September/October 2010

variations on the photographic arts
Bruce Barnbaum
Working with Abstraction
in Photography
David Vestal
Dover’s History Part 1
Dan Burkholder
iPhone Meets iPad
EDDA TAYLOR
Explorations of Light
TERRI WARPINSKI
Landscape’s Narrative
THOMAS SCHIFF
360˚ Panorama
Tech:
Phototrap Captures
CS5 Brushes
Flash Power
Julieanne Kost
Interview with
www.phototechmag.com
Cont ents | Zoom i n | Zoom out Search I ssue | Next Page For navi gat i on i nst ruct i ons pl ease cl i ck here
Cont ents | Zoom i n | Zoom out Search I ssue | Next Page For navi gat i on i nst ruct i ons pl ease cl i ck here
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
____________
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
Contents
Portfolios
Explorations of Light
Elegant portraits using ambient light
Edda Taylor
Vanishing Points–
Landscape’s Narrative
Photographs as unique objects
created in the darkroom and on
the drawing board
Terri Warpinksi
360˚ Panorama
Photographing architecture from
above and within
Thomas Schiff
15
25
40
Commentary
Working with Abstraction
in Photography
Defining and capturing abstract
photographic images
Bruce Barnbaum
5
Perspectives
Dover’s History Trip–Part 1
Insights into great photographs in
history, starting with Daguerre
David Vestal
19
Feature
An Interview with
Julieanne Kost
Personal works by an
Adobe Evangelist
Paul Schranz
29
pg. 25
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
Sept./Oct. 2010 Vol. 31 No. 5
Formerly PHOTO Techniques Magazine
Publisher S. Tinsley Preston III
Editor Paul R. Schranz
Creative Director Lisa Cordova
Copy Editor Bonnie Schranz
Production Roberta Knight
Marketing Manager Janice Gordon
Online Content Coordinator Bree Lamb
Project Manager Norma Vechot
Newstand Distribution
Curtis Circulation Company
730 River Road, New Milford, NJ 07646-3048
201-634-7400 Fax: 201-634-7499
Retail Distribution
6600 Touhy Ave., Niles, IL 60714-4516
847-647-2900
Advertising Sales Manager
Ashley Gallegos
agallegos@phototechmag.com
List Rental
Rickard List Marketing
Gerald Petrocelli
631-249-8710 x 118
Subscription Service
NCS Fulfillment Inc.
P.O. Box 567, Selmer, TN 38375
Subscriptions:
U.S. - 1 Yr/$29.99; 2 Yr/$49.99; 3 Yr/$69.99
For new subscriptions, renewals or change
of address call 866-295-2900 or email at
circulation@phototechmag.com.
Reader Services
Books, back issues, and collector prints may
be ordered with VISA, Mastercard, or
American Express by calling 866-295-2900
Mon-Fri. 8 am-4 pm Central Time or email
circulation@phototechmag.com.
See www.phototechmag.com for guidelines,
instructions and restrictions for editorial
submissions to photo technique.
Mention of any photographic formula/ product does
not constitute endorsement by photo technique.
photo technique (ISSN 1083-9070) is published
bimonthly by Preston Publications, Div. Preston
Industries, Inc., 6600 W. Touhy Ave., Niles, IL
60714-4516. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago,
IL and additional mailing offices. Copyright 2010;
reproduction without permission strictly prohibited.
Canadian Publications Mail Agreement #40030346
Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses to: Station
A, P.O. Box 54, Windsor, ON N9A 6J5 email:
jgordon@prestonpub.com.
PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. by St. Croix Press Inc.
EDITOR’S NOTE:
In this issue, we illuminate some of the best work created in both
historical and cutting-edge photographic technology.
We have everything from David Vestal’s insight into the important
photographs in history to Dan Burkholder’s advice about editing
photographs on the iPad.
We have portfolios that include Thomas Schiff’s 360-degree
panoramas, Edda Taylor’s location portraits, and Terri Warpinski’s
altered landscape silver prints. We complete the portfolios with an
interview with Adobe Evangelist Julieanne Kost that goes beyond
her recognized technical expertise to reveal the intellect and
emotion behind her amazing photo-collage creations.
You’ll find incredible technical articles on the power of portable
flash with John Siskin, new CS5 Brush Applications with Dan
Moughamian, and Phototrap capture of animal images in an
outdoor studio with Scott Linstead. Bruce Barnbaum also
comments about seeing abstractly and putting your own visual
slant on real objects in front of your lens.
Once again, we celebrate the fullness of the photographic
experience in all its genres and processes, which brings me to
important news.
In the next issue, photo technique magazine will open submissions
for an upcoming juried exhibition of works by 24 of our readers
that help us define the very essence of The Photographic Experience.
Every process, from non-silver through silver-based to digital
collage, is open for submission to this exhibition.
We will be looking for photographically based images that define
the highest aesthetic of the creative experience combined with
the new expanded and inclusive definition of the medium. The
exhibition will be displayed at the Preston Contemporary Art
Center, a 13,200 square foot art complex in Mesilla, NM.
A portion of the exhibition will be published in an upcoming issue
of photo technique and the remainder will be featured online. Some
entries will also be awarded prizes that I think you will find are
worthy of this juried show.
Look in late October for the ads for The Photographic Experience in
the Nov/Dec issue of photo technique and online announcements
with submission details and deadlines.
Paul Schranz, Editor
photo technique magazine
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
_________________
__________________
__________________
______________
______________
Tech
Adobe Photoshop CS5:
Photo Painting with the Mixer Brush
and Bristle Tips
Dan Moughamian
Strobe Power
Best methods for using strobe units
John Siskin
iPhone Meets iPad
Apple’s Two Newest Gizmos Unite
to Make Photography Easy and Fun
Partners in new technology
Dan Burkholder
Tripwire Photography and
the Outdoor Studio
A new device for image capture in the wild
Scott Linstead
8
11
35
44
Innovations
Sony NEX-5 w/18-55mm Lens
An Instant Panorama Camera
Pro applications at an amateur
camera price
23
Archival Methods
Quality portfolios at a great value
F-Stop Tilopa Backpack
A Unique and Versatile System
Handy portable equipment storage
24
pg. 23
pg. 24
pg. 40
pg. 44
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
My entry into photography came via hiking and
backpacking in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The
monstrous river canyons with crashing waterfalls
and cascades below 14,000' granite summits and
forests of enormous sugar pines, themselves dwar-
fed by giant sequoia trees, were so exciting to me
that I was inspired to “capture them” on film. That
was in the mid-1960s. Today my attitude has com-
pletely changed.
First, I don’t think you can “capture” anything. I
think you can document where you’ve been and
what you’ve seen. If you’re really serious about
things, you can go beyond mere documentation and
try to convey your feelings about what you’ve seen.
But how can you possibly “capture” a 3,000' granite
cliff on the 16" side of a “large” 16x20"photograph?
You simply can’t. Even Ansel Adams didn’t
“capture” Half Dome or Bridalveil Fall in
Yosemite. What he did, however, was convey the
essence of those monumental forms so well that
some people who have seen his photographs first,
and then go to Yosemite to see the real thing,
sometimes walk away disappointed. That’s a mon-
umental achievement on Adams’ part and an
exceptional demonstration of the power of photo-
graphy when it’s done really, really well.
My recognition of the futility of trying to “capture”
things via photography came slowly, over many
years. But along with that realization came a wider
appreciation of the possibilities of photography
Bruce Barnbaum
Working with
Abstraction
in Photography
Ghosts and Masks
Above
as a personally interpretive and expressive med-
ium. And with that came an appreciation of a
far wider set of things that I was attracted to photo-
graph: architectural subjects, the slit canyons of
Arizona and Utah and even pure abstracts in their
own right.
What do I mean by “abstract”? That term, in fact,
is difficult to define. When I consider abstraction, I
start with a general dictionary definition, which says
that it is something that is not concrete, perhaps not
easy to understand, not representational and in the
realm of art may be characterized by design and
form. That’s a good start. To me, it is also something
that is not easily recognizable upon first viewing.
The mountains, forests, canyons and rivers that
brought me into photography did not fall into the
category of abstraction. But my interests gradually
phototechmag.com 5
WORKING WITH ABSTRACTION IN PHOTOGRAPHY BRUCE BARNBAUM
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
The Crystal Ball
Dream Distortions
Crystalline Light-
Black Star
Above Left
Above Middle
Above Right
expanded to encompass abstraction. It is now a
major part of my photography.
Though I was already moving in that direction, the
most dramatic transition in my thinking came in
two stages. The first was in October, 1979 when
John Sexton, Ray McSavaney and I, as workshop
co-instructors, took students to Brett Weston’s
home, where he showed us a number of his images,
all of which were exceptional, most of which were
amazingly abstract. It fully opened the door of ab-
straction to me, a door that I had been knocking
on, but now Weston’s work told me that I could
unhesitatingly go through that door.
Five months later I walked into Antelope Canyon.
Instantly and instinctively I saw the lines and
forms as forces in nature. (See portfolio in photo
technique, Jan/Feb 2010). I didn’t look upon it as a
sandstone canyon, but as a visual representation
of forces from the subatomic realm to the cosmic
realm. So I used the walls of the canyonɎthe
actual subject matterɎas representations of those
forces in nature. It was not my intent to “show”
the canyon, but to “use” the lines and forms of the
canyon walls to express my ideas about forces.
With those two experiences, I was fully into
abstraction. Minor White said, “You photograph
something for two reasons: for what it is, and for
what else it is.” When you’re into abstraction, you
photograph for what else it is.
For those producing photographs, this generally
means keeping your eyes open to things that you
may often overlook, even those things that you see
on a daily basis, but never consider as subject mat-
ter for your photography. Or it may come from
using entirely different procedures when exposing
the negative or when enlarging the negative. It
could even come from a bizarre invention or
thought process on your own part. For example,
the renowned photographer Frederic Sommer
produced a stunning series of abstracts by letting
smoke from a hearth fire accumulate on sheets of
8x10 glass that he had first coated with Vaseline,
then using those sheets of smoke-encrusted glass
as negatives for enlargement. No camera was in-
volved in the process, nor any silver, except for that
of the final prints. Yet the metallic tones achieved
in those prints were stunning, compelling, exciting.
His comment about the process: “Soot beats silver
any day!”
Very few photographers, or artists in any medium,
start out producing abstract work. Those who pro-
duce abstraction tend to work toward it over a
period of time, as I did. I find that my students who
dislike abstracts are certain not to produce any
themselvesɎat least not now, but maybe later in
time as their own thinking evolves. Students who
respond favorably to abstracts are probably ready
to produce them.
Through my workshops and gallery exhibits I
have found that abstraction cleaves the viewing
audience in two: some people enjoy it immensely;
others dislike it intensely. There tend to be few
people whose thoughts lie between those two ends
of the spectrum.
6 photo technique S/O 2010
COMMENTARY:
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
I have been surprised to see some viewers befud-
dled by the underlying subject matter of my work,
sometimes even when the work was not intended
to be abstract or the subject matter to be obscure.
Of course black and white photographs are one
step further away from reality than color, so that
may be enough to mask the subject matter a bit
for some viewers. Black and white is certainly an
easier vehicle for abstraction than is color, which is
closer to reality.
Most viewers seem to need to define exactly what
the subject matter is. (Sometimes the definition
is completely wrong, but that doesn’t matter: it
satisfies them.) Some don’t care, delighted to let
their minds wander into their own interpretation
of what the image means to them, even if the
underlying subject matter is unclear or mysterious.
Offering a few of the abstractions that I have
produced over the years leaves me with a
dilemma: do I reveal the subject matter or how I
produced them, or do I put them out there with no
explanation? I have decided on the latter. I fully
recognize that those who dislike abstraction will
not only find the work unappealing (or worse!), but
will also find me despicable for not setting forth a
full explanation of each image. Those people are
looking for a handle to gain access to the images.
In essence, they’re looking for a lifeline. (Of course,
some others will have skipped this article entirely
after just one glance at the imagery!) But for you
who appreciate abstraction, I’ll remain silent to
allow your minds to wander freely without being
constrained by the reality of the situation.
Bruce Barnbaum teaches photography workshops throughout
the year, focusing on the art of seeing and conveying impressions
of your photographed world (real or imagined). He has two
monographs in print: Tone PoemsɎBook 1, 2002; and Tone
PoemsɎBook 2, 2005. Both are collaborative efforts, featuring
a CD of classical piano music performed by Judith Cohen.
Barnbaum’s The Art of Photography...an Approach to Personal
Expression, now in a fully revised edition 4.1, will soon to be
available in a fully illustrated edition written for both digital and
traditional users. For complete information, visit www.barnbaum.
com or write barnbaum@aol.com.
To ask a question or comment on this article, visit our online
Forum: www.phototechforum.com
WORKING WITH ABSTRACTION IN PHOTOGRAPHY BRUCE BARNBAUM
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
___________ ___
__________________
This spring, Adobe introduced new tools for
digital painting in Photoshop CS5. The new Mixer
Brush goes a long way towards creating a realistic
simulation of how paints mix and blend with each
other on a canvas and with textures on the doc-
ument canvas. The other side of the equation is
the new Bristle Tips, which simulate the physics of
real paintbrushes. While it is impossible to cover
every facet of these impressive tools in the span
of a single article, I can focus on how to quickly
get started with these tools, so that you can begin
experimenting with your own photos.
One benefit of using the new Mixer Brush workflow
is that it can breathe new life into shots we may
have otherwise discarded. Good composition, good
light, but maybe the exposure was off or the focus
too soft in spots to be recovered. Those photos
make an excellent foundation for digital paintings
in Photoshop CS5.
Bristle Tips Explained
Bristle Tips are a new kind of brush preset (de-
signed primarily for use with the new Mixer Brush),
and they reside in familiar locations, like the
Brush Picker in the Options bar and in the Brush
panel. When working with these tools, first set up
the user interface for a painting workflow. Click
on the Painting button to open Photoshop’s default
painting workspace.
Next select the Mixer Brush, grouped with the
Brush tool, Pencil tool and Color Replacement
tool (shortcut B or Shift-B to cycle through them).
Then, from the Brush panel, click one of the icons
that looks like a real paint brush (Figure 1), rather
than the traditional brush outline. These are the
Bristle Tips.
Once selected, the Brush panel displays the para-
meters for defining the look of a Brush Tips stroke
(Bristle Qualities), as well as a preview of the brush
stoke. Photoshop ships with two types of Bristle Tip
to reflect the real-world options: brush tips with a
rounded set of bristles and those with a flattened set
of bristles. Both round and flat have five subtypes
(found in the Shape pop-up menu): Point, Blunt
Curve, Angle and Fan.
Figure 2 shows a simple brush stoke made with each,
using a 40 pixel brush size. Customize these
shapes by changing the Bristle Quality settings,
which control things like the bristle density
(Bristles slider), bristle length and thickness, and
how flexible the bristles are (Stiffness). Watch the
preview to see how the settings interact. As with
other brushes, the Bristle Tip parameters can be
customized and saved as a preset.
Preview Bristle Tips by clicking on the Bristle
Brush Preview button at the bottom of the Brush
panel (left-most icon). A small overlay will appear
over the active document displaying an “artist’s
eye view” of the brush being used. As you press
the stylus to the tablet and begin to paint and tilt
your brush, the preview will show the effect on
the actual brush bristles (Figure 3). If you have a
Wacom 6D Art Pen, this preview and the Bristle
Tips will support brush rotation, as well. If you click
the overlay, the preview orientation will change to
Dan Moughamian
8 photo technique S/O 2010
(Figure 1) The new Bristle Tips brush presets can be selected and customized from
the Brush panel (open here to the left of the main panel group).
Photoshop CS5:
Photo Painting with
the Mixer Brush and
Bristle Tips
TECH:
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
give you different vantage points. Shift-clicking the
overlay changes the preview from a line drawing
style to a 3D rendered style.
The Mixer Brush Explained
With an understanding of how Bristle Tips differ
from normal brush presets, let’s look at the other
side of the equation. Essentially, the Mixer Brush
treats pixels like real paintɎas you paint over
previous brush strokes you can blend colors on
the fly and create new kinds of strokes that are
neither symmetrical in shape nor uniform in their
density like a typical Photoshop brush. In short,
it is designed to work exactly like a paint brush
loaded with a predetermined amount of paint as it
glides across a canvas. Figure 4 provides a look at
the Mixer Brush painting options.
Load
The Load setting determines how much “digital
paint” is present among the bristles and on the sur-
face of the brush. The Load amount is controlled
by the Load slider. The type of colors being loaded
(or whether there is a load present) is controlled in
one of three ways: 1) Clicking the Load button will
automatically load the current color or mix after
every brush stroke; 2) Leaving the Load button
off and using the Load pop-up menu to manually
load the brush; 3) Alt-clicking on a portion of the
image. The last option uses two behaviors. If the
Load Solid Colors Only option is checked in the
pop-up, pressing Alt will provide an eyedropper
to select a single color. If that option is turned off,
pressing Alt over the document will sample the
pixels around the cursor and place those colors as
the load (Figure 5).
Note: It’s also a good idea to paint on a separate
(empty) layer by taking advantage of the Sample
All Layers setting in the Options Bar. This allows
you to control the opacity and blend mode of the
paint layer as well as clip adjustments to it without
affecting the background photo.
Brush Cleaning
Photoshop provides the ability to clean the Mixer
Brush each time you pick up the stylus. After each
stroke, click the Clean Brush button. Most of the
time I use this feature in combination with no load
or a very light load; this way when I paint over
photos, each brush stroke is interacting with the
pixels under the brush. For a more organic looking
phototechmag.com 9
(Figure 2) There are 10 different Bristle presets, each based
on a specific shape of paint brush tip that can be used in
traditional painting.
(Figure 3) The Bristle Preview provides real-time feedback
to the artist, letting him or her know what the brush is doing
as the stylus is moved across the tablet. This can be a great
learning aid when first starting.
(Figure 4) The Mixer Brush has several options for defining
how the digital "paint" on the canvas behaves, as you make
each brush stroke.
(Figure 5) When loading the Mixer Brush with paint, you
can load after every stroke by clicking the Load button, or
you can leave the button off, and load manually from the
pop-up (pictured). You can also choose to manually clean
the brush using this pop-up, and whether loads should use
solid colors only.
PHOTOSHOP CS5 DAN MOUGHAMIAN
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
To ask a question or comment on this article, visit our
online Forum: www.phototechforum.com
Dan Moughamian is an exerienced photographer and Photoshop
author. His most recent titles include Adobe Digital Imaging How-
To's (Peachpit, Adobe Press), as well as Photoshop CS5 Image
Retouching & Adjustment (macProVideo.com).
painting, leave Clean Brush off. Figure 6 shows one
area of the photo painted with a load, a neighboring
area with no load (otherwise similar settings), and
the final area with a load and no cleaning.
Wet
The Wet setting describes how wet or dry the
canvas and paint are. Like real paintings, the less
dry the paint, the more it can be spread across the
canvas, mixing with other colors and textures. The
easiest way to use the Load, Wet settings (as well
as the Mix settingɎdiscussed next) in combination
is to work with the Blending Brush Combinations
pop-up menu (left of the Wet slider in the Options
bar). Adobe created several combinations that can
help you to relate the settings of the Mixer brush to
working with a particular kind of paint you might
be used to (such as oil paints). Most often I find the
Moist presets (or slight variations) to be the most
useful when painting over a photo, as it makes the
process of maintaining the general outlines and
details easier. Blending Brush Combinations menu
options are shown in Figure 7.
Mix
This setting defines how readily the brush will mix
the colors on the canvas to create new colors and
blends. When using real paints, certain types mix
to create new colors, while others tend to cover
up underlying colors, depending on the mediums
being used and other variables.
Flow
The Flow defines the amount of paint that’s being
added to the canvas. The higher the value, the
denser the paint will be, and the colors and details
underneath will show through less. Figure 8 shows
a different photo in its finished, painted state.
Ultimately the best way to familiarize yourself with
Photoshop's new painting tools is to sit down for an
hour or so and really experiment with the various
Bristle Qualities and Wet - Load - Mix combinations
(and even the Texture option from the Brush panel).
As you do so, you will find combinations that suit
your taste and style of painting, and which suit your
images as well.
10 photo technique S/O 2010
TECH:
(Figure 6) Area 1 was painted with a load and cleaned after each stroke; area 2 was
painted with no load and cleaned after each stroke; and the third area was brushed
with no preset load and no cleaning (meaning after each stroke, more and more load
is picked up based on the pixels under the stroke. Paint layer used 90% opacity,
normal blend.
(Figure 7) The best way to
get a head start with the
Mixer Brush is to use the
Blending Brush
Combinations pop-up to
help you set all three of
Load, Wet and Mix in
combinations that roughly
mimic real painting
scenarios.The higher the
wet and mix values, the
more easily the paint will
spread and mix.
(Figure 8) Given a little time to experiment and familiarize yourself, the Mixer Brush
and Bristle Tips make it easy to create artistic paintings from your photographs.
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
__________
STOBE POWER JOHN SISKIN
phototechmag.com 11
I have been working with and writing about strobes
for several decades. In that time I’ve made a really
huge number of images with strobes. All strobes
have certain characteristics: they have a daylight
spectrum, and the light has very short duration.
These characteristics make them the best lights
for still photography, because you can mix strobes
with daylight and also stop action.
Several characteristics are really important in
understanding how useful any particular strobe
might be. First, know how much light output the
unit has. Second, know the coverage of the strobe,
how big an angle it illuminates and how evenly.
Third, does the unit have a modeling light? These
continuous lights on a strobe make it easier to see
what the strobe will do. Fourth, how quickly does it
recycle, that is how soon is it ready to shoot again?
Fifth, how portable is the unit? Finally, how easy is
it to control the unit: will the strobe work with your
camera’s automation?
How powerful does a strobe need to be? That
depends on several factors, including the way you
use light and the ISO you shoot at. I really like
using big light sources to create soft light. Such
light sources are not very efficient; so much of
the light the strobe puts out won’t end up on the
subject. In Figure 1, I used a light panel and an
umbrella to make a big light source on the left of
the camera. If I had used the strobe directly on
the subject, the aperture would have been f/22.2
at ISO 100, but because of the light modifiers, the
aperture was f/8.7. So I lost more than 75% of the
light I started with. Consequently, I need strobes
with a lot of power. If I had used a more efficient
Strobe Power
John Siskin
In this set-up, light A is a
750 watt-second moonlight,
which bounces off an
umbrella, and then the
light goes through a light
panel. This gives the soft light
source. The other panel is a
gold reflector. Lights A and
C are connected to a power
pack and both have warm
filtration and are set to a
power of 125 watt-seconds.
B is used with a snoot to light
the background; light C
is used with a beauty dish
to give a catch light and
more definition.
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
lighting design, I wouldn’t have used as much
power, but the light wouldn’t have had the same
quality. Large light sources illuminate the subject
from more angles, making softer light with more
gradual transitions. I used a second light with a
beauty dish to give the subject more definition and
a good catch light in the eyes.
This article will provide information about the rel-
ative power and coverage of some strobes. This is
helpful because strobes are currently measured in
at least two different ways, which makes it impos-
sible to compare their relative light output or power.
The light was measured with a Sekonic L-508 light
meter at 10 feet from the light. The meter was set
to ISO 100. This is how guide numbers are figured,
and it makes sense to use this way of measuring
with strobes that have built in reflectors, such as
hot-shoe mounted strobes. The guide number of
these strobes is the measured aperture, multiplied
by 10, at 10 feet from the light, usually at ISO 100.
So guide numbers work like aperture numbers: a
rating of 110 is twice as powerful as a rating of 80.
When you measure monolights or studio strobes in
this way, you measure the light and the reflector.
Changing the reflector will change the quantity of
the light, as well as the quality. This is one of the
advantages of monolights and studio strobes: they
allow you to use many light modifiers.
I decided to do another test that used a 3x3 soft box
to read the strobes with the same modifier, which
essentially changes the light output. Studio strobes
are usually measured in watt-seconds, which are
a measurement of power consumption, rather than
light output. So two units can have the same num-
ber of watt-seconds and provide very different
amounts of light.
When I started doing the tests for this article I had
certain basic assumptions about strobe power: first
that the manufacturers’ guide numbers are often
inaccurate. Second, I reasoned that studio strobes
and monolights are much more powerful than hot-
shoe mount strobes, like the Canon 580EX II. As
the data will show, both these assumptions were
found to be inaccurate.
I did have one assumption about strobe power that
was accurate: when you cut the watt-seconds in half
you have reduced the power of the strobe by one
stop. So if the meter reads f/11 at 200 watt-seconds,
it will read f/8 at 100 watt-seconds.
TECH:
12 photo technique S/O 2010
The meter and the strobe were 10 feet apart
for the power test. The soft box was in the
same position.
Canon 580EX II
Vivitar 283
Calumet Travelite 750
Norman 200B
AlienBees B1600
Norman LH2400 @
200 w-s
f/2.8.8
f/2.8.1
f/8.0
f/2.8.9
f/5.6.6
f/11.1
f/11.2
f/8.0
f/11.4
f/8.8
f/16.3
f/16.3
Unit Soft Box Reflector
Published
Guide Number
138@ 50mm
120
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
STOBE POWER JOHN SISKIN
phototechmag.com 13
I chose strobes from several different manufacturers
and of several different types for this test. The first
thing I wanted to know was if the Canon strobe
was really producing as much light as it was rated
to do. As previously mentioned, it produced a lot
of light when it was used without any modifier.
Then I wanted to examine some new technology
moonlights, so I looked at the AlienBees B1600 and
the Calumet Travelite. These are contemporary
monolights, the type I use in many circumstances.
Finally, I wanted to check some older lights so I
could find out more about the progress of lighting
technology. This was why I wanted to look at a
Vivitar 283, introduced in about 1977. This was a
great strobe at that time. While the Vivitar is about
the same size as the Canon 580EX II, it is about
half the power. I also wanted to know about the
power of the Norman LH2400 head with a 2000
watt-second power pack. This was my standard
gear for decades, and I wanted to know how its
power compared to the monolights. In this case,
the Norman was significantly more powerful with
the soft box, and the difference in power was much
less with just the reflector. In the end it appears
as though the reflector enables some of the small
strobes to perform like the powerful units. This
is particularly true with the AlienBees and the
Canon. When you use a device that encloses the
strobe, like the soft box, the power rating of the
strobe seems to be more indicative of the amount
of light from the unit.
You can see that the Norman power pack I dragged
all over Los Angeles is really only two stops more
powerful than a Vivitar 283, with the reflector,
but it is 4 stops more powerful if I use the soft
box. I also note that although the watt-seconds
on the AlienBees are lower than the Calumet, the
output is almost twice as high in these tests. The
Canon’s published guide number is accurate, since
my meter gives the aperture and a decimal, and
f/11.2 and G.N. 138 are about the same. I was also
interested to see that the AlienBees unit had about
the same power as the Norman LH2400 set at 2000
watt-seconds.
Assessment of the coverage of a strobe is a more
subjective matter and is dependant on the modifier
on the strobe. The coverage with the soft box, for
instance, is about the same for all units. Since many
photographers manipulate strobe light, the power
test results would change, as well as the coverage,
with different modifiers. For tighter coverage, use
snoots, or grid spots, to control light. For more
coverage I could use a different reflector or um-
brella or other tool.
I used the 6 to 8-inch reflectors on the monolights
and studio strobes and looked at the light they
produced. These are the reflectors most frequently
sold with these units. The Calumet Travelite has
broad coverage. The light is much brighter in the
center than the sides. The Canon 580EX II has
smaller coverage. The light is fairly even, but falls
off quickly at the side. This test was done at the
50mm setting. If the wider setting were used, the
coverage would be broader. The Norman 200B
has very narrow coverage and a rapid fall-off. The
Norman LH2400 has very broad coverage with a
very gradual fall-off. The AlienBees unit has narrow
Canon 580EX II
The Calumet unit has much broader coverage than the Canon
unit. Both are pretty even. For this test, all the units were fired
at the same distance from the wall
Calumet Travelite 750
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
14 photo technique S/O 2010
John Siskin is a commercial and fine art photographer who
specializes in making architectural images, as well as macro,
portraiture and product photographs. He has taught photography
for more than 20 years and is currently teaching photographic
lighting at BetterPhoto.com online. His web site is www.siskin-
photo.com. His first book, Understanding and Controlling Strobe
Lighting, A Guide for Digital Photographers, will be published this
fall by Amherst Media.
To ask a question or comment on this article, visit our
online Forum: www.phototechforum.com
Product Resources
Lighting: Canon 580EX II strobe, Norman LH2400 powerpack,
Calumet Travelite, AlienBees B1600, Vivitar 283, Norman
200B; Meter: Sekonic L-508.
coverage with a rapid fall-off. I think that broad
even coverage is an advantage, but the amount of
advantage changes if you use different modifiers.
For years I recommended studio lights and mono-
lights because of the power they provide a photo-
grapher. Now I’m not at all sure that there is as
much advantage in power. So why would I keep
using studio lights? They recycle quickly all day
and all night; most recycle in about two seconds.
You can get external battery packs for a dedicated
strobe, but they add extra cost, and there is a limit
to how many shots you can take.
In addition, modeling lights, which are on studio
strobes and monolights, are very important for
designing light. Another concern is how easy is it to
control the strobe. This is subjective. I prefer man-
ual control, with a continuous power range of sev-
eral stops. Through teaching classes I have become
aware that many people would prefer the camera
to be in control, which requires a dedicated unit.
Finally, there is cost. An AlienBees B1600 costs less
than a Canon 580EX II, without a battery pack.
I think there is tremendous advantage in having
a dedicated strobe. It does a beautiful job with
flash fill outdoors and is your best friend if you
photograph events. However, I use monolights and
studio strobes for most of my work. I feel that I can
shoot all day and get better control with these units.
PORTFOLIO:
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
______
______
______________________________________
________________________________________
_______________________________
EXPLORATIONS OF LIGHT EDDA TAYLOR
phototechmag.com 15
First I studied fine art, and then I fell in love
with photography. Ambient light has always
been my preferred element of the medium.
In my first photography class, my professor,
Gerhard Bakker, influenced my defining style
when he said, “You are going to become a
photographer. A painter of light.” He explained
the origin of the word “photography” from the
Greek words “photo” meaning “light” and
“grapho” meaning “write.” I knew I would be
a painter of light using a camera instead of a
brush, and I began my explorations of light.
As a painter learns the properties of paint to
give life to a canvas, the photographer learns the
characteristics of light to create an artistic
photograph. The amount of light influences
quantity and quality. The sun is the primary
light source and we instinctively create with it.
We may suppose that a ray of light is a row of
bundles of energy we call quanta. When light
reflects on an object, our senses and instincts
capture the moment. I have discovered that
not all light is the same. When photographing
in ambient light, we often have limited control
over the quality of light, though it can be
altered with filters and reflectors. Light quality
can be a condition of cloud coverage. On
an overcast day, sunlight is filtered through
clouds and diffusion can result in a soft quality.
Another important contributor to light quality
is time of day. In the early morning and late
afternoon, sunlight acquires a warm soft qual-
ity, while sunlight can be harsh at noon. Some
photographers are hesitant in taking photo-
Edda Taylor
Explorations of Light
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
PORTFOLIO:
16 photo technique S/O 2010
graphs in high sun because of the problem of high
contrast. However, it is one of my favorite times to
shoot when I can create photographs with shadows
and drama in their composition.
As the quality of light changes, we find opportunities
to create moods and styles. Light then becomes
an effective compositional tool in its own right.
Through exploration we learn to use its basic ele-
ments: direction, quantity and quality. I continue
to observe light and take advantage of its countless
possibilities in creating beautiful photographs.
Photographing outside at different times of the day
and in different seasons, one can observe how light
works on objects. It provides a surprisingly fresh
perspective on the way we see composition. We
can create soft images in the morning, dramatic
and lengthy shadows at noon, cool images in the
afternoon and warm compositions at sundown.
Using rake lighting (light striking the subject at
a slant giving form and depth), we can create
interesting and artistic compositions. When the sun
sends angled shafts of light, it’s the perfect time to
collect or rake light across a subject’s face or the
Joanne 2009
Previous Page
Ballet 2009
Above
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
EXPLORATIONS OF LIGHT EDDA TAYLOR
scene as a whole to create drama and mystery in
composition. I find that golden light appears warm
and very flattering to my subjects when the illum-
ination comes as side lighting.
Leonardo da Vinci wrote, “You do not paint fea-
tures, you paint what is in your mind.” Today’s
photographers face a challenge. The tools of the
craft have become sophisticated to the point that
technique can overpower what is in the mind.
Learning how light works has kept my photography
as simple as possible and allows the subject to
define the moment I previsualize.
There is an old building in our town. The vitality
of its past has waned and its vibrant history is
no more. The years have turned the paint on the
walls into a Degas-like canvas. The light filtering
through the broken glass forms designs and in-
teresting patterns on the walls. It is for me an
enchanting place. I can close my eyes and envision
ballerinas dancing to soft music as their shadows
form on the walls. My love for the ballet is captured
in this wonderful place. I can explore the variations
of existing light with the dancers as my subject. I
began a ballerina series two years ago and continue
to work on this project which I find exciting. Work
on the series will end only when the building is
restored and the magic disappears.
Besides good lighting, I rely on several other
elements in a scene that help me create what I
envisioned in my mind’s eye. One of them is the
lens. My favorite lens is the Canon EF 24-70 f/2.8L
because I like a lens with coverage from wide angle
to standard to a medium telephoto. My goal is al-
ways to portray my subjects as I see them as closely
as possible. The advantages of that lens is that it
helps you to express exactly what you see when
you look at your subject.
I start by taking in the whole scene with the zoom
set to wide angle, then view the perspectives at
each focal length. Zooming back and forth helps
me see different angles of cropping until I see the
image that I had created in my mind. I attempt to
duplicate what I see and feel, in other words, make
the camera an extension of me. Almost all of my
location images were taken with that lens. In one
instance, I took a photo of a musician with guitar
and his grandson. As I was zooming, I noticed the
little boy grasping grandpa’s hand on the guitar;
I zoomed closer, cropped grandpa’s head, and
there was my image. The zoom lens becomes an
exploratory tool for the final composition.
I photographed a ballerina standing in the corner
of a green-walled room. In her black tutu she ap-
peared like a graceful spider going up the wall.
Working on another image of ballerinas in a group,
as I was zooming I noticed the little ballerina
peeking from a door. I told her to stand still, and I
got my image. Working in New Mexico, I created
an image inspired by the weathered face of a man
who was sitting peeling red peppers against a grey
wall, drying just like the red peppers in the hot
Cara 2009
Above
phototechmag.com 17
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
sun. Taking the time to closely observe people and
explore the possibilities of light and location, I'm
inspired to create the images that capture for me an
important moment in time.
PORTFOLIO:
18 photo technique S/O 2010
Edda Taylor has earned a reputation as one of the most
recognized names in photographic portraiture. Taylor holds the
degree of Master Photographer, Photographic Craftsman from the
Professional Photographers of America, and is a certified color
analyst. Recipient of both the Gerhard Bakker Memorial Award
and the Kirt Lieber Gold Award, she is an international guest
lecturer and instructor; leading workshops at Purdue University,
Indiana University and the Mesilla Digital Imaging Workshops, NM.
www.eddataylor.com.
To ask a question or comment on this article, visit our online
Forum: www.phototechforum.com
Product Resources
Cameras: Canon EOS-1Ds; Lenses: Canon 70-200mm f/2.8;
Lighting: Photoflex Lifedisc reflectors Tripod: Manfrotto;
Other: Digital Target Calibration-photovisionvideo.com.
Red Peppers 2010
Grandpa and Me 2008
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
_____________
DOVER'S HISTORY TRIP-PART I DAVID VESTAL
Dover Publications has published a special version
of the history of photography under the title, Great
Photographs from Daguerre to the Great Depression.
What’s special is that, with no written text, it pre-
sents 139 Royalty-Free Designs in a CD-ROM & Book
as part of its large series, “Dover Electronic Clip
Art for Macintosh
®
and Windows
®
.”
Much is included; more is left out. Oddly, there is
nothing from Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, Daguerre’s
early collaborator, who made the first existing
photograph that we are sure of in 1826. It’s in the
Gernsheim Collection at the Humanities Research
Center of the University of Texas at Austin. It is not
a daguerreotype, but used a much slower process
David Vestal
Dover’s History Trip–Part I
invented by Niépce, who died before Daguerre
invented his own entirely different method.
Written histories tell of three men, each of whom
invented his own form of black-and-white photo-
graphy. They all announced their methods in 1839:
Hippolyte Bayard and Louis-Jacques-Mandé
Daguerre, both in Paris, and William Henry Fox
Talbot in England. Bayard made and exhibited
direct positive pictures on paper; Talbot, using
some of the same chemicals, made paper negatives
that could be used to make any number of positive
prints; and Daguerre made direct positives on
silver-plated copper plates that were developed in
mercury vapor. Talbot’s negative-positive method
phototechmag.com 19
Boulevard du Temple, 1838, daguerreotype by Daguerre

q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
was the direct ancestor of our negatives and prints,
but because his negatives were on paper, his prints
didn’t have the amazingly fine detail and texture
that was rendered by the daguerreotype.

Dover’s CD-ROM includes both low and high res-
olution files of all its photos. Whoever selected the
pictures is not named. Perhaps a committee? I can’t
agree with all of Dover’s choices, but many seem
excellent to me. I have chosen from those. Among
them are several that I’d never seen before.
Printing from the high-resolution files wasn’t
difficult, though each picture was at least a little
different to work with. Some needed little or no
tweaking to produce good inkjet prints, but others
needed much more work to get the tones right.
Some of the photos are very clean; others sorely
need spotting, the removal, done via Photoshop, of
distracting spots and scratches. Dover apparently
copied every photo just as it was, with no retouching,
and that was the right thing to do. Some were ap-
parently copied from poor prints: I gave up on one
good photo, of which I had seen an excellent print,
because I couldn’t make an acceptable print from
the version on the CD. The ones I finally printed
were more rewarding. I present them here with
Dover’s identifying numbers.
On the sunlit street photographed from Daguerre’s
window, probably in 1838, a man was getting a
shoeshine on the corner. The daguerreotype was
very slow then, and the street was probably not
empty. People walking didn’t hold still long enough
to register on the plate, but this man held still.
Chemical ways to get pictures with shorter expos-
ures were soon found, and daguerreotype por-
traits could then be made with exposures as short
as, say, half a minute. Fast lenses helped. Josef
Max Petzval designed an f/3.6 lens for portrai-
ture in 1840, much faster than the f/14 lens that
came with early daguerreotype cameras made by
Alphonse Giroux.
Hippolyte Bayard’s 1839 exhibition in Paris of his
invention, direct-positive photographs on paper,
got little attention. Daguerre fared better: he was
already a famous showman whose huge painted
Diorama was a popular spectacle in the streets of
Paris long before his photography appeared, and
he had influential help in presenting his invention
to the government. Daguerre knew how to get
publicity, as Bayard did not, and Talbot was rich
and influential, as Bayard was not. Bayard’s self-
portrait as a drowned man, dated 1840, was made
to illustrate his despair at not being able to compete
with such high-powered rivals. I admire his sense
of humor under the circumstances.

I don’t think Bayard made this photo by his own
method. I think he used Talbot’s, as he certainly
did later. It was widely used for business reasons by
photographers who made and sold large numbers
of prints of each of their most popular pictures,
impossible with the daguerreotype. The sensitized
paper was not red-sensitive, so his face and hands,
but not his arms and chest, appear much darkened
by exposure to daylight.
This picture of a haystack by William Henry Fox
Talbot appeared in the very first book of photo-
graphs, The Pencil of Nature, which he published
in 1844. It consisted of actual photographic prints
made by Talbot and his assistants and pasted into
the book. No one then knew how to reproduce
any kind of picture except for print media such as
etchings and engravings. A book of photographs
was something completely new. And this old pic-
ture is new to me. It is a Talbotype, as he first
called his method, in which paper negatives were
contact-printed on sensitized paper. The tech-
20 photo technique S/O 2010
PERSPECTIVES:
Self Portrait as a Drowned Man, 1840, Hippolyte Bayard

q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
DOVER'S HISTORY TRIP-PART I DAVID VESTAL
nique is also called salted-paper photography, but
that is a general term that also applies to other
early processes, including Bayard’s direct-positive
method. Talbot patented his process in 1841 and
wanted to license people and charge them fees to
use it. That didn’t last, and later such photographs
were, and still are, called calotypes. This is no
haystack, it’s a hay monument: great construction,
wonderful photograph.
Daguerre himself. Five years after his process was
announced, L. J. M. Daguerre was photographed
by Jean Baptiste Sabatier-Blot. Note the scratches
and what looks like a generous sprinkling of white
dust. The daguerreotype is vulnerable. If you touch
its surface you will probably leave a mark. The
daguerreotype was slow, and its photos were made
with simple lenses used wide open to keep the
exposure time short—a few seconds in very bright
light. This portrait is blurred around its edges.
Only the center is sharp. Simple lenses focus
accurately only on equally distant points inside a
spherical surface, not on all of a flat plane. Another
problem was solved later by color-corrected
lenses. Simple lenses focus light of different colors
at different distances. “Chemical focus” involved
a need to shift the focus from what’s seen on the
groundglass to get a critically sharp picture. We
focus on a groundglass by all visible light, but early
photographic plates were sensitive only to blue light
and ultraviolet, which focus at a slightly different
distance behind the lens. Some early cameras had
marks showing the shift required to get from visual
focus to “chemical focus.” The difference was attri-
buted to “chemical rays.” No one knew about the
electromagnetic spectrum.
It took hours of spotting with Photoshop to clean
up this picture’s scratches and spots, a task I took
on to see how it looked when new. But so much
retouching takes away some of the photo’s bite
and character and makes a severe portrait look
phototechmag.com 21
Haystack, from The Pencil of Nature, 1844, William Henry Fox Talbot

q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
22 photo technique S/O 2010
bland. For me it works better with all its scars and
blemishes than when they are smoothed over, but
finding that out was worth the effort.
Now look at Daguerre trying to appear relaxed.
How firmly he’s braced on his arms, how stiffly he
holds his head, how rigidly he stares. There’s a hint
of desperation. He’s working hard to hold his pose,
surely with a brace (not a clamp) behind his head.
These pictures on the CD are in jpeg format: “System require-
ments: Windows 95, 98, ME, NT, 2000, XP, Vista or Macintosh,
all versions; CD-ROM drive.” The price of the book and CD-
ROM is $16.95. To use more than ten of these photos in one
project requires special permission from Dover, which was
granted to photo technique for this series of articles.
PERSPECTIVES:
David Vestal is a photographer, critic and teacher whose publica-
tions include The Art of Black & White Enlarging (1984) and The
Craft of Photography. His photographs are exhibited internationally
and are found in numerous collections, among them the Museum of
Modern Art (NYC) and the George Eastman House, Rochester, NY.
Vestal’s wit and wisdom have long earned him a strong following
among photo technique readers who can look forward to additional
installments of this Dover History article series.
To ask a question or comment on this article, visit our online
Forum: www.phototechforum.com
Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre, 1844, Jean Baptiste Sabatier-Blot

q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
Sony NEX-5 w/18-55mm Lens
An Instant Panorama Camera
Sony’s new interchangeable lens cameras have a
lot of easy–to–use amateur functions.
The NEX-5 in particular has the ability to also act
like a pro camera with an amazing array of high
quality options. The Micro Four-Thirds camera is
small but versatile. It is exceptionally light, and
while it is available with a 16mm pancake lens that
makes it capable of fitting in a pocket and has
an 18-200mm zoom, the configuration we tested
had the 18-55mm, a nice range telephoto that
still maintains a small size but with more creative
framing capabilities. The NEX-5 is 14.2 megapixels
with the capability of recording in RAW, RAW plus
jpeg, or two different levels of jpeg. The camera’s
APS HD CMOS sensor also records 1080i video in
either MPEG4 or AVHCD formats.
The camera has an attachable flash with a GN of 7
that is so unobtrusive you might find it easier just
to leave it on. The LCD display is 920,000 dots
and is moveable for viewing from above or below.
The user interface, while loaded with a wide
variety of auto recognition capabilities, is also easy
to stay in a more professional mode. Aperture,
shutter speeds, ISO and shooting modes are
easily changed. In fact, one of the display choices
in manual looks like the old SLR match needle
display with an easy one-button switch for f-stop
or shutter control. Its histogram can be set to live
for accurate exposure.
The television commercial aside, the really sweet
part of this camera is its Sweep Panorama
capabilities. You set the mode for this option, and
then the camera makes a series of exposures
as you move in a single direction either vertically
or horizontally. The camera takes the combined
exposures, automatically stitches them, and even
attempts to straighten the horizonɎall in a few
moments.
Though this function is only available in jpeg format,
it yields a 43.5 megapixel file at 23.4 x 5.03 inches
at 350 dpi. ISO range on the camera is 200-12,800.
Color spaces are sRGB and Adobe RGB. The
camera configuration we tested sells for $699.99.
For more information, go to www.sony.com.
phototechmag.com 23
INNOVATIONS:
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
24 photo technique S/O 2010
Archival Methods
Today 13"x19" is considered a normal size for presenting unmounted
digital prints. While there are a lot of 13"x19" presentation boxes out
there, the Accent Gray Portfolio by Archival Methods is certainly worthy
of consideration.
The portfolios have a three-sided internal tray with a folddown cover for
easy access. The 13 ¼"x19 ¼" inside dimensions allow for easy removal
of the set onto the clean cover interior for viewing and a clean, easy
return into the box. The box interior is lined with white archival paper.
The 13"x19" box is one inch deep and it holds approximately 70
fiber-based sheets.
The 13"x19" Accent Gray portfolio is charcoal gray with a black tray.
Boxes of smaller formats (9"x12"x1" or 9"x12"x2") offer trays in a
variety of other colors to identify specific portfolios.
Cost is very reasonable, with a purchase of 1–9 13"x19" boxes at
$37.47; 10 or more at $35.60 each; and $33.75 each for orders of 50 or
more. Archival Methods will also customize or personalize orders of 100.
www.archivalmethods.com
INNOVATIONS:
F-Stop Tilopa Backpack
A Unique and Versatile System
Most pros have more than one bag because of the
extensive equipment needed for a variety of jobs.
They usually end up packing an array for the type
of applications they anticipate. F-Stop’s Tilopa
backpack offers a unique approach with a modular
equipment pod design.
First, lets talk about the backpack itself. The Tilopa
is 12"x 24"x10" and has a solid metal support
rack (an uncommon addition to the normal camera
backpack) that allows for comfortable back support
and equipment protection. It is made of Rip-stop
Nylon and has numerous outer and inner pockets,
an internal padded section for most 15 inch laptops,
and straps and a cup on the outside for carrying a
tripod and other gear. It also has numerous straps for
attaching additional accessory cases. Access to the
camera gear is from the back and it has a larger base
allowing it to stand freely in most conditions. The
Tilopa fits within the size for airline carry-on.
The real versatility of this backpack is its use of
ICUs- Internal Camera Units. These are somewhat
like common internal backpack dividers except that
the whole unit is removable and interchangeable.
Each ICU module can be set up with a particular
configuration of cameras and lenses and dropped
into the top of the Tilopa backpack. There are even
four different sizes of ICUs for different types and
amount of equipment. While each ICU has a zippered
cover, this is easily folded back when in the Tilopa
for easy access from the back opening. Of particular
note is the way the ICU separations are made. Not
only does the Velcro attach to the sides, but also to
the bottom making a firm separation between camera
equipment. When using one of the smaller ICU’s there
is also internal space on the top for additional lens
cases, clothing, food, etc.
The Tilopa with one ICU sells for $295.00 with free
shipping. For more information, contact
www.fstopgear.com.
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
___________________
______________
VANISHING POINTS TERRI WARPINSKI
Wind ripples across an estuary creating a rhythmic pattern
on the surface attracting my attention. Waves of thought
break and wash over the moment, dredging up an internal
dialogue. Words break the surface, invoke memory, emotion
and spirit, and mix with historic, scientific and literary
associations. Questions form, hover and move on, like clouds
in the sky.
Vanishing Points–
Landscape’s Narrative
Terri Warpinski
phototechmag.com 25
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
26 photo technique S/O 2010
Ripple Effect,
South Jetty,
sepia toned silver
gelatin print with
graphite text
Previous Page
Cottonwood Stand,
Andrews,
sepia toned silver
gelatin print with
graphite text
Above
Landscapes of vast, undifferentiated spaces such as
deserts and large bodies of water have a hold on me.
They have been a source of inspiration for me as an
artist and photographer for over two decades. My
concept of landscape begins in the material world
and a geographic location. But it is more than that.
It is a dynamic situation, a narrative of interaction
between human and natural forces. Karl Marx noted,
“All of history is a ruin,” ever folding and unfolding.
The faint trail now only marked by the antelopes’
track across the meadow, the cottonwoods that re-
main as the sole occupants of the homesteads that
once thrived in this desertɎlandscapes are what
remain of human and natural histories in flux.
In my series Vanishing Points, point of view becomes
a narrative gesture employed to examine the
dualities that aboundɎemptiness and fullness,
near and far, past and present, life and deathɎ
literally and figuratively seen from one perspective.
It is the confluence of personal, cultural and
natural histories. And, as with all histories, our
understanding and interpretation change with
time and distance.
The photographs I create punctuate moments
along the continuum of perpetual change. Inscribed
marks of soft graphite, minute written words, often
barely visible, float upon the surface of the print
or may appear to emerge from the depths of the
far horizon. A gestural, textual filter forms through
which the landscape is seen. Even when illegible,
these notations indicate their potential for mean-
ingɎif only it could be perceived. They may be
read as an intervention, call attention to details, or
suggest alternative ‘readings’ of the natural world
as Rachel Carson in Silent Spring describes it being
“spread before us like pages of an open book.”
The metaphor of the book and the act of reading
as a quiet process of internalization are ideas that
correspond to some of the physical properties of
this series. The enlarged photographic prints result
in images that are no bigger than the palm of
my hand. The diminutive size (3.25" x4.75") makes
gentle reference to personal diaries and journals,
and to the miniature as an historical art objectɎ
illuminated manuscripts, miniature paintings and
the Daguerreotypes and ambrotypes of the 19th
century. Qualities that I associate with these objects
and with this small scale, such as preciousness and
intimacy, are also the qualities and associations I
want to elicit from the viewer regarding the subject
matter contained within the frame. With the focus
set to reach to infinity, the transformation of a wide
sweeping view condensed into a structure that is
so extremely small begs for heightened attention
in order to distill the details. The all-compassing
material world represented in such diminished
scale forms an inverse relationship and, like the
Latin phrase multum in parvo, signifies there is
much in little.
The photographs in Vanishing Points are created
to be unique objects. This is an attribute more
PORTFOLIO:
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
VANISHING POINTS TERRI WARPINSKI
common to archaic 19th Century photo processes
than to those of the 21st Century. Although I make
a limited set of prints from each negative, the end
result is not an edition, but in works that are one-
of–a–kind. The variation of the graphite marks on
the surface described earlier is one feature of their
individuality; another is the split tonality of the
print achieved with a sulphide sepia toner. This
toner converts bleached metallic silver to silver
sulphide, changing the neutral quality of the
monochrome black-and-white print to a warm tone
that can range from a soft peach color cast to an
overall deep brown. I use the process selectively,
limiting the effect to mid-tones and highlight areas
of the image. This is accomplished by limiting the
preliminary bleach bath so that it reduces only the
lightest areas of the print. I control this by visual
inspection rather than by time. After a rinse, the re-
development bath is used in much the same way.
Always working with a fresh sulphide re-devel-
opment solution creates more predictable results
Prior to making final prints, I do an extensive set
of test exposures with variations in contrast and
density using a step scale method. I tone these
tests, studying them to determine the range of ef-
fect I want in the final prints. Just as every moment
in the landscape is different, each print is a unique
combination of light, time and interaction.
Storm,
Harney Basin,
sepia toned silver
gelatin print with
graphite text
Above
phototechmag.com 27
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
Product Resources
Camera: Fujica GSW–690; Film: Kodak TMax 400; Filter:
Tiffen Yellow 8; Meter: Gossen Luna–Pro; Tripod: Manfrotto
694 magfiber monopod with Manfrotto 234RC head;
Darkroom: Besseler 45MXT enlarger, El–Nikkor 105mm 5.6,
Peak 2000 (model 1) Enlarging Focuser, Saunders 4 Blade
Easel, Gralab 450R Timer, Gravity Works Archival Print
Washer; Paper: Bergger VCCM; Chemistry: Kodak Xtol
Developer, Sprint–Print Developer, Stop Bath, Fixer, Fixer
Remover, Edwal LFN Wetting Agent, Kodak Sepia Toner;
Incidentals: Giotto Rocket Blaster Air Blower, PrintFile
WorkBox, PrintFile Archival Preservers, Marshall's Spot-
All Spotting Dyes, Schwan Stabilo mico 9000 8 B Graphite
Pencil, Silver Prismacolor Pencil, Pink Pearl Eraser.
To ask a question or comment on this article, visit our online
Forum: www.phototechforum.com
Born in Green Bay, Wisconsin, Terri Warpinski received her MA and
MFA degrees in Photography from the University of Iowa. Since
1984 she has been a professor of photography at the University of
Oregon, Eugene. Her work has been widely exhibited in galleries,
institutions, and international festivals. Warpinski served two terms
as Chair of the Society for Photographic Education. She was
awarded a residency at the Ucross Foundation and a Fulbright
Senior Scholar Fellowship to Israel. http://www.terriwarpinski.com.
I enjoy time spent in the darkroom more than at
the computer screen, but that is not the reason
underlying my decision to use film over digital
capture for this work. I have been drawing into and
on top of photographs since I first began seriously
using photography in my art practice in 1979.
Conventional black and white photo paper, with its
gelatin emulsion, creates a very smooth surface that
holds the graphite and withstands vigorous erasure,
acting much the same as a prepared gesso base.
This characteristic of traditional silver gelatin photo
paper as a drawing surface is the primary reason
I continue to use conventional black and white
filmɎas surprising as that may seem.
Creating photographs in the way that I do is to
openly admit their mutability and to accentuate the
subjective capacity of the medium. The landscape,
as a repository of human experience, becomes as
a cultural palimpsest, bearing tangible evidence of
our past and present. Then, too, there is that which
is intangible, when the surface is as a reflection
mirroring our values, our fears and our aspirations.
It is in the liminal space where these two co-exist
that I travel to make my photographs.
Camera notes
Twenty years ago my long-time friend and mentor,
the late Jerry Dell, had the hunch that my vision
and ideas might be better served by a 6 x 9cm
format rather than the 2
1
/4 square I was using at
the time. He pressed his Fujica SW 690 into my
hands and encouraged me to use it for a few days.
The next week I purchased my own. I continue to
rely on that same model to this day. After 14 years
and 19,000 exposures I retired my original and re-
placed it with another of the same. It could be
that the only place I respond well to change is in
the landscape. Beyond its initial affordability and
its outstanding reliability, other aspects of this
particular camera are well suited to my needs.
It focuses with a rangefinder rather than TTL
(through the lens) system, resulting in a camera
that is mechanically simpler and substantially
lighter. The fixed 65mm lens that the SW (super
wide) is equipped with freed me from the burden
of carrying lenses I never put into use, allowing
more room to carry filmɎan excellent trade-off
for working in remote locations.
Decomposition,
Summer Valley,
sepia toned silver
gelatin print with
graphite text
Above
28 photo technique S/O 2010
PORTFOLIO:
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
When it comes to aesthetic digital collage and technical expertise with Photoshop, few can
equal Julieanne Kost. Professionally a Digital Imaging Evangelist for Adobe, Kost not only
knows her tools, but she incorporates her skill into some of the most sensitive narrative
collages exhibited today. I recently had the opportunity to spend time with Julieanne, and
she answered some pertinent questions and offered insights into her artwork and her
life at Adobe.
An Interview with
Julieanne Kost
Paul Schranz
phototechmag.com 29
AN INTERVIEW WITH JULIEANNE KOST
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
30 photo technique S/O 2010
PS: You were originally a psychology major. Tell me
how you went from earning that degree into a career
in photography.
JK: I have always been interested in photography
and grew up in a household that had the perfect
combination of left and right brain influences. My
father is an engineer: very logical, pragmatic and
disciplined in his work and he always encouraged
me to master the technology necessary for a part-
icular field of study. We had a darkroom set up in
the laundry room and he taught me how to develop
and print my images. My mother is a creative, imag-
inative and free thinking artist who encouraged me
to explore different ways to express myself and
communicate through many channels including
music, drawing and photography.
During college I continued taking both art and photo-
graphy classes along with the required psychology
units. Upon graduation, I took a position at a medical
imaging company where I was responsible for the
capture, editing (in Photoshop 2.0) and archiving
a large library of medical images while I pursued
photography at a local community college.
In 1992, I learned of an opening for a Technical
Support specialist at Adobe Systems and jumped at
the opportunity. I have been with Adobe ever since.
My early study of human behavior still helps me
find ways to simplify complex techniques and pro-
cedures as I present seminars and workshops in
Photoshop and Lightroom.
PS: What does an “Evangelist” do at Adobe, and
how did you attain that rank?
JK: The primary goal of any evangelist at Adobe is
to help keep our customers informed with regards to
our applications and technologies by demonstrating
the actual products, as well as by showing examples
of extraordinary and imaginative images created with
the applications. Evangelism also includes serving
as the liaison between the engineering team and
the individual user of the productɎmaking sure that
features of Photoshop and Lightroom are under-
stood by people who use them. The range of indi-
viduals who use Photoshop on a daily basis is
extensiveɎfrom web, print and motion designers to
law enforcement officers, artists, scientists, photo-
journalists, wedding and portrait photographersɎall
of whom have different needs. An evangelist should
be able to recognize what features and components
of an application are most beneficial to a specific
group of users.
I also contribute to several publications and speak
at conferences and industry events, photography
workshops and fine art schools. I am the founder
of jkost.com, publisher of the Daily PS Tip (blogs.
adobe.com/jkost), and author of Window SeatɎ
The Art of Digital PhotographyɎwhich all help me
reach a broad and diverse number of Adobe users.
To complete the circle, I constantly gather customer
requests and provide product feedback to the team.
PS: I know that you do analytic singular photographs,
but you are best known for your collage work. Which
of these styles do you prefer and why?
JK: The two styles of image-making are so fund-
amentally different that I can really only speak to my
preference of certain aspects of one style over the
other. For example, when working on the Window
Seat project, all of the images were photographed
from commercial airlines as I flew from one event to
another. It was a very passive project, as I would sit
in my seat and look out of the window hoping that
something in the land/sky-scape would catch my
eye. I had no control over the speed and route of
the flight, the lighting or weather, or even which side
of the plane my seat was on (although I do try to
choose the shady-side).
My current personal project is photographing
landscapes while sitting in the passenger seat of a
moving vehicle (train, car, bus). I have some control,
such as the f-stop and speed at which I pan, but
the route is determined by the driver, the time of day
and the lighting is dependent on my travel schedule,
and my self-imposed rule is that I can’t go back to
capture something that I didn’t see, or wasn’t fast
enough to capture the first time. I appreciate giving
up control in order to allow myself permission to
simply experiment and take chances with my ima-
gery. It’s the spontaneity and coincidence of this
type of work that results in the gift of capturing a
vision that would otherwise remain unseen.
The collage work is on the other end of the spectrum.
I am able to control the exact elements that I want
to merge together to form a cohesive message. As
a result, I am able to create a composite image more
powerful than its individual parts. The interactive
process of selecting and assembling images is one
of the most challenging and thought-provoking as-
pects of my creative exploration. Although overall,
the images may appear serene and calm, the act
of creation is anything but passive. I begin with a
concept in mind, yet I may not know exactly how
the pieces will fit together at the end. As the image
Twilight,
Digital Print
Prison Walls,
Digital Print
Right
Previous Page
FEATURE:
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
____
takes on its own life, I often allow myself to explore
additional directions, sometimes finding that the final
image only faintly resembles the one first imagined.
The composite images mentally challenge me the
most.
PS: Your collages are personal narratives. How are
your ideas conceived and what is the process
you use for gathering image information for the
assemblages?
JK: I have created libraries of individual elements
ranging from photographs of textures and land-
scapes, to scans of found objects, to encaustic
paintings and charcoal drawings. When I am photo-
graphing (or painting or gathering) these ingredients,
I do not know exactly what I will use them for. At this
point, the photograph is not at all a final piece of
work; instead they are waiting to take their position
as a component of a larger message. The common
thread is that as I photograph each individual ele-
ment, it must evoke an emotional response. What
that response might be (positive or negative, com-
forting or confrontational) is not important at the
capture stage, because how the image will be used
at that point is not clear.
phototechmag.com 31
AN INTERVIEW WITH JULIEANNE KOST
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
32 photo technique S/O 2010
In order to keep track of the individual elements, I
import and keyword all of my images in Lightroom,
allowing me to quickly filter and find the images that
I need. I have also created collections of supporting
backgrounds, textures, color palettes, etc. from
which I draw components to build images and
convey my idea.
I don’t begin assembling any composite until I have
an idea/concept/statement that I want to make. After
deciding on an initial topic, I move forward to select
the primary image to be the subject of the illustration.
Then I build the supporting scene, drawing from my
library of elements. If, in the beginning, I want to try
several wildly diverse options, I will roughly sketch
these differing ideas and concepts (I am faster with
a pencil than with a computer). And of course, many
times I will photograph any necessary component(s)
required to complete the image.
Then begins the process of working in Photoshop.
I believe that the most significant recommendation
that I can give is to master your tools. And since
Photoshop is the single most important tool that I
use to create my digital composites, I know that it is
vital that I master features such as layers, masking,
Illusive,
Digital Print
Above
FEATURE:
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
the pen tool, blend modes and smart objects. Once
I am proficient in these techniques, the “tool” be-
comes invisible, and my mind is free to create
without hesitating and stumbling over the tech-
nical process. Look at the masters in any field and
you will see a beautiful relationship between the
tool and the creativityɎfrom the musicians and
their instruments to the painters and their brushes.
These experts of both the left and right side of the
brain have a tremendous advantage over those
who have to guess at one or the other. Knowing
the technical behaviors behind any tool will set
you free.
Because the photographer’s tool set is always
evolving, I give myself assignments based on a word
or concept such as “Drifting” or “Twilight.” It will be
a topic that I am free to take in any direction, there
is no right or wrong. I give myself permission to ex-
plore all of the different possibilities that the software
might have to offer, and the computer allows me
to discover what is possible in no other medium.
However, because the digital realm is so forgiving,
offering so many options for exploration, discipline
becomes part of the challenge. The paint is never
dry, the exposure is never fixed, and the print is
never finalɎall components can be done differently
Isostacy,
Digital Print
Above
phototechmag.com 33
AN INTERVIEW WITH JULIEANNE KOST
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
34 photo technique S/O 2010
Product Resources
Cameras: Canon 5D Mark II ; Lenses: Assorted Canon L
Lenses; Software: Adobe Photoshop CS5, Lightroom 3.
To ask a question or comment on this article, visit our online
Forum: www.phototechforum.com
Julieanne Kost is an accomplished digital artist, as well as an
internationally recognized teacher, presenter, writer and creative
representative of Adobe. She was selected by Fast Company
as one of the “100 Most Creative People in Business.” More of
Julieanne's work can be see on her website www.jkost.com.
at any point. Here the real art form is knowing when
to stop and realizing when you’ve said what you set
out to say.
PS: You told me that you seldom use third-party
software in creating your work. Is this true, and if
so, why?
JK: I rarely feel the need to leave Lightroom and
Photoshop to create my imagesɎincluding both
the individual stills and/or composites. However, I’m
not against adding tools to my repertoire. For ex-
ample, I have been learning Premiere Pro in order to
edit some of the digital video that I have been ex-
perimenting with. What’s more important to me
is that I won’t incorporate any imagery in my work
that I didn’t take or make (through photography,
painting, scanning, etc). I require my images to
be entirely my creations and not a derivative of
someone else’s work.
PS: Give me a discussion of this body of work in
terms of an overall theme. What permeates the work,
other than the fact that you created all of them, what
holds this body of work together so tightly?
JK: In my work I try to construct a visual world
realistic enough to appear familiar, yet obviously an
interpretation of the physical reality that surrounds
us. Because the images are not direct, concrete re-
presentations of people or places, viewers can inter-
pret them as they wishɎleaving the reality that they
hold true to explore, if only for an instant, the visual
placeholder of my thoughts and dreams. Because
the images use photographic elements, they are
almost plausible, yet the viewer knows that they are
not indeed reality. Mystical, dreamlike landscapes
with recurring subject matter unite to create a
simplistically coherent, interwoven body of work.
Because the components are created at different
times in different locations, I find that my work
falls somewhere between the more traditional
photographic practice of capturing a single decisive
moment and the time compression techniques used
to tell a story in cinematography. I create imaginary
scenes layering elements together that are uncon-
strained by linear time and physical location that
work together to form a cohesive message more
powerful than its individual parts.
PS: You are known internationally as the top
Photoshop instructor. How has working for Adobe
while also being a practicing artist helped you to
become such an excellent teacher?
JK: I believe that because I am not only a software
trainer, but also a working artist, I can relate to many
of the challenges that Adobe customers face both
as creative image-makers and as businessmen
and women. It can be difficult to keep up with
technology in this rapidly evolving industry, so I try
to make certain that the concepts I demonstrate
have a direct relationship to the work done by each
specific audience. With every lecture, my goal is
to make sure that every single person leaves with
a new understanding of either a feature, a concept
or a technology. I try to make learning the software
fun and appealing and to remove obstacles. With
every new release, I try to demonstrate a technology
that might ignite the imagination or give insight into
a new and more productive way of creating the
photographer’s vision.
Whisper,
Digital Print
Above
FEATURE:
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
phototechmag.com 35
And in the Beginning...
In this wacky, adrenaline and pixel driven world
of digital photography, we’re witnessing something
close to a reinvention of the medium rather reg-
ularly. In fact, this article looks at new hardware
and software that, without exaggeration, really does
represent a new beginning in the way we capture
and edit our images.
When Apple introduced its first iPhone in 2007,
many of us were amazed at the list of jaw-dropping
features the new gizmo sported. We could browse
the web, send emails, and synch our calendars
and address books, all while talking on the phone.
But few photographers had any inkling of what
creative potential lay under the LCD of Apple’s
new “phone.” Boy, was that ever destined to change!
Now here we are in the middle of 2010, with
another amazing iPhone hitting the stores. With
more resolution, a built-in flash (of sorts) and even
a second camera facing the user to facilitate video
conferencing, this 4th generation iPhone will once
again raise the bar on pocket connectivity andɎ
our concernɎgreat picture making. Sure, we ex-
pected more resolution (growing from three to
five mega pixels) but, to Apple’s credit, they didn’t
just jam more pixels into the same tiny chip (we
all know what happens with that scenarioɎsensor
noise). Instead, even with the added resolution,
the pixel sites themselves are the same size as in
the iPhone 3GS. Apple used the newest backside
illuminated CCD, in which the circuitry is placed
on the rear of the sensor where it doesn’t compete
Dan Burkholder
iPhone Meets iPad
Apple’s Two Coolest Gizmos Unite to Make Photography
Easy and Fun
(Figure 1) Tractors and Distant Catskills, New York. Stitched (Auto Stitch App) from 12 Captures on the iPhone 3GS
IPOD MEETS IPAD DAN BURKHOLDER
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
for photons with the image-forming parts of the
sensor. One result: low light shooting (a problem
with nearly all small sensor cameras) should be
markedly improved with the iPhone 4.
And then there was iPad
Spring brought more than flowers and insects to
the northern hemisphere as Apple introduced the
first viable tablet computer. With its 10" multi-
touch screen and 10-hour battery life, the iPad
is the first of surely many handheld devices that
will significantly alter our concept of computing.
As its most obvious behavior modification, the
iPad changes the entire paradigm of where you
go to compute. Now, instead of your going to the
computer, the computer goes with you. Upon
waking in the morning, you’ll grab the iPad instead
of the paper. Need to check email on the train?
Internet connectivity, great battery life and lap
friendliness (much better than laptop juggling)
make iPad an ideal commuter device. But how
does the iPad impact your photography, other than
as a sweet way to show your portfolio to friends,
colleagues and clients?
First, What the iPad isn’t
With no camera on board, you won’t be capturing
your images with this first generation iPad. And if
the blogs and speculators are on target, it’s likely
we’ll see a front-facing camera on the iPad (for
video conferencing) before Apple equips it with a
facing-the-scene camera, as on the iPhone. Once
we understand the limitations, let’s explore how
the iPad partners with your iPhone.
Getting Your iPhone Captures onto Your iPad
For the photo in figure 1, I made 12 handheld ex-
posures on the iPhone and thenɎusing the brilliant
Auto Stitch appɎstitched the overlapping images
together. I could have proceeded to edit the image
in the field with the iPhone but, shucks, there I
was with this brand new iPad, so as you can see in
figure 2, I sat down in the woods and proceeded to
edit the image on the iPad instead. This is where
you’re silently asking, “How did Dan move his
image from the iPhone to the iPad?"
When you shoot with a normal digital camera
(removable memory cards), you can use Apple’s
Camera Connection Kit to download your photos.
This two-part kit includes two connectors: one with
an SD card slot (SDHC compatible but not SDXC)
and one with USB. Apple’s done a good job here,
supporting not just jpegs but many RAW formats
for import (see Apple’s website).
The Camera Connection Kit can also be used to
move images from your iPhone: just plug your
synch/charge cable into your iPhone and connect
the other end to the USB connector from the
Camera Connection Kit. Up pop your images for
import. But wires and connectors are so 2009!
Can’t we find a no-wires way to get our photos to
move wherever we want them?
What about Emailing Photos to get them from
the iPhone to the iPad?
If you have an Internet connection (wifi Edge or
3G network), emailing works just fine. (For a full
resolution image sent via email, you should Copy
it in the Camera RollɎhold down on the image
for a secondɎand then Paste it into the body of
your email message. If you email normally from
the camera roll by selecting the image and tapping
on the Send icon, the photo will be reduced to
480 x640 pixels.)
Apps for Moving Your Photos Around
For getting photos from Point A to Point B, serious
photographers will want better options than email.
With a plethora of apps designed to help get your
photos just where you want them, I’ll touch upon
(Figure 2) Dan hard at work editing iPhone images in the
Catskills (photo by Jill Skupin Burkholder).
36 photo technique S/O 2010
TECH:
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
a few of the most useful, cheap (as in free), easy
and designed to work with wifi, Bluetooth, and
sometimes either.
Wifi or Bluetooth for Photo Transfers
Our two current (and non-ATT) wireless protocols
are wifi and Bluetooth. Without going into the
geek-speak details of how they compare, be aware
of two things:
1. Wifi will be a faster photo-moving method in
almost all situations (it has more bandwidth).
2. Bluetooth is peer-to-peer, meaning it will be
available even when you don’t have a wifi
network to tap into.
When shopping for apps that let you move images
from your iPhone (where your camera is after all)
to the iPad, think about the situations in which
you’ll be shooting. If you’ll be surrounded by a
friendly (and open) wifi network, it’s hard to beat
Photo Transfer App ($2.99, www.PhotoTransfer
App.com). You can transfer up to 50 images at once
from iPhone to iPad, iPad to Computer, iPhone to
computer, Computer to iPad, or any combination
of the bunch. Figure 3 shows Transfer App in action,
in this case being used to send images from an iPad
to a desktop computer. On the left in figure 3 you
see Photo Transfer App on the iPad, and on the
right is a browser window on a Mac, showing the
(Figure 3) Using Photo Transfer App to wirelessly move images from the iPad to a desktop computer. On the left is
the screen you see on your iPad; on the right is your computer's browser window.
IPOD MEETS IPAD DAN BURKHOLDER
phototechmag.com 37
seven images about to be moved from the iPad to
the Mac. Photo Transfer App is amazingly simple,
fast and easy, but for it to work as advertised, all
devices must be on the same wifi network. What if
you’re in the field where a wifi network is missing
in action? This is where Bluetooth comes into play.
Bluetooth might not be as fast as wifi, but as a peer-
to-peer sharing protocol, it can come in handy as
an image transferring method.
A Couple of My Favorites
IFiles ($0.99, www.ifilesapp.com). This app blows
me away every time I use it. Think of it as the Swiss
Army Knife of iPhone/iPad transfer tools. Using
either Bluetooth or wifi, you can send photos and
other files to and from other i-devices or your Mac
or PC. You can even create zip files to email a
group of images in a tidy package. At press time
this app had not been optimized for the iPad, but it
works just fine for me.
Bluetooth Photo Share (www.nathanpeterson.com)
is a no-nonsense and free app using Bluetooth to
shuttle files between your iPhone and iPad. (Note:
usable only with 3G or later iPhones.) And it pro-
mises to keep all your resolution with no lossy com-
pression. If Bluetooth is your weapon of choice,
this free app can’t be beat.
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
_______
iPhone and iPad as a shooting team
Fasten your seat belts! The Camera for iPad app
($0.99, http://headlightinc.com/camera.php) not
only lets you fire the iPhone shutter remotely (from
your iPad), it also instantly sends the image to your
iPad so you can start editing on the larger screen
right away. That would be cool enough, but when
you learn Camera for iPad can also be configured
to use the iPad as a fill flash (take the picture with
your iPhone and the iPad screen will light-up to
provide fill)Ɏgood grief, how can you not want to
spend all of $0.99 for this app?
Editing Photos on the iPad
You’ve heard me rave about the gorgeous LCD on
the iPadɎa good reason for doing your post-pro-
cessing on the iPad. Let’s explore other rationales.
Sidebar:
But first, a warning: be very careful with using
iPhone apps on the iPad. I was shocked the first
time I edited a 3mp image on iPad only to discover
the resolution had been trashed because I used
one of my favorite iPhone apps. Splurge and get
photo apps specifically made for the iPad. Not only
will you preserve your resolution, you’ll probably
discover additional features that were not included
with the iPhone version.
Upgrades is an important reason to consider editing
on the iPad instead of the iPhone. The new iPhone
4 with its higher resolution camera may “break” the
iPhone’s photo editing apps. Surely a temporary
condition (app developers are chomping at the bit
to have new versions of their software), it’s still
likely that we’ll go through a dry spell with reliance
on some of our most trusted iPhone photo editing
apps. The iPad apps, on the other hand, are ready
to take on larger images with aplomb.
A Couple of Typical Editing Tasks
My purpose isn’t to overwhelm you with a smorg-
asbord of iPad apps to lust after and purchase. Rest
assured, future photo technique features will take care
of that. But I can’t resist teasing you with a couple
very sweet photo apps I’m using on the iPad.
Figure 4 shows Photogene ($3.99, www.mobile-
pond.com) and Filterstorm ($1.99, www.filterstorm.
com) in action on the iPad. Photogene has been a
best-selling iPhone app, offering a wide selection
of controls with an intuitive interface. When they
ported it to the iPad, they added Curves, Red-
Eye removal and lots of other useful techniques.
Filterstorm is a newcomer and is iPad-only. This
app cleverly gives us Color Range, Gradients and
locally brushed filter effects using a powerfully easy
approach. On the right side of figure 4, I’m using
Filterstorm to vignette the image. Simply dragging
the two circles on the image locates where the
vignette starts and stops. When I use Filterstorm to
demo certain image processing techniques, students
(Figure 4) Photogene and Filterstorm on the iPad.
38 photo technique S/O 2010
TECH:
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
_________
_______
___
IPOD MEETS IPAD DAN BURKHOLDER
To ask a question or comment on this article, visit our online
Forum: www.phototechforum.com
Dan Burkholder has been teaching digital imaging workshops for
15 years at venues including The School of the Art Institute,
Chicago; The Royal Photographic Society, Madrid; The International
Center of Photography, NY, Mesilla Digital Imaging Workshops, NM
and many others. Dan’s latest book, The Color of Loss (University of
Texas Press, 2008), documents the flooded interiors of post-Katrina
New Orleans and is the first coffee table book done entirely using
HDR methods. His award-winning book, Making Digital Negatives
for Contact Printing, has become a standard resource in the fine-
artphotography community. Dan’s iPhone images can be seen at
www.iPhoneArtistry.com/.
light-up with a “now I get it!” response that eluded
them in Photoshop. It’s $1.99 well spent.
Coming Soon to an iPad Near You
Some predictions don’t need a crystal ball. In no
time we’ll have apps that let us Live-View our
DSLR images on the iPad’s LCD. (Who wants
to mess with a tethered laptop in the field?) We’ll
tweak focus, change apertures and adjust flash ex-
posure compensationɎnot on the tiny camera
LCD, but right on the iPad. And that’s just the
proverbial tip of the iceberg. Our cameras and
handheld devices will become increasingly more
friendly and integrated. And, as we’ve seen with
the iPhone, they’ll become one and the same.
I’ve often said, “If you don’t like change, Photo-
graphy’s not the place to be.” My wife constantly
cautions me that not everyone is as enchanted with
this change as I am. She could be right, though I’ll
never understand how that can be. Photography
is such an exciting field of play. It keeps our minds
alert and our wallets empty. And in six months or
so, you might reread this article to remember how
things were “in the beginning.”
(Figure 5) Window in Woods, Catskills. Stitched on the iPhone
from 63 individual captures
phototechmag.com 39
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
_________________
Although I have always owned a 35mm camera,
I have never been comfortable with the small
format and have preferred the medium and large
format cameras, the 4x5 and 8x10. Not only did
the large negatives provide more detail and greater
range, they forced me to slow down and think
more about the process of making a photograph.
As a result, the tedious nature of working with
large format cameras has helped me in making a
logical transition to making photographs with the
Hulcherama panoramic camera.
The camera is based on the old circuit camera from
the turn of the last century, but the Hulcherama
uses 220 roll film, which is easier to work with
than the enormous rolled film used in the circuit
camera. I have a custom-made tripod that allows
360° Panorama
me to elevate the camera 15 or 20 feet into the air.
Since there are often many obstructions at ground
level, elevating the camera allows me to get above
stop signs, fireplugs, parked cars, sewer lids, etc.
You get a much purer picture from my elevated
point of view.
I prefer to shoot color negative film because it is
easier to deal with lighting variations you get by
pointing the camera in all different directions.
Sometimes the light will change in an exposure
when the sun comes out or goes in, and that
is easier to correct because of the use of color
negative film. Due to economic considerations,
camera manufactures have not developed digital
panoramic cameras to the same degree that they
have developed point and shoot cameras, so I
Thomas Schiff
40 photo technique S/O 2010
PORTFOLIO:
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
360° PANORAMIC THOMAS SCHIFF
Corning Museum, Corning, New York
have chosen to stay with the color film camera.
The quality of the color in the film process is
much greater and better controlled. The disad-
vantage is that it is very time consuming to
get the film processed, proofed, digitized and
run through the computer programming pro-
cess. The final images are printed on a Fuji
LightJet 5000 Archive printer.
In conventional photography we are taught to
compose a photograph by selectively cropping
out the extraneous parts of an image. Ansel
Adams talked about cutting out a square in a
piece of cardboard and looking through that
square to create the composition. Telephoto
lenses allow you to do this in the extreme. Pan-
oramic photographs are composed by doing
Art Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Lincoln Center Opera House, New York, New York
phototechmag.com 41
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
the opposite. When you take the opposite approach,
not only do you get a view in a 360 degree circle,
but I prefer to use a wide angle lens which allows
me to capture more of an image above and below
the horizon line. So instead of cropping out the
images, I have something that allows me to look in
all directions.
The challenge in doing 360° photography is to find
an ideal vantage point, that is, the right tripod
placement and camera height in order to get the
best photograph. I want to transform 3-D space into
a 2-D image. With exterior shots, I have to choose
the right time of day to get the right sun reflection
on building surfaces.
I have always been drawn to man made struc-
tures. I think the work that has been done by great
architects is very interesting. The variety of styles:
Frank Lloyd Wright, Eero Saarinen, Philip Johnson,
Richard Meier and many other architects, intrigues
me more than what I see in nature. So many arch-
itectural photographs concentrate on the exterior of
the building, but I find that the panoramic camera
works equally well when defining interiors. Log-
istically interiors are more challenging because you
are required to acquire permission with the building
owners and tenants, so a lot of coordination needs
to be worked out prior to the visit to make this hap-
pen. But the extra effort is worthwhile because of
the results obtained.
Obviously, when dealing with the transportation
of cumbersome equipment and the necessity of
scouting out locations, it is easier to make photos in
your own backyard. It’s also easier to revisit nearby
42 photo technique S/O 2010
PORTFOLIO:
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
360° PANORAMIC THOMAS SCHIFF
locations under different conditions, seasons, and
times of day. But as you exhaust that subject matter,
you have to spread out. I did a book on Cincinnati in
1998 and one on the state of Ohio in 2003. Currently
I have been shooting the large variety of American
architecture in numerous locations. So as I travel
across the country to each site, I make photographs
on different book projects that are in various stages
of completion. I soon hope to have books out on
Frank Lloyd Wright's buildings, the architecture of
American theatres, American libraries, Columbus,
Indiana, religious architecture and art museums.
I like to assign myself projects from ideas that cap-
ture my imagination. The projects listed above are
among those I have taken on myself, but I have
also enjoyed projects that I have been invited to
do, such as a book on the parks of Cincinnati and
the campus architecture of Northern Kentucky
University. I’m working on all these projects simul-
taneously because they take many years to plan,
execute and publish. Consequently, the work is on-
going and seemingly never ending. Being immer-
sed in a number of projects gives me the flexibility
to photograph in great variety of locations, which is
how I like to work.
Nelson Center, Pheonix, Arizona
phototechmag.com 43
Product Resources
Camera: Hulcherama panoramic; Lenses: Mamiya 35mm,
Nikor PC 28mm; Film: Kodak, Fujicolor Pro.
To ask a question or comment on this article, visit our online
Forum: www.phototechforum.com
Thomas R. Schiff is a lifelong resident of Cincinnati, OH. Although his
professional life has been in the insurance business, photography is
his passion; he's been shooting with the Hulcherama 360 Panoramic
Camera since 1994. The results of his panoramic work have appeared
in gallery exhibitions and in books which include Vegas 360, 2008,
BrightCity Books. www.brightcitybooks.com.
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
As a creative medium, photography is resistant
to change. Every new technique that comes along
is embraced by some and adamantly rejected by
others. In the case of tripwire photography, the
absence of a human being present at the decisive
moment to trip the shutter might be regarded as
another automated step with the perceived aban-
donment of artistic control.
Many iconic images are the result of pure seren-
dipity, but just as many are staged or at least
anticipated. Consider the original clouded leo-
pard images produced by National Geographic in
2000. They were camera trap images and they
looked the part; the subject was flashed straight
on, the retinas glowing with reflected flashlight.
The images were nonetheless iconic because
they represented the first time that the species
was documented to celluloid. But “documented”
is the word that worries the purist. The clouded
Scott Linstead
44 photo technique S/O 2010
TECH:
Tripwire Photography
and the
Outdoor Studio
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
TRIPWIRE PHOTOGRAPHY & THE OUTDOOR STUDIO SCOTT LINSTEAD
leopard was rendered in the same way that a
hunter renders a 12 point buck with a trail camera.
A document was produced to confirm the exist-
ence of something elusive. But artistic control
seemed as lost to the wildlife photographer as it
is irrelevant to the hunter.
Almost a decade later, Steve Winter of National
Geographic tackles the snow leopard of the
Himalayas with camera traps. The results exhibit
creative and atmospheric lighting, serendipitous
snowflakes and the clever mixing of ambient and
flashed light. The images win awards, are pub-
lished extensively and their massive production
efforts are documented in TV specials. The world
gazes in awe at the most unique renditions of the
wildest of creatures and the critics grumble about
the appropriateness of camera traps in the most
prestigious of photo contests.
The occurrence of the unexpected produces a
stunning image. The photographer carefullychose
focal lengths, lighting approaches and camera
positions just like any other photographer would.
His images were no more defined or limited
by the camera trap than by any other piece
of technology.
The technology that I employ is somewhat differ-
ent than the simple trail camera. I am not limited
to tripping a camera when a large subject goes
lumbering by. Using the Phototrap, I can photo-
graph not only the elusive, but also the unimag-
inably quick. The Phototrap is a device that inter-
faces with either your camera or your flash. In the
most basic sense, the trap is intended to trigger the
shutter of your camera when the photographic
subject passes through a defined position in
space. The two most obvious cases where the trap
is essential is when the photographer cannot be
there to trip the shutter or when the event occurs
so quickly that it is beyond the practical reaction
time of the photographer.
Unlike the majority of what is currently available
on the market, the Phototrap employs a diver-
ging, infrared beam, as opposed to lasers to
define the trigger point in space. An infrared
emitter and detector face each other. As soon
as activity breaks the beam, the camera shutter
is tripped. The unit has variable sensitivity,
and the working distance between the emitter
and detector is 42" maximum. (More technical
information is available at www.phototrap.com.)
Suffice to say that the approach affords the
user a degree of user-friendliness and intuitive
operation that betray any preconceived notions
of the excessively technical nature of this kind
of photography. I overcome the limitations of
human reaction time and endurance for photo-
graphing phenomena that occur once a day and
on no particular schedule. This is the domain that
is popularly known as high-speed photography.
During a five-week shoot in South Texas, I made
extensive use of the Phototrap. Shown here are a
handful of images revealing “behind the curtain.”
The barn owls on the ranch build nests in any
man-made structure that they can get access to.
My first effort involved installing a 60mm macro
lens inside a turkey hunting blind to photograph
the barn owls from the inside-the-nest perspective
as they returned from their nocturnal hunts.
Thinking in terms of flash as the singular source
of light takes some getting used to. Two flashes
were positioned outside the blind: one overhead
and a lower-powered flash fired from below to
avoid letting the undersides of the owl to fall into
complete shadow. An incoming owl trips the
beam on the way into the blind and effectively
creates a self portrait.
Barn Owl and Mexican Free Tail Bat–Nikon D3 with 60mm Nikkor Macro lens
and four flashes.
phototechmag.com 45
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
Barn Swallow–Nikon D3 with 150mm Sigma Macro lens and three flashes.
Moth–Nikon D3 with 150mm Sigma Macro lens and two flashes.
Barn Owl with Rat–Nikon D3 with 60mm Nikkor Macro and four flashes.
TECH:
46 photo technique S/O 2010
The initial results were as expected: multiple re-
turns with a myriad of prey items. Most of them
were rodents in various states of mutilation,
many of which were headless. Among the images
that made the final cut was one in which the
rodent appeared to still be alive and in relatively
good condition. But the real treat was an event
that I could not take credit for, at least no more
credit than any photographer who happens to
be at the physical and temporal dimensions we
call “right”. A wayward bat, perhaps looking for
a roost at the end of its nightly bug hunt, flew
towards the entrance to the blind and tripped the
camera at the moment that one of the barn owls
was peeking out.
At a deer hunting blind, where one of those
windows had been left open, a barn owl couple
used this entrance to set up a nest inside. In this
case, I installed a 24mm lens at the opening and
tried not to include the edges of the window in
the final image. Two flashes, set up identically to
those used in the turkey blind, were triggered as
the owl flew in. To avoid the black backgrounds
that plague night photography, I left the shutter
open for another 30 seconds after the initial flash
exposure. This allowed traces of the available
light to creep in and produce an image with
greater depth, showing the deep blues and subtle
oranges of the night sky.

The deer mouse image was conceived out of the
desire to tell a story about this crafty rodent. Four
deer mice were captured in non-lethal traps and
then released into an elaborate set with hope
of recounting the story of a deer mouse and its
attempt to obtain some dried, discarded corn.
Props from around the barn were used, including
the tip of an axe handle from which the mouse
would have presumably climbed up and launched
itself. A speedlight coupled to a homemade soft
box provided the frontal lighting and a snooted
speedlight provided the backlighting. Finally, a
third flash was used at a low setting to light the
barn wall and further clarify the location and
avoid a black background.
The barn swallow was purely an exercise in
time saving. Other images took priority over this
rather commonplace species, and I simply left
the camera in place for a day and then culled the
results to find a suitable pose. A similar approach
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
TRIPWIRE PHOTOGRAPHY & THE OUTDOOR STUDIO SCOTT LINSTEAD
To ask a question or comment on this article, visit our online
Forum: www.phototechforum.com
Product Resources
Cameras: Nikon D300, D3; Lenses: 60mm Nikkor
Macro, 150mm Sigma Macro; Lighting: 4X Nikon SB-
800 Flashes; Tripod: Manfrotto 090 and 486 ballhead;
Software: Adobe Photoshop CS3, Nikon Capture NX2;
Phototrap.
Scott Linstead is an internationally published, freelance wildlife
photographer/writer who worked as an aerospace engineer and
a high-school teacher before moving on to professional wildlife
photography. His clients include Natural History Magazine,
Hewlett Packard, Ranger Rick Magazine and a number of
wildlife publications in North America and Europe. His column
on the techniques of bird photography appears in every issue
of Outdoor Photography Canada.
phototechmag.com 47
was employed to produce the moth-to-a-bulb
image. Leaving an asthetically pleasing bulb
hanging in space with the invisible beam ex-
tending vertically and to the left of the bulb pro-
duced a variety of poses, some out of focus. But
an illuminating albeit rhetorical question is to
ask how the results may have differed if I had
been there to trip the shutter myself.
The leaping leopard frog was a matter of recog-
nizing a scene that always occurred outside the
reach of a camera. In daylight, the frogs are next
to impossible to approach and invariably leap
into the pond well before I could get within
camera’s range. Capturing a number of frogs
and building a convincing pond set seemed only
somewhat less daunting than stalking the frogs
endlessly and perhaps fruitlessly. The pond was
a four by twelve foot affair, lined with garbage
bags and sprinkled with the local sand. Front
lighting was accomplished by the soft box and
the snoot provided the backlighting to illum-
inate the semi-transparent extremities of the
amphibian. It turned out that placing the frog on
the muddy shore and waiting till it felt the need
to jump was a much more reasonable exercise in
patience than the hopeless stalking of the frogs
at the real pond.
Surely the camera trap and high-speed photo-
graphy are not for everyone. Admittedly, my
initial foray into high-speed photography was
largely motivated by economics. It seemed fru-
gal to produce captivating images close to home
rather than constantly traveling to exotic loca-
tions. Now, the trap follows me to locations exotic
and otherwise. From a commercial perspective,
the Phototrap helps me to further distinguish
my work from the masses. But from an artistic
perspective, it tears down the walls put in place
by technological and practical limitations.
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
Scanner GIass:Anti-Newton &
Clear. Most Manufacturers.
Platens, Holders, Custom Cuts
Focal Point 386-860-3918
www.f ointinc.com
Marketplace
Adorama Camera, Inc.
www.adorama.com
Delta 1/C.P.M., Inc.
www.cpmdelta1.com
Elsevier, Inc./Focal Press
www.focalpress.com
EZWebPlayer.com
www.EZWebPlayer.com
Focal Point
www.fpointinc.com
HP Marketing Corp
www.hpmarketingcorp. om
photo technique Magazine
www.phototechmag.com
Phototrap
www.phototrap.com
Regal Photo Products, Inc.
Sony
www.sony.com
Sto-Fen Products
www.stofen.com
C3
39
C4
14
48
7
48
14
39
C2-1
48
LimitedEdition
Prints
by photo technique magazine's
contributing photographers
See portfolios, prices and ordering
information at www.phototechmag.com
Including work by:
Howard Bond · Gene Fedorov
Cole Thompson · Nolan Preece
Book of Palms 3060, 11
"
x 14
",
Tom Millea
Ad Index
Visit www.phototechmag.com
º Upcoming issue preview
º Subscription service
º Past issues and artic|es archives
º Current photo news and events
º Purchase Specia| Edition Prints

º Readers' Ga||ery
º Underexposed Emerging Photographers' Ga||ery

º New feature-Photography Schoo|s
º photo technique e-|etter |ink
º photo technique Forum |ink
º Innovative products reviewed
º Mesi||a Digita| Imaging Workshops
6XEVFULEH
WR photo technique
PDJD]LQH
phototechmag.com
847-647-2900 ext. 1303
6600 West Touhy Ave. Niles, IL 60714
Bhumika Bhatia
XQGHUH[SRVHG
>HPHUJLQJSKRWRJUDSKHUV@
See some amazing work by emerging
photographers or submit your own portfolio.
www.phototechmag.com
p
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
_____
______________
_________________
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
q
q
M
M
q
q
M
M
qM
THE WORLD’S NEWSSTAND®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Issue | Next Page
Techniques
®
PHOTO
________________
¯
¯
Ó
Ó
¯
¯
Ó
Ó
¯Ó
ÌØÛ ÉÑÎÔÜ•Í ÒÛÉÍÍÌßÒÜ
®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Ìssue | Next Page
Ì»½¸²·¯«»-
r
ÐØÑÌÑ
¯
¯
Ó
Ó
¯
¯
Ó
Ó
¯Ó
ÌØÛ ÉÑÎÔÜ•Í ÒÛÉÍÍÌßÒÜ
®
Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Front Cover | Search Ìssue | Next Page
Ì»½¸²·¯«»-
r
ÐØÑÌÑ
__________________________
______________________________________

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful