architects, engineers, surveyors and other professionals within the construction industry. As
professionals adhering to a Code of Conduct, they are required to obtain and maintain adequate Professional
Indemnity Insurance (PII) if providing services directly to clients.

Developing the architectural project


Chartered Architectural Technologists are recognised as
being qualified to negotiate and manage the development
of a construction project

Assessing the needs of clients and users and agreeing


the project brief
he
Recognising the significance of the design stage and
i n g t ject
lop al pro

Ar
how it underpins the construction project
e

ch ma
v
Evaluating and advising upon environmental and
De ectur

ite na
hit
regulatory legal requirements affecting the project and

ct ge
obtaining initial approvals
arc

ur m
Producing and evaluating feasibility studies

al en
Assessing and managing survey requirements and

de t
producing surveys

si
Professional

gn
Developing project briefs and design programmes
Advising clients on methods of project procurement and practice
forms of contract

co
Architectural design management ns Pos
Chartered Architectural Technologists specialise in the tru t
application of building science and technology to ct t
architectural and construction projects. They are io
n o n trac t
C n
eme
recognised as having specialist skills enabling them to
manage the design process and use their technical
n a g
knowledge and expertise to provide innovative ma
solutions

Preparing and presenting design proposals using


CAD and traditional methods
Leading the detailed design process and
co-ordinating detailed design information
Managing and co-ordinating the design team and
associated professional consultants Post construction
Developing the project design, researching problems Chartered Architectural Technologists (MCIAT) recognise the
and producing, developing and advising upon significance of the post construction aspects of the project
innovative solutions
Gaining feedback from and de-briefing client and user
Producing, analysing and advising upon specification,
materials selection and detailed design solutions in Appraisal of building performance in use and producing, developing
relation to performance and production criteria and maintaining maintenance management information systems
Liaising with and producing documentation for Evaluating and advising upon refurbishment, repair, reuse, recycling
statutory approval authorities and deconstruction of buildings
Producing, managing, controlling and integrating
design and production information
Carrying out design stage risk assessments Professional practice
Chartered Architectural Technologists (MCIAT), are architectural
professionals and may practise on their own account as a partner or
Contract management director, and must adhere to a Code of Conduct
Chartered Architectural Technologists are recognised as being
Providing professional guidance and decision making to clients,
qualified to negotiate and manage all aspects of architectural and
users and design/construction teams
construction contracts, whether it is using traditional, partnering or
other methods Weighing up issues and making balanced judgements
If providing services directly to a client, obtaining and maintaining
Managing or co-ordinating associated professionals adequate mandatory Professional Indemnity Insurance
Obtaining and evaluating tenders and agreeing contracts Undertaking structured Continuing Professional Development (CPD)
Ensuring continual compliance with design, legal, statutory and
professional requirements
Programming schedules and undertaking stage inspections
Administering contracts and project certification

4
Guidance notes
What is the Architectural Technician Professional demonstrate how you would have undertaken the
and Occupational Performance Record and what is it contract management.
for?
(2) Underpinning knowledge
The Professional and Occupational Performance (POP)
Record is a statement of competence expected of an This is the knowledge required to be able to perform
Architectural Technician (TCIAT). In order to become an competently as it underpins the performance. If you have
Architectural Technician (TCIAT), you will need to an approved Higher Education qualification, such as an
demonstrate practical competence as well as accredited honours degree in Architectural Technology,
underpinning knowledge. Your Supervisor should be able or an HNC/D with all CIAT specified units, then you will
to provide you with support in gaining the necessary receive exemptions for all underpinning knowledge
experience, possibly through a training and development except for units C, J and K.
plan.
If you have not completed an approved course, or if all
When you have gained competence in all of the listed CIAT required course units were not attained, then you
performance standards you will be able to submit this to will not have complete exemption and will be required to
apply for qualified Architectural Technician status, TCIAT. demonstrate knowledge evidence against all
requirements. You will, however, be able to make
What is included in the POP Record? reference to qualification units you have attained in order
to satisfy specific knowledge requirements.
The POP Record covers the competence required of a
professionally qualified Architectural Technician (TCIAT). To assist in understanding where your qualification units
Architectural Technicians are specialists in the applica- or modules match (or map) the underpinning knowledge
tion of technology to architecture, building design and requirements, tables have been provided under the
construction. knowledge maps section. Where more than one
qualification unit is shaded, all units should be attained.
The main functions of a professionally qualified For example within table two, page twelve, CIAT unit A.1
Architectural Technician, TCIAT can be broken down into contains knowledge from four Higher National Units, all
four categories (further expansion can be found on page of which must be attained in order to gain exemption
three): from the whole knowledge aspect of the CIAT unit.
Developing the architectural project Similarly, where a qualification unit can be used for
several CIAT units, different knowledge requirements will
Architectural design
be satisfied by different parts of the qualification unit.
Contract management
Where you do not have exemption from the underpinning
Professional practice knowledge requirement of a CIAT unit, you will be
required to demonstrate to your Supervisor that you
There is also a POP Record aimed at Chartered have a thorough knowledge and understanding of the
Architectural Technologists (MCIAT). The role and knowledge requirements. This may be achieved via
functions of the Chartered Architectural Technologist can reflective practice or other courses you have attended,
be found on page four. including non-accredited degrees, in service training or
CPD. Where this is the case, you need to ensure that:
The structure of the POP Record
• the relevant content of the qualification can be
The POP Record is broken down into eleven units and
specifically matched to the statement of competence
each unit is divided into three sections;
and range in the CIAT unit.
(1) Performance evidence • you were successfully assessed on your capabilities
This is the type of evidence you should offer to your in respect of the specific course content.
Supervisor as demonstration that you have reached the Your Supervisor may also choose to use questions, case
required competence. The exact format of the evidence study and simulation. Guidance on how to undertake and
is entirely dependent upon the project and so will vary assess this is contained in the Supervisor’s Guidance
from candidate to candidate. Detailed guidance is given Notes.
wherever possible.
(3) Range indicators
The evidence should come from live projects. Wherever
case studies are acceptable this will be indicated in the This is an indication of the range or evidence types
unit and should be based upon an extension to a live which should be covered. It is designed to be indicative
project. An example of this could be where your and is not a comprehensive list.
employment situation does not allow direct access to
contract management. In these cases you should use The units are arranged according to their stage in the
your live projects as a basis for the case study to traditional architectural design and construction process

5
and the main functional areas of a professionally requirements or wish to discuss any aspects of the
qualified Architectural Technician (TCIAT) as outlined on qualification process and the associated requirements,
page three. please contact CIAT Central Office.

How to complete the POP Record

When you have satisfied your Supervisor that you have


attained the required level of competence they should
sign off the relevant standard in the POP Record
Results Schedule. You will then return the Results
Schedule to CIAT and NOT the POP Record itself.

The objective is NOT to assemble a portfolio of


evidence. Rather, under the ‘detail and location’ you
should record what the evidence is, where it is located
and how it satisfies the requirements. This will enable
you to locate the evidence at a later stage, when
required to submit it to CIAT for approval (this will be
done on a risk assessment and random basis for quality
assurance purposes).

Where evidence is called into CIAT:

• CIAT undertakes to treat all evidence in confidence.

• you should not supply originals, as evidence


cannot be returned as CIAT cannot accept liability
for their loss.

CIAT may wish to use some evidence as exemplar


evidence and if this is the case with any part of your
evidence, permission will be sought and, wherever
possible, all traceable and confidential elements will be
removed.

It is your responsibility to ensure that evidence is not


destroyed or removed from circulation (eg via archiving)
until your application process has been completed.

What should I do when I have completed the POP


Record?

Once you have completed the POP Record you should


ensure that the POP Record Results Schedule has
been signed by your approved Supervisor(s). The
Results Schedule should then be returned to CIAT
Central Office with an up to date CV and the
Architectural Technicians POP Record assessment fee.
Please note that at this stage you do NOT need to
return the POP Record, only the aforementioned items.
The POP Record is for your own records, unless
required by CIAT.

Once the POP Record is approved, you will be a


professionally qualified Architectural Technician, TCIAT.

Whilst you are qualififed as an Architectural Technician,


you can progress further to a Chartered Architectural
Technologist, MCIAT, by completing the Chartered
Architectural Technologist POP Record (using evidence
used to gain Architectural Technician membership).

The Institute operates an equal opportunities policy with


respect to qualifying for Chartered or Technician
membership and will endeavour to support all
candidates during their membership progression.
Should you have difficulties with any of the

6
Frequently asked questions
How do I gather evidence? What if I cannot get an appropriate Supervisor?

When gathering evidence, you should initially decide It is recognised that some people may not have access
which job functions match different performance to an appropriate Supervisor. If this is the case, then
standards and identify potential existing evidence to CIAT will provide you with a list of approved Supervisors
demonstrate competence against those standards. Once who will be able to help assess your evidence. For
any gaps have been identified, you should consider what further information, please contact CIAT Central Office.
other evidence could be gathered from normal work
activities and which activities could provide additional What if I change employer?
evidence. This could be done with or without the support
It is recognised that candidates may change employment
of the Supervisor and additionally be used to formulate
and this should not hamper your POP Record. You
your development plan.
should however ensure that your previous employer is
You should also be aware that evidence can be gathered happy either for you to retain copies of any evidence
and used from more than one project. Also, a particular referred to in your POP Record. Ensure that these will
piece of evidence may, where appropriate, be used for not be destroyed and you will be able to access them at
more than one CIAT unit. Candidates are encouraged to a later date should it be required by CIAT, as part of the
use evidence to satisfy multiple performance standards, quality assurance process.
especially if this rationalises their evidence and allows
maximum demonstration of their skills.

How long will the POP Record take?

There is no specific time plan for the completion of the


POP Record as it largely relates to the individual's
circumstances and abilities to meet the performance
standards. We would, however, expect it to take two to
three years from leaving college/university to build up the
required range of competence.

Who can be the Supervisor?

The POP Record Supervisor is required to:

• be competent and professional

• hold an appropriate full professional qualification


which we consider to be appropriate eg. MCIAT,
RIBA, MCIOB etc (a full list is available from CIAT
Central Office). In the case of the Chartered
Architectural Technologist POP Record this should
have been held for at least three years

• know the candidates work well enough to be able to


vouch for the work documented in the POP Record
Results Schedule

• ideally, be senior to the candidate, and able to help


them gain the experience needed

• be a college/university course leader or lecturer if


verifying the assessment of relevant areas of
knowledge and understanding

Do I need a single Supervisor?

We are able to accept more than one Supervisor for a


POP Record. If your Supervisor changes, then ensure
that your previous Supervisor has completed the
appropriate sections of the POP Record Results
Schedule. Then arrange for your new Supervisor to
complete the additional Supervisor form, in the Results
Schedule, and then continue forward with him/her
approving each performance standard achieved.

7
Qualification knowledge maps
Candidates who have attained an accredited honours degree will be exempt from all underpinning knowledge
requirements in the Architectural Technician POP Record with the exception of the developing the architectural
project CIAT unit C and the professional practice CIAT units J and K, although it is recommended that such
candidates progress directly to MCIAT via the Chartered Architectural Technologist POP Record, rather than qualify
as Architectural Technicians.

All other candidates will be required to use the qualification knowledge maps which follow. The shaded area of the
maps indicates where a match of at least part of the knowledge requirement of the CIAT unit is located. Where
more than one qualification unit or module is shaded all units must be attained to gain exemption from the
knowledge requirements. For example, unit A.1 on the pre 2002 Edexcel/BTEC HNC/D, page twelve, indicates that
four separate modules contain the knowledge required to cover this unit, all of these should be attained to gain
complete exemption from the underpinning knowledge requirements of this unit

Knowledge maps for other courses will be made available in the future and listed at www.ciat.org.uk

Honours degrees accredited by CIAT An up to date list can be obtained from CIAT
Accredited Centre for Learning and Teaching in Accreditation in Principle
Architectural Technology
Anglia Ruskin University
The University of Bolton BSc (Hons) Architectural Design Technology
BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology
University of Central Lancashire
University of Central England BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology
BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology
University of Glamorgan
Coventry University BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology
BSc (Hons) Architectural Design Technology
Highlands College (Jersey)
De Montfort University BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology
BSc (Hons) Architectural Design Technology and
London South Bank University
Production
BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology
University of Derby
The University of Plymouth
BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology and
BA (Hons) Architectural Technology and the
Innovation
Environment
University of Huddersfield
University of Wales Institute, Cardiff
BSc (Hons) Architectural Computer Aided
BSc (Hons) Architectural Design and Technology
Technology
University of Westminster
Leeds Metropolitan University
BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology
BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology
University of the West of England, Bristol
Napier University
BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology and Design
BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology
Northumbria University These courses are no longer available, but are still
BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology accepted for underpinning knowledge exemptions:
Nottingham Trent University Glasgow Caledonian University
BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology
The Robert Gordon University University of Lincoln
BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology
Sheffield Hallam University University of Luton
BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology
Southampton Solent University
BA (Hons) Architectural Technology Honours degrees from the University of Northampton
are accepted for underpinning knowledge exemption
University of Ulster until May 2006. If you enrolled prior to this date, you will
BSc (Hons) Architectural Technology and qualify for underpinning knowledge exemptions. Those
Management enrolling post May 2006, will not qualify for exemptions.

8
Map of knowledge within the POP Records

Developing the architectural project Contract management

MCIAT POP Record TCIAT POP Record MCIAT POP Record TCIAT POP Record

Unit Unit Unit Unit


A.1 A.1 L.1
A.2 L.2 H.1
B.1 B.1 L.3 H.2
B.2 B.2 L.4
B.3 L.5
C.1 M.1 I.1
C.2 M.2 I.2
C.3 M.3
D.1 M.4
D.2
D.3
D.4 Post construction
D.5
MCIAT POP Record TCIAT POP Record
E.1 C.1
E.2 C.2
Unit
F.1 D.1
N.1
F.2
N.2
F.3
N.3
F.4 D.2

Architectural design (management) Professional practice

MCIAT POP Record TCIAT POP Record MCIAT POP Record TCIAT POP Record

Unit Unit Unit Unit


G.1 O.1
G.2 O.2 J.1
G.3 P.1 J.3
G.4 P.2 J.4
H.1 E.1 P.3 J.5
H.2 Q.1 K.1
H.3 E.2
I.1 F.3
I.2 F.1
I.3 F.2
J.1 G.1
J.2 G.2
J.3 G.3
J.4 G.4
K.1 G.5
K.2

9
Map of knowledge within S/NVQ 4
Architectural Technology against TCIAT Units
The shaded areas indicate where the NVQ unit matches the knowledge requirements in the CIAT unit.

AT 10.1
AT 10.2
AT 10.3
AT 11.1
AT 11.2
AT 1.1
AT 1.2
AT 2.1
AT 2.2
AT 2.3
AT 3.1
AT 3.2
AT 3.3
AT 4.1
AT 4.2
AT 4.3
AT 5.1
AT 5.2
AT 6.1
AT 6.2
AT 6.3
AT 6.4
AT 7.1
AT 7.2
AT 8.1
AT 8.2
AT 8.3
AT 9.1
AT 9.2
Unit
A.1
A A.2
B.1
B B.2
B.3
C.1
C C.2
D.1
D D.2
E.1
E E.2
E.3
F.1
F F.2
G.1
G.2
G.3
G G.4
G.5
G.6
H.1
H H.2
I.1
I I.2
J.1
J.2
J J.3
J.4
J.5
K K.1

10
Map of knowledge within post-2002 Edexcel HNC/D
(Architectural Design) Units against TCIAT Units
The shaded areas indicate where the HNC/D unit matches the knowledge requirements in the CIAT unit. Where
more than one HNC/D unit matches a CIAT unit then all HNC/D units must be attained to gain exemption for the
CIAT unit knowledge requirements.

Engineering and Technology

Specification and Contract

Materials, Properties, and


Contractual Procedures

Design Technology
Design Procedures
Refurbishment and
Building Services

Documentation
Technology C
Technology A

Technology B

Performance
Adaptation
Unit
A.1
A A.2
B.1
B B.2
B.3
C.1
C C.2
D.1
D D.2
E.1
E E.2
E.3
F.1
F F.2
G.1
G.2
G.3
G G.4
G.5
G.6
H.1
H H.2
I.1
I I.2
J.1
J.2
J J.3
J.4
J.5
K K.1

11
Map of knowledge within pre-2002 Edexcel/BTEC HNC/D
(Building Studies) Units against TCIAT Units
The shaded areas indicate where the HNC/D unit matches the knowledge requirements in the CIAT unit. Where
more than one HNC/D unit matches a CIAT unit then all HNC/D units must be attained to gain exemption for the
CIAT unit knowledge requirements.

Building Construction C
Building Construction A

Building Construction B

Building Services and

Design Technology A

Design Technology B
Design Procedures

Conversion and
Administration
Equipment A
Contractual

Adaptation

Project
Unit
A.1
A A.2
B.1
B B.2
B.3
C.1
C C.2
D.1
D D.2
E.1
E E.2
E.3
F.1
F F.2
G.1
G.2
G.3
G G.4
G.5
G.6
H.1
H H.2
I.1
I I.2
J.1
J.2
J J.3
J.4
J.5
K K.1

12
I

J
F

K
E
B
A

H
D
C

G
Unit

I.2
I.1

J.5
J.4
J.3
J.2
J.1
F.2
F.1

K.1
E.3
E.2
E.1
B.3
B.2
B.1
A.2
A.1

H.2
H.1
D.2
D.1
C.2
C.1

G.6
G.5
G.4
G.3
G.2
G.1
knowledge requirements.

Construction Technology 3: Industrial/Commercial Superstructure


Standard Forms of Construction Contracts
Building Materials: Selection and Deterioration
Architectural Procedures
Architectural Drawing and Design
Design of Building Structures
Conversion and Adaptation of Buildings
Law 1 for Construction
Law 2 for Construction
Building Services Design 1
Building Services Design 2
Construction Health and Safety: Practice and Management
Site Administration
Units against TCIAT Units

Quality Assurance in Construction


Promoting Sustainable Development
Introduction to CAD for Construction
Intermediate CAD for Construction
Advanced CAD for Construction
than one HNC unit matches a CIAT unit then all HNC units must be attained to gain exemption for the CIAT unit
Map of knowledge within SQA HNC (Architectural Technology)

The shaded areas indicate where the HNC unit matches the knowledge requirements in the CIAT unit. Where more

13
14
I

J
F

K
E
B
A

H
D
C

G
Unit

I.2
I.1

J.5
J.4
J.3
J.2
J.1
F.2
F.1

K.1
E.3
E.2
E.1
B.3
B.2
B.1
A.2
A.1

H.2
H.1
D.2
D.1
C.2
C.1

G.6
G.5
G.4
G.3
G.2
G.1
Construction Technology 1: Domestic Construction
Construction Technology 3: Industrial/Commercial Superstructure
knowledge requirements.

Construction Site Surveying


Architectural Drawing and Design
Introduction to the Construction Industry
Building Materials: Performance Studies
Information Technology Applications 1
Architectural Design Project 1
Quantitative Building Studies: Introduction
Standard Forms of Construction Contract
Intermediate CAD for Construction
Building Materials: Selection and Deterioration
Design of Building Structures
Architectural Procedures
Conversion and Adaptation of Buildings
Architectural Design Project 2
Units against TCIAT Units

Law 1 for Construction


Law 2 for Construction
Construction Health and Safety: Practice and Management
Advanced CAD for Construction
Site Administration
Building Inspection
Quality Assurance in Construction
Application of Building Regulations
than one HND unit matches a CIAT unit then all HND units must be attained to gain exemption for the CIAT unit
Map of knowledge within SQA HND (Architectural Technology)

The shaded areas indicate where the HND unit matches the knowledge requirements in the CIAT unit. Where more

Promoting Sustainable Development


Architectural Technician
Professional and Occupational
Performance Record

Units A-K
A.1
A.2
Identify user factors
A
IDENTIFY USER FACTORS AND INVESTIGATE AND ORGANISE DEVELOPMENT FACTORS

Unit A

Investigate development factors and likely problems

Knowledge
Underpinning knowledge Range
Know how to identify users and requirements These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

The needs such as: the purpose of use; location; occupancy; site
Know how to identify investigation sources and access; access to services; access to transport infrastructure; client
feasibility options expectations, options, preferences and aspirations; space standards and
requirements for spatial organisation and relationship of functions; health
and safety
The requirements, which could be identified by: client and user
requirement studies; consultation with interested parties (clients, users,
statutory bodies); checklists; questionnaires; standard documentation and
advisory material; comparative field research; market research
Appropriate methods and techniques for investigation: documentary,
field research, questionnaires
The use of investigations sources such as: records, people, authorities,
archives
The use of data such as: photographs, maps, drawings, legal
documents, surveys, questionnaires
Investigation of factors including: historical, conservation, social, visual,
environmental, construction, quality cost, time
Clarification of opportunities and constraints which might include:
project type, purpose and location, regulatory, physical and technical,
health and safety, quantity, quality, cost, time
Information presenting by methods such as: written, graphical

16
Unit A
Knowledge

Knowledge evidence
Detail and location of knowledge evidence or detail of exempting qualification and units

17
A.1
A.2
Identify user factors
Investigate development factors and likely problems
A
IDENTIFY USER FACTORS AND INVESTIGATE AND ORGANISE DEVELOPMENT FACTORS

Unit A

Performance
Performance requirements Range
Evidence for these areas could also come from a case study These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

The needs such as: the purpose of use; location; occupancy; site
Records of a user requirement study access; access to services; access to transport infrastructure; client
expectations, options, preferences and aspirations; space standards and
Records of investigated project data and a requirements for spatial organisation and relationship of functions; health
feasibility study and safety
The requirements, which could be identified by: client and user
requirement studies; consultation with interested parties (clients, users,
statutory bodies); checklists; questionnaires; standard documentation and
advisory material; comparative field research; market research
Appropriate methods and techniques for investigation: documentary,
field research, questionnaires
The use of investigations sources such as: records, people, authorities,
archives
The use of data such as: photographs, maps, drawings, legal
documents, surveys, questionnaires
Investigation of factors including: historical, conservation, social, visual,
environmental, construction, quality cost, time
Clarification of opportunities and constraints which might include:
project type, purpose and location, regulatory, physical and technical,
health and safety, quantity, quality, cost, time
Information presenting by methods such as: written, graphical

18
Unit A
Performance

Performance evidence
Detail and location of performance evidence

19
Unit B
B.1
B.2
B.3
B
IDENTIFY SURVEY REQUIREMENTS AND MEASURE AND PRESENT SURVEY DATA

Identify survey requirements, data standards and outputs


Observe and record measurements
Check and present survey data

Knowledge
Underpinning knowledge Range
Know how to identify survey needs, accuracy and These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

outputs Different survey types (land and buildings) and survey methods (visual,
approximate measured, detailed, graphic and instrumental)
Know how to conduct and record measured Utilisation of other investigation sources such as photographs; maps
surveys and charts; drawings; people; authorities and archives
Adherence to safe working practice: equipment; clothing; access
Know how to collect, check, adjust and present
survey data Circumstances and conditions: topography, obstacles, ‘live’ (in use)
conditions
Equipment: mechanical, optical, electronic
Presenting: graphical and written

20
Unit B
Knowledge

Knowledge evidence
Detail of knowledge evidence or detail of exempting qualification and units

21
Unit B
B.1
B.2
B.3
B
IDENTIFY SURVEY REQUIREMENTS AND MEASURE AND PRESENT SURVEY DATA

Identify survey requirements, data standards and outputs


Observe and record measurements
Check and present survey data

Performance
Performance requirements Range
Assessed existing information about the site — These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

evidence could also come from a case study Different survey types (land and buildings) and survey methods (visual,
approximate measured, detailed, graphic and instrumental)
Records of project survey observations — evidence Utilisation of other investigation sources such as photographs; maps
should come from a live project and charts; drawings; people; authorities and archives
Adherence to safe working practice: equipment; clothing; access
Analysed and presented project surveydata — Circumstances and conditions: topography, obstacles, ‘live’ (in use)
evidence should come from a live project conditions
Equipment: mechanical, optical, electronic
Presenting: graphical and written

22
Unit B
Performance

Performance evidence
Detail and location of performance evidence

23
Unit C
C.1
C.2
Identify hazards and risks
C
MONITOR HEALTH AND SAFETY IN DESIGN

Check design choices to reduce health and safety risks

Knowledge
Underpinning knowledge Range
These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about
Know how to communicate with parties who have
an interest to ensure compliance of the design Relevant regulations such as: CDM regulations and Approved Code of
Practice; current health, safety and welfare regulations
with the relevant health and safety regulations
People who may have an interest such as: planning supervisor; other
Know how to check elimination or reduction of designers; specialist advisors (e.g. contractors); clients
identified hazards through developing and Hazards such as: falls from height; fire; obstructions; moving vehicles;
modifying designs slips, trips and falls (same height); hit by falling or moving objects; manual
handling; health issues; power sources; hazardous substances; trapped
Know how to promote the implementation of the by something collapsing or overturning; confined spaces
risk reduction measures Developing and modifying: planning; investigating; analysing;
identifying interactions; calculating and testing; selecting materials;
components and systems; detailing and specifying
Designs: infrastructure; structure; building fabric; finishes; services and
equipment; landscape
Measures: control at source; cumulative protection; manage
Unit C
Knowledge

Knowledge evidence
Detail of knowledge evidence or detail of exempting qualification and units

25
Unit C
C.1
C.2
Identify hazards and risks
C
MONITOR HEALTH AND SAFETY IN DESIGN

Check design choices to reduce health and safety risks

Performance
Performance requirements Range
Records of hazard identifications — evidence should come These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about
from a live study Relevant regulations such as: CDM regulations and Approved Code of
Practice; current health, safety and welfare regulations
Records of monitored hazard and risk reduction People who may have an interest such as: planning supervisor; other
measures — evidence should come from a live study designers; specialist advisors (e.g. contractors); clients
Hazards such as: falls from height; fire; obstructions; moving vehicles;
slips, trips and falls (same height); hit by falling or moving objects; manual
handling; health issues; power sources; hazardous substances; trapped
by something collapsing or overturning; confined spaces
Developing and modifying: planning; investigating; analysing;
identifying interactions; calculating and testing; selecting materials;
components and systems; detailing and specifying
Designs: infrastructure; structure; building fabric; finishes; services and
equipment; landscape
Measures: control at source; cumulative protection; manage

26
Unit C
Performance

Performance evidence
Detail and location of performance evidence

27
D.1
D.2
D
CONFIRM REGULATORY CONSENT REQUIREMENTS AND PREPARE APPLICATIONS

Unit D
Identify regulatory requirements on development
Identify statutory consent requirements and prepare applications

Knowledge
Underpinning knowledge Range
Know how to identify regulatory requirements on These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

development Key factors: such as, infrastructures; land use; physical developments;
environmental considerations; timetable; financing
Know how to identify aspects of projects requiring Legislation: construction; construction process; end use; health, safety
consent and welfare
Consents for: development and use of land; structures; buildings and
Know how to prepare applications
highways; health, safety, and welfare; renewal and clearance; grant, loan
and subsidy applications
The applications: which may be, written; graphic; oral

28
Unit D
Knowledge

Knowledge evidence
Detail of knowledge evidence or detail of exempting qualification and units

29
D.1
D.2
D
CONFIRM REGULATORY CONSENT REQUIREMENTS AND PREPARE APPLICATIONS

Unit D
Identify regulatory requirements on development
Identify statutory consent requirements and prepare applications

Performance
Performance requirements Range
Records of statutory consent applications and These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

support information Key factors: such as, infrastructures; land use; physical developments;
environmental considerations; timetable; financing
Legislation: construction; construction process; end use; health, safety
and welfare
Consents for: development and use of land; structures; buildings and
highways; health, safety, and welfare; renewal and clearance; grant, loan
and subsidy applications
The applications: which may be, written; graphic; oral

30
Unit D
Performance

Performance evidence
Detail and location of performance evidence

31
Unit E
E.1
E.2
E.3
E
PREPARE AND PRESENT DESIGN PROPOSALS

Prepare and present design proposals


Provide information to agree detailed designs
Identify detailed design interactions and methods for maintaining design coherence

Knowledge
Underpinning knowledge Range
Know how to prepare and present design These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

proposals Presentation methods: documentary; comparative studies; illustrated


oral presentations; computer-modelled simulations; public exhibition;
Know how to provide information to agree detailed including use of appropriate materials, such as: drawings; projections;
design physical models; computer generated data; photomontage; mock-ups;
written reports
Know about design interactions between project Justifying by using: sketches, drawings and projections;
parts physical models; computer generated data; diagrams; written
reports; cost estimates; programming outline approvals from
Know how to set up procedures to maintain regulatory authorities
design coherence People who have an interest: the client; prospective users; contractors
(potential, lead and sub); suppliers; partners; investors; regulatory
authorities; government agencies; public interest organisations; media
Presenting using: oral; graphical; written; computer based

32
Unit E
Knowledge

Knowledge evidence
Detail of knowledge evidence or detail of exempting qualification and units

33
Unit E
E.1
E.2
E.3
E
PREPARE AND PRESENT DESIGN PROPOSALS

Prepare and present design proposals


Provide information to agree detailed designs
Identify detailed design interactions and methods for maintaining design coherence

Performance
Performance requirements Range
Records of a scheme design presentation These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

Presentation methods: documentary; comparative studies; illustrated


Records of a detailed design oral presentations; computer-modelled simulations; public exhibition;
including use of appropriate materials, such as: drawings; projections;
physical models; computer generated data; photomontage; mock-ups;
written reports
Justifying by using: sketches, drawings and projections;
physical models; computer generated data; diagrams; written
reports; cost estimates; programming outline approvals from
regulatory authorities
People who have an interest: the client; prospective users; contractors
(potential, lead and sub); suppliers; partners; investors; regulatory
authorities; government agencies; public interest organisations; media
Presenting using: oral; graphical; written; computer based

34
Unit E
Performance

Performance evidence
Detail and location of performance evidence

35
Unit F
F.1
F.2
F
IDENTIFY, ANALYSE AND PRESENT DETAILED DESIGN SOLUTIONS

Identify, analyse and record construction criteria and detailed design solutions
Investigate, calculate, test and present detailed design solutions

Knowledge
Underpinning knowledge Range
Know how to identify construction requirements of These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

relative importance Construction and installation requirements: contained in the


design brief
Know how to record detailed design solutions Physical factors: geology; exposure; orientation; light levels
and solar gain; temperature range and wind speed
Know how to investigate, analyse and assess
Technical factors: materials performance and availability;
construction criteria
structural forms; component life; heating and cooling; energy
use; surface type and durability; occupancy; health, safety and
Know how to identify technical factors and design welfare; fire protection; access; equipment performance; plant
selection criteria availability; human resource availability; transportation; traffic
generation; local ecology; emissions and pollution risk
Know how to calculate, record and present
Products: raw materials; manufactured materials; components
detailed designs
and systems
Know how to analyse and test significant design Standards: British Standards and Codes, official certifcates;
factors and solutions guidance publications
Identification by: standard lists and procedures; investigative
research
Data: identified construction criteria; existing design solutions;
potential conceptual solutions
Tests: data research; comparison with regulations; modelling;
calculation
Presenting using: oral; graphical; written; computer based

36
Unit F
Knowledge

Knowledge evidence
Detail of knowledge evidence or detail of exempting qualification and units

37
Unit F
F.1
F.2
F
IDENTIFY, ANALYSE AND PRESENT DETAILED DESIGN SOLUTIONS

Identify, analyse and record construction criteria and detailed design solutions
Investigate, calculate, test and present detailed design solutions

Performance
Performance requirements Range
Production information These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about
Construction and installation requirements: contained in the
Records of technical calculations design brief
Physical factors: geology; exposure; orientation; light levels
Records of supporting information for selecting and solar gain; temperature range and wind speed
materials, components and systems Technical factors: materials performance and availability;
structural forms; component life; heating and cooling; energy
use; surface type and durability; occupancy; health, safety and
welfare; fire protection; access; equipment performance; plant
availability; human resource availability; transportation; traffic
generation; local ecology; emissions and pollution risk
Products: raw materials; manufactured materials; components
and systems
Standards: British Standards and Codes, official certifcates;
guidance publications
Identification by: standard lists and procedures; investigative
research
Data: identified construction criteria; existing design solutions;
potential conceptual solutions
Tests: data research; comparison with regulations; modelling;
calculation
Presenting using: oral; graphical; written; computer based

38
Unit F
Performance

Performance evidence
Detail and location of performance evidence

39
Unit G
G.1
G.2
G.3
Control document production
G
CONTROL AND EVALUATE DESIGN DOCUMENTS AND INFORMATION

Check and evaluate design information


Prepare drawings and associated graphical information
G.4
G.5
G.6
Knowledge
Prepare schedules
Draft prescriptive technical specifications
Organise technical information systems

Underpinning knowledge Range


Know how to set up systems for controlling These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

document production Requirements for controlling: type of measurement; cost;


time; quality; methods of production
Know how to identify discrepancies and Type of document: forms of contract; specifications; drawings;
inconsistencies bills of quantities; schedules; health and safety plans; accounts;
claims; incoming and outgoing drawing and document registers;
Know how to collate and check production records of document approval and revision
information Purpose of documents: to obtain consents; procurement;
contract; production
Know how to assess status of information about
Scope: number; type; format; size
design
Registers and records: incoming and outgoing drawing and
Know how to recommend changes to brief, design document registers; records of document approval and revision
and specification Checks and approvals: format; presentation; accuracy;
technical content; completeness; referencing; cross referencing
Know about deviations from standard conventions and correlation; status; positioning; shape; dimensions;
tolerances; composition; fixing; annotation; symbols and
Know how to produce checked drawings for conventions
different purposes Drawings: location, assembly and components; sketches;
working drawings; schedules; presentation drawings
Know how to select drawing production and media
Drawing conventions: detailing standards; codes of practice;
Know how to produce checked schedules current industry practice; methods of coordination
including calculations Schedules: schedules of rates, works materials, building
elements, components and finishes
Know how to identify valid sources of information Type of prescriptive specification: original documkent; NBS;
industry/practice standards
Know how to produce structured checked
technical specifications Source information: design information; statutory regulations;
British Standards; codes of practice; technical literature
Know how to draft clauses from standard sources Referenced against: common arrangement; CI/StB
The information: approved providers; project documents;
Know how to collate and classify techncial
drawings; specifications; technical and product references
information
Use of information: technical reference; current record; archive
Know how to organise information and advise on Classification and types of information: project file;
use organisational system; alphanumeric; CI/StB; common
arrangement files; microfiche;electronic

40
Unit G
Knowledge

Knowledge evidence
Detail of knowledge evidence or detail of exempting qualification and units

41
Unit G
G.1
G.2
G.3
Control document production
Check and evaluate design information
Prepare drawings and associated graphical information
G
CONTROL AND EVALUATE DESIGN DOCUMENTS AND INFORMATION

G.4
G.5
G.6
Prepare schedules
Performance
Draft prescriptive technical specifications
Organise technical information systems

Performance requirements Range


Evidence for these areas could come from a live project or from a case study These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about
Requirements for controlling: type of measurement; cost;
Presented drawings and document registers time; quality; methods of production
Type of document: forms of contract; specifications; drawings;
Records of checked drawings and graphical
bills of quantities; schedules; health and safety plans; accounts;
information claims; incoming and outgoing drawing and document registers;
records of document approval and revision
Records of checked schedules including Purpose of documents: to obtain consents; procurement;
calculations contract; production
Scope: number; type; format; size
Records of checked prescriptive specifications
Registers and records: incoming and outgoing drawing and
document registers; records of document approval and revision
Records of organised project information
Checks and approvals: format; presentation; accuracy;
technical content; completeness; referencing; cross referencing
and correlation; status; positioning; shape; dimensions;
tolerances; composition; fixing; annotation; symbols and
conventions
Drawings: location, assembly and components; sketches;
working drawings; schedules; presentation drawings
Drawing conventions: detailing standards; codes of practice;
current industry practice; methods of coordination
Schedules: schedules of rates, works materials, building
elements, components and finishes
Type of prescriptive specification: original documkent; NBS;
industry/practice standards
Source information: design information; statutory regulations;
British Standards; codes of practice; technical literature
Referenced against: common arrangement; CI/StB
The information: approved providers; project documents;
drawings; specifications; technical and product references
Use of information: technical reference; current record; archive
Classification and types of information: project file;
organisational system; alphanumeric; CI/StB; common
arrangement files; microfiche;electronic

42
Unit G
Performance

Performance evidence
Detail and location of performance evidence

43
Unit H
H.1
H.2
H
OBTAIN AND CHECK ESTIMATE, BID AND TENDER ENQUIRIES

Obtain estimates, bids and tenders


Check estimates, bids and tenders

Knowledge
Underpinning knowledge Range
Know how to issue tender documents and follow These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

procedures Tender type: open competitive; two stage; 'two envelope';


selected list
Know how to check tenders and confirm Type of tender documents: invitation to tender; form of tender;
amendments returns procedure; specifications; drawings; schedules; bills of
quantities; health and safety plans
Content of tender documents: technical requirements; contract
terms and the conditions; procedures for submitting tenders
Tenderers: contractors; sub/works/trade contractors; suppliers;
consultants
Variations, adjustments and corrections: price; quantity;
quality; standards; carriage and delivery; completion;
maintenance; after sales service; method of payment; terms of
payment; contract conditions
Amendments: extension to tender period; changes resulting
from queries
Selection criteria for tenderers: quality and delivery record;
perceived added value; acceptability of know sub-contracting
arrangements; acceptability to client; financial resources;
references for previous clients/financers
Selection criteria for tender: quality; technical viability;
timescale; costs; loading and cashflow; perceived added value;
comparative criteria; weighting; organisational policies; legal
requirements

44
Unit H
Knowledge

Knowledge evidence
Detail of knowledge evidence or detail of exempting qualification and units

45
Unit H
H.1
H.2
Obtain estimates, bids and tenders
Check estimates, bids and tenders
H
OBTAIN AND CHECK ESTIMATE, BID AND TENDER ENQUIRIES

Performance
Performance requirements Range
These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about
Records of project tender documents issued
Tender type: open competitive; two stage; 'two envelope';
Records of checked project tenders selected list
Type of tender documents: invitation to tender; form of tender;
returns procedure; specifications; drawings; schedules; bills of
quantities; health and safety plans
Content of tender documents: technical requirements; contract
terms and the conditions; procedures for submitting tenders
Tenderers: contractors; sub/works/trade contractors; suppliers;
consultants
Variations, adjustments and corrections: price; quantity;
quality; standards; carriage and delivery; completion;
maintenance; after sales service; method of payment; terms of
payment; contract conditions
Amendments: extension to tender period; changes resulting
from queries
Selection criteria for tenderers: quality and delivery record;
perceived added value; acceptability of know sub-contracting
arrangements; acceptability to client; financial resources;
references for previous clients/financers
Selection criteria for tender: quality; technical viability;
timescale; costs; loading and cashflow; perceived added value;
comparative criteria; weighting; organisational policies; legal
requirements

46
Unit H
Performance

Performance evidence
Detail and location of performance evidence

47
I
MONITOR CONSTRUCTION WORKS COMPLIANCE

Unit I
I.1 Monitor construction work against agreed quality standards
I.2 Monitor contract compliance with legal and statutory requirements

Knowledge
Underpinning knowledge Range
Know how to identify quality standards and These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

control systems Quality standards: statutory requirements; project


specifications; British Standards; Codes of Practice; company
Know how to check materials and construction standards; trade advisory guidance and best practice
work conformance Monitoring systems: visual inspection; comparison with design
requirements; comparison with standard documentation;
Know how to identify legal and statutory checking manufacturer's documentation; checking delivery
requirements notes; sampling and testing; site meetings and reports; records
of work against agreed programmes
Know how to implement monitoring systems and Legal and statutory requirements and responsibilities:
corrective action Building Control; environmental health; health and safety; fire;
utilities regulations; highways; heritage; development licences
and building permits; employment practice; byelaws; non-
statutory guidelines
Corrective action: corrective action; restore compliance

48
Unit I
Knowledge

Knowledge evidence
Detail of knowledge evidence or detail of exempting qualification and units

49
I
MONITOR CONSTRUCTION WORKS COMPLIANCE

Unit I
I.1 Monitor construction work against agreed quality standards
I.2 Monitor contract compliance with legal and statutory requirements

Performance
Performance requirements Range
Records of project site observations and quality These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

control records Quality standards: statutory requirements; project


specifications; British Standards; Codes of Practice; company
standards; trade advisory guidance and best practice
Records of project statutory compliance
monitoring Monitoring systems: visual inspection; comparison with design
requirements; comparison with standard documentation;
checking manufacturer's documentation; checking delivery
notes; sampling and testing; site meetings and reports; records
of work against agreed programmes
Legal and statutory requirements and responsibilities:
Building Control; environmental health; health and safety; fire;
utilities regulations; highways; heritage; development licences
and building permits; employment practice; byelaws; non-
statutory guidelines
Corrective action: corrective action; restore compliance

50
Unit I
Performance

Performance evidence
Detail and location of performance evidence

51
Unit J
J.1
J.2
J.3
Make contributions to meetings
J
ENHANCE WORKING RELATIONSHIPS AND OPERATE IN A PROFESSIONAL MANNER

Gain the trust and support of your manager


Present technical information
J.4
J.5
Knowledge
Identify and summarise problems and criteria for solutions
Contribute to the protection of client interest*

Underpinning knowledge Range


Know how to identify meeting roles and These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

responsibilities Types of meetings: involving people within or without your


organisation
Know how to contribute in meetings Obtaining information: dialogue; questioning others

Know how to present technical data, advice and Technical information and advice: issuing instructions; making
decisions; increasing others’ understanding; negotiation
recommendations
Presenting: orally; in writing; graphically
Know how to identify problems, their causes and People receiving information: same and related occupations;
criteria for solutions clients, techncial and non-technical people; craft and manual
workers
Know how to summarise problems
Giving techncial instruction: critical points; clear language
Know how to communicate with clients and Techncial recommendations: implications of alternatives that
prevent interest conflicts have been considered; descriptions of information sources
consulted; analysis techniques applied; criteria used for drawing
conclusions
Information sources: experience and practice; information
systems; other people
Analysing problems: information and conclusions from and
comparisons with previous cases; required outcomes; known
and anticipated limitations
Aids and techniques: identify options; relationship between
factors; graphical aids
Criteria: interests of the client; legal; conformity with recognised
good practice; cost-effectiveness; resources; safety; predicted
risk
Ethical standards and good practice: codes of practice;
statute law, duty of care
Conflicts of interest: offers resulting in adverse conditions to
indivduals or the community; offers involving the financial
interest of the practitioner

* This evidence will need to be assessed according to CIAT’s Code of Conduct

52
Unit J
Knowledge

Knowledge evidence
Detail of knowledge evidence

53
ENHANCE WORKING RELATIONSHIPS AND OPERATE IN A PROFESSIONAL MANNER

Unit J
J.1
J.2
J.3
Make contributions to meetings
Gain the trust and support of your manager
Present technical information
J
J.4
J.5
Performance
Identify and summarise problems and criteria for solutions
Contribute to the protection of client interest*

Performance requirements Range


Evidence for these areas would normally come from the structured appraisal of These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about
the candidate’s supervisor Types of meetings: involving people within or without your
organisation
Records of contributions to meetings
Obtaining information: dialogue; questioning others

Evidence of reports, presentations and liaison with Technical information and advice: issuing instructions; making
decisions; increasing others’ understanding; negotiation
managers
Presenting: orally; in writing; graphically
Records of professional technical data and advice People receiving information: same and related occupations;
given clients, techncial and non-technical people; craft and manual
workers
Records of summarise problems and criteria for Giving techncial instruction: critical points; clear language
solutions Techncial recommendations: implications of alternatives that
have been considered; descriptions of information sources
Records of professional duty of care in practice * consulted; analysis techniques applied; criteria used for drawing
conclusions
Information sources: experience and practice; information
systems; other people
Analysing problems: information and conclusions from and
comparisons with previous cases; required outcomes; known
and anticipated limitations
Aids and techniques: identify options; relationship between
factors; graphical aids
Criteria: interests of the client; legal; conformity with recognised
good practice; cost-effectiveness; resources; safety; predicted
risk
Ethical standards and good practice: codes of practice;
statute law, duty of care
Conflicts of interest: offers resulting in adverse conditions to
indivduals or the community; offers involving the financial
interest of the practitioner

* This evidence will need to be assessed according to CIAT’s Code of Conduct

54
Unit J
Performance

Performance evidence
Detail and location of performance evidence

55
Unit K
K.1
K
UNDERTAKE STRUCTURED PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

Identify, record and analyse personal development aims and progress*

Knowledge
Underpinning knowledge Range
Know how to identify competence needs and These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

sources of support Aims and objectives: preparation for new job or role;
intellectual challenge; need for updating; ensuring and
Know how to record profiles of competence needs evidencing professional competence; compliance with employer
and progress and professional requirements; awareness of shortcomings
Personal development: maintenance of existing competence;
Know how to analyse personal development aims improvement of existing competence; development of new
and progress competence
Sources: national/ industry bodies; education and training
providers; in house; media (journals, newspapers, TV/radio,
internet); fairs and exhibitions; conferences; professional bodies
and regional networks
Standards of competence: job descriptions; professional
instituion requirements; industry national standards
Development plan: priorities; target dates; development
activities
Development activities: formal courses; research; work
experience; personal study

* This evidence will need to be assessed according to CIAT’s Code of Conduct


56
Unit K
Knowledge

Knowledge evidence
Detail of knowledge evidence

57
Unit K
K.1
K
UNDERTAKE STRUCTURED PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

Identify, record and analyse personal development aims and progress*

Performance
Performance requirements Range
Evidence for these areas would normally come from the structured appraisal of These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about
the candidate’s supervisor Aims and objectives: preparation for new job or role;
intellectual challenge; need for updating; ensuring and
Records of personal development plans, analyses evidencing professional competence; compliance with employer
and reviews and professional requirements; awareness of shortcomings
Personal development: maintenance of existing competence;
improvement of existing competence; development of new
competence
Sources: national/ industry bodies; education and training
providers; in house; media (journals, newspapers, TV/radio,
internet); fairs and exhibitions; conferences; professional bodies
and regional networks
Standards of competence: job descriptions; professional
instituion requirements; industry national standards
Development plan: priorities; target dates; development
activities
Development activities: formal courses; research; work
experience; personal study

* This evidence will need to be assessed according to CIAT’s Code of Conduct

58
Unit K
Performance
Performance evidence
Detail and location of performance evidence

59
Case studies

Case Study 1:
No exemption for underpinning knowledge

Case Study 2:
Partial exemption for underpinning knowledge

Case Study 3:
Complete exemption for underpinning
knowledge from an accredited degree course

Case Study 4:
Complete exemption for underpinning
knowledge from Higher National Units
(progressing from TCIAT to MCIAT)
N.B All case studies are based on the Chartered Architectural Technologist POP Record units (principles remain the same)

Case study 1
MANAGE AND CONTRIBUTE TO MEETINGS

Unit O
O.1 Manage meetings
Example
O.2 Make analytical contributions to meetings

Knowledge
Underpinning knowledge Range
Know how to manage meetings to achieve These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

objectives Preparation: previous minutes; agenda; support papers; notification;


attendance; matters arising
Know how to analyse problems discussed Information about: location; attendance; meeting type, style and
purpose; historical issues; political issues
People involved: client; user; employer; employee; contractor (main and
sub); consultants; partners; funders; investors; legal and regulatory
authorities; government agencies; public interest organisations; other
bodies

62
No exemption for underpinning knowledge

Please note that these case studies are intended to be indicative only and so might not cover the entire requirements of the unit. The degree of
coverage with the requirements will depend upon the actual content of the evidence produced and will be at the professional discretion of the
supervisor.

Detail of knowledge evidence or detail of exempting qualification and units

O.1 Know how to manage meetings to achieve objectives


This evidence came following observation of my peers and discussions with colleagues and managers.
Before the meeting I make sure that I:
— Confirm the date, time and venue and ensure attendees are notified and available and ensure all
paperwork agendas, support papers etc) are produced with enough notice
— Understand the purpose and objectives of the meeting
— Am aware of progress against the actions of the previous meeting
— Am aware of the key people present, their roles and organisations and interested parties are invited
— Am confident that I understand the view I am to present and what views others may express
— Am clear what actions are necessary for the meeting to agree in order to proceed
— Have thought about and can answer questions I am likely to be asked and should ask
During the meeting I:
— Confirm the style, purpose and objectives of the meeting
— Identify myself and my role clearly and establish who the other participants are and what their
roles are
— Speak clearly, using appropriate tone and language
— Confirm the accuracy of records of any previous meeting and progress of any actions agreed
— Keep the discussion focussed and well ordered
— Allow all attendees to express their views and ensure that, wherever possible, the meeting reaches
agreement, and agreed actions given to appropriate people
— Ensure that notes of views expressed and actions agreed are made
— Ensure that actions are sufficient, appropriate and achievable within the timescale.
After the meeting I:
— Ensure that meeting records are accurate and distributed to all attendees and other interested parties
— Keep up to date with progress against actions, consulting as necessary

63
Case study 1
MANAGE AND CONTRIBUTE TO MEETINGS

Unit O
O.1 Manage meetings
Example
O.2 Make analytical contributions to meetings

Performance
Performance requirements Range
Evidence for these areas could also come from a case study These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

Preparation: previous minutes; agenda; support papers; notification;


Records of managed meetings attendance; matters arising
Information about: location; attendance; meeting type, style and
Records of contributions to meetings purpose; historical issues; political issues
People involved: client; user; employer; employee; contractor (main
and sub); consultants; partners; funders; investors; legal and
regulatory authorities; government agencies; public interest
organisations; other bodies

64
No exemption for underpinning knowledge

Please note that these case studies are intended to be indicative only and so might not cover the entire requirements of the unit. The degree of
coverage with the requirements will depend upon the actual content of the evidence produced and will be at the professional discretion of the
supervisor.

Detail and location of performance evidence

Records of led meetings

The evidence for this unit comes from a new build supermarket on a green field site. The project was chosen
because the meetings were of varying type, style and purpose. Our main hurdle was gaining planning
permission, which involved the environmental interest and community groups. During these meetings it was
my role to listen to the arguments of these groups and weigh them up, with respect to the needs of the client,
other users and alternative sites. Part of the process was an analysis and of the impacts of selecting this or one
of three alternative sites. This showed that the site gave the most benefit to client, user, environment,
community and other parties.

Records of these meetings and the analysis can be found in the file marked BWA/263/site This evidence was
also used for CIAT units A, B, C and N.

Once the project was approved I was responsible for the project management and chaired meetings with
varying representation of the design team, clients and contractors as the project progressed. Representation and
style varied with the purpose of the meeting; some being less formal than others. A key requirement of the client
was that the project was completed as soon as possible in order that they could commence trading. Thus
deadlines were very strict and the whole team needed to be kept informed of progress. Any potential delays were
quickly identified and rectified if necessary. It was part of my role to ensure that this was managed effectively.

Records of these meetings can be found in the file BWA/263/projmgmt/meetingrecords


This evidence was also used for units M and P.

65
Case study 2
INTEGRATE, CONTROL AND EVALUATE DESIGN DOCUMENTATION AND DRAWING
AND SCHEDULE PRODUCTION

Unit J
J.1
Example
Set up systems for controlling document production
J.2 Integrate, evaluate and recommend changes to design information
J.3 Select drawing production methods and media
J.4
Knowledge
Control and check schedule production

Underpinning knowledge Range


Know how to specify, select and agree These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

requirements and systems Information type: design brief; records of earlier stages; surveys;
reports; statutory approvals and requirements; cost estimates; standards
Know how to choose production methods and and codes of practice; technical literature
evaluate documents Purpose of documents: to obtain consents; procurement; contract;
production
Know how to select drawing production methods
Requirements for controlling: type of measurement; cost; time; quality;
and media methods of production

Know how to produce schedules including Type of document: forms of contract; specifications; drawings; bills of
quantities; schedules; health and safety plans; accounts; claims;
calculations
incoming and outgoing drawing and document registers; records of
document approval and revision
Decision makers: client; financial advisers; contractors (lead, potential
and sub); suppliers
Criteria: format; presentation; accuracy; technical content;
completeness; referencing; cross referencing and correlation; status
Drawings: location, assembly and components; sketches; working
drawings; schedules; presentation drawings
Purpose of drawings: obtain consents; procurement; contract;
production
Drawing conventions: detailing standards; codes of practice; current
industry practice; methods of coordination
Checks and approvals: format; presentation; accuracy; technical
content; completeness; referencing; cross referencing and correlation;
status; positioning; shape; dimensions; tolerances; composition; fixing;
annotation; symbols and conventions
Schedules: schedules of rates, works materials, building elements,
components and finishes
Purpose of schedules: obtain consents; procurement; contract;
production
Drawing conventions: detailing standards; codes of practice; current
industry practice; methods of coordination
Checks and approvals: format; presentation; accuracy (including
balancing checks); technical content; completeness; referencing; cross
referencing and correlation; status

66
Partial exemption for underpinning knowledge (eg: does not have all Higher National Units)

Please note that these case studies are intended to be indicative only and so might not cover the entire requirements of the unit. The degree of
coverage with the requirements will depend upon the actual content of the evidence produced and will be at the professional discretion of the
supervisor.

Detail of knowledge evidence or detail of exempting qualification and units

J.1 Set up systems for controlling document production

(Know how to specify, select and agree requirements and systems)

This is partly assessed in Organisation & Procedures IIa, Design Procedures III and Building Technology (B)
(certificates attached). These covered the types of documentation and drawings used for construction projects.

I attended an AutoCAD short course at a local training centre. This included coverage of the organisation,
structuring, co-ordination and checking of production information for the different purposes set out in the unit
range. The course was assessed on each aspect and I attach my pass certificate.

I have carried out research in my office with a view to developing a check list for our office handbook for checking
drawings. This necessitated me reviewing, studying and summarising published British Standards, Codes of
Practice and guidance material on the subject.

This evidence is recorded in the electronic folder t:/office/handbook/procedures/

67
Case study 2
INTEGRATE, CONTROL AND EVALUATE DESIGN DOCUMENTATION AND DRAWING
AND SCHEDULE PRODUCTION

Unit J
J.1
Example
Set up systems for controlling document production
J.2 Integrate, evaluate and recommend changes to design information
J.3 Select drawing production methods and media
J.4
Performance
Control and check schedule production

Performance requirements Range


Established records of project production These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

document control procedures — evidence would normally Information type: design brief; records of earlier stages; surveys; reports;
come from structured appraisal by candidates supervisor statutory approvals and requirements; cost estimates; standards and
codes of practice; technical literature

Records of evaluated and checked project Purpose of documents: to obtain consents; procurement; contract;
production
documents, drawings and graphical
information —evidence should come from a live project Requirements for controlling: type of measurement; cost; time; quality;
methods of production
Checked schedules including calculations Type of document: forms of contract; specifications; drawings; bills of
— evidence should come from a live project quantities; schedules; health and safety plans; accounts; claims; incoming
and outgoing drawing and document registers; records of document
approval and revision
Decision makers: client; financial advisers; contractors (lead, potential
and sub), suppliers
Criteria: format; presentation; accuracy; technical content; completeness;
referencing; cross referencing and correlation; status
Drawings: location, assembly and components; sketches; working
drawings; schedules; presentation drawings
Purpose of drawings: obtain consents; procurement; contract;
production
Drawing conventions: detailing standards; codes of practice; current
industry practice; methods of coordination
Checks and approvals: format; presentation; accuracy; technical
content; completeness; referencing; cross referencing and correlation;
status; positioning; shape; dimensions; tolerances; composition; fixing;
annotation; symbols and conventions
Schedules: schedules of rates, works materials, building elements,
components and finishes
Purpose of schedules: obtain consents; procurement; contract;
production
Drawing conventions: detailing standards; codes of practice; current
industry practice; methods of coordination
Checks and approvals: format; presentation; accuracy (including
balancing checks); technical content; completeness; referencing; cross
referencing and correlation; status

68
Partial exemption for underpinning knowledge (eg: does not have all Higher National Units)

Please note that these case studies are intended to be indicative only and so might not cover the entire requirements of the unit. The degree of
coverage with the requirements will depend upon the actual content of the evidence produced and will be at the professional discretion of the
supervisor.

Detail and location of performance evidence

Records of established project production document control procedures

As part of a new private housing development it was my responsibility to control the preparation of project
drawings and other related information. It was important to ensure that drawings produced by the various
consultants were compatible and used the same protocols. This was undertaken using electronic data storage
and communication and I had to establish a system whereby each consultant always had the latest version of
the drawings and any alterations were communicated effectively to the team. The communication was
undertaken via email and the use of a secure project website. The system involves the use of a drawing register
that records details of each drawing and any revisions and details of dissemination to team members.

From the outset of the project and the formation of the design team (architectural, structural engineer, services
engineer, quantity surveyor — and subsequently contractor), I introduced, via periodic team meetings, a set of
procedures for the preparation of and co-ordination of all production documentation. The system was based on
the Common Arrangement for the structuring of information. Procedures were agreed for:
— Individual responsibility for producing and checking information
— Identification of any joint responsibilities and for co-ordination between related information
— The purpose(s) for each document (eg. Building Regulation consent, tenders, contract,
production, Health & Safety Plan)
— Base documents to work from (feasibility study, site survey,, soil investigation report, planning
approval)
— Procedures for distribution and amendment
— Key personnel in each organisation through whom information was channelled.

This evidence is recorded in the electronic folder t:/projects/housing/surrey/WTP - drawings and team
meetings.

This evidence was also partly used for units D, I and K.

69
Case study 3
SELECT AND AGREE PROCUREMENT PROCEDURES, FORMS OF CONTRACT AND
DESIGN TEAM

Unit D
D.1
Example
Select and agree procurement procedures with clients
D.2 Recommend and agree forms of contract
D.3 Select and form a design team
D.4
D.5
Knowledge
Confirm and agree design team responsibilities and processes
Establish and monitor design team working methods

Underpinning knowledge Range


Know how to evaluate, select and agree These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about

procurement methods The procurement objectives of a project, including: type and from of
contract; risk allocation; time; project duration and complexity; economic
Know how to select and agree a form of contract and political context; funding sources
The criteria against which tenders are assessed: degree of
Know how to evaluate and select design services commercial and financial risk; relative costs; timescales; complexity; quali-
and resources ty; client constraints (mandatory and advisory)
The legal and statutory requirements affecting procurement such as:
Know how to agree design responsibilities and common laws; contract laws; EU Statues; Codes of Practice and
processes Procedures

Know how to select, specify and agree monitoring Recommending the appropriate procurement method (for example;
partnering, negotiation, competitive tender, management contracting,
methods
construction management, project management) and agreeing and
recording the implementation procedures, including tendering process;
tender evaluation; award recommendation; contract award
The people involved in the contract such as: client; employer; partners;
lead contractors; domestic, nominated sub contractors; management;
third parties
The criteria for selecting the form of contract such as: client needs
and requirements; form of procurement; degree of commercial and
financial risk; relative costs; timescales; complexity; quality; sector prac-
tice; project type (for example design, construction or services)
Identification of required services (specialist and support) and resources
(human; material; plant and equipment and facilities), assessing their
quality and reliability and mechanisms for obtaining them under the
required term of appointment
Confirmation of the roles and capabilities of the design team, which
will include: aspects of design; health, safety and welfare; statutory and
other approvals; procurement; coordination; quality assurance
Recognising and communicating with people who have an interest,
which might include: the client; prospective users; contractors (potential,
lead and sub); suppliers; partners; regulatory authorities; government
agencies; public interest organisations
Clarifying and communicating the requirements of the design brief and
programme such as: key decision stages; scheduling and timetabling;
delivery of design documentation; statutory approvals; design team
meetings; procurement
Agreeing appropriate methods for design development, evaluation,
modification and updating, such as: responsibilities; format; content;
indexing; distribution; reviewing; resolving conflicts; revising; quality
control; storage; security; retrieval; statutory approvals and specifying a
method of deign monitoring appropriate to the project (this could include
exchanging and coordinating information; checks and approvals;
meetings and reporting)
Undertaking necessary and appropriate design investigation (for
example documentary search; investigative search; field investigation;
consultation; physical models; computer models)

70
Complete exemption for underpining knowledge from accredited degree course

Please note that these case studies are intended to be indicative only and so might not cover the entire requirements of the Unit. The degree of
coverage with the requirements will depend upon the actual content of the evidence produced and will be at the professional discretion of the
supervisor.

Detail and location of knowledge evidence or detail of exempting qualification and units

(How to select and agree a form of contract)

Exemption awarded with accredited degree as outlined earlier.

71
Case study 3
SELECT AND AGREE PROCUREMENT PROCEDURES, FORMS OF CONTRACT AND
DESIGN TEAM

Unit D
D.1
Example
Select and agree procurement procedures with clients
D.2 Recommend and agree forms of contract
D.3 Select and form a design team
D.4
D.5
Performance
Confirm and agree design team responsibilities and processes
Establish and monitor design team working methods

Performance requirements Range


Practical evidence you need to produce These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about
The procurement objectives of a project, including: type and from of
Records of selected and agreed project contract; risk allocation; time; project duration and complexity; economic
procurement procedures and political context; funding sources
The criteria against which tenders are assessed: degree of
Records of reviewed forms of contract for projects commercial and financial risk; relative costs; timescales; complexity; quali-
ty; client constraints (mandatory and advisory)
Evaluated and selected design team requirements The legal and statutory requirements affecting procurement such as:
common laws; contract laws; EU Statues; Codes of Practice and
Records of agreed project team briefing and Procedures
programmes Recommending the appropriate procurement method (for example;
partnering, negotiation, competitive tender, management contracting,
construction management, project management) and agreeing and
Records of monitored project design procedures recording the implementation procedures, including tendering process;
tender evaluation; award recommendation; contract award
The people involved in the contract such as: client; employer; partners;
lead contractors; domestic, nominated sub contractors; management;
third parties
The criteria for selecting the form of contract such as: client needs
and requirements; form of procurement; degree of commercial and
financial risk; relative costs; timescales; complexity; quality; sector prac-
tice; project type (for example design, construction or services)
Identification of required services (specialist and support) and resources
(human; material; plant and equipment and facilities), assessing their
quality and reliability and mechanisms for obtaining them under the
required term of appointment
Confirmation of the roles and capabilities of the design team, which
will include: aspects of design; health, safety and welfare; statutory and
other approvals; procurement; coordination; quality assurance
Recognising and communicating with people who have an interest,
which might include: the client; prospective users; contractors (potential,
lead and sub); suppliers; partners; regulatory authorities; government
agencies; public interest organisations
Clarifying and communicating the requirements of the design brief and
programme such as: key decision stages; scheduling and timetabling;
delivery of design documentation; statutory approvals; design team
meetings; procurement
Agreeing appropriate methods for design development, evaluation,
modification and updating, such as: responsibilities; format; content;
indexing; distribution; reviewing; resolving conflicts; revising; quality
control; storage; security; retrieval; statutory approvals and specifying a
method of deign monitoring appropriate to the project (this could include
exchanging and coordinating information; checks and approvals;
meetings and reporting)
Undertaking necessary and appropriate design investigation (for
example documentary search; investigative search; field investigation;
consultation; physical models; computer models)
72
Complete exemption for underpining knowledge from accredited degree course

Please note that these case studies are intended to be indicative only and so might not cover the entire requirements of the unit. The degree of
coverage with the requirements will depend upon the actual content of the evidence produced and will be at the professional discretion of the
supervisor.

Detail and location of knowledge evidence or detail of exempting qualification and units

Records of selected and agreed forms of contracts for projects

I work within a local authority, undertaking design work on their behalf. I have experience dealing with
contracts of varying type and there are several evidence sources listed, demonstrating selection against criteria
including
— People involved (partners, approved lead contractor and nominated sub contractor)
— Client requirements and user needs
— In house procedures and regulations
— Degree of commercial and financial risk
— Relative costs and timescale

Whilst due to employment restrictions I have not been involved in the approval stages, I have undertaken case
studies to extend my role into this area and these are included in my evidence listed below compared to the
actual approvals. I have also undertaken an analysis of ten discrepancies between the two sets of papers and the
reasons behind them.

Records of can be found in files marked:


schools/refurb/2000/Sacred_Heart/contractsschools/newbuild/All_Saints/contractshousing/adapt/disability/whet
stone/contracts

Corresponding case studies and their analyses can be found in:schools/refurb/2000/Sacred_Heart/contracts/cas-


estudiesschools/newbuild/All_Saints/contracts/casestudieshousing/adapt/disability/whetstone/contracts/cases-
tudies

73
Case study 4
JUSTIFY AND ADVISE ON THE SELECTION OF PROJECT DESIGNS

Unit H
H.1
Example
Present and justify project design recommendations
H.2 Advise clients on the selection and modification of design proposals
H.3 Assess detailed design implications of design recommendations

Knowledge
Underpinning knowledge Range
Know how to provide evidence and justify These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about
recommendations Presentation methods: documentary; comparative studies; illustrated
oral presentations; computer-modelled simulations; public exhibition;
Know how to advise on design proposals including use of appropriate materials, such as: drawings; projections;
physical models; computer generated data; photomontage; mock-ups;
Know how to assess implications of design written reports
recommendations
People who have an interest: the client; prospective users; contractors
Know how to choose design purposes, formats (potential, lead and sub); suppliers; partners; investors; regulatory
and techniques authorities; government agencies; public interest organisations; media
Implications of modification: cost; programme; performance
Know how to evaluate and select design solutions
and products Presentation methods: oral; graphical; written; computer based
People who have an interest: the client; prospective users;
Know how to resolve conflicts between factors contractors (potential, lead and sub); suppliers; partners;
investors; regulatory authorities; government agencies; public
Know how to prepare and present design
interest organisations
proposals
Presentation methods: documentary; comparative studies;
illustrated oral presentations; computer-modelled simulations;
public exhibition; including use of appropriate materials, such as:
drawings; projections; physical models; computer generated
data; photomontage; mock-ups; written reports; cost estimates;
programming; cash analysis; outline approvals from regulatory
authorities
Presenting using: oral; graphical; written; computer based

74
Complete exemption for underpining knowledge from Higher National Units (progressing
from TCIAT to MCIAT)

Please note that these case studies are intended to be indicative only and so might not cover the entire requirements of the unit. The degree of
coverage with the requirements will depend upon the actual content of the evidence produced and will be at the professional discretion of the
supervisor.

Detail and location of knowledge evidence or detail of exempting qualification and units

Exemption awarded with Higher National (with supplementary units) as outlined earlier.

75
Case study 4
JUSTIFY AND ADVISE ON THE SELECTION OF PROJECT DESIGNS

Unit H
H.1
Example
Present and justify project design recommendations
H.2 Advise clients on the selection and modification of design proposals
H.3 Assess detailed design implications of design recommendations

Performance
Performance requirements Range
Practical evidence you need to produce These are the type and range of things you need to demonstrate that you know about
Presentation methods: documentary; comparative studies; illustrated
Presented project design proposals oral presentations; computer-modelled simulations; public exhibition;
including use of appropriate materials, such as: drawings; projections;
Records of advice on and explanations of design physical models; computer generated data; photomontage; mock-ups;
written reports
recommendations
People who have an interest: the client; prospective users; contractors
Records of confirmed project design solutions (potential, lead and sub); suppliers; partners; investors; regulatory
authorities; government agencies; public interest organisations; media
Implications of modification: cost; programme; performance
Presentation methods: oral; graphical; written; computer based
People who have an interest: the client; prospective users;
contractors (potential, lead and sub); suppliers; partners;
investors; regulatory authorities; government agencies; public
interest organisations
Presentation methods: documentary; comparative studies;
illustrated oral presentations; computer-modelled simulations;
public exhibition; including use of appropriate materials, such as:
drawings; projections; physical models; computer generated
data; photomontage; mock-ups; written reports; cost estimates;
programming; cash analysis; outline approvals from regulatory
authorities
Presenting using: oral; graphical; written; computer based

76
Complete exemption for underpining knowledge from Higher National Units (progressing
from TCIAT to MCIAT)

Please note that these case studies are intended to be indicative only and so might not cover the entire requirements of the unit. The degree of
coverage with the requirements will depend upon the actual content of the evidence produced and will be at the professional discretion of the
supervisor.

Detail and location of knowledge evidence or detail of exempting qualification and units

Analysed and presented project design proposals

I was assessed against this performance standard for my Architectural Technician POP Record and am
using some of the same evidence. I have added additional evidence to show how my experience and
competence have improved since gaining TCIAT.

I have presented designs to both client and design teams, mainly once the concept scheme has been agreed.
My major contribution is normally related to developing the presentation itself using CAD walkthroughs
and project boards. CAD walkthroughs are costly but effective and so are used more extensively for major
projects. Design boards allow us to incorporate samples of materials within the proposal, useful on façade
refurbishment for example.

When presenting design proposals, especially in the initial stages, I offer the client several options and
show how this might affect the overall project in terms of time and budget. This enables clients and users
to make decisions and feel more engaged with the project.

Some of this evidence comes from witness testimony, supplied by my line manager who has witnessed my
contributions to the preparation and presentation of design proposals for an historical refurbishment and
a new build sports stadia as well as several lager domestic projects.

This evidence is located in:


v:/designs/FB/911/walkthroughFile: BandB/1912(including boards layout, record of meetings and testi-
mony)

This evidence was also used for units A, F and G.

77
Architectural Technician
Professional and Occupational
Performance Record

Results Schedule

Candidate name:

Membership number:

The following pages are to be signed by your Supervisor. Once signed, please
return this section only to the CIAT Membership Department for assessment.
You do not need to return the POP Record at this stage
Supervisor details

Name of Supervisor

Professional qualifications held by Supervisor (including qualification date)

Supervisor’s job title

Name of Supervisor’s practice/organisation

Supervisor’s practice/organisation address

Additional Supervisor details (if applicable)

Name of Supervisor

Professional qualifications held by Supervisor (including qualification date)

Supervisor’s job title

Name of Supervisor’s practice/organisation

Supervisor’s practice/organisation address

80
A. Identify user factors and investigate and Knowledge evidence:
organise development factors Unit or course which covers knowledge evidence, or signature of Supervisor to
confirm attained knowledge

A.1 Identify user factors

A
A.2 Investigate development factors and likely
problems

Performance evidence:

Signature of Supervisor

B. Identify survey requirements and measure and Knowledge evidence:


present survey data Unit or course which covers knowledge evidence, or signature of Supervisor to
confirm attained knowledge

B.1 Identify survey requirements, data standards and

B
outputs

B.2 Observe and record measurements

B.3 Check and present survey data Performance evidence:

Signature of Supervisor

C. Monitor health and safety in design Knowledge evidence:


Unit or course which covers knowledge evidence, or signature of Supervisor to
confirm attained knowledge

C.1 Identify hazards and risks

C
C.2 Check design choices to reduce health and safety
risks
Performance evidence:

Signature of Supervisor

D. Confirm regulatory consent requirements and Knowledge evidence:


prepare applications Unit or course which covers knowledge evidence, or signature of Supervisor to
confirm attained knowledge

D.1 Identify regulatory requirements on development

D
D.2 Identify statutory consent requirements and
prepare applications

Performance evidence:

Signature of Supervisor

81
E. Prepare and present design proposals Knowledge evidence:
Unit or course which covers knowledge evidence, or signature of Supervisor to
confirm attained knowledge

E.1 Prepare and present design proposals

E
E.2 Provide information to agree detailed designs

E.3 Identify detailed design interactions and methods


for maintaining design coherence
Performance evidence:

Signature of Supervisor

F. Identify, analyse and present detailed design Knowledge evidence:


solutions Unit or course which covers knowledge evidence, or signature of Supervisor to
confirm attained knowledge

F.1 Identify, analyse and record construction criteria

F
and detailed design solutions

F.2 Investigate, calculate, test and present detailed


design solutions
Performance evidence:

Signature of Supervisor

G. Control and evaluate design documents and Knowledge evidence:


information Unit or course which covers knowledge evidence, or signature of Supervisor to
confirm attained knowledge

G.1 Control document production

G
G.2 Check and evaluate design information
G.3 Prepare drawings and associated graphical
information
Performance evidence:
G.4 Prepare schedules
G.5 Draft prescriptive technical specifications
G.6 Organise technical information systems
Signature of Supervisor

H. Obtain and check estimate, bid and tender Knowledge evidence:


enquiries Unit or course which covers knowledge evidence, or signature of Supervisor to
confirm attained knowledge

H.1 Obtain estimates, bids and tenders

H
H.2 Check estimates, bids and tenders

Performance evidence:

Signature of Supervisor

82
I. Monitor construction works compliance Knowledge evidence:
Unit or course which covers knowledge evidence, or signature of Supervisor to
confirm attained knowledge

I.1 Monitor construction work against agreed quality

I
standards

I.2 Monitor contract compliance with legal and


statutory requirements
Performance evidence:

Signature of Supervisor

J. Enhance working relationships and operate in a Knowledge evidence:


professional manner Unit or course which covers knowledge evidence, or signature of Supervisor to
confirm attained knowledge

J.1 Make contributions to meetings

J
J.2 Gain the trust and support of your manager

J.3 Present technical information


Performance evidence:
J.4 Identify and summarise problems and criteria for
solutions

J.5 Contribute to the protection of client interest


Signature of Supervisor

K. Undertake structured personal development Knowledge evidence:


Unit or course which covers knowledge evidence, or signature of Supervisor to
confirm attained knowledge

K.1 Identify, record and analyse personal development

K
aims and progress

Performance evidence:

Signature of Supervisor

83