$

3
00
Vol. II, No. 2
magazine
magazine
From the
Community:
• Stories
• Articles
• Legal Updates
PATIENT
RESOURCE
DIRECTORY
Dispensary Listings
ACTIVISM
TODAY
Reflections of the
Medical Cannabis Community
HEMP AS
ALTERNATIVE
FUEL?
www.gkmagazine.net www.gkmagazine.net
greenkind
greenkind
C
o
v
e
r

p
h
o
t
o
:

L
e
e

S
a
n
c
h
e
z
...Best of
420 Girls
— a book
review
2 www.gkmagazine.net
D.T.P.G.
1753 HILL ST., #8
LOS ANGELES, CA 90021
Downtown
Patient
Group
Downtown
Patient
Group
OPEN EVERYDAY
11am to 10 pm
Only individuals with legally recognized, medical cannabis identification cards may purchase.
213.747-3386
All
Strains
PLENTY OF PARKING
213.747-3386
NOW
OPEN!
NOW
OPEN!
3 greenkind magazine Vol II, No 2 2007
4 www.gkmagazine.net
A Few Minutes with Toronto’s
Marko Ivancicevic
by Gooey Rabinski
C
hronologically, Toronto resident Marko
Ivancicevic is a relatively junior activist
within the Ontario medical cannabis move-
ment. In terms of his level of activism and
impact on the Toronto compassion scene,
however, 25-year-old Ivancicevic is one of Ontario’s shin-
ing stars. He’s an example of intelligent and balanced activ-
ism driven by true compassion for patients — and not the
promotion of his own agenda or flogging of his ego, an all-
too-common condition within the Canadian and American
cannabis movements.
Having been busted in January 2004 for possession of 49
grams of cannabis while smoking a joint behind a pool hall, the
young activist said that medical cannabis proponents must fight
in the courts for their right to grow and possess cannabis. “If we
rely on Parliament, we’re doomed,” Ivancicevic told local media
in a reference to the political foot dragging within his country’s
federal government — despite overwhelming public acceptance
of medical cannabis and the beginning of mainstream normaliza-
tion of recreational smoking and growing.
Ivancicevic is notable for his 2004 constitutional challenge
in which he petitioned an Ontario provincial judge to nullify
Canada’s federal cannabis laws. In other words, he asked Canada’s
version of a circuit court to hear a case determining the constitu-
tionality of a federal law. The court refused.
I recently had the opportunity to sit down with Ivancicevic,
himself a medical user, at his Toronto home to discuss his medical
cannabis activism and the state of the Canadian compassion move-
ment.
P
h
o
t
o
s

b
y

G
o
o
e
y

R
a
b
i
n
s
k
i
“. . . one of Ontario’s shining stars. He’s an example of intelligent and balanced
activism driven by true compassion for patients . . .”
5 greenkind magazine Vol II, No 2 2007
Gooey Rabinski: When did you begin your activist career?
Marko Ivancicevic: The first event I attended was the Mil-
lion Marijuana March in Toronto in May of 2003. I learned how
the cannabis community as a whole was being attacked by our
government. I met some of the medical users who were experi-
encing problems with Health Canada and getting their [federal]
legal exemptions [to grow, possess, and consume] and the prob-
lems with the program in general.
Around this time, there was a great deal of talk about can-
nabis being legal in Canada. It was then that I decided I wanted to
get involved and do something for the movement because it
seemed like our government had no compassion. I realized that
this is something that I want to fight for because I’ve always been
involved with fighting the powers that be. I eventually got involved
in organizing events in Ontario and met fellow Toronto activist
Eric Wood. In 2003, he and I decided to put together an event called
Cannabian Day. For several weeks leading up to Cannabian Day,
we held smoke outs at CityTV [Toronto’s largest television net-
work] and City Hall, as well as at various parks and major down-
town street corners.
GR: What, specifically, were you trying to accomplish?
MI: Eric and I were just trying to raise awareness of the is-
sue. We knew that the average Canadian knew nothing about the
current state of our laws and we needed to get that information to
everybody.
GR: How did the local authorities respond?
MI: We had many altercations with police. We stood our
ground and said, no matter what you say, we realize that cannabis
is a legal substance at this point and, no matter how many times
you want to tell us that it’s illegal, we’re not going to budge. We
threw out the name of our attorney, Alan Young [a prominent can-
nabis-friendly Toronto attorney and law professor] and told them,
if they really wanted to discuss the issue, we could call him. Most
of the time they would just say they’d been asked to remove us
from the property and ask us to step aside. We were nice and lis-
tened to them at that point.
GR: You’re involved with the Toronto Compassion Centre
[TCC]. What’s your role at TCC?
MI: I don’t really have a title, to be honest. We just identify
people as being “volunteers.”
Basically, as a TCC volunteer, we try to help alleviate the
pain that the members suffer due to their ailments. One of the
ways that we do that is working with them to learn the strains of
medical cannabis that are most suitable for their needs.
GR: What forms of medicine does TCC provide?
MI: We provide access to cannabis, tinctures, and food. We
also provide access to various hashes and oils. So if there’s a mem-
ber who doesn’t really like the option of smoking, there are defi-
nitely other things that we can provide them. I would say — in
terms of demographics, for people over 45 — edibles are usually
better. Typically, once you reach a certain age, your immune sys-
tem sort of goes a bit. In terms of actual long-lasting effectiveness,
edibles are the way to go.
continued next page
6 www.gkmagazine.net
I would also note that the largest single portion of our mem-
bership is comprised of HIV members [25 percent]. A lot of them
need long-lasting, effective medication because the symptoms that
they suffer are long-lasting. Edibles are an excellent form of medi-
cal cannabis for them. If they’re in a situation where they can’t
smoke, they can at least have their edible and enjoy its effect for as
long as they need.
GR: So, in your experience, for those who are middle aged
and older, smoking cannabis is a bit too rough on their immune
system?
MI: I wouldn’t so much say rough on their immune system
as rough on their throat, for example. This is why vaporization is
the perfect alternative.
GR: Wouldn’t this espe-
cially be the case because TCC’s
patients have illnesses that make
them even more sensitive than
the average person?
MI: Yes. One of the major
things we thrive on at the Cen-
tre is being compassionate.
We’re the Toronto Compassion
Centre; compassion is literally
our middle name. We work with members to find an average dose
that works for them, as well as the medical cannabis strains that
are best.
We also offer a mail order service, so we have the option of
mailing their medicine across Canada. There’s a lot of members
who live in the general Toronto area who, due to their illness, sim-
ply can’t get to the Centre. We offer this option so they don’t go
without their medicine. The biggest problem in Toronto, when it
comes to cannabis, is that you’re not going to get high-grade, high-
potency medicine unless you really know somebody. The Centre
offers a significantly higher quality medicine than can generally
be found on the street.
GR: How do you think cannabis compassion differs between
Canada and the U.S.?
MI: I would say there’s a bit more widespread acceptance
in Canada. A recent poll showed that 83 percent of the Canadian
population agrees with less stringent laws. About 93 percent agree
with medical cannabis. I don’t believe that the statistics are quite
the same in the States — nor even in California. I think there’s just
a lot more widespread acceptance in Canada. It allows us to oper-
ate a lot more easily than in the States. It’s more of a machine-run
country in the States. George Bush, as we know, doesn’t like medi-
cal cannabis or anything attached to the drug culture. So, when it
comes to Canada, we’re a bit more lax on a lot of things. The police
realize that there’s a medicinal need for many of the people and
that’s why, I’d say, a good 80 percent of Canadian compassion cen-
ters have never been shut down — from the day they opened their
doors.
GR: But you, just like the Americans, have your roadblocks.
For example, there are high schools in Ontario brainwashing stu-
dents with the D.A.R.E. [Drug Abuse Resistance Education] pro-
gram that began in the States during the 1980s.
MI: Yea. There are a lot of similarities between the States
and Canada. The difference is, as I said, we’re a bit more lax. But
now, we’re having drug dogs brought into our schools and there’s
no real approval from anybody, except for someone within the
school board, I’m sure. It’s pretty sad that they’ve got to target
youth just to satisfy some hidden agenda.
GR: What do you think about the cafe scene in Toronto?
MI: It’s an interesting scene and quite diverse between the
three cafes. Comparing the HotBox Cafe with Kindred Cafe, you
have a diverse crowd. Which really coincides with how the medi-
cal cannabis movement and culture really is. You’ve got people
from all parts of the world that share the same thing: Smoking
cannabis. When it comes to the HotBox Cafe, you generally get
the more hippy-type people who love the groovy music and the
trippy scenes.
When it comes to the Kindred Cafe, it’s seen as a more up-
scale, normalized place. We have to kind of go that normalization
route. So the Kindred Cafe [owned by Dom Cramer, who also owns
the Toronto Compassion Centre] brings you that. It’s a high-class
joint: DVD players, widescreen TVs, Xbox systems…the whole
nine. It’s a patient’s dream, all
in one building, with a Volcano
in each room.
GR: The greater Toronto
metro area used to offer five
smoking cafes. What’s your
opinion of the police raids and
resulting shuttering of nearly
half of the area’s dedicated
stoner hangouts?
MI: Cafe owners and staff
have tried real hard to give cannabis consumers a place to feel
safe, accepted, and comfortable. Cafe owners are in favor of posi-
tive changes to our cannabis laws. Owning a “smoke friendly cafe”
also makes them a target for persecution from the community, poli-
ticians, and police. Sometimes it takes only one complaint to shut
them down.
Due to an increase in funding for the Toronto police, they
have been able to increase the number of officers in their drug
units. I’m sure that they have also worked real close with politi-
cians that are in favor of prohibition. They’re the fuel that helps
keep the fire burning.
GR: What do you think of the in-your-face style of activism
employed by some of those connected with now-closed cafes in
southern Ontario and the brazen actions and questionable deci-
sions they made in 2006 — such as the vandalization of police
vehicles and selling to underage teens?
MI: I believe that there’s a time and a place for each type of
“activism.” Sometimes you need an in-your-face approach, but
other times you need to be cautious, respectful, and a little more
laid back. I don’t condone stickering police cars — you’re egging
them on at that point and asking for further troubles.
GR: What do you think the activists in Toronto are doing
right?
MI: We’ve got a lot of organizing going on and we’re get-
ting good feedback from many events. The Toronto Million Mari-
“… I believe that there’s a time and a
place for each type of “activism.” Sometimes
you need an in-your-face approach, but other
times you need to be cautious, respectful,
and a little more laid back.”
Marko Ivancicevic, continued from page 5
www.oaksterdamuniversity.com
(510) 251-1544
7 greenkind magazine Vol II, No 2 2007
4799 Heyer Ave, 4799 Heyer Ave, 4799 Heyer Ave, 4799 Heyer Ave, 4799 Heyer Ave,
Castro Valley Castro Valley Castro Valley Castro Valley Castro Valley
(corner of Heyer & Center)
Mon-Sat 6am to 5pm • Sun 8am to noon
(5 (5 (5 (5 (51 11 110) 0) 0) 0) 0) 53 53 53 53 537 77 77- -- --8382 8382 8382 8382 8382
Coffee, Smoothies, Pastries,
Sandwiches & More
Grand Opening!
Grand Opening!
Coffee Cup Café
Free Wi-Fi
juana March now attracts 25,000–30,000 participants. We also or-
ganize small forums — with the public invited — where we have
a panel group discussing various elements regarding medical can-
nabis.
One thing we do well is stay in contact with people in the
federal and provincial governments. Marc-Boris St. Maurice [a
prominent Montreal-based activist and entrepreneur] made the
jump from the Marijuana Party to the Liberal Party because he
wants to see change and he realized that the Liberal Party is prob-
ably our best chance. So we’re dealing with the right politicians
and the right political parties. We’ve also got many people who
are involved with the NDP [New Democratic Party], so covering
two political parties is a positive thing. We’re working to get more
involved with organizations that are generally not pro-medical
cannabis. We’re trying to — I wouldn’t say convert people — but
get people to understand that cannabis isn’t as horrible as the Reefer
Madness days have depicted.
GR: Do you simply want non-tokers to tolerate tokers?
MI: In essence, yes. If we have to tolerate the normalization
of alcohol and tobacco — both deadly substances — then they can
accept the normalization of a substance that hasn’t killed a single
person. The only negative component of cannabis is the prohibi-
tion that currently surrounds it.
GR: What do you think Canadian activists are doing wrong?
Where do you think they can improve?
MI: By becoming more of a cohesive unit. I think there needs
to be some type of unison for us to get anywhere. There just needs
to be more solidarity between the various activist communities
throughout each province and each city in Canada.
GR: Do you think there’s too much infighting?
MI: Yea. Sometimes there’s too many egos that get in the
way. Generally, personal agendas get in the way of moving for-
ward with a positive theme.
GR: What advice do you have for medical cannabis activ-
ists in California?
MI: Keep doing what you’re doing. In terms of the medical
community in the United States, I’d say California is a few steps
ahead of many states. Maintain solidarity and anything can hap-
pen. I would also suggest working closely with Ron Dellums and
other politicians to continue the push for legalization.
greenkind magazine
4061 E. Castro Valley Blvd., Ste. 267
Castro Valley, CA 94552
PHONE_510 728.4772
EMAIL_greenkind@earthlink.net
EXECUTIVE EDITOR PRODUCTION/LAYOUT
Melrose Sanchez Lee Sanchez
MEDIA DIRECTOR/PHOTO PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTOR
Marcella Sanchez Rachel Perlstein
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS ADVISORY CONSULANT
Jean Talleyrand, M.D. Stephanie Landa
Gooey Rabinski
REGIONAL CORRESPONDENT DIRECTOR OF MARKETING
Melissa Athens Lorri Hapach
greenkind magazine 510 728.4772
Printing by Rodgers & MacDonald, Carson, CA
1-ISSUE 3-ISSUE
AD RATE AD RATE AD RATE
1/8 Page Ad $ 225 $ 608
1/4 Page Ad $ 350 $ 945
1/2 Page Ad $ 580 $1566
Full Page Ad $ 920 $2484
PREMIUM AD SPACE:
Cover pages and center spread; call for availabilty and
scheduling.
www.gkmagazine.net
www.myspace.com/greenkindmagazine
©2007 greenkind magazine • All rights reserved. Reproduction in
whole or part without permission is prohibited. All contents ©2007 by
greenkind magazine is intended for adult use only and assumes no
responsibility for any claims or representations contained in this
publication or in any advertisement nor do they encourage the illegal
use of any of the products advertised within. We reserve the right to
refuse service to anyone. Thank you for your patronage.
TREATING YOURSELF
The Alternative
Medicine Journal
www.treatingyourself.com Inc.
250 The East Mall, P.O. Box 36531
Etobicoke, Ontario M9B 3Y8
Phone: 416-620-1951
email: weedmaster@treatingyourself.com
8 www.gkmagazine.net
SAN DIEGO AND LOS ANGELES MEDICAL CANNABIS PROTEST RALLIES
9 greenkind magazine Vol II, No 2 2007
MORE PROTEST PICS
HERE
VAN NUYS
Photos by Rev. Glenn M. Roland
LOS ANGELES AND VAN NUYS ANTI-DEA RALLIES
L
A

A
n
t
i
-
D
E
A

R
a
l
l
y

a
n
d

V
a
n

N
u
y
s

p
h
o
t
o
s

b
y

G
l
e
n
n

R
o
l
a
n
d

P
h
o
t
o
g
r
a
p
h
y
10 www.gkmagazine.net
11 greenkind magazine Vol II, No 2 2007
If you were wondering where we found the
cover art for Greenkind January, 2007 the
necklace pictured was created by Mike Hanley
of Creative Kuts. Mike’s hobby has led him to
art shows and cannabis events where his
hand-tooled coins are making a big hit. Mike’s
cut coin collection includes large and small
cut-out coins from all over the world. We
chose the Liberty 1923 Half-dollar coin for our
first glossy magazine.
For more information please contact Mike at
Creative Kuts
510.439 8835.
P
h
o
t
o
s

b
y

L
e
e

S
a
n
c
h
e
z
greenkind
January Cover
by
Creative Kuts
Mike Hanley
www.MediCannUSA.com
Advertise your
Services and Wares
with GREENKIND!
Advertise your
Services and Wares
with GREENKIND!
For DISPLAY AD RATES see our web page at:
web: www.greenkind
email: greenkind@earthlink.net
phone: (510) 728-4779
For DISPLAY AD RATES see our web page at:
web: www.gkmagazine.net
email: greenkind@earthlink.net
phone: (510) 728-4772
Reach your TARGET AUDIENCE
STATEWIDE circulation & beyond
SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY RATES
FLEXIBLE Advertising plans
CALL AND LET’S TALK MARKETING
Reach your TARGET AUDIENCE
STATEWIDE circulation & beyond
SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY RATES
FLEXIBLE Advertising plans
CALL AND LET’S TALK MARKETING
— Entrepeneurs —
— Entrepeneurs —
12 www.gkmagazine.net
W
ith so many selections out there of coffee table marijuana photography books,
how is a patient to choose? One way is to pick the book with the most bang
for your buck. There are many books that can quench a patient’s thirst for juicy pot
shots, but Rob Griffin has taken lusty ladies and combined them with beautiful
buds in 157 pages that are truly interesting. Naked Girls Smoking Weed is the best
of the “420 girls” — a term made popular by the photographers for 420
Magazine.com a very popular website frequented by the 20- to 40-year-old set.
This hardbound book features Playboy Bunnies, amateur models and Pent-
house Pets posed with impressive indoor and outdoor grows, custom-made wa-
ter pipes, blown glass art pieces, and pounds and pounds of sweet, sticky MaryJane.
Naked Girls Smoking Weed is packed full of eye candy with fun and educa-
tional quotes mixed with facts about cannabis from U.S. political figures, musi-
cians, actors, doctors, writers, marijuana activists and yes, the Bible — both New
and Old Testaments.
Check out Amazon.com for more reviews, comments and to purchase the book.
This is a must have coffee table book for the lighter side of life, and a great gift.
. . . Best of 420 Girls — a book by Rob Griffin
A book review
by Staff
Hemp is good for the earth. Hemp anchors soil and protects it from
run off. It preserves topsoil and subsoil structure as does forests.
Hemp cultivation requires few chemicals. Hemp is easy to grow
and actually restores and replenishes soil nutrients.
— Dr. Heather Anne Harder
Penalties against possession of a drug should not be more
damaging to an individual than the use of the drug itself
— Jimmy Carter
The God Shiva is said to have brought cannabis from the Himalayas
for human enjoyment and enlightenment. The Sardu priests travel
throughout India and the world sharing “chillum” pipes filled with
cannabis, sometimes blended with other substances. — Jack Herer
a “420”girl
Excerpt quotes from Naked Girls Smoking Weed
13 greenkind magazine Vol II, No 2 2007
by Melrose Sanchez
Hydroponic Gardening De-mystified
Brought to you by Blooming Success
O
ur food supply seems increasingly to be going toxic. How many
times over recent months has the top news story been about
toxins in not only fresh fruit and vegetables but packaged and
processed food as well. The pet food scare alone was enough to start us
cooking-up various versions of dog and cat food. A recent news report on
ABC said that astoundingly, the Federal Food and Drug Administration
really only inspects about 5% of imported foods while the amount of
imported food is skyrocketing with over 1/3 of our food coming from
China. China is quickly earning the dubious honor of producing food with
a cut corners for more profit mentality. At any rate, we might want to
remain suspect as the details of a global food market gets worked out.
It is not in our nature to question the quality of the foods we get from
the supermarket, farmer’s market or favorite restaurant. Too long we lived
with the assurance that our food is safe. We grew-up thinking our food was
safe, inspected and that all food production is supervised and double checked.
Maybe it is time to get used to the idea that if we are to eat healthful food the
responsibility lies more with us than with someone else. We might need to
begin looking at our options and what patients can do to protect their already
compromised physical condition.
Patients need the healthiest of foods to give the body all it needs to
replenish and renew. We hear it everyday that eating more vegetables is the
way to go. But how do we obtain veggies that have a standard of quality?
Growing them ourselves could be a way to go. We can find some land
and get a pickax and start a lot of digging and planting, but then we end up
with a harvest too huge to use all ripe at one time.
This is where hydroponics comes in to save the day. The word hydro-
ponics seems complicated enough to cause a slight panic and detour any well
intended soul from considering it a viable option. It is perhaps the only option
for food production for the apartment dweller and even for the homeowner.
Hydroponics is gardening methods that can produce year around, ensure the
nutrients of the food grown, and is fun to do in the process.
Hydro is the Greek word meaning water and ponics is from the word
geoponics which refers to the study of agriculture. The big idea behind hydro-
ponics is to use liquid solution or a water base to grow plants rather than soil.
The plant needs to bring in nutrients up through the roots into the foliage,
fruits and flowers. We need to water soil-based plants so the nutrients in the
soil break down into a usable liquid substance so the plant roots can take in
the nutrients. The soil itself, more or less, serves to hold the plant upright and
as a storehouse for nutrients. Soil is not necessary to grow plants. Properly
balanced nutrients, enough light and a comfortable temperature is really all
that is required to grow high yield plants.
The idea with hydroponics is to eliminate the soil, feed the plant supe-
rior nutrients, provide light and maintain a comfortable environment. Plants of
all types thrive. Of course like all living things, they need some care and atten-
tion and the results have been tremendous. The garden can be grown indoors,
under lights and in limited space. The temperature, air moisture, amount and
type of nutrients are controlled and not dependent upon outside conditions.
Hydroponics is giving us the option of fresh, toxin-free veggies year around.
This is a manageable, interesting, fun and very productive activity for every-
one. It is really great to eat what you have grown.
The systems are easy to build or setup. This is a case where the
terminology is far more complicated than the process. There’s not a lot of
physical labor or time involved so even those with limited activity can manage
easily.
All one needs to begin is a small space like a closet or small room that
can function as a gardening area. The amount of space is not as important as
the layout of the space. Remember, the point of hydroponics is a controlled
environment so the temperature and air flow can be regulated. The space is
best with fewer doors and windows. The light source is from light fixtures
not sunlight or natural light and generally speaking the airflow is from a fan.
There are a few different methods used in hydroponics. The place to
start to get the hang of this gardening experience is to begin small. There are
numerous kits available from a table top version to room-sized. For the more
knowledgeable, the necessary elements can be purchased to produce a more
personalized garden specific to space availability.
The impression many potential gardeners have is growing hydroponi-
cally creates heavy energy bills, but many of the options use no more energy
than a small household appliance.
Our friends at Blooming Success in Hayward, California (22370
Mission Blvd; 510.538.4769) are contributing a new feature to Greenkind
Magazine. Future issues will include hydroponic growing tips, new products,
and helpful information for all levels of hydroponic production. Along with the
new feature, we invite and welcome any tips or information from patients/
readers growing hydroponically. Contact us at greenkind@earthlink.net and
maybe your growing tip will appear in future issues.
(510) 538-GROW
The AeroGarden
The EuroGrower
14 www.gkmagazine.net
by Staff
Introducing
Rosalyn –
Patient Artist
The interaction of shape,
color, theme and content draws
the viewer in — even the most
casual of viewers. The richness
of the design elements develops
a deeper more internal meaning
as the paintings connects to the
viewer’s personal life
experiences. Rosalyn’s
distinctive soft-voiced, yet
outspoken feminine style
reaches out to touch and
embrace the universal human
experience. The amazing surprise
is the paintings can be viewed
from any angle and still make
sense to the viewer and
highlights the artist’s fresh, yet
bold approach that is not only
identifiable but enduring as well.
T
o underscore the diversity, exceptional talent, and professionalism of our patient population,
meet Rosalyn. This experienced artist brings to her work a multidimensional concept allowing
both the inner and outer features of her subjects to be explored and expressed. Each piece in the
collection is rendered with a refreshing purity and innocence that is rarely found in the work of mature
artists.
Rosalyn
Rosalyn
Welcome! — My name i s
Rosalyn. Art is an emotional
playground I enjoy. A
frame of mind I indulge
with all my senses. The
art is free to become a
reflection of an honest
reality. My very essence
indulges itself in the deli-
cacy of the uninhibited. A quad-
rilateral perspective with a reckless
paint job. I hope you too will enjoy the work; feel free to relax,
and get lost for a moment in Rozland.
Dad

15 greenkind magazine Vol II, No 2 2007
Burning Isis
Fast Track
Daughter
OBO
16 www.gkmagazine.net
W
The
VaporTower
A Perfect
Alternative
by Staff
function concept is at work in the Vaporstore’s creative depart-
ment. Other vaporizors may be popular, but it is the VaporTower
that will outlast, be used more frequently, and become a staple in
any patient’s home. There isn’t all the folderol of messing with
bags and connectors. Some patients like the ritual of preparation
to medicate, but I just want pain relief as quickly as possible. I
don’t want to be connecting and cleaning and sorting to get to my
medicine. The VaporTower’s low maintenance, easy to load, quick
heating and consistent burn combined with the durability and
beauty of the wood base at an affordable price, make the
VaporTower most attractive.
For more information contact the VaporStore toll free at 877-
892-8405 or on the internet at VaporStore.com. I think you will be
happy to discover a practical vaporizer that will work for you.
The
VaporTower
A Perfect
Alternative
Absolutely Evolving Absolutely Evolving
W
e hear that vaporizing is the rec-
ommended method to intake
medicine, but then we see the
price tag of the highly mar-
keted, popular brands of vapor-
izers, most of us think we will be sure to invest in one as soon as
our ship comes in — or when we make the big sale or when the
settlement is finally settled.
The good news is we really don’t need to wait for illusions
to come true to own a very functional, effective, handy, and easy
to operate vaporizer. The VaporStore’s newest innovation the
VaporTower is the answer to medicating healthfully, yet the model
is small enough to move from room to room, to store when not in
use and especially to use solo or with friends. With no gadgets or
bags required, the VaporTower seems as easy to use as a pipe. It
only takes about five minutes to warm — just about the time it
takes to cut or grind the medicine and to fill the bowl. With a ca-
pacity large enough to share with patient-friends and small enough
for just one hit, the VaporTower really is the answer to medicating
safely and getting the most out of your medicine.
The concept of the Tower evolved from VaporStore’s origi-
nal design which is mostly horizontal with the tubing coming from
the side rather than like the vertical Tower with the tubing coming
from the top. I have used the original design for over a year, trav-
eled with it, shared it with my patient family and friends and use
it solo almost daily. The compact design and the beautiful wood
finish suits my tastes and my needs. I especially like the way I can
quickly and safely store it in a drawer or cabinet. And I have no-
ticed medicine lasting longer and feeling more potent when using
the vaporizer over a traditional pipe.
The Tower seems to be even easier to use than the original
design. With the tubing and the bowl placed at the top, the Tower
makes for easy passing of the mouthpiece and keeps the tubing
from bumping into other articles that may be placed near it.
The VaporStore is patient-owned and the vaporizer designs
are created with practicality as a priority. Clearly, the form follows
PRODUCT REVIEW
— ERRATUM —
The correct address for
7LBH/KEEP IT MEDICAL, INC. is
3322 Barham Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90068.
Keep it Medical
www.7LBH.org
17 greenkind magazine Vol II, No 2 2007
DELIVERY & CATERING AVAILABLE DELIVERY & CATERING AVAILABLE DELIVERY & CATERING AVAILABLE DELIVERY & CATERING AVAILABLE DELIVERY & CATERING AVAILABLE
BREAKFAST • SALADS BREAKFAST • SALADS BREAKFAST • SALADS BREAKFAST • SALADS BREAKFAST • SALADS
Italian-American Specialties Italian-American Specialties Italian-American Specialties Italian-American Specialties Italian-American Specialties
Hot & Cold Heros • Italian Ices Hot & Cold Heros • Italian Ices Hot & Cold Heros • Italian Ices Hot & Cold Heros • Italian Ices Hot & Cold Heros • Italian Ices
=¬=+ Clayton Rd., =± • Concord, CA o=<±+ =¬=+ Clayton Rd., =± • Concord, CA o=<±+ =¬=+ Clayton Rd., =± • Concord, CA o=<±+ =¬=+ Clayton Rd., =± • Concord, CA o=<±+ =¬=+ Clayton Rd., =± • Concord, CA o=<±+
(o±<) ó8o-++¬< • Fax: (o±<) ó8o-+o=o (o±<) ó8o-++¬< • Fax: (o±<) ó8o-+o=o (o±<) ó8o-++¬< • Fax: (o±<) ó8o-+o=o (o±<) ó8o-++¬< • Fax: (o±<) ó8o-+o=o (o±<) ó8o-++¬< • Fax: (o±<) ó8o-+o=o
email: canesa+@sbcglobal.net email: canesa+@sbcglobal.net email: canesa+@sbcglobal.net email: canesa+@sbcglobal.net email: canesa+@sbcglobal.net
Delivery minimum s±< Delivery minimum s±< Delivery minimum s±< Delivery minimum s±< Delivery minimum s±<
18 www.gkmagazine.net
Stephanie Landa
The Activist’s Activist
Stephanie Landa
The Activist’s Activist
W
ith a youthful face that defies her years, sixty-
year-old Stephanie Landa rises before 5 a.m.
to slip her feet into the required steel-toed
boots and makes her way to the prison’s
kitchen to begin performing duties to feed
the inmates. There she works doing menial kitchen tasks, such as
lifting heavy pots of food, scrubbing and peeling and other tasks
12-hours a day in a cold, unfeeling environment.
Without medication these tasks become painful to her al-
ready painful arm. Frequently, her letter writing, and favorite hour
of her long work day is cut short by the increasing pain in her
arm. She finds no comrade among the other prisoners. It is too
early in her stay to be accepted by the others. After work, she drags
her boots out to the track to keep body and soul united by walk-
ing her 2 miles a day around and around the allotted space that
goes no where.
In the pocket of her drab blue uniform is a folded and worn
paper with, When you come to the edge of all the light you know and are
about to step off into the darkness of the unknown, faith is knowing one
of two things: there will be something solid to stand on, or you will be
taught to fly, written clearly and carefully. It is her strength, her
reminder that there is purpose in this purposeless time that keeps
by Melrose Sanchez
her from her beloved family and aging mother. The minutes do
tick by, one after another until a day passes and a week and now it
is almost 7 months served of her 41-month sentence for growing
880 medical marijuana plants for the dispensaries within the San
Francisco city limits.
There is no reason Stephie, as she is known to her friends, is
serving this time. There is no logic to it. She had the permission
and sanction of the San Francisco Police Department. The authori-
ties suggested she grow close to the police station and they issued
county guidelines. However, this is the plight of over 100,000 pa-
tients serving time related to marijuana. Yet, the federal agents
had their way.
The entire medical marijuana community attempts to func-
tion normally, conducting business, providing for patients, mak-
ing improvements and developing better, healthier, more effec-
tive, and less expensive medicine. Everyone is hard at work build-
ing dispensaries to better serve patients, to be better informed,
more educated and to create happy, wholesome environments and
to cast off the misinformation of decades.
Even so, a cloud of suspicion, an edge of quiet fear perme-
ates our community. It will be different someday soon. Stephie
will be applauded for her time, her courage and her openness for
“When you come to the edge of all the light you know and are about to step off
into the darkness of the unknown, faith is knowing one of two things: there will be
something solid to stand on, or you will be taught to fly”
POW 09247-800
19 greenkind magazine Vol II, No 2 2007
“… she drags her boots out to the track to
keep body and soul united by walking her 2
miles a day around and around the allotted
space that goes no where.
sharing this most unpleasant and senseless experience she is en-
during. She is a hero for many of us. She and the other prisoners
must feel nameless and forgotten but in fact they are the activist’s
activist. She is inspiration to make this magazine, to attend the
protest rallies, to vote and to inform. Stephie floats, not only my
mind and heart throughout the day, but she inspires many others
to take the extra step, go the extra mile to make a difference. She is
the inspiration to appreciate the air and the sky and my choice of
shoes for the day.
Her first weeks in the federal camp in Dublin, California
were spent sleeping on the floor with many other women tucked
into their stone hard cots and covered with a thin blanket. Now,
she finally has her cot. It is not much better than the floor, a little
warmer. The guards make the rounds throughout the night every
couple of hours shinning flashlight beams into the eyes of the
women to count heads. The malfunctioning fire alarm goes off
several times in between the head counts. There is no sleep from
midnight until the 5 a.m. wake-up. The women’s only chance for
any real sleep is from 10 p.m. to midnight. The room vibrates with
the snores of exhausted women attempting to take the edge off
sleep deprivation. The lack of sleep makes for impatience and
anger.
And so it goes for this gentle woman — a tender of plants
whose only crime was to make lovely medicine for patients in need.
What can we do to let our sister and brother patients know that
we have not forgotten them, or their work. Perhaps, simply being
inspired to work a little harder to change the laws, or to appreci-
ate the freedom we each enjoy even with pain and illness. Regard-
less of our current personal crisis, each of us are a lot better off
than our friends and loved ones serving the time that could be
you or me or the local dispensary owner.
Maybe we can be a little kinder to each other, a bit more
understanding and helpful to our fellow man. Maybe we can hold
a small place in our hearts for those patients paying the price so
we can carry on a determined and powerful fight to win the rights
of patients to medicate.
Stephie is not the type of woman to feel sorry for her self.
She is brave and strong. She has her moments when it is over-
whelming to realize her freedom is stripped away and by the seem-
ingly endless hours and days needed to total the 41-month sen-
tence. She is in a mean place with people who have forgotten the
power of kindness, but we are out here — free to remember that
every kindness feeds another kindness. Will it directly help
Stephie? Most likely not, but holding these POWs close to our
hearts and remembering them when we are too tired to make it to
the protest or to make yet another sign or to make sure we are
following the guidelines and laws can make a difference.
We can remember Stephie when the strain we wanted at the
dispensary isn’t available or a staff person seemed a bit rude or
hurried. One way to counter the negative is to heap on the positive.
We are Stephie’s arms and legs now, and she trusts us to
continue the fight she so willingly fought for us; the right to use
our medicine. We are her voice now.
Stephie’s strength comes from mail call. A day without mail
is a day without connection to her community. She enjoys each
card, postcard and appreciates the thoughts and well wishes. She
needs the connection and a bit of appreciation as any of us would.
Please take some time and tell Stephie we are here for her and we
will not forget her in the rush of our personal lives. We can make
Stephie’s mail call a real connection to each of us who make up
her community.
We are honored to announce that Stephanie Landa will ap-
pear in our staff box for each and every issue of Greenkind Maga-
zine. We welcome her counsel and advice and we eagerly wait the
day that we greet her with open arms. We have a date pending
upon her release and work to ensure she never makes the 41-month
count. We each need Stephie’s knowledge, spirit and work ethic
on the outside, not fading away within prison walls.
Stephie’s address: Stephanie Landa 90247-800
Federal Prison Camp
5675 8th St. Camp Parks
Dublin, CA 94568
20 www.gkmagazine.net
RESTAURANT REVIEW
by Melrose Sanchez
Coffee Cup Café
P
h
o
t
o
s

b
y


L
e
e

S
a
n
c
h
e
z
time, it is establishments like the Coffee Cup Cafe that highlight my
travels. Tucked away from the usual early morning and lunch-
time parking problems, lines and seating fiascos, this delightful
corner cafe offers true respite from the franchise-brew drinking
crowd. Here is a place to bring in the laptop and check the email,
and to enjoy a few minutes of the “Cooking Channel” or to relax
and enjoy the sandwich of your dreams and an Italian soda.
Looking for a special treat or maybe a meaningful hostess
gift? Veronica makes Apple and Pumpkin pies to order. Her spe-
cial pride is her mounding Apple Pie with homemade crust from
the family recipe. This American delight is sure to please at any
holiday gathering, however, the pies are by special order only, so
be sure to call ahead and allow a couple of days for pick-up .
It is worth the few blocks drive up the hill from the 580 fwy.
Simply take the Center St. off-ramp coming from the east or Crow
Canyon Rd. from the west and go up Center toward the hills. The
Coffee Cup Cafe is located at the corner of Center Street and Heyer
Ave. Hours are Monday – Saturday 6am to 5pm; Sunday 8 – noon.
Call (510) 537-8382 for more information.
One of S.F. East Bay’s best kept secrets
T
T
here is something to be said about a clean, well-lighted place to
enjoy a cup of freshly brewed coffee, a wonderfully delicious
homemade sandwich, salad, or best of all, real homemade pastry.
The one of the best kept secrets in the East Bay is The Coffee Cup Cafe.
This family-owned coffee-house offers the best homemade Cinnamon
Strussel coffee cake that is rich in flavor while light in texture and taste.
This delight takes-up where commercial cof-
fee pastries leave off. The taste is not just a
rush of sweet, but there is a lingering flavor
until the last swallow. It is like a treat from
my own mother’s kitchen.
The Coffee Cup Cafe offers all of the above
prepared from the family recipe collection of Chef
Veronica Landavazo, a graduate of the West Lake
Culinary Institute located in the Los Angeles area.
This seems like an opportunity to get to know a
future culinary great in the “early years”. Toss in
a lovely, bright room filled with cozy smells, nice-
sized tables and chairs, a sofa and an honor-sys-
tem lending library, and we are talking home
away from home. At the far end of the dinning
room, two flat-screened TVs are mounted for easy
viewing, yet they are equally as easy to ignore.
Of course there is free wireless internet connec-
tion. We are talking total comfort for the lone busi-
ness traveler seeking temporary refuge, or for an
East Bay local having a casual meeting with fam-
ily, friends or business associates.
This family-operated cafe offers the com-
forts of home with a friendly caring staff prepar-
ing food to order. Being on the road some of the
FREE WI-FI
21 greenkind magazine Vol II, No 2 2007
The stock — The baby stock needs to be succulent
with water content. Thicker stocks are less desir-
able than thinner stock that is fresh and full of mois-
ture. Stocks should not be woody, but a nice fresh
green.
Nodes — Look for multiple identifiable nodes.
Make sure there are at least 3 to 4 nodes on each
baby plant.
New Growth — Look for new fresh growth. The
leaves although small, need to be fully formed with
a bright green color.
Cut Leaves — Should you see leaves that have been
sheared or cut at an angle it is done so the babies
will fit into a tray and to prevent leaf-rot. Even the
cut leaves should look fresh, no curling, or yellow
or brown on the leaves of both the cut and new
growth leaves.
The Overall Look of the Plant The plant should be green and
fresh looking. No brown or yellow marks or spots on the plant.
The rooting sponge should be moist and soft, but not dripping
The root mass on a baby is impor-
tant to check. The roots need to
be totally white. No brown or yel-
low colorations. The exposed
roots must not be touched — just
checked for pure white color and
a fresh crisp look.
Best of luck this growing season; may all your babies come to fruition.
or sitting in water. The plant should look vibrant, healthy and
strong. The stem is not woody, or brown and thick. Supple,
thinner stems denote a healthier plant.
by Staff
Information provided in cooperation with the
management and staff of Alternative Relief
Cooperative, 1944 Ocean, San Francisco.
P
h
o
t
o
s

b
y

M
a
r
c
e
l
l
a

S
a
n
c
h
e
z
Babies
Selecting
22 www.gkmagazine.net
The Bandit of Kabul
Making its mark in the world of readers is, The Bandit of Kabul.
Writer, Jerry Beisler brings his readers a time travel vehicle char-
acterized by a clear concise writ-
ing style with the brevity of a poet
and a matter-of-fact presentation
devoid of opinion, adjectives, and
fluff.
“Rebecca and I were forced
off the train when it was comman-
deered by soldiers for the war ef-
fort at Allahabad,” is an example
of the understated writing which
gives the reader the opportunity
to leap from creature comforts to
the simple, yet complex environ-
ments of sultry heat, jammed
streets, over crowded trains, and
split-second decision making.
Anyone old enough to
have experienced the youth cul-
ture of the early 1970s will imme-
diately relate to the taste and tone
of the time captured within the
sentences and paragraphs of The
Bandit of Kabul. The prose takes
the reader on a trek from India
to Amsterdam. We meet Jerry
and his lover/travel companion,
Rebecca, as they experience and
manipulate through the villages
and teaming cities of India to the
Middle East in a time when the
cultural differences were more
like a Disneyland adventure than
the political potholes we think of
today.
The book is spiced with
photographs of the people and
places the pair encounter along
the way and the colorful modes of transportation that seam the
adventure with names like Jerry Garcia and United Nation del-
Jerry Beisler’s
The Bandit of Kabul
egates. We meet Kachook, a big dog and follow along as the trav-
eling team mount horses, meet dubious warlords and follow the
Ganja trail to Amsterdam.
The most unique feature of
the book is the mastery of Beisler
to recreate the feeling and men-
tality of a generation of Ameri-
can and European youths as they
explore the values, traditions and
ethics of foreign lands. The es-
sence of the time is captured as
restless youths search for a new
awareness and a way to open
minds and hearts to a reality that
moves beyond the traditions and
social mores of their World War
II parental culture.
This adventure captures a
time that applauded the willing-
ness to go beyond the college
classroom, and travel books. Our
protagonists live more by “the seat
of their pants” as war, and meet-
ing with new and old friends,
change and create the pair’s travel
plans.
The Bandit of Kabul, is epi-
sode two of the series, As the Prayer
Wheel Turns, however, the two
books stand independently.
Beisler is also the author of three
books of poetry, international po-
litical commentary, travel articles,
historical research papers and re-
views.
Available at Amazon.com
with both new and used copies
available from $17.25, this is a
summer reading must for any pa-
tient looking for adventure, a bit of cultural history and down-
right exciting storytelling at its finest.
BOOK REVIEW
by Melrose Sanchez
M
o
r
n
i
n
g

S
t
a
r
L
a
m
b

s

B
r
e
a
d
G
o
o
G
o
l
d
e
n

C
a
n
d
y
A
p
p
l
e

H
a
s
h
J
e
d
i
J
e
d
i
J
e
d
i
J
e
d
i
J
e
d
i
O
.
G
.

K
u
s
h
M
e
d
i
c
i
n
a
l

s
a
m
p
l
e
s
c
o
u
r
t
e
s
y

o
f

H
o
p
e
N
e
t
,

S
a
n

F
r
a
n
c
i
s
c
o
.
g
r
e
e
n
k
i
n
d
1
s
t

a
n
n
i
v
e
r
s
a
r
y

:

2
0
0
6
-
2
0
0
7
g
r
e
e
n
k
i
n
d
1
s
t

a
n
n
i
v
e
r
s
a
r
y

:

2
0
0
6
-
2
0
0
7
Photo by Marcella Sanchez
M
y

C
h
o
i
c
e
.

M
y

M
e
d
i
c
i
n
e
.

M
y

M
a
g
a
z
i
n
e
.
M
y

C
h
o
i
c
e
.

M
y

M
e
d
i
c
i
n
e
.

M
y

M
a
g
a
z
i
n
e
.
m
a
g
a
z
i
n
e
27 greenkind magazine VOL II, NO. 2 2007
Experience
The Delivery Service
Experience
by Staff
Not only for the homebound, delivery service is a safe and convenient option to procure
medication that most dispensary-goers don’t really consider. It is always a bit odd to invite
a stranger into your home and perhaps a little nerve-racking, but only the first time.
N N
N NN
ot being homebound except by my work, I didn’t
know if I qualified for a delivery service. I also
didn’t know if the prices would be higher con-
sidering most deliveries are not free. My vet
charges a $60 travel fee for a barn visit for my horse, so I
was thinking the same might be true of a medicine-delivery
service and it gave me pause to make the call.
Much to my surprise, my call was answered by a soft-
spoken man who gave me his full attention. I assured him my
documentation is in order and prepared for verification when he
arrived. Next, he wanted to talk about my condition including
what type of medicine had worked best in the past and what he
had available that would work best for me now. The next evening
at the appointed time, there was a soft knock on my door, and I
am welcoming the nicest guy into my living room and offering
him a seat and a cold drink. It reminded me of my nephew’s visits
except this man was here to bring relief for my seemingly end-
less headaches, neck, and back pain.
Toting a small medicine case, the delivery person
discretely and carefully verifies my recommendation
then selects from his impressive selection this and that
strain and a few extracts for my inspection. He tells
me the virtues of each for my specific situation.
There was no selling involved. He let me view
each vile and we talked about indicas and
sativas and how a Trainwreck and/or Kush
may work well for me since I need relief but
I also need to work on the computer, take
calls and attend meetings pain-free with a
public presence and a clear head. I made my
small selection and paid the normal rate for
medicine with no additional charges for the
service. This delivery service happens to
have a portable credit and ATM card pro-
cessor in his case, so no worries about
cash on hand. It was an easy and fast
transaction for both of us.
The entire process was not only ex-
peditious but enjoyable and relaxed. I am
indeed looking forward to experiencing de-
livery service again. We easily connected as
patients and more importantly, I had his full attention. He didn’t
rush in and rush out and I didn’t feel hurried, but rather he made
me feel that I was his only consideration for the time being. I liked
the experience very much and next time I have to make a delivery
call, it will be more like calling a friend than a delivery service. I
highly recommend utilizing delivery as a viable option to dispen-
sary visits. The one-on-one experience was an added bonus and
being able to select my medicine in the most relaxed way pos-
sible—in my home and at my leisure was wonderful. Check the
Greenkind’s Patient Resource and Service Directory to locate a
delivery service in your area. It is a possible option to consider if
moving medicine is a concern or simply for the convenience.
28 www.gkmagazine.net
P
h
o
t
o
:

R
e
g
i
n
a
,

S
a
s
k
a
t
c
h
e
w
a
n
A
s the scientific experts ponder the impending
global warming crisis, they search and explore
everything from corn oil to cow manure as
possible alternative fuel. Yet hemp, the crop of our
forefathers that actually helped to establish the economic
base of our country is being sorely, if not deliberately
overlooked as a fuel source. Sometimes it takes looking
to the past in order to move forward into a meaningful
future. Maybe George Washington and Thomas Jefferson
were on to something as they grew hemp on their farms.
Historically, hemp was considered by our forefathers and
mothers as a valued and important crop. It became illegal to
consider hemp as an American agricultural product and all re-
search came to a screeching halt by the mid-1930s. Industrial
hemp is a member of the cannabis plant family as is marijuana.
Hemp looks like marijuana. Actually, marijuana is the Spanish
word for hemp. However, hemp contains almost no natural
medicinal element in its biological makeup. Hemp can be used
in the production of most everything from building materials to
fine lace, with one exception — it cannot be used as medicine.
Even though the hemp plant yields three full crops a year
with a harvest every 120 days, and it is drought and pest resis-
tant, as well as one of the most natural, nonpolluting crops
known in agriculture, the word “hemp” is NOT in the conver-
sation as we search for fuel alternatives. No thought has been
given to the plant and its potential as a cash crop not only for
fuel, but food and industry. The entire idea of hemp has been
kept heavily under wraps.
The list of reasons for the elimination of hemp from the
American industrial scene is justified with the ever-present so-
cial stigma put forth by the now classic, Reefer Madness, men-
tality. Perhaps, if we wore hemp clothing as George Washing-
ton and Betsy Ross did, or if our modern day flag were made of
hemp like the original, the mad dash for a non-carbon based
fuel would and could be circumvented. Perhaps, the solution
to the entire situation would be in our own back yard – where
most solutions are found in the first place.
The Diesel engine can function perfectly well using a
hemp oil concoction. Vegetable oils were originally used as die-
sel fuel. Later, as the price of oil became incredibly cheap, a
petroleum component was added to produce a fuel known as
diesel #2. The Ford Motor Company performed tests and de-
veloped concepts utilizing hemp and vegetable oil during the
early 20
th
Century. The Standard Oil Company, during the 1920s,
was comprised of 25% bio-fuel and 75% of petroleum fuel.
Cannabis was used industrially at that time as well as in
as many as 29 American Medical Association approved and
regularly prescribed medications. Cannabis-based medicines
were produced by the pharmaceutical companies Eli Lilly and
Squibb. Marijuana was used as a primary pain killer until 1899
Looking to the Past for Future Solutions
A Look at Hemp as a Useful, Practical Alternative Biofuel
One More Time for Hemphasis
by Melrose Sanchez
when commercial aspirin came on the market. If aspirin were
introduced as a pain killer today, it also would most likely be
restricted. Aspirin is so entrenched in our society as a part of
daily life, it would be near impossible due to public outcry for
the government to reschedule it to a prescription only medica-
tion.
Rudolf Diesel, born in 1858, began his work to find the
best fuel for his engines convinced that bio-fuel was the en-
ergy source to be used by the developing transportation in-
dustry. Ford agreed and used 30% hemp seed oil as a high-
grade diesel fuel while the oil could also be used to lubricate
machinery and as motor oil. Not to mention that it is the most
nutritionally balanced oil for human consumption. However,
as the price of petroleum became cheaper, bio-fuels were aban-
doned and the petroleum companies began to realize they
could control fuel consumption and pricing in the United States.
This was a very attractive concept to the up-and-coming
American industrialists like William Randolph Hearst who was
busy cornering the paper making business using wood pulp
while other oil-rich industrialist wanted to eliminate the com-
petition from renewable fuel sources. The cotton and lumber
industries went down a similar track. Eliminate the competi-
tion of the hemp textile and building material industry while
cotton and lumber industries grew to dominate. And they have
certainly been dominate for almost one hundred years. Never
mind hemp fabric can hold up to 250 times the moisture of
cotton, is more durable and is used to create everything from
fine lace to cooking oil. The most desirable fabric may well be
a blend of cotton and hemp. We have not had the opportunity
to find out.
The industrialist, by 1937, using fear and racism man-
aged to eliminate hemp from the American industrial scene.
Marijuana is the Spanish word for hemp, and using a racist
slant against Mexican workers coming to the United States and
fear of a society gone wild on “loco weed”, they managed to
get the Marijuana Tax Act passed and with it, the demise of
industrialized hemp production in the United States.
There was a flurry of hemp activity during Word War II,
with a slogan “Hemp for Victory” to encourage farmers to plant
hemp but the plant had been controlled, debauched, and made
illegal to grow without special limited permits. The farmers
did not embrace the idea of growing a product with no market
industry. The industrialists were creating a “new” world and
personal fortunes. They were not thinking longevity of the
earth’s environment to ensure humanity’s longevity upon the
planet. That was not the focus of the time. The focus was to
industrialize an agriculturally-based nation. Perhaps they
thought the oil and lumber supplies would last forever, much
like our current thinking.
Lumber, oil, and cotton are the most polluting crops to
our environment. They each leave a trail of pollutants with a
29 greenkind magazine VOL II, NO. 2 2007
“Pot,” another common name for
marijuana, most likely came from the fact
that marijuana was grown in flower pots
during the 1940s. It was also commonly
brewed in a pot as a tea. From pot comes
“pot head,” a frequent user of marijuana.
Did You Know?
P
h
o
t
o
:

R
e
g
i
n
a
,

S
a
s
k
a
t
c
h
e
w
a
n
carbon footprint as big Sasquatch. Even so, there is no mention of
hemp as a possible solution to our environmental woes. If hemp
was a morally-defunct plant would George Washington and the
majority of our founding fathers have been hemp farmers? Mary
Lincoln financed Abraham’s presidential race with hemp crops
from her farm. Dating back as far as written history, hemp has
played a very important role in civilization. The hemp plant does
not require much nurturing to flourish and does so in a large range
of soils and climates.
It is clear that the oil-rich empires of the world are dimin-
ishing or limiting oil supplies to drive demand and prices. The
current excuse for high oil prices is refineries unable to produce
due to weather conditions and needed repairs. Prices go up when
traditional travel occurs for holidays and vacations while they drop
when the public is not in travel mode. With billions of dollars in
quarterly profits, surely the oil companies have enough revenue
to maintain and to modernize refineries. If any companies have
the resources to become state-of-the-art in production, it would be
the oil companies. They have OPEC and together a small group of
rich men decide how much and at what price we get our fuel.
Hemp may well be a solution to our current environmental
crisis and could well become an economically viable industry as
revenue in more arid conditions. Hemp thrives in Afghanistan.
France, and Canada grow and produces numerous hemp prod-
ucts as do several other countries. Hemp clothing and skin care
products are making their way into the marketplace, so this is an
agricultural product that may move out of the past and into the
future as more people learn of the known and yet to be explored
and developed possibilities. It almost seems as if our forefathers
are pointing the way to the solutions both economically and envi-
ronmentally.
30 www.gkmagazine.net
Insomnia
and Medical Marijuana
Insomnia
and Medical Marijuana
finds to be very effective for sleep and doesn’t seem to cause a hangover
— but it’s illegal.”
• In an interview on CNN, Dr. Clete Kushida, of the Stanford
University Sleep Clinic in Palo Alto, California was asked: “Do
you know if using marijuana can be linked to getting to sleep easier?
What are the pros and cons?” His reply was: “Obviously use of mari-
juana is illegal. The problem with marijuana as a sleep aid, studies
have shown, is that it pro-
duces poor sleep and amne-
sia and also may be associ-
ated with unusual behav-
iors during sleep.”
To date there is
not enough scientific
information to draw
any concrete conclu-
sions. Much of the con-
troversy involves the
insidious nature of In-
somnia and how to
cure it. Many pharma-
ceuticals or herbals
that are used to help
insomnia may also
create insomnia. A
benzodiazepene used
in the elderly popula-
tion may cause insom-
nia and agitation. Often,
the use of a medicine to alleviate insomnia must be tailored to a
specific patient. This is the case with marijuana as medicine for
insomnia. Most patients who have found success using mari-
juana for insomnia report improved sleep with less drowsiness
(or drug hangover) the next day, as compared to over the counter
or prescription medication. Some patients also report improved
sleep with kava kava, melatonin or valerian. Discussion with a
physician can help you choose the best medicine.
ALTERNATIVE THERAPIES
Nutritional Interventions – Avoid stimulants, caffeine, tobacco,
alcohol before bed, supplement with Melatonin, L-Tryptophan (an
amino acid, pre-serotonin), warm milk
Herbals – Valerian root (sedative), Kava-kava (sedative and
relaxant), California poppy (sedative and relaxant), Passion flower
(relaxant), Chamomile tea
Additional treatments – Homeopathy • Cortisol reduction •
Biofeedback • Relaxation therapy • Meditation • Acupuncture •
Hypnosis • Sleep induction guided tapes/CDs.
by Jean Talleyrand, MD
FOUNDER OF MEDICANN
P
P
rimary Insomnia is a condition characterized by
sleeplessness not derived from chemical or envi-
ronmental causes. The primary symptom is an
inability for the patient in either getting to sleep or staying
asleep.
We have all experienced an overactive mind which will not
release the body and allow it to rest. Insomnia affects 20-30% of
adults worldwide. It often occurs during times of stress and may
be associated with altered neurochemicals known as the “sleep”
neurotransmitters (serotonin or GABA), or with increased stress
hormones (cortisol) coursing through the bloodstream. Other forms
of sleeplessness may occur as a result of substance abuse or a
withdrawal condition, including withdrawal
from marijuana. Disturbance of
the biological clock, such as a
shift in time zones, or erratic
work patterns, or schedules
can also result in insomnia.
Poor sleep habits often con-
tribute to the problem.
Other medical conditions
that create insomnia in-
clude sleep apnea, restless
legs, night sweats and pain.
STANDARD TREATMENT
After reviewing the
patient’s lifestyle, habits,
diet, and bedtime rituals to
better understand possible
causes for Insomnia, most
standard medical treatment
includes prescribing benzo–
diazepenes (Valium, Xanax)
or hypnotics (Halcion).
Other medications which
could contribute to sleeplessness include antihistamines such as
Benadryl, or antidepressants such as Prozac, Trazodone, Elavil. A
good physician will also suggest exercise to alleviate the stress of
daily life and increase serotonin in the blood.
MARIJUANA
Marijuana’s use to help cure Insomnia has been a contro-
versial topic, and comes up frequently in the media and talk radio:
• At Health Central, Dr. Dean Edell was asked the follow-
ing question: “Is It Okay To Use Marijuana To Get To Sleep?“ His
reply: “It would be perfectly legal for your husband to waste his money
on kava kava, or melatonin, or a whole bunch of other stuff that doesn’t
work for sleep. The fact is, he’s spending money on an herb that evidence
31 greenkind magazine VOL II, NO. 2 2007
Medicinal Search
California Cannabis
BECOME A GREENKIND DISTRIBUTOR BECOME A GREENKIND DISTRIBUTOR BECOME A GREENKIND DISTRIBUTOR BECOME A GREENKIND DISTRIBUTOR BECOME A GREENKIND DISTRIBUTOR
CALL 510.728-4772 or email greenkind@earthlink.net
"
BUD
CANNABIS
DOOBIE
DOPE
GANJA
GRASS
HASH
HERB
JOINT
MARIJUANA
POT
REEFER
SINSEMILLA
SPLIFF
WEED
(hints on pg. 42)
D M Y P E R O G U A H R P W Z
P D X D W N F W J C E C H S B
M F F I L P S N E E Q A E D U
E A R D W X A D F E O N R U I
T I R S P G C E L I D N B B U
J O B I H H R H S A H A Q U F
C Y P O J J O I N T D B W G M
X O J P O U F T U T X I S D H
V R I S M D A Z V D T S S Z T
D L U U V B X N S O J R P S I
G X R J S D I P A T Z D D S F
S I N S E M I L L A O R C A M
M O T V S L Y V O P Z X R R B
M M B D B S Q K E I B N Q G M
E M A N O D U N E T R N F V I
1996 Compassionate Act (CUA)
Health and Safety Code 11362.5
Marijuana May Help If You Suffer From:
DIABETES, ARTHRITIS, CHRONIC PAIN,
HYPERTENSION, ANOREXIA, MENSTRAL CRAMPS,
MIGRAINES, AND MUCH MORE
CALL TODAY (310) 670-7400 • CLOSED SUNDAY
ALTERNATIVE HEALTH WORKS
5591 Manchester, Los Angeles, CA 90045
24/7 live patient verification/ID cards for any valid recommendation holder
MEDICAL MARIJUANA
MEDICAL MARIJUANA
Long Live PPLO
To the Future
32 www.gkmagazine.net
Greenkind SERVES AS THE MEDICAL CANNABIS COMMUNITY INFORMATIONAL CONNECTION. We
provide objective information about the goods, services, and issues relevant to
medical cannabis its production, dispensation, use, effects, and political sta-
tus. Each month we feature informative articles from all aspects of the medical
cannabis community from seed to consumption. Our goal is to be the public
forum that connects the community giving it a voice and a means for growers,
doctors, lawyers, political activist, patients, and dispensaries a place to share
their story.
Greenkind is distributed through medical cannabis dispensaries through-
out California and in states where medical cannabis is dispensed in the hope
that patients and workers in the field, feel connected not only to each other,
but to their providers as well. It is understood that true identities may not be
revealed, but the information brings medical cannabis into the public forum in
clear, forthright, manner. We believe that by providing a public forum in the writ-
ten, printed word as well as on the world wide web, we are acting as a unifying
force that sets differences aside and underscores the public’s need for medical
Our Mission
cannabis availability and for clean, regulated, comfortable and safe dispensation
of the product.
As Greenkind makes its way from patient to the public at large, infor-
mation will disseminate to educate and to dispel the stigma associated and
propagated by organizations threatened by the use of medical cannabis.
We are dependent upon the community for support. Advertising in
Greenkind is also a source of information that has been historically limited.
Purveyors of goods also have an opportunity to discuss their products, their
uses and how it can help patients secure the best possible methods to grow,
store, and consume medication. A community bulletin board is provided for
notices, events, and relevant information for our readers.
Our intent is heart-felt and founded in compassion and care. By being a
mirror of the medical cannabis community, it is our desire to bring understand-
ing, dignity, and opportunity to all aspects of medical cannabis, and its benefits
not only to patients and providers, but to the public at large.
A MUST SEE DVD
T
his new documentary gives an overview and update of the legal and emotional
battles California voters have fought in their efforts to decriminalize medical
marijuana. It includes recent scientific studies, reported in reputable medical
journals, that indicate new therapeutic uses for this ancient plant.
The filmmakers draw on leading activists to describe both the problems and
solutions available to those who feel the issue of safe access to medical cannabis
must be resolved in favor of the patients to whom it is a lifesaving remedy. There are
interviews with a fighting district attorney, doctors who give cannabis recommenda-
tions, and advocates for legalization including representatives of organizations such
as NORML, ASA, and FAMM (Families Against Mandatory Minimums).
The film begins with a rousing speech by the legendary Brownie Mary at
Berkeley’s Peoples’ Park. It then traces the development of the California movement
to make marijuana available to patients for relieving the symptoms of many serious
illnesses, including glaucoma, multiple sclerosis, various seizure disorders, and the
nausea which most people experience when undergoing chemo or radiation therapy for
the treatment of cancer. Scenes from numerous historical hemp festivals, pot protests
and smoke-ins have been included. Also, are scenes representing the opposition, such
as cop busts and interviews with indignant citizens who say that many of the so-
called patients are perfectly healthy as far as they can tell.
Although the triumph of Prop. 215 made it possible for California residents to
grow their own medicine and possess small amounts for personal use, the Federal
government’s refusal to honor this state law has created ongoing problems and uncer-
tainties. This documentary hopes to help resolve these issues. It also seeks to redefine
the image of the marijuana smoker in the eyes of the general public from that of the
stoned slacker to that of responsible patient. The opening of legal cannabis dispensa-
ries, or “pot clubs”, is examined and their advantages and disadvantages considered.
Art and Education Media, Inc. has a long history as a documentary producer
concerned with human rights. Mayor Tom Bates of Berkeley writes, “Ms. Burch is a
wonderful Berkeley Institution. For over 20 years she has used her camera and her pen
to document the plight of homeless people in our community. She is respected for her
skill as a filmmaker and for her deep commitment to improving our society.”
Sponsored by ART AND EDUCATION, INC.
Available from REGENT PRESS, 6020-A Adeline, Oakland, CA 94606
www.regentpress.net • regentpress@mindspring.com
www.claireburch.com
Mendo Remedies • 44975 Hwy 101 Laytonville, CA • (707) 984-7101
33 greenkind magazine VOL II, NO. 2 2007
The ladies love Sean Paul.
510.357.5521
MADE IN USA
WORLD’S FINEST EXRACTION EQUIPMENT WORLD’S FINEST EXRACTION EQUIPMENT WORLD’S FINEST EXRACTION EQUIPMENT WORLD’S FINEST EXRACTION EQUIPMENT WORLD’S FINEST EXRACTION EQUIPMENT
email us at:
sandmindustries@hotmail.com I N D U S T R I E S I N D U S T R I E S I N D U S T R I E S I N D U S T R I E S I N D U S T R I E S
Highest quality
sifting equipment
available. Made to
withstand the
demands of
commercial
applications.

Sizes:
10x12”
15x15”
17x21”
20x24”
S&M
S&M
TRASH BAGS are available in 1 gal., 5 gal.,
20 gal., and 32 gal. sizes.
3, 4, and 5-bag sets
34 www.gkmagazine.net
Restaurant Reviews
by Rachel Perlstein
A PROFESSIONAL
CAREGIVING SERVICE AND COLLECTIVE
THE HEMPORIUM, LLC
• CLONES
• PREMUIM SEEDS
• TOP GRADE CANNABIS
FELTON, CALIFORNIA six miles from Santa Cruz
HOURS OF OPERATION MON-FRI 12 PM TO 6 PM • (831) 295-9381
T
he building is nothing special. The area is extremely acces-
sible, located steps from the 16
th
Street/Mission Bart Station
and many buses (making it inevitably slightly sketchy). The
line moves quickly, and there definitely will be one if you go dur-
ing peak lunch or dinner hours. Their Mexican food is always fresh
because this place is in high demand and the food goes quickly
with all the customers coming in and out. Once inside you can
check out the ever-changing local art on the walls until you reach
the front of the line. Proceeding down the cafeteria-style line the
lovely ladies behind the counter will give you whatever you want,
within reason. There are plenty of Mexican classics to choose from
but I always order a burrito. I usually enjoy scoping out what seems
to have just been made, as in I saw the guy chopping up the chicken
when I was walking in and now the fresh chicken is available for
my burrito! I then tell the ladies behind the counter what I feel like
having inside my burrito that very day, and in less than one minute
I have my food with a side of chips and a cup of seriously good
horchata. I hit up the salsa bar to snatch up everything from fresh
limes and chilies to every kind of salsa imaginable. I’m ready to
sit down and eat so I approach one of the small wooden tables
with unique leather strapped-wooden stools to sit on. I try to re-
member that if I eat the entire burrito at once I won’t be able to do
anything but relax for a bit, but it is hard to resist finishing it off;
it’s so good once it hits the lips. The food at Pancho Villa Taqueria is
fresh, the service is quick and friendly, and it’s cheap. Make sure
to try anything from the juice bar, the aguas frescas and the awe-
some alfajor cookies.
Pancho Villa Taqueria
3071 16
th
Street, San Francisco, CA 94103
{415} 864. 8840 • www.panchovillasf.com
Open Daily From 10:00 AM – Midnight (Main Courses $2 - $10)
For only a few bucks Pancho Villa will make you so full you
might need to sit down, that is if you eat your entire burrito.
Pancho Villa Taqueria
T
he early twentieth century brick building has a homey, com-
fortable feel. Elegant dark woods compliment the off-white
walls and high vaulted ceilings with wooden beams running
along them. Windows line the interior overhead and large chan-
deliers hang with dozens of lights from each fixture, which in and
of themselves are pieces of art. The collections of old books, fresh
flowers, and dated portraits lend a true charm to the space. Mod-
ern art, young servers and a lively bar are a quick reminder that
this is still the heart of glamorous San Francisco full of foodies,
yuppies, and hipsters all at once.
Almost instantly after being seated the fire alarm began
to go off. Our server, a very friendly young gal, told us the fire
brigade would be there soon to shut it off and kept on going like it
didn’t phase her one bit. Ten to fifteen minutes later the alarm was
off and we had already placed an order for our starters, and had
received our wine and drinks from the bar in a very timely fashion.
The wine selection is pretty strong, with plenty to choose from.
We ordered crispy squash blossoms with four cheese stuffing,
pesto, and a roasted cherry tomato vinaigrette; tuna tartare with
fried green tomatoes, garlic chips, and Tabasco green onion
vinaigrette; buttermilk biscuits with Johnston family country ham
and Dry Creek peach marmalade; and finally, smoked anduoille
sausage with green garlic onion marmalade and Zataran’s mustard,
and the jalapeño corn bread. Every single dish had amazing
flavors. The biscuits were unbelievably mouthwatering and moist;
the contrast of the sweet succulent jam and the salty ham is perfect.
The tartare is on point in all its glory, and ended up being a few of
my fellow diners favorite. The squash blossoms are superior,
however the flavors rely heavily on the cheeses and it’s nearly
impossible to disappoint with high quality cheeses as an ingredient
in any dish. The sausage is juicy and hearty just as expected and
accompanies the biscuits to lend a great Southern feel to the
experience. The dishes maintain a distinctive Louisiana essence
but also contain the added flare of fresh California cuisine.
The service kept the drinks flowing smoothly, checking
on us every so often, but not in an annoying manner. The starters
were filling but, we had come here to eat a hearty meal, and in
keeping with that intention, we all decided to continue our com-
munity style of ordering for the table. We all shared a perfectly
seasoned Blackened Cedar River rib-eye accompanied with corn
maque choux, crispy onions and a brown butter garlic sauce. This
dish was beloved by all members of the dinner party! We also tried
the buttermilk fried chicken, which is what had lured us to the
Hall in the first place. It lived up to any expectations I may have
had. Crispy on the outside, and tender inside with sweet
Brentwood white corn and Yukon gold smashed potatoes that were
amazing, all accompanied by bacon gravy that was nothing less
than perfect.
At this point we could have stopped, but there was no way
we were going finish up without dessert. I absolutely love butter-
You’ll want to go to this
Town Hall
see Town Hall, page 35
San Francisco
Photos by Marcella Sanchez
35 greenkind magazine VOL II, NO. 2 2007
Used • Out of Print
Buy • Sell • Trade
6395 Telegraph Avenue
Oakland, California 94609
510•654•2665
OPEN 12–8 • CLOSED MONDAYS
Pick up your Greenkind Magazine here!
Eddie P. Lugan Broker Associate
Loan Officer
PERFORMANCE FINANCIAL
& REALTY SERVICES
8334 Clairemont Mesa Blvd. Tel (760) 277-4059
Suite 106E Fax (619) 393-0600
San Diego, CA 92109 eddielugan@yahoo.com
— Delivery Service —
Serving Manteca / Modesto 209 area code
10 am to 9 pm daily
(209) 679-0245 (209) 679-0245 (209) 679-0245 (209) 679-0245 (209) 679-0245
Golden Valley
Caregivers
Materials:
1 ounce of medicine
2 tablespoons soft (warm room temperature)
butter. Writers recommend using unhomogenized
and unpasteurized butter, but your preferred butter works as well.
1 electric coffee grinder
1 covered glass container
Directions:
Using a small electric coffee bean grinder, put enough medicine to cover the
blades. Replace lid, and grind for about one minute. It is important that the
material is ground to a fine powder.
Combine butter and powder throughly in a glass container.
Mix until rich dark green in color.
Cannibutter is ready to use or; cover and store at room temperature to
increase infusion.
Quick Cannibutter
Town Hall continued from page 34
scotch and was delighted to order the butterscotch and chocolate
pot de créme topped with butter crunch. We also shared the Breton
shortbread strawberry shortcake with chantilly cream, and the
sticky toffee cake with vanilla ice cream and toffee sauce. At this
point there was no doubt the desserts would be perfect. Upon ar-
rival the strawberry shortcake is huge. We could have all split this
one dessert, which was filling but sweet and light all at the same
time. The butterscotch was everything I has imagined and more.
It was smooth and rich just like I like it. The butter crunch on top
was a true highlight. I thought that nothing could top pot de creme
for me that night, but I had judged too quickly. The sticky toffee
cake is amazing. It’s delicious. Perfectly warm, soft, saucy, and oh
so insanely devilish. I attempted to consume every bite until I
reached a gluttonous state of full. It doesn’t hit me until the server
brings our check inside of an old book that I realize they have
taken some desserts off our bill for the inconvenience with the fire
alarm. Not only does this make me a very happy customer, but
also it makes me believe in Town Hall’s positive vibe. This meal
was one of the best I have had in San Francisco. I can’t believe it
has taken me so long to eat here and I now know one thing is for
sure; it won’t be long before I return.
Town Hall
342 Howard Street, San Francisco, CA 94105
Tel {415} 908. 3900 • www.townhallsf.com
Open for Lunch Monday - Friday 11:30AM - 2:30PM
(Main Courses $15 - $20)
Open For Dinner Monday – Thursday 5:30 – 10:00, Friday and
Saturday 5:30 – 11:00 (Main Courses $18 - $29; Desserts $8)
From L&L, New Mexico
Tasty Medicinal Marble Cake
Recipies
1 Cup Canna-Butter
2 Cup Superfine Sugar
4 Eggs
2-1/2 Cups Plain All Purpose Flour
2 Teaspoon Baking Powder
1 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract
1 Cup milk
A Pinch of Salt
1/4 Cup Cocoa Powder
Method:
Preheat oven to 350º
In a mixer, with a hand mixer, or with your hands, mix the butter until it’s
light and fluffy. Add the sugar and continue mixing.
Add eggs one at a time until all ingredients are mixed in.
Gather two separate bowls.
Mix the milk and the vanilla.
In the other bowl sift and mix flour, salt, and baking powder.
Alternate adding each of these two bowls into the butter and sugar mixture
until all ingredients are incorporated completely. This should take a few
minutes. Make sure all ingredients are completely mixed but not overworked.
Once finished, split the batter into two batches.
Add the cocoa powder to one of the batches.
Layer the two batters into a well-buttered, well-floured 10-inch pan and use a
knife or toothpick to swirl the two batters together.
Bake in a 325-degree oven for 1 hour or more as needed or until testing the
center with a toothpick or knife comes out clean.
As an additional option in the non-cocoa batter you could add orange extract,
vanilla extract, lavender essence, or any essence/extract you like after the
egg white step.
by Rachel Perlstein
36 www.gkmagazine.net
37 greenkind magazine VOL II, NO. 2 2007
Northern California
Dr. Roger Stephen Ellis, San Francisco; (415) 681-0823 www.PotDoc.com
Dr. Frank Lucido, Berkeley; (510) 848-0958; www.drlucido.com;
www.medboardwatch.com
Dr. Gene Schoenfeld, Sausalito; (415) 331-6832
Dr. Hanya Barth, (415) 255-1200, San Francisco & Santa Rosa;
www.howardstreethealthoptions.com
Dr. Hany Assad, (510) 839-0723; Oakland, 1504 Franklin St., #101, lower level -
walk-ins accepted; 7 days a week; www.norcalhealthcare.org.
Dr. Tom O’Connell, (510) 4445771; Oakland; www.doctortom.org
Dr. William R. Turnipseed, Citrus Heights - Sacramento; (916) 722-3433
Dr. Marion “Mollie” P. Fry, California Medical Research Center (office in Cool,
El Dorado Co, CA); www.cannabisdoctor.com; 1-866-4-DocFry
Dr. William Toy, Grass Valley (Nevada Co.); (530) 273-5690
Dr. Stephen Banister, 1117 E Main St., #C, Grass Valley; (530) 274-2274
Dr. Jeff Hergenrather, Sebastopol (Sonoma Co.); (707) 484-7720
Norcal Healthcare, 527 S. State St. Ukiah, (707) 468-7400
Dr. Raymond Rowell, Livermore; (925) 443-3097
Dr. Philip Denney and Robert Sullivan, 1522 Charles Dr., Redding; (530) 242-6784,
and 4709 Engle Rd., #5, Carmichael (Sacto County); (916) 978-9777
MediCann (Dr. Jean Talleyrand) (Modesto, Oakland, SF, Santa Cruz, Sacto,
San Rafael, Santa Rosa, Ukiah) 866-632-6627; www.medicannUSA.com
(see ad pg.11)
Dr. Armond T. Tollette, Jr., ROOTS Medical Clinic, 8419 Hannum Ave., Culver City
(310) 505-0002; attleomd@comcast.net
Southern California
Aldridge Medical, Inc., 8932 Woodman Ave., Ste. 102, Pacoima; (818) 920-6800.
Natural Care for Wellness (NCW), Medical Cannabis Consultant, Santa Barbara,
Ventura County, San Fernando Valley, Glendale; (310) 975-5832;
info@naturalcare4wellness.com; www.naturalcare4wellness.com
Dr. Daniel B. Brubaker, Pain Mgmt/Musculoskeletal, 3726 North First St., Fresno
(559) 248-0116 or 0117
Dr. Philip Denney and Robert Sullivan, 22691 Lambert St., Lake Forest, Orange
County; (949) 855-8845
Dr. Claudia Jensen, 8 N. Fir St., Ventura; and 34281 Doheny Park Rd., 7538
Capistrano Beach; (805) 648-LOVE (5683).
Dr. James Eisenberg, Santa Monica; 877-468-5874
Dr. James W. Eisenberg, West Hollywood, 310-858-8602
Dr. Christine Paoletti, 1304-15th St., #405, Santa Monica, (310) 319-6116
www.coolbreezeclinic.com
Alternative Healthworks, 5591 Manchester, Los Angeles, (310) 670-7400; closed
Sunday; (see ad p.31)
Dr. Anna Gravich, 425 S. Fairfax Ave., Ste. 302, Los Angeles, (323) 954-0231
Dr. Vivi Stafford Mathur, 6051 San Vicente, Los Angeles, (323) 954-9162
Dr. William Eidelman, 1654 N. Cahuenga Blvd, Los Angeles, (323) 463-3295
www.dreidelman.com
THC M.D., Inc., Medical Group, 13701 Riverside Dr., Ste. 608, Sherman Oaks,
(877) THC-MD44; (818) 981-6331; wwwthcmd.com
Dr. Dean Weiss, 46 Park Ave., Venice, (310) 437-3407
continued page 39
•California ATTORNEY Referral List
North State
Chris Andrian, 1100 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, CA 95401; 707-527-9381
Eric Alan Berg, 5000 Bechelli Lane, Ste. 201, Redding, CA 96002; 530-223-5100
(p), 530-223-5200 (f), http://www.bergslaw.com
Bob Boyd, 107 West Perkins St., Ste. 17, Ukiah, CA 95482; 707-468-0500 (p/f),
boydlaw@calicom.net
Gordon S. Brownell, 1241Adams St., #1139, St. Helena, CA 94574; 707-942-
4565 (p), 707-942-8520 (f), gsbrownell@aol.com, appellate cases
Russell Clanton & Bryce Kenney, 791-8th St., #R, Arcata, CA 95521; 707-825-
6587
Manny Daskal, P.O. Box 593, Eureka, CA 95502; 707-443-9842 (p), 707-443-
3654 (f), mdesq@sbcglobal.com
Eugene Denson, P.O. Box 158, Alderpoint, CA 95511; 707-923-4764 (p), 707-926-
5250 (f), www.marijuanadefenselawyer.com-edenson@asis.com
Sandy Feinland, 404 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, CA 95402; 707-421-0909
Mark Harris, 1160 G Street, Ste. B, Arcata, CA 95521; 707-822-9506 (p), 707-
822-8175 (f), mharris@humboldt1.com
Susan Jordan, 515 S. School St., Ukiah, CA 95482; 707-462-2151
David Nelson, P.O. Box N, Ukiah, CA 95482; 707-462-1351
Dale Rasmussen, P.O. Box 954, Chico, CA 95927; 530-342-5130
Ronald Sinoway, P.O. Box 1339, Redway, CA 95580; 707-923-3905 (p), 707-923-
2099 (f), RSINOWAY@asis.com
Steve Spiegelman, 708 College Ave., Santa Rosa, CA; (707) 575-1103
Sacramento — Central Valley
David W. Dratman, 1007 7th St., Sacramento, CA 95814; 916-443-2000 (p), 916-
443-0989 (f), DWDratman@aol.com
John Duree, 428 J. St., Ste. 352, Sacramento, CA 95814; 916-441-0562 (p),
916-447-2988 (f), jduree@ms.net
James R. Homola, 2950 Mariposa St., Ste. 250, Fresno, CA 93721; 559-441-
7111 (p), 559-441-7115 (f)
Bill Logan, P.O. Box 726, Three Rivers, CA 93271; 559-561-4695
William McPike, 36360 Peterson Mill Rd., Auberry CA 93602; (559) 841-3366; fax
(559) 841-5343; mcpike@psnw.com. Prop. 215 civil expert
Kenneth Clark, 3245 S. Hughes, Fresno, CA 93706; 559-276-2210
PATIENT RESOURCE DIRECTORY
California DOCTOR Referral List
Thank you California NORML for the use of your directory format. Content expanded and updated by Greenkind Magazine
greenkind
Dr. Robert Sterner, San Diego; Phone (619) 543-1061
Dr. Alfonso Jimenez, San Diego, Orange County, Los Angeles, Hawaii, 1-888-
215-HERB; www.1888215HERB.com
Dr. Joseph Durante, 72205 Painters Path, Palm Desert, (760) 341-7777
C & C for Wellness San Pedro, Burbank, (310) 872-6732; www.cc4wellness.com
Norcal Health Care, 2808 F St., #D, Bakersfield, (661) 322-4258
Medicann (Dr. Jean Talleyrand) (Sherman Oaks, San Diego, W. Hollywood) 866-
632-6627; www.medicann.com (see ad pg 11)
Alternative Care Consultants, San Diego, Los Angeles and Long Beach (866)-
420-7215 www.accsocal.com
Dr. Edward Alexander, M.D. and Dr. Ted Schalter, 14532 Friar St., Ste. C3, Van
Nuys
Dr. Wesley Duane Albert, M.D., 1605 West Olympic Blvd., Ste. 9090, Los Angeles,
(213) 477-4186
Long Beach Compassionate Cooperative
20% Discount w/mention of this ad • DOCTOR REFERRALS
Mon–Sat 11am to 8pm • Sunday 11am to 6pm
We have an abundant selection for all your needs
(562) 435-9395 (ph)
(562) 435-9313 (fx)
342 E. 4th Street
Long Beach, CA
38 www.gkmagazine.net
Julie Ruiz-Sierra, P.O. Box 73381, Davis, CA 95817; 530-758-3180 (p),
julie@omsoft.com
Peter Tiemann, 490 Main St. #E, Placerville, CA 95401; 530-621-2400
Steven Cilenti, 25 Court St. #2, Jackson, CA 95642; 209-223-5550 steve@cilenti-
law.com
Tim Warriner, 1725 Capitol Ave., Sacramento, CA 95814; 916-443-7141 (p), 916-
448-5346 (f), twarriner@thewilsongroup.com, www.warrinerlaw.com
San Francisco Bay Area
Bruce Hall Atwater, 1440 Broadway Ste. 919, Oakland, CA 94612; 510-451-9800
(p), 510-451-9807 (f); bruceatwater@aol.com
Mark Arnold, 45 E. Julian St., San Jose, CA 95112; 408-286-6320 (p), 408-286-
9155 (f); marnold@roseandarnold.com
Scot Candell, 2019 Webster St, San Francisco, CA 94115; (415) 441-1776;
candell@sflegalhelp.com
James L. Clark, 506 Broadway, San Francisco, CA 94113; (415) 986-5591 (p)
(415) 986-5591 (f) james.clark@colorado.edu
Joseph Elford, Americans for Safe Access, 1322 Webster St., #208, Oakland CA
94612; (510) 251-1856. Medical marijuana specialist.
Alan Ellis, 34 Issaquah Dock, Waldo Point Harbor, Sausalito, CA 94965; 415-332-
6464 (p), 415-332-1464 (f); AElaw1@alanellis.com; www.alanellis.com
Anthony Feldstein, 177 Post Street, Ste. 600, San Francisco, CA 94123; 415-
668-4845 (p), 415-474-4882 (f); ajfeld98@aol.com
Omar Figueroa, 506 Broadway, San Francisco, CA 94133; 415-986-5591 (p),
415-421-1331 (f); Yo hablo español omar@stanfordalumni.org;
www.omarfigueroa.com
Jack T. Frohlich, Esq., 350 Arballo Dr., Apt. 12L, San Francisco, CA 94132, 415-
841-9896; Employment Law. (p), jfrohlich@pathfindermail.com
George J. Gigarjian, 108 Locust Street, Ste. 13, Santa Cruz, CA 95060; 831-429-
1440 (p), 831-427-8005 (f); gigalaw@surfnetusa.com
Mel Grimes, Jr., 706 Forest Ave., Pacific Grove, CA 93950; 831-373-4338 (p),
831-373-4311 (f), melgrimes@jps.net
Bill Hornaday, 802 Hillcrest Dr., Felton CA 95018; (831) 835-0633
Matt Kumin, 870 Market St., #1128, San Francisco, CA 94102; (415) 434-8454;
Business law (medical caregivers), civil rights
David Michael, DiMartini Historical Landmark Bldg., 294 Page St., San Francisco,
CA 94102; 415-621-4500 (p), 415-621-4173 (f), DMMP5@aol.com
Randy Moore, 332 - 2nd St, San Jose, CA 95112; 408-298-2000
J. David Nick, 506 Broadway., San Francisco, CA 94102; 415-986-5591
Thomas Nolan, 600 University Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94301; 650-326-2980
William L. Osterhoust, 135 Belvedere St., San Francisco, CA 94117; 415-664-
4600 (p), 415-664-4691 (f)
William G. Panzer, 370 Grand Ave., Ste. 3, Oakland, CA 94610; 510-834-1892 (p),
510-834-0418 (f), wgpanzer@earthlink.net
Robert Raich, 1970 Broadway, #1200, Oakland CA 94612; 510-338-0700 Medical
cannabis business law & regulations.
Benjamin Rice, 331 Soquel Ave., Ste. 203, Santa Cruz, CA 95060; 408-425-0555
(p), 831-459-9615 (f), ben@benricelaw.com
Dennis Roberts, 370 Grand Ave., Oakland, CA 94610; 510-465-6363 (p), 510-465-
7375 (f); Roberts_dennis@sbcglobal.net
Richard Rosen, 123 Capitol St., #B, Salinas, CA 93901; 831-757-8200 (p), 831-
757-3182 (f), rosen@redshift.com
Tony Serra, Randy Daar, Laurence J. Lichter, 506 Broadway, San Francisco, CA
94133; 415-986-5591 (p), 415-421-1331 (f)
Michael Stepanian, Stadtmuller House, 819 Eddy St., San Francisco, CA 94109;
415-771-6174 (p), 415-474-3748 (f); mikes@slip.net
Stephen D. Tulanian, P.O. Box 158, Lower Lake, CA 95457; 707 994-7676;
www.expertdefense.com; tulanian@expertdefense.com
Ean Vizzi - PIER 5 LAW OFFFICES, 506 Broadway, San Francisco CA 94133; (415)
986-5591
Greater Los Angeles
Michael L. Becker, Law Offices of Michael L. Becker, 965 N. Vignes St., #10, Los
Angeles, CA 90012; 213-437-0555 (p), 213-437-0880 (f);
MLeeBecker@aol.com
Jeffrey H. Friedman, 4 Hutton Centre Dr., Ste. 720, Santa Ana, CA 92707; 714-
972-9100; friedmanlaw@cox.net; (specialty: writs, appeals).
Christopher Glew, 1851 E. 1st St., #840, Santa Ana, CA; (714) 231-4435.
William Kroger, 8888 Olympic Blvd., Beverly Hills, CA 90211; 323-655-2450 (p),
323-655-7446 (f); wskroger@laattorney.com; www.laattorney.com (cannabis
clubs & caregivers, criminal law)
Bruce M. Margolin (LA NORML), 8749 Holloway Dr., West Hollywood, CA 90069;
310-652-0991 (p), 310-652-1501 (f), bmargolin@aol.com
Eric Shevin, 9000 W. Sunset Blvd. #720, West Hollywood 90069; 310-273-1300
Davis & Mattern, 2901 W. Coast Hwy., #200, Newport Beach 92263; (949) 258-
4364; davismatternlaw@aol.com
Michael Mehas, 840 County Sq. Dr., #247, Ventura, CA 93003; 805-644-2883
Michael Nasatir, 2115 Main St., Santa Monica, CA 90405; 310-399-3259
Sean Tabibian, 9000 W. Sunset Blvd, W. Hollywood CA 90069; (310) 633-0444
Allen G. Weinberg, 9454 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 600, Beverly Hills, CA 90212; 310-
550-7177 (p), 310-550-1558 (f), allen@completedefense.com
David Yousefyeh, (ADY Law Group) 1925 Century Park East, Ste. 500, Los
Angeles, CA 90024; 800-762-8469 (p), 310-388-39007 (f)
San Diego and Desert
Patrick Dudley, 4153 Market St. #B-152, San Diego 92102; 619-233-7334.
Steven E. Feldman, Law Offices, 934 23rd St., San Diego, CA 92102; 619-232-
8649 (p), 619-232-8271 (f); sfeldman@cts.com
William R. Fletcher, Portola Centre, 74-040 Hwy. 111, Ste. l-214, Palm Desert, CA
92260; 760-773-9922 (p), bill@fletchlaw.com
James J. Warner, 3233 Third Avenue, San Diego, CA 92103; 619-243-7333 (p),
619-243-7343 (f); jjwlaw@jwarnerlaw.com
David Zugman, 600 Trout St., Apt. 238, San Diego, CA 92101; 619-231-6292 (p),
david_zugman@fd.org
California Patient Service Listing
North Coast North Coast North Coast North Coast North Coast
• Arcata iCenter, 1085 K St., Arcata, (707) 496-9769; Mon-Wed 10-6pm, Th-Sun
10-8pm
• Cannabis Club, Ukiah, (information only); (707) 462-0691
• Caregiver Compassion Group, 2425 Cleveland Ave., #140, Santa Rosa; (707)
537-7303
• Green Coast Care Group, 2383 Grevenstein Hwy S, Sebastopol; (707) 829-
7420; Mon-Sat 1-5pm; www.myspace.com/greencoastcaregroup
• Green Parcel Service (Delivery), Sonoma County; (707) 921-9843; M-Sa 9-6pm
• Humboldt Patient Resource Center, 980 6th St., 601, Arcata; (707) 826-7988;
M-Th 10-5pm, Fri 10-5:30pm
• Herban Legend, 18300 Old Coast Hwy #3, Fort Bragg; (707) 961-0113; M-Sat
11am-6pm.
• LaCoMeDel, (Delivery) Lake/Napa/E. Sonoma; (707) 987-4585
• MendoHealing, Fort Bragg; (707) 964-3677
• Mendo Remedies, 42400 Highway 101, Laytonville; (707) 984-7101; Wed-Sat
10-6pm; (winter 10-4pm)
• North Bay Collective, 3200 Dutton Ave., #112, Santa Rosa; (707) 569-1420 or
(707) 799-0006; M, Tu, Fr 10-5pm; W-Th 12-8pm; Sat 12-4pm
• Organic Cannabis Foundation, 3386 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa;
www.organicann.com; Mon-Fri 10-6:45pm, Sat 10-4:45pm
• Organic Medical Delivery, Santa Rosa; (707) 480-7851; Mon-Sat 9-4pm
• Peace in Medicine, 6771 Sebastopol Ave. (Hwy 12), Sebastopol; (707) 823-
4206; Tu-Sat 10:30-7pm; Sun-Mon 10:30-5pm; www.peaceinmedicine.org
• Sonoma Alliance for Medical MJ; (707) 522-0292 – Advocacy & education only.
• Marvin’s Gardens, Sonoma (Guerneville); 707-869-1291
• Compassionate Services (Delivery), Sonoma County; 707-972-7818
• Lake County Holistic Solutions, 14240 Lakeshore Dr., Clearlake; (707) 995-9000;
Mon-Sat 11-7pm
• Lake County D&M Compassion Center, 15196 Lakeshore Blvd., Clearlake; (707)
994-1320
• Lake County Alternative Caregiver Clinic, Clearlake Oaks; (707) 998-0358;
lacc@mchsi.com
• Triple M Collective, 21297 Calistoga St., Middletown, (707) 281-6273. Open
10-6pm (10-7pm summer)
Central Valley & Foothills to Redding Central Valley & Foothills to Redding Central Valley & Foothills to Redding Central Valley & Foothills to Redding Central Valley & Foothills to Redding
• 28/16 Collective Corp, 4459 Spyres Way #E, Modesto; (209) 622-9404; Open
daily 10-7pm
• Jim'z Deliveries, Roseville area; (916) 519-5328. Open 7 days: 10-6pm
• Charity Caregivers Of Tulare, 219 N "M" St. #106, Tulare, (559) 688-2001;
info@CCOFT.com
• Golden Valley Caregivers Delivery Service; (209) area code (Modesto/
Manteca); (209) 679-0245. Discount for seniors and cancer patients. (see ad p.35)
• High Flight Deliveries, Stockton/Tri-Valley area, (209) 346-4489; 10% discount
for cancer patients
continued from page 37
39 greenkind magazine VOL II, NO. 2 2007
• San Joaquin County Medi-Caregivers. Delivery service to Manteca/Tri-Valley;
(209) 456-0680
• NorCal Medical Cannabis Collective. Call for address & directions; (530) 354-1114
• Shasta Herbal Delivery. Call for address & directions; (530) 725-8281
• Stanislaus/Central Valley Co-op; Call for address & directions; (209) 818-2932
• Total Healthy Choice, 4213 McHenry Ave., #E, Modesto; (209) 521-2557. Open
daily 9-8pm
• Yuba County CBC (530) 749-7497
Sacramento Sacramento Sacramento Sacramento Sacramento
• Canna Care, 320 Harris Ave., #G, (916) 925-1199; M-Fri 11-8pm; Sat-Su 12-5pm
• End of the Rainbow deliveries, Sacramento; End-of-the-Rainbow@Hotmail.com
916-369-6000 or 916-698-6249
• The Greenhouse. Call for verification & directions. (916) 366-0420; daily 10-6pm
• MedSac916, Sacramento; (916) 806-2314; www.medsac916.com
• River City Patients' Center, 1512 El Camino Ave. #C, (916) 649-0114; M-Fri 10-
6pm; Sat 10-5pm; Sun 10-3pm
• Sam’s deliveries, Sacramento; (916) 717-4848. 10-6pm.
• Today’s Holistic Caregivers (Deliveries), Sacramento; (661) 946-6600;
caregivers420@yahoo.com
East Bay — Berkeley East Bay — Berkeley East Bay — Berkeley East Bay — Berkeley East Bay — Berkeley
• Berkeley Cannabis Coop (Shattuck Av btwn Prince & Woolsey): (510) 486-1025
• Berkeley Patients’ Group, 2747 San Pablo Ave, (510) 540-6013
www.BerkeleyPatientsGroup.com
Contra Costa County Contra Costa County Contra Costa County Contra Costa County Contra Costa County
• Delivery Alternative Northern Kalifornia, Mobile Compassion, (925) 335-
0420; cell (925) 586-7052; fax (925) 228-2321; one4kgb@yahoo.com
• Holistic Solutions, 2924 Hilltop Mall Rd., Richmond; (510) 243-7575
• Maricare, 127 Aspen Dr., Pacheco; (925) 459-2929. Open daily 11am-7pm
Alameda County — Hayward/ Tri-Valley Alameda County — Hayward/ Tri-Valley Alameda County — Hayward/ Tri-Valley Alameda County — Hayward/ Tri-Valley Alameda County — Hayward/ Tri-Valley
• Garden of Eden, 21227 Foothill Blvd., Hayward; (510) 881-2160; daily 9-9pm
• We Are Hemp, 913 East Lewelling Blvd., San Lorenzo; (510) 276-2628. Open Mon-
Sat 11-8pm
Oakland Oakland Oakland Oakland Oakland
• California Advocate Relief Exchange, 701 Broadway, Oakland
• Harborside Health Center, 1840 Embarcadero, Oakland, (510) 533-0146; fax
(510) 533-1048; Open daily 11-8pm (see ad p47)
• Purple Heart Center, 415 Fourth St., Oakland
• Official city ID cards & patient info available at the Coop Store, 1733 Broadway
(510) 832-5346; www.rxcbc.org.
• SR-71, 377-17th St. Oakland; (510) 251-0690. Open Mon-Fri 9-8pm; Sat 10-
8pm, Sun 10-6pm
San Francisco San Francisco San Francisco San Francisco San Francisco
• Alternative Herbal Health Services, 442 Haight St.
• Alternative Patient Caregivers, 953 Mission St. #108 (btwn 5th & 6th); (415)
618-0680; Mon-Sat 11:30-6:30pm
• Alternative Relief Co-Op, 1944 Ocean Ave., (415) 239-4766; Natural Herbs & Tea
Mon-Sat Noon-7pm; www.alternativerelief.org
• Bay Area Safe Alternatives, Inc., 1326 Grove St., (415) 409-1002; daily 11-9pm
• Bernal Heights Dispensary, 33 29th St., (415) 642-5895. Open daily 8am-8pm
• CannaMed Care, 1211 Sutter St (lower); (415) 885-8007
www.cannamedcare.com; Mon-Sat 1-9pm, Sun 1-6pm
• Divinity Tree, 958 Geary St., (415) 614-9194; M-Sat 10-8pm, Sun 11-6pm
• Emmalyn’s, 1597 Howard St. #A; (415) 861-1000. Open daily 10-9pm
• Grass Roots Clinic, 1077 Post St., (415) 346-4338; M-Sat 10-7pm; Sun 10-5pm
• Green Cross Delivery Service, (415) 648-4420; www.thegreencross.org (see
ad p29)
• Green Door, 843 Howard St., (415) 541-9590, www.GreenDoorInfo.com. Open
11-8pm everyday
• Good Fellows Smoke Shop, 473 Haight St. at Fillmore, (415) 255-1323; Open
daily 10-10pm
• Happy Days Herbal Relief North, 607 Divisadero St., (415) 359-9927; Mon-Thur
12-8pm; Fri-Sat 12-10pm; Sun 12-6pm
• Hope Net Co-Op, 223 Ninth St., (415) 863-4399. Open Mon-Sat 12pm-7pm
• Ketama, 14 Valencia St., (415) 706-2679, Mon-Fri 11-8pm, Sat-Sun 12-6pm
• Love Shack, 502 14th St. (at Guerrero); (415) 552-5121; Mon-Sat 12-7pm; Sun
12-5pm; www.lssf.com
• Mr. Nice Guy, 174 Valencia St., (415) 865-0990. Su-Th 11-9pm, Fri-Sat 11-11pm
• Nor Cal Herbal Relief Center, 1545 Ocean Ave., (415) 469-7700; Tue-Sat 10-7pm
• Patients Helping Patients Home Bike Delivery, (415) 240-7190
• The Patient Place, 4811 Geary Blvd, (415) 221-HEMP
• Re-Leaf Herbal Center, 2980 21st St., (415) 235-3307; Mon-Sat 12-8pm
• Sanctuary, 669 O’Farrell St., (415) 885-4420
• San Francisco ACT-UP, 1884 Market St., (415) 864-6686; www.actupsf.com
• SF Medical Cannabis Clinic #1, 122 Tenth St. (at Mission); (415) 626-4781; Open
Mon-Wed 11-7pm; Th-Sat 10-7pm; Sun 11-6pm.
• SF Medical Cannabis Clinic #2, 194 Church St.; 11- 7 M-F, 11-5 Sa-Su; (415)
626-4781
• San Francisco Patients’ Cooperative, 350 Divisadero St., (415) 552-8653;
www.sfprc.org
• Sweetleaf Collective, (415) 273-4663. For low-income AIDS, cancer patients
• Vapor Room, 609 Haight St., #A; Open Mon-Sat 11-9pm; Sun 12-8pm
• Valencia Street Caregivers, 208 Valencia St., (415) 621-0131; daily 8am-10pm
Marin — North Bay Marin — North Bay Marin — North Bay Marin — North Bay Marin — North Bay
• Marin Alliance for Medical MJ, Fairfax, (415) 256-9328; www.cbcmarin.com
• Pure Purple SF/North Bay deliveries, (415) 410-8298; open 9-9pm
South Bay & Peninsula South Bay & Peninsula South Bay & Peninsula South Bay & Peninsula South Bay & Peninsula
• 408 Delivery Service, San Jose/408 area deliveries, (408) 425-8641
• Auto-Med RX, W. Santa Clara Co. deliveries, (408) 509-4905; Mon-Sat 2-8pm
• Cal Medical MJ Patients Assoc., San Mateo County deliveries; (650) 520-627;
24 hours; www.myspace.com/ohiorob420
• Growth Unlimited, San Jose/Santa Cruz area deliveries; 1-888-MED-CANN
• Herbal Leaf, Santa Clara/San Jose area deliveries, (408) 854-1314
• Mobil Meds RX, E. Santa Clara Co. deliveries, (408) 661-2366
• My Green Heaven Ministry, Millbrae; www.mygreenheaven.org
• The Purple Buddah, South Bay deliveries, (408) 985-3662
• Purple High, San Jose/Peninsula deliveries, (408) 551-9227; open daily 9-9pm
• Seventh Heaven, Santa Clara County deliveries, (650) 669-6986
Santa Cruz Santa Cruz Santa Cruz Santa Cruz Santa Cruz
• Greenway Compassionate Relief, 140 Dubois St., #D, Santa Cruz, (831) 420-
1640; Mon-Fri 11-6pm, Sat 10-6pm (see ad p.3)
• Hemporium LLC, Delivery Service, Felton, (831) 295-9381; Mon-Fri 12-6pm (see
ad p.34)
• Santa Cruz Patients Collective, 115 Limeklin St., Santa Cruz, (831) 425-SCPC;
Mon-Fri 11-7pm, Sat 10-7pm; closed Sun
• MedEx Delivery Service, (831) 425-3444
• Wo/Men’s Alliance for Medical MJ; (831) 425-0580 (NOT a dispensary, but a
collective for seriously ill Santa Cruz patients in hospice care) www.wamm.org
Central Coast — Santa Barbara Central Coast — Santa Barbara Central Coast — Santa Barbara Central Coast — Santa Barbara Central Coast — Santa Barbara
• California Alliance for Patients. Call for details, (805) 890-1365
• Pacific Greens Inc., 816 N. Milpas St. Santa Barbara, (805) 963-0616; open 7
days 10-8pm
• Nature's Path Care, 414 E Haley St., Santa Barbara, (805) 331-4567; open 7
days 10-8pm
• Santa Barbara Care Center, 5814 Gaviota St., Goleta, (805) 845-4291; Mon-Sun
11-8pm
• Santa Barbara Collective, 234 E. Haley St., (805) 896-6326
• Santa Barbara Patients’ Group, 3114 State St., (805) 687-8988; Mon-Sat 11-5pm
• Helping Hands Wellness Center, 4141 State St., #F-4 Santa Barbara, (805) 692-
1419. Open 10:30-7pm daily
www.canorml.org
40 www.gkmagazine.net
Central Valley — Bakersfield South Central Valley — Bakersfield South Central Valley — Bakersfield South Central Valley — Bakersfield South Central Valley — Bakersfield South
(All Bakersfied dispensaires are closed voluntarily until further notice pursuant to
DEA raid on Nature’s Medicinal July 16, 2007)
Southern California Deliveries Southern California Deliveries Southern California Deliveries Southern California Deliveries Southern California Deliveries
• Natural Care For Wellness, VanNuys, Chico, Santa Barbara; (310) 975-5832
(see ad p.17)
• Los Angeles Cannabis Club, Free membership; Doctor Referrrals; Fast, Friendly
Delivery; www.LACannabisClub.org
• Pharmakeia (LA/Orange/Riverside/Santa Barbara), (323) 462-1516; M-Sa
10am - 5 pm; www.pharmakeia.org; info@pharmakeia.org
• California Compassionate Caregivers C3; LA (818) 565-9476; Orange (714) 618-
5221; Riverside (951) 520-6909; San Bernardino (951) 520-6909; San Diego
(951) 520-6909; Ventura (909) 708-7104
Los Angeles Area
Los Angeles Los Angeles Los Angeles Los Angeles Los Angeles
• Absolute Herbal Pain Solutions, 901 S. La Brea Ave., #3, Los Angeles, (323)
932-6263, fax (323) 932-6264; Mon-Sat 10-9pm, Sun 11-9pm
• Apothecary 420, 330 N. Western Ave., Los Angeles, (323) 836-0420; Mon-Sat
11-8pm, Sun 12-6pm
• Arts District Healing Center, 620 E. 1st St., Los Angeles, (213) 687-9981, fax
(213) 687-7056; Mon-Sat 11-10pm
• Beverly Hills One Stop, 292 S. La Cienega, #205, Beverly Hills, (866) GOT-
KUSH; Mon-Sat 12-8pm
• California Caregivers Alliance, 2815 W. Sunset Blvd., #201, Silverlake, (213) 353-
0100, fax (213) 353-0060; Mon-Sat 11-8pm, Sun 12-7pm; www.420kush.com
• California’s Finest Compassionate Co-Op, 8552 Venice Blvd., Los Angeles, (310)
838-5800; daily 12 noon-10pm
• California Medical Caregivers Assn., Los Angeles, 3430 Whittier Blvd., Los
Angeles, (323) 261-2009, fax (323) 261-2027
• Chinatown Patient Collective, 987 N. Broadway, Los Angeles, (213) 621-2977;
Mon-Sat 11-8pm, Sun 12-6pm
• ChroicPractor, 5751 W. Adams Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 934-7269, fax (323)
934-4709; open daily 10-10pm
• City Compassionate Caregivers, 606 E. 4th St., Los Angeles, (213) 617-0447,
fax (213) 617-0174; daily 10-8pm
• Downtown Medical Caregivers, 1301 S. Main St., Ste. 209, 2nd Flr., Los Angeles,
(213) 741-0901; Mon-Sat 10-30-8pm, Sun 11-7pm
• Downtown Patient Group (DTPG), 928 E. 12th St., Los Angeles, (213) 747-
3386; daily 11-8pm (see ad p.2)
• Downtown Wellness Center, 312 W. Olympic Blvd, Los Angeles (213) 746-3355,
fax (213) 746-3366; Tue-Sun 10-6pm
• Eden Therapy, 6757-1/2 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 463-8937; Mon-
Thur 10-10pm, Fri & Sat 10-8pm, Sun 12-7pm
• Hazelwood Patients Collective, 4619-1/2 York Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 258-4573,
fax (323) 255-9581; Mon-Fri 10-9pm, Sun 11-7pm
• The Healing Touch, 4430 Santa Monica Blvd., Ste. 105, Los Angeles, (323) 644-
7300; Mon-Sat 11-8pm, Sat 12-6pm
• Healthy Herbal Care, 313 N. Virgil Ave., Los Angeles, (323) 660-0386, fax (323)
660-0386; daily 10-8pm
• Healthy Herbal Care, 955 S. Vermont Ave., #T, Los Angeles, (213) 387-5203; Mon-
Fri 11-7pm, Sat 11-6pm
• Herbal Relief Caregivers, 6317 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 100, Los Angeles, (323) 951-
9992, fax (323) 951-9993; Mon-Sat 11-7pm
• Holistic Healing Alternatives, 1400 S. Olive St., Los Angeles, (213) 746-4477, fax
(213) 746-4477; Mon-Sat 11-7pm
• Inglewood Wellness Center. Call for details, (310) 674-4444
• A Kinder Understanding Sensitive Healing (KUSH) Collective, 1111 S. La Brea Ave.,
Los Angeles, (323) 938-5874
• La Brea Collective, 812 S. La Brea Ave., Los Angeles, (323) 939-3374; open daily
noon-12am
• La Brea Compassionate Caregivers, 735 N. La Brea Ave., Los Angeles, (323) 938-
0799; daily 11-9pm
• L.A. Caregivers, 3107 Beverly Blvd., Ste. 1, Los Angeles, (213) 383-5445
• LA Wonderland Caregivers, 4410 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 936-4410, fax
(888) 569-3565; daily noon-9pm
• Los Angeles Compasionate Act Care (Silverlake), 13th-2227 Sunset Blvd, (213)
484-1001; en español, (213) 272-9489
• Los Angeles Medical Caregivers, 5585 W. Manchester Ave., Los Angeles, (310)
410-9954
• Melrose Therapeutic Herbal Caregivers, 7266 Melrose Ave., Los Angeles; open daily
11am-8pm
• MedXnow.com, 441-1/2 E. 16th St., Los Angeles, (213) 291-8180, fax (213) 291-
7449; open daily 11-8pm
• The Natural Way of L.A., 5817 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 936-4300, fax
(323) 936-4307; Mon-Sat 10-8pm, Sun closed
• Organic Century Farmacy, 404 W. 7th St., #1405, Los Angeles, (213) 489-
0852, fax (213) 489-0862; M-Sat 11-7pm; organiccenturyfarmacy@yahoo.com
• The Relief Collective, Los Angeles. Call for address, (323) 938-9800
• Shiva's Gardens Caregivers, 2002 S. Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles, 310-841-
0550, fax (310) 841-0990; open daily 11am-8pm; also delivers
• Silverlake Caregivers Group, 240 N. Virgil Ave., Ste. 10, Los Angeles, (213) 487-
5442; Mon-Sat 10-8pm; closed Sun
• SL Caregivers, 3003 W. Olympic Blvd., Ste. 201, Los Angeles, (213) 487-1700,
fax (213) 487-1702; Mon-Sat 10-8pm; Sun 11-7pm; (see ad p.31)
• Wilshire Caregivers Group, 6300 Wilshire Blvd., #160, Los Angeles, (323) 655-
0303, fax (323) 655-0349; Mon-Sat 11-8pm
• United Medical Caregivers Clinic, 1248 S. Fairfax, Los Angeles (310) 358-
0212. Mon-Sat 10-8pm
• Universal Herbal Center, 3177 W. Cahuenga Blvd., Los Angeles
• Western Caregivers Group, 467 N. Western Ave., Los Angeles (323) 464-5571;
Open 7 days 10am-8pm
East Los Angeles East Los Angeles East Los Angeles East Los Angeles East Los Angeles
• Apothecary Collective, 5404 Alhambra Ave., Los Angeles, (323) 222-4420; open
daily 11am-8pm
• Compassionate Green Cross, 2219 Hacienda Blvd., Ste. 207, Hacienda Heights,
(626) 333-1515; Mon-Fri 11-9pm, Sat 9-9pm; closed Sun
• Conerstone Research Collective, 4623 Eagle Rock Blvd., Los Angeles, (323)
259-8933, fax (323) 259-8702; Mon-Sat 11-7pm
• Golden State Caregivers Assn., 5711 E. Beverly Blvd., East Los Angeles, (323)
888-0865, fax (323) 888-0424; open daily 11-8pm
• Green Earth Collective, 5045 York Blvd, Los Angeles, (323) 982-9042; Mon-Fri
9:30am-8pm, Sat 11-8pm
• Highland Park Patient Collective, 5716 N. Figueroa Ave., Highland Park, (626)
610-3145
• The Holistic Co-Op, 2607 E. 1st St., Los Angeles, (323) 540-6700; M-Fr 11-7pm
• Medical Caregivers Assn., 4966 Monte Vista St., (Highland Park), Los Angeles,
(323) 551-5874; Mon-Sat 11-7pm
• Northeast Collective Group, 4253 Eagle Rock Blvd., Ste. G, Los Angeles, (323)
255-2526, fax (323) 315-9337; Mon-Fri 10-8pm, Sat 12 noon-6pm
• So-Cal Consultants Dispensary, 486 W. Arrow Hwy., Covina, (626) 967-1300;
Mon-Fri 12-8pm, Sat & Sun 10-8pm
West Los Angeles West Los Angeles West Los Angeles West Los Angeles West Los Angeles
• Alternative Caregivers Christ. Alliance Discount Dispensary, 122 S. Lincoln Ave.
#204, Venice; (877) 219-3809. Open Mon-Sat 12-8pm
• California Caregivers' Association, 12107 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles,
(310) 826-3536; open 7 days 10-8pm
• Calm at the Beach Compassionate Caregivers of Malibu, 21355 Pacific Coast
Highway, Ste. #100, Malibu, (310) 317-6298
• Canna Care Relief, 1716 S. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles, (310) 473-4105, fax
(310) 473-4065; Mon-Thurs 10-7pm, Fri & Sat 11-8pm, closed Sun
• Culver City Collective, 10887 Venice Blvd., Unit A, Los Angeles, (310) 838-
5888, fax (310) 838-5889
AMERICANS FOR SAVE ACCESS
www.SafeAccessNow.org
41 greenkind magazine VOL II, NO. 2 2007
• Comfort Care Group, 1720 Westwood Blvd, Los Angeles, (310) 441-8315; open
7-8pm; www.comfortcaregroup.net
• Gourmet Green Room, 2000 Cotner Ave., Los Angeles, (310) 473-3509, fax
(310) 473-3537; Mon-Sat 10-8pm, Sun 12-6pm
• Ironworks Collective, 4100 Lincoln Blvd., Venice, (310) 305-8425
• Living Earth Wellness Center, 4207 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 936-5000
• Marina Caregivers, 3007 Washington Blvd., #225, Marina Del Rey, (310) 574-
4000. Open 4pm-11pm
• PCH Collective, 22333 Pacific Coast Hwy, #102A, Malibu, (310) 456-0666; M-
Sat 11-8pm, Sun 12-6pm; www.pchcollective.com
• PureLife Alternative Wellness Center, 1649 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles,
(310) 246-9345; Mon-Sat 12-9pm, Sun 12-8pm; www.purelifealternative.com
• Robertson Caregivers BeverlyWood, 2515 S. Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles, (310)
837-7279, fax (310) 837-7885; Mon-Sat 1-9pm, Sun 12-5pm
• West LA Collective Caregivers. Deliveries. Call for details. (310) 953-2475.
Hollywood Hollywood Hollywood Hollywood Hollywood
• City of Angels Wellness Center, 1600 N. La Brea, #118, Hollywood, (323) 463-
0225; Mon-Sat 11-9pm, Sun 12-9pm
• Earth Collective, 5115 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, (323) 668-7633; open 7 days
11am-11pm
• Hollywood Compassionate Collective, 1110 N. Western Ave., #204, Los Angeles,
(323) 467-7292. Mon-Fri 11-7; Sat 12-8pm; Sun 12-6pm;
www.hollywoodcollective. com
• Hollywood Home Remedies, 1607 N. El Centro Ave., Los Angeles; daily 12-11pm
• Kushmart, 1580 N. Gower St., Hollywood, (323) 464-6465. Open 10-10pm daily
• SouthWest CareGivers, 4961 W. Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 660-3776,
fax (323) 660-3769; Mon-Sat 11-7pm, Sun 1pm-7pm
• Sunset & Fountain Collective, 4343 W. Sunset Blvd., #10, Hollywood, (323)
660-6337; open daily 12 noon-7pm
North Hollywood North Hollywood North Hollywood North Hollywood North Hollywood
• California Compassionate Care Network, 4664 Lankershim Blvd., North
Hollywood, (818) 980-6337, fax (818) 755-4051
• Cahuenga Care Givers, 5656 Cahuenga Blvd., North Hollywood, (818) 985-
0012; Sun 12-5pm, Mon-Wed 12-8pm, Thurs-Sat 12-10pm
• Caregivers Medical Resource, 12458 Magnolia Blvd., Valley Village, (818) 980-
8420; Mon-Sat 10am-8pm
• CCW, North Hollywod, Malibu, Long Beach, (877) 229-4201; cc4wellness@
yahoo.com; www.cc4wellness.com
• The Collectively Organized Organic Products, 6748 Laurel Canyon Blvd, North
Hollywood, (818) 255-5303; Mon-Sat 10-8pm, Sun 11-7pm
• Galaxy Caregivers, 11428 Vanowen St., North Hollywood, (818) 977-BEST;
open daily 11am-8pm
• Happy Days Herbal Relief South, 5126 Vineland Ave., North Hollywood, (661)
492-4621, (661) 209-4773; Tu-Thu 11-7pm, Fri-Sat 11-10pm, closed Sun & Mon
• Patients Against Pain, 6240 Laurel Canyon Blvd., #B, North Hollywood, (818)
752-7274; www.PatientsAgainstPain.com
• North Hollywood Collective, 10929 Vanowen, #110, North Hollywood, (818)
763-4008
• TLMD, 12458 Magnolia Blvd, Valley Village, (818) 761-8973; Mon-Sat 9-9pm,
Sun 1pm-9pm
West Hollywood West Hollywood West Hollywood West Hollywood West Hollywood
• Medical Marijuana Farmacy, 7825 Santa Monica Blvd., West Hollywood,
(323) 550-8408; Mon-Sat10am-8pm; Sun 12 pm-7pm. (see ad p.47)
• West Hollywood Center for Compassionate Healing, 8921 Sunset Blvd. @ San
Vicente (park across street at Hustler); (310) 289-1369; open to midnight
• Zen Healing Collective, 8921 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood, (323) 656-6611;
Mon-Sat 11-8pm, Sun 11-7pm
West San Fernando Valley West San Fernando Valley West San Fernando Valley West San Fernando Valley West San Fernando Valley
• 2AMPharmacy.com, 8239 Canoga Ave., Canoga Park, (818) 264-0790; Hours:
11am-2am
• Alternative Herbal Caregivers, Inc., 22728 Ventura Blvd. Ste. A (2nd flr),
Woodland Hills, (818) 591-7070; Mon-Fri 10-6pm
• Buddha Lounge (Caregivers of Tarzan), 13650 Burbank Blvd., Sherman Oaks;
(818) 345-5477
• Compassionate Patient Resources of Tarzana, Inc., 19237-1/2 Ventura Blvd.,
Tarzana; Mon 12-9pm, Tue-Thu 12-8pm, Fri 12-9pm, Sat-Sun 12-6pm
• East Meets West Caregivers, 19973 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills, (818) 610-
8019; fax (818) 610-8623; Mon-Fri 11:30-8pm, Sat 12-5pm
• Freedom Caregivers, 6360 Van Nuys #171, Van Nuys, (866) 997-6155, (818)
997-6167, (818) 215-0623; daily 9-10pm; deliveries available
• The Healing Center, 10239 Topanga Canyon Blvd., Chatsworth, (818) 700-
2670, fax (818) 700-2680; Mon-Fri 11-8pm, Sat-Sun 12-6pm
• Herbal Pain-Relief Center, 21521 Sherman Way, Canoga Park, (818) 716-1860;
Mon-Sat 11-8pm; closed Sundays
• Herbal Solutions Collective, 22122 Sherman Way #206, Canoga Park, (818)
704-1300; Mon-Thurs 11-8pm, Fri-Sat 11-9pm, Sun 12-7pm
• HC Remedies, 19327 Ventura Blvd., Ste. A, Tarzana, (818) 758-9613, fax (818)
758-9625; Mon-Sat 11-8pm, Sun 12-7pm
• Holistic Alternatives, Inc., 21001 Sherman Way, Ste. 12, Canoga Park, (818)
703-1990, fax (818) 703-1187
• Platinum Club, 21220 Devonshire St. #203, Chatsworth, (818) 998-CLUB
(2582); Mon-Fri 10-8pm, Sat 11-6pm
• So. Cal. Co-Op, 19459 Ventura Blvd., Tarzana, Mon-Fri 10-10pm, Sat 10-10pm,
Sun 11-8pm
• Topanga Caregivers, 6457 Topanga Cyn. Blvd., Woodland Hills, (818) 716-
9200; Mon-Sat 11-8pm
• Total Wellness Caregivers, 16161 Ventura Blvd, Ste. 105, Encino, (818) 205-
9042; Mon-Fri 10-8pm, Sat-Sun 11-7pm
• Wellness Caregivers of Tarzana, 18663 Ventura Blvd., Ste. 230, Tarzana, (818)
300-0035; Mon-Sat 11-8pm
• Westside Caregivers Club, 22148 Ventura Blvd., Ste. A, Woodland Hills, (818)
887-2106; daily 12pm-10pm
• West Valley Caregivers, 23067 Ventura Blvd., #102, Woodland Hills, (818) 591-
5899; Mon-Sun 10am-10pm
• West Valley Co-Op, 19709 Ventura Blvd., #B, Woodland Hills, (818) 713-0258
• West Valley Patients Group, 23043 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills, Mon-Thurs &
Sat 11-8pm, Fri 11-9pm, Sun 12-7pm
San Fernando Valley San Fernando Valley San Fernando Valley San Fernando Valley San Fernando Valley
• 101 Emerald Triangle Ministry, 13321 Ventura Blvd., Sherman Oaks, (818) 386-
2998; Mon-Sat 12-8pm, Sun 12-7pm
• Balboa CareGivers, 16900 Sherman Way, #6, Van Nuys, (818) 902-0201; Mon-
Sat 11-8pm, Sun 11-5pm
• Caregivers Earth Ordinance, 17050 Chatsworth St., #243, Granada Hills, (818)
530-2614, fax (818) 530-2615; Mon-Sat 11-8pm, Sun 12-6pm
• Foothill Wellness Center, 7132 Foothill Blvd., Tujunga, (818) 352-3388
• Golden State Collective, 10369 Balboa Blvd., Granada Hills, (818) 368-8180
• Granada Hills Discount Farmacy, 10705 Balboa Blvd., Granada Hills, (818) 832-
8378; Mon-Fri 10-9pm, Sat-Sun 11-8pm
• The Green House, 5156 Sepulveda Blvd. (upstairs), Sherman Oaks, (818) 386-1343
• Greenlight Discount Pharmacy, 15507 Cobalt St., #4, Sylmar; (818) 256-1964;
Mon-Sat 11-7pm, Sun optional, please call ahead
• Kind 4 Less, 16157 San Fernando Mission Blvd., #8, Granada Hills, (818) 831-
3178, fax (818) 831-3178; Mon-Sat 11-8pm, Sun 12-7pm
• Medical Marijuana Relief Clinic, 14303 Ventura Blvd., Sherman Oaks, (818) 783-
3888; Mon-Thurs 11-8pm, Fri 11-9pm, Sat 11-8pm, Sun 12-7pm
• My Alternative Collective Care, 13173 Van Nuys Blvd., Pacoima, (818) 896-2616;
Mon-Sat 11-7pm; closed Sunday
• North Valley Discount Caregivers, 15600 Devonshire, #203, Granada Hills, (818)
920-3110
• Perennial Holistic Wellness Center, 14542 Ventura Blvd., Ste. 201, Sherman Oaks,
(818) 728-4883, fax (818) 728-4854; Mon-Sun 12pm-8pm
MP
Visit us at www.mpp.org
887-JOIN-MPP
(564-6677)
You can help.
P
42 www.gkmagazine.net
• Santa Clarita MCE. Delivery service to all of Southern California; (818) 471-6779;
Open 7 days 11-8pm
• SoCalCoop.com. Delivery service to all of Southern California areas. Call for
details; (818) 703-1769, fax (818) 703-6234
• Sun Valley Caregiver’s, 11000 Randall St., #E, Sun Valley, (818) 504-2661, fax
(818) 504-2557; Mon-Sat 11-7pm
• Tujunga Hills Caregivers, Inc., 6920 Foothill Blvd., Tujunga, (818) 352-9400; Mon-
Wed, Sat 12pm-8pm; Thurs-Fri 11-9pm
Northridge & Reseda Northridge & Reseda Northridge & Reseda Northridge & Reseda Northridge & Reseda
• 420 For the People, 15300 Devonshire St., Ste. 11, Mission Hills, (800) PUSH-
420, (818) 891-0800; open daily 12pm-8pm
• After Care, 18729 Napa St., Northridge, (818) 357-2222; Mon-Sat 11-8pm
• CannaMed of Northridge, 9349 Melvin Ave., Ste. 9, Northridge, (818) 882-4849;
Mon-Sat 10-7pm
• Medical Caregivers Clinic, 6657 Reseda Blvd., #202, Reseda, (818) 776-9586;
open 7 days 11-8pm
• Mission Hills Patients Collective, 9911 Sepulveda Blvd., Mission Hills, (818)
894-5100, fax (818) 894-5117; open daily 11-8pm
• Nature’s Natural Collective Care, 6951 Reseda Blvd., Reseda, (818) 344-1102,
fax (818) 344-6273; Mon-Sat 10-9pm, Sun 11-7pm
• Northridge Healing Center, 8349 Reseda Blvd. Ste. D, Northridge, (818) 701-
6666; Mon-Sat 11-8pm; closed Sundays
• Reseda Discount Caregivers, 6102 Reseda Blvd., Tarzana, (818) 757-0434; open
daily 10am-9pm
• San Fernando Valley Patients Group, 8805 Reseda Boulevard, Northridge, (818)
734-2778; open daily 11-9pm
• Today’s Health Care, Inc., 18118 Parthenia S., Northridge, (818) 700-2842; fax
(818) 709-2842; open daily 11-7pm
• Valley Health Center, 19015 Parthenia St., Northridge, (818) 772-1096
Van Nuys Van Nuys Van Nuys Van Nuys Van Nuys
• California’s Choice, 6722 White Oak Ave., Van Nuys, (818) 881-1489, fax (818)
881-6916; open 7 days 11am-7pm
• California Collective Center, 14532 Friar St., Ste. A, Van Nuys, (818) 781-8865;
Mon-Sun 11-7pm
• Delta-9 Compassionate Caregivers, 7648 Van Nuys Blvd., Van Nuys, (818) 997-
1003; open daily 11am-7pm
• Eastwood Patients Group, 7522 Valjean Ave., Van Nuys, (818) 997-1244; Mon-
Sat 11-8pm, Sun 12-8pm
• Green Dragon, 7423 Van Nuys Blvd, Unit C, Van Nuys, (818) 442-0054; open 7
days 10am-8pm
• The Herbal Caregivers, 13550 Roscoe Blvd., #7, Panorama City, (818) 780-
1010, fax (818) 780-2192; Sun-Thur 10am-10pm, Fri & Sat 10am-12pm
• The Karma Collective, 16115 Vanowen St., Van Nuys, (818) 373-7733, fax
(818) 373-7799; open daily 12 noon-10pm
• Kind Meds, 14649 Victory Blvd., #24., Van Nuys, (818) 908-9580; Mon-Sat 11-
7pm, Sun by appt.; www.kindmeds.com
• Kush Corner, 15345-1/2 Parthenia St., North Hills, (818) 830-0409; open 7 days
10am-8pm
• Madison’s Garden, 8741 Van Nuys Ave., Rm. 201, Panorama City, (818) 893-
9792, fax (818) 893-2799; Mon-Sat 11am-7pm
• Medi Mar Collective, 16218 Ventura Blvd., #4, Encino, (818) 501-6334, fax (18)
501-6336, Mon-Sat 10-8pm, Sun 11-7pm
• Safe Harbor Patients Collective, 5953 Hazeltine Ave., Ste. B (back of medical
center), Van Nuys, (818) 902-0015, fax (818) 902-0015
• Trichome Healing Caregivers, 7100 Van Nuys Blvd., #204, Van Nuys, (818) 373-
5000. Open 10-8 daily; disabled access
• Valley Health Caregivers Center, 7232 Van Nuys Blvd., Ste. 204, Van Nuys,
(818) 908-0198; Mon-Sat 11-7pm
• Valley Herbal Center, Inc., 13609 Victory Blvd, #244, Van Nuys, (818) 442-
0171, fax (818) 442-0159; daily 9am-9pm
• Valley Patients, 8953 Woodman Ave. #101, Arieta, (818) 332-0736; daily 9-8pm
Studio City Studio City Studio City Studio City Studio City
• Buds & Roses Collective, Inc., 13235 Ventura Blvd., Studio City, (818) 907-
8852; Mon-Sat 10am-10pm
• Compassionate Caregivers of Studio City, 11314 Ventura Blvd., Studio City,
(818) 506-7207
• Herbal Love Caregivers on the Blvd., 3715 Cahuenga Blvd, Studio City, (818)
980-4420; open 7 days 11-7pm
• Holistic Care of Studio City; call for directions, (818) 985-5551
To be added to the Directory or to update entry,
contact Greenkind Magazine
(510) 728-4772 or
email: greenkind@earthlink.net
CANNABIS
PUZZLE
HINTS
FROM
PAGE 31
Over, Down, Direction
e.g., 3 over, 1 down, east
BUD(1,7,SE)
CANNABIS(8,15,NW)
DOOBIE(9,15,E)
DOPE(14,13,N)
GANJA(4,6,S)
GRASS(1,11,SE)
HASH(10,8,NE)
HERB(4,13,NW)
JOINT(11,6,SW)
MARIJUANA(15,9,W)
POT(8,10,E)
REEFER(8,6,N)
SINSEMILLA(14,1,SW)
SPLIFF(10,6,NE)
WEED(4,5,W)
• A Kush Valley Collective, 11626 Ventura Blvd., Studio City, (818) 985-4274;
open daily 10-10pm
• Studio City Caregivers, 3625 Cahuenga Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 850-1847, fax
(323) 850-1848; Mon-Sat 11:30-9pm, Sun by appt.
• Toluca Lake Collective, 10628 Riverside Dr., Unit 1, Toluca Lake, (818) 752-
8420; open daily 10-9pm
• Wellness Caregivers of Studio City, 10628 Ventura Blvd., Studio City, (818)
308-9598; open 7 days 11-8pm
• Wellness Earth Energy Dispensary, 12021-1/2 Ventura Blvd., Studio City, (818)
980-2266
Long Beach and South Bay Long Beach and South Bay Long Beach and South Bay Long Beach and South Bay Long Beach and South Bay
• 420 Highway Pharmacy, 18710 S. Normandie Ave., #D, Los Angeles, (310)
808-0420, 10:30-7:30pm; collective420@yahoo.com (see ad p.11)
• All Care Emporium, 11421 E. Carson St., Ste. G, Lakewood, (562) 860-4141;
Mon-Sat 11-7pm
• Herbal Solutions Compassionate Caregivers, 5746 E. 2nd St., Long Beach, (562)
434-5075, fax (562) 439-8295
• Long Beach Compassionate Cooperative, 342 E. 4th St., Long Beach; (562)
435-9395, fax (562) 435-9313; Mon-Sat 11-8pm, Sun 11-6pm. Doctor referrals.
(see ad p.27)
• Long Beach Quality Discount Caregivers, 1150 San Antonio Dr., Long Beach,
(562) 988-8889; daily 11-8pm
Orange — San Bernardino — Riverside Orange — San Bernardino — Riverside Orange — San Bernardino — Riverside Orange — San Bernardino — Riverside Orange — San Bernardino — Riverside
• California Caregiver’s Assn. Riverside, 7201 Arlington Ave., #B, Riverside, (951)
785-0670, fax (951) 785-0673; daily 11-8pm; cca_riverside@yahoo.com
• CCCOC, delivery to So. Orange Co./No. San Diego Co., (714) 658-3502
• Herb Depot. Delivery to Orange County, (714) 925-3026; www.herb-depot.com
• Laguna Beach Collective, 220 Park Ave., Ste. 1, Laguna Beach, (949) 400-
9345; Mon-Fri 11-7pm, Sat-Sun 12-5pm
• Orange County Patient Group, 2315 E. 17th St., Ste. 4, Santa Ana, (714) 547-
2525, fax (714) 547-2526; Mon-Fri 10-8pm, Sat & Sun 11-7pm
• Peaceful Primary Caregivers. Deliveries & retail; call for details, (949) 395-9588
• So. Cal Discount Co-Op (Delivery), Laguna Beach, (949) 395-8129; daily 10-7pm
• Therapeutic Health Care (Deliveries); call for details, (949) 916-7176
Visit Us Online at:
www.gkmagazine.net
43 greenkind magazine VOL II, NO. 2 2007
44 www.gkmagazine.net
A must for every medicine chest —
Old School, Downtown Brown, Dirt
. . . still effective medicine
Old School
Old School
Ready to clean Final product, fine Stem removed, coarse
P
h
o
t
o
s
:

L
e
e

S
a
n
c
h
e
z
by Staff
T
T
ucked at the far end of the dispensary case, a
baggie or two sit almost forgotten by patients
and dispensary staff. Usually, the dried out, bent-
over buds are full of seeds and stems, and the
medicine looks, tastes and smells more like soil
than her more illustrious offspring — the Purples, Kushs,
Widows and Diesels. Old School is the most humble of medi-
cal cannabis, and perhaps the most overlooked and under-
rated medicine available.
These days, this mainstay strain of medical cannabis
is out of favor in lieu of her seemingly more highly evolved,
pretty, sweet-smelling “top-shelf” grandchildren; but pay no
attention to this elitism. For pain relief, including the easing
of joint and back pain, headache, sleeplessness, and loss of
appetite, Old School is still valuable and effective medicine.
They say what makes Kush desirable is consistent po-
tency which seems to remain effective with repeated use.
This “Kush-like” characteristic is present in the outdoor
strains. True, it takes time to clean the stems and seeds
from the leaf, but the result is worth the trouble when look-
ing for reliable, affordable pain relief. Also, it seems to work
well for sleeplessness or waking after only a few hours of
sleep.
The taste is more primitive than the sweeter, more
popular strains. It is closer to the earth with a little bite and
slight harshness. It is the plant of our forefathers and moth-
ers, so it translates extremely well to extraction and infu-
sion for food, teas, and soups. It also makes great salves,
balms and poultices. The recipes of indigenous peoples which
are traditionally handed from one generation to the next are
intended for the old school outdoor strains.
Old School is so named since it was the principle type
of marijuana available in the late 1960s and early ’70s when
the healing qualities of cannabis became more widely ap-
preciated. Medicine had names like Acapulco Gold, Colom-
bian, Humboldt. Plants varied in color from an Army-drab
green to gold and brown. The strain was referred to by loca-
tion of origin which in-turn became its name. At the time,
cannabis was pretty much grown outdoors in remote rural
areas with the soil, weather and growing conditions dictat-
ing the color, taste and potency of the plant. From these
humble beginnings evolved the growing techniques produc-
ing the beautiful strains we know today.
The dried-bent, seedy buds require cleaning before the
medicine can be used. Back in the day, the cleaning process
was part of obtaining medicine. It became somewhat ritual-
ized since many had a favorite cleaning box and method.
Some cleaned as needed while others cleaned medication
upon arrival then stored for use in a tightly sealed container.
Most patients had a method of cleaning involving a shoe or
cigar box and a stiff yet flexible card such as a playing card
or a paper matchbook cover.
The medicine is placed in the box using the fingers to
crumble and loosen the seeds and stems from the green.
The box is tilted-back slightly so the medicine runs along
the back of the box.
Using the card, the plant matter is lifted slightly and
the heavier seeds and stems fall to the bottom of the box.
With a slight tilt of the box forward, the seeds and stems
roll to the front of the box and can easily be removed. The
process is repeated until only the cleaned leaf remains in the
box. Cleaning was as much a part of the medicating process
as was rolling a joint or filling a pipe. It is a forgotten ritual,
but it was common for patients to watch TV, listen to mu-
sic, talk to friends and clean their precious medicine.
Old School is good to have on hand. It is compara-
tively inexpensive since few want to go through the clean-
ing process. A little effort and time spent with this depend-
able strain will render a very pleasant, effective and long-
lasting medicating experience.
45 greenkind magazine VOL II, NO. 2 2007
www.skunkmagazine.com
info@skunkmagazine.com
frosty white THC* crystals. The pungent smell tickles the senses.
Patients and caregivers interested in cultivating Trainwreck
will produce a quality medicine that is prime for harvest within 6
to 7 weeks, however, with sativa it is best to wait a bit longer for
the crystals to mature. Patient growers in the San Francisco Bay
Area are extremely fortunate because Trainwreck babies are cur-
rently readily available at many of the local co-ops.
Trainwreck is advantageous for patients requiring medica-
tion, yet need to remain alert and attentive. It is also recommended
for the chronically ill and those with long-term disabilities since
this strain, over most others, is wonderful for depression.
*Abbreviation: THC tetrahydrocannabinol — [te-truh-hahy-druh-
kuh-nab-uh-nawl, -nol], noun. Pharmacology. A compound,
C21H30O2, that is the physiologically active component in can-
nabis preparations (marijuana, hashish, etc.) derived from the In-
dian hemp plant or produced synthetically.
Origin: 1965–70; tetra- + hydro-2 + cannabinol. Dictionary.com
Unabridged (v 1.1) Based on the Random House Unabridged Dic-
tionary, ©Random House, Inc. 2006.
II
n the deep woods of Humboldt County California, a superior
plant was masterminded by combining the genetics of Thai
and Afghani cannabis. The strong history behind these two out-
standing strains has made a sativa, namely Trainwreck, one of the
finest and most in-demand strains available for medical cannabis
patients.
All medical cannabis strains can be divided in to three pri-
mary categories:
(1) Indica, body high
(2) Sativa, head high
(3) Hybrid cross of indica and sativa in which the strain
becomes either indica or sativa dominate.
Indicas such as Grandaddy Purple and Romulan are meant to
relax mind and body. These strains are recommended to be in-
gested later in the day while Trainwreck is the opposite. Medicat-
ing with Trainwreck gives a feeling of being uplifted and ener-
gized as it stimulates the brain and creates an overall sense of well-
being. With a mild, lemony taste, the Trainwreck flowers are char-
acterized by dense, tight and small buds that are light green in
color with a few orange hairs while the buds are sprinkled with
46 www.gkmagazine.net
Alpha-Stim SCS — Stress Control System
by Marcella Sanchez
Federally Funded Research Finally Pays Off
Cannabis Acknowledged as Viable Medication
rates between cannabis smokers, tobacco smokers, and non smok-
ers. Tobacco smokers tipped the scales heads over with the high-
est rates of lung and other cancers. Patients that only smoked can-
nabis had no significant increase in the risk of inclusive cancer.
Cannabis smokers had a lower rate compared to the nonsmokers
as well, however, the results were pretty close.
Only now the larger organizations, The Leukemia and
Lymphoma Society, and ARRP are publicly endorsing can-
nabis as a helpful medication and as a support medica-
tion for cancer and other patients. AIDS research doc-
tors recognized cannabis a number of years ago as they
witnessed patients respond positively with the use of
cannabis in countering the effects of “wasting” or the
inability to eat resulting in tremendous weight loss.
Cannabis has made its unrefutable mark in the treat-
ment of AIDS.
T
he use of cannabis by humans dates back to 3000 BC when
farmers in Central Asia and Northern India grew mas-sive
crops of eco-friendly ganja for the people to use as rope,
cloth, paper, and medicine. In 1938, an article was published in
Popular Mechanics Magazine advocating hemp for its astounding
economical value to our country. What slipped by the
magazine’s editors in 1938 was that their “billion dol-
lar crop” had been outlawed by the Marijuana Tax
Stamp in 1937.* Today, Cannabis is legal for doctors to
recommend to their patients in 12 North American states.
California is the first state to have a working patient
card program and functional medical cannabis dispens-
ing system.
The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, the sec-
ond largest cancer charity in the U.S. is standing
up for patients that are using cannabis under the
recommendation of their doctor. The LLS has
taken a formal affirmative policy position which
is at odds with federal protocol that includes the
prosecution and incarceration of very sick people.
In 1994, two years before California passed Prop. 215, fed-
eral researchers in the U.S. administered tremendous amounts of
THC** to mice and rats looking for any signs of toxicity, none found,
these little vermin lived longer and developed fewer cancers than
the poor little rodents that didn’t get a healthy dose of THC**
America’s own Kaiser-Permanente researchers devoted a
decade to following 65,000 patients and their avoidance or pro-
pensity in cancer development. In the end, they compared cancer
W
ant to quit smoking tobacco, and the patch isn’t working or you are
doing a great job of not smoking only to find the anxiety level escalates?
Are you experiencing depression and/or insomnia? Here is a handy little
product that as easy to use, produces immediate results, is mobile, silent and
reduces anxiety without drugs or herbs of any type. No ingestion required.
The Alpha-Stim SCS is a hand-held cranial electro therapy stimulator now
available for personal use. This simple little contraption is producing great results
for many. In as little as 20 minutes a day patients are finding relief by applying a
bit of gel and tiny clips to the earlobes. With a one button operation the device
sends tiny electric pulses to the earlobes that relieves the symptoms of stress
including anxiety, depression and insomnia within minutes.
Clearly, the premise that pharmaceuticals are the only treatment for stress
related disorders is untrue. The side effects of most drugs are frequently more
debilitating than the disorder leaving patients with few options for relief. Now as
we move into the 21
st
century, alternatives are being reexamined that were dis-
credited by the pharmaceuticals as hoaxes. This reasoning left biophysics in the
dust the early part of the 20
th
century.
We have all seen movies, usually comedies, depicting crazy looking de-
vices with wires and strange attachments being used in relation to pain relief, hair
growth and other common maladies. The operators of the devices were charac-
terized as “mad scientists” or as charlatans. Now as we realize that what really
happened during the late 19
th
and early 20
th
centuries was more about cornering
the market than about what methods work best. Sometimes a pill is the perfect
PRODUCT REVIEW by Staff
solution, and sometimes it is not. All alternatives to prescription drugs have been
touted as ruses or equated with a “snake oil” mentality. If it isn’t a prescribed
drug the treatment is debauched and made to seem foolish.
Now, however, the military is prescribing the Alpha-Stim SCS to returning
Iraq Veterans as a treatment for posttraumatic stress syndrome. Naturally, all
products reviewed are tested by our staff. I used the Alpha-Stim SCS the first
time after driving in Los Angeles traffic all day. The effects were immediately
noticeable. I felt a tiny pulse in my earlobes then a calming sensation that lasted
far longer than the 5 minutes the device was attached to my ears. It was exciting
to realize that the stress of the freeways and busy downtown streets was melt-
ing away. I returned to my car refreshed and calm, ready to conquer the afternoon
commute traffic.
This little device is well worth investigation especially for those with
high anxiety levels and sleepless nights. By prescription only. For more informa-
tion visit Dr. Eidelman, 1654 N. Cahuenga Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 463-3295;
www.dreidelman.com.
Federal Mouse
*NEW BILLION-DOLLAR CROP, Popular Mechanics, Feb., 1938
**THC, n. Tetrahydrocannabinol; a compound that is obtained from cannabis or is made syn-
thetically; it is the primary intoxicant in marijuana and hashish. The American Heritage¨ Stedman’s
Medical Dictionary. Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton
Mifflin Company.
Munson, AE et al. Antineoplastic Activity of Cannabinoids. Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
Sept. 1975. p. 597-602.
NTP Technical Report On The Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of 1-Trans- Delta-9-Tetrahydro-
cannabinol, CAS No. 1972-08-3, In F344/N Rats and B6C3F Mice, Gavage Studies. See also, Medical
Marijuana: Unpublished federal study found THC-treated rats lived longer, had less cancer, AIDS Treat-
ment News, no. 263, Jan. 17, 1997.
Sidney, S. et al. Marijuana Use and Cancer Incidence (California, United States). Cancer Causes and
Control. Vol. 8. Sept. 1997, p. 722-728.
Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Endorses Medical Marijuana. For more information visit www.
MarijuanaPolicy.org
47 greenkind magazine VOL II, NO. 2 2007
(323) 848-7981
Great Selection
of Flowers,
Concentrates,
Edibles &
Clones
11 am to 8 pm
7 days/week
Many Organics
Available.
Free Holistic
Health Services.
“Free Parking”
1840 Embarcadero,
Oakland
#12 -