Renewables Obligation: DRAFT Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance

Document type: DRAFT Guidance Ref: 170/08 Date of publication: 19 December 2008

Deadline for response: 9 February 2009 Target audience: This document may be of interest to generators using biomass and/or waste fuels, trade associations, fuel suppliers and other interested parties.
Overview:
This document provides generators using biomass and waste fuels with draft guidance on how to meet the fuel measurement and sampling requirements of the Renewables Obligation. It details the requirements of the legislation, what we expect from generators, and suggestions on how generators can best meet these requirements. It is not intended to be a definitive legal guide. This document is an update of guidance 57/07 (published 29 March 2007) to encompass the latest round of reforms to the Renewables Obligation Order which take effect from 1 April 2009.

Biomass, Co-firing and Waste

Contact name and details: Jonathan Blagrove- Manager – Renewables Team – Tel: 020 7901 7094 Email: jonathan.blagrove@ofgem.gov.uk Team: Regulatory Services

Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008

Context
The Government's aim is that renewable energy will make an increasing contribution to energy supplies in the UK, with renewable energy playing a key role in the wider Climate Change Programme. The Renewables Obligation, the Renewables Obligation (Scotland) and the Northern Ireland Renewables Obligation are designed to incentivise renewable generation into the electricity generation market. These schemes were introduced by the then Department of Trade and Industry, the Scottish Executive and the Department of Enterprise, Trade and Investment respectively and are administered by the Gas and Electricity Markets Authority (whose day-to-day functions are performed by Ofgem). The schemes are provided for in secondary legislation. The first Renewables Obligation Order came into force in April 2002, as did the first Renewables Obligation (Scotland) Order. These Orders were subject to review in 2004, 2005 2006 and 2007, and in 2008 for Scotland. The first Renewables Obligation Order (Northern Ireland) came into force in April 2005. New Orders came into force on 1 April 2005, 1 April 2006 and 1 April 2007. The Renewables Obligation Order (Northern Ireland) 2007 was amended on 19 October to allow for its continued effective operation within the new Single Electricity Market arrangements for the island of Ireland with effect from 1 November 2007. All three Orders will be replaced with new Orders on 1 April 2009, which introduce banding and grandfathering and other changes to the Renewables Obligation. The Orders place an obligation on licensed electricity suppliers in England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland respectively to source an increasing proportion of electricity from renewable sources. Suppliers meet their obligations by presenting sufficient Renewables Obligation Certificates ("ROCs") to cover their obligations. Where suppliers do not have sufficient ROCs to meet their obligation, they must pay an equivalent amount into a fund, the proceeds of which are paid back on a prorated basis to those suppliers that have presented ROCs. In particular, this guidance has been updated to reflect a number of changes made as part of the reform of the Renewables Obligation, some of which have been designed specifically for fuelled stations. The introduction of banding and grandfathering will have a significant impact on the number of ROCs that can potentially be claimed by fuelled generators, and this will in turn have a major bearing on the workings of the Obligation as a whole. This draft guidance document has been written on the basis of the draft Renewables Obligation Order 2009, published by the Department for Energy and Climate Change on 2 December 2009, and the Government response to the statutory consultation on the draft Renewables Obligation Order 2009, also published on 2 December 2009. Readers should be aware that some Articles within this document have been referred to as “Article {X}" reflecting both the draft Order in its current form and the formal Government response.

Office of Gas and Electricity Markets

Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008

Associated Documents
Readers should be aware of the following documents which support this publication. These documents are available on our website at www.ofgem.gov.uk. • • • • Renewables Obligation : guidance for generators over 50kW Renewables Obligation : guidance for generators under 50kW Renewables and CHP Register User Guide Fuel measurement and sampling questionnaire

Office of Gas and Electricity Markets

.......................................20  Energy crops grown overseas ....................................................... 12  The nature of the legislation ...............................................................................................................................15  “Standard” and “co-fired” ROCs ...............................................16  Generating stations not relying on Article 27 .......................................................14  Biomass ........................13  This guidance document ......................................................................................................................................................................13  Queries .... i  Summary ........ 7  Consultation summary .............................................................................................. 7  Queries .............................................Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Table of Contents Context ..........................................12  Open and consistent .....................................................................................................14  Waste ............................................................................................................... 9  Areas of administrative change due new legislation ....................................19  Energy Crops ...................................................................19  The amount of CHP ROCs to be issued ............................................................................... and co-firing ....19  Generating stations fuelled by peat ...12  Our approach ........16  Generating stations relying on Article 27 ........................................ 9  Consultation response ..................17  Article 24 (1) (a) ..................................................................................... 6  This guidance document .........................................................10  1.................................... 9  Background .........................................................................................................14  Fuel that can treated as biomass ..........................................................20  Definition ........................................................................................17  Combined Heat and Power Quality Assurance programme ..........16  Redemption of standard and co-fired ROCs ............................................ 9  Consultation on guidance for the Renewables Obligation with respect to fuel measurement and sampling ..........................................................................15  Co-firing and co-fired ROCs ...........................................................................................................................................18  Eligibility of specific fuels ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 6  Our role under the Renewables Obligation ................................................................................................................. 14  The definitions of biomass..................................................................................................................................................................20  Interpretation ..................................18  Article 24 (c) ................................................................................................................................13  2................................14  100% biomass ...............12  Legislative and administrative changes .................................................................................................................................................................... Eligibility ......................... Introduction .....................15  Eligibility for claiming co-fired ROCs according to the use of fossil fuel or waste for Article 27 purposes .................................................... waste.....................................................................................................18  Liquid fossil fuel ...................................................................................17  Eligibility for stations using waste ......20  Office of Gas and Electricity Markets .......................18  Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) .....................17  Advanced Conversion Technologies ............................................19  Eligibility for claiming CHP ROCs ......................................................................................19  Calculating the number of ROCs issued ...................................

.......................................................................35  Fuel type ...................................................33  Using a standard methodology ................ Sustainability reporting ..........................................................................................................................29  Sampling frequency ..........34  FMS procedures for stations using heterogeneous waste with a fossil fuel content lower than 50 per cent .................... FMS .36  Evidence ..............................................................................................................................29  Verification ..................................................................21  Letter of intent ..................................................... 25  What is FMS? .............25  When to submit FMS procedures ................23  4.................................................................39  Office of Gas and Electricity Markets ....................................................31  Distance and transport conditions ................................................................................................................................................31  Auditing for stations using off-site measurement .............26  Using estimates .............................................................21  Binding contracts .............................................................37  Mass balance ..33  Measuring weight or volume and energy content ...............27  Weight or volume measurement in the month of burn ................................................................................................................26  A case-by-case approach .........................................................32  Access to premises ...35  Content of evidence .............................................................................30  Storage ..................27  Stations using only 100 per cent biomass fuels ....................................................Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 3....................................................................................................................................................................................36  Changes in the fuel stream .................................................................................................. 37  What information is required? .29  Sampling fuels for energy content ......................23  Comfort Letters ..................................................................................27  New and improved FMS procedures ..............................................................................23  Energy crops going through a process ....................................................................23  Mass balance .........34  Verifying results ...............................28  Verification ...............25  Why FMS? ..............28  Excluding biomass not used for electricity generation......................................................................in principle and in practice ........................32  FMS procedures for stations using waste with a fossil fuel content greater than 50 per cent .......................................................................................................................36  Reviewing the level of the declared renewable content ......26  The timeframe for agreeing FMS procedures .......................................................................................................................................................22  Multiple contracts/letters ...................................................................25  Accurate and reliable information ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................30  Gross Calorific Value (GCV) ..........................32  Agreeing FMS Procedures ...................................................................................................................30  Off-site measurement and sampling ......................................................26  The format of an FMS procedure .....................................................................................30  Contamination .................................34  Fuel type .................................................................................................................................................................28  Weighted averaging ............................................................33  Initial sampling .........................................................................................................................................................39  The format of a sustainability report ........................................................35  Sources of information .................................................................................................................................................................................................

....42  Statistical accuracy .........47  The timeframe for submitting a sustainability report .......................................................................................... 41  Fuel measurement and sampling plans .........................................43  Electronic Information .................................................................................................................................. 55  Stock level indicator template ........................41  Monthly data..........................................................................................................41  Fuel Maintenance ........................................41  Fuel Approval ...................................................................................................39  Incomplete and overdue sustainability reports ...................................40  2 3 4 5 – – – – Generation types ...................39  Information that is not available ......................... ........................................................................................................Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 5.........44  Using the Renewables and CHP Register ................... 48  Grandfathering provisions flow diagram ................ 59  Office of Gas and Electricity Markets .................................................. 54  Banding provisions flow diagram .................................... Submitting information ............................................ 46  Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Certain statutory guidance on social and environmental matters issued by the Secretary of State........................................................................................44  Appendices ...........................................................................................40  Audit..................................................................................................................................................43  Clear and accurate information ....................... 45  Appendix 1 – The Authority’s Powers and Duties ..........................................................42  Rounding .....................................

Due to the extensive revisions to the Order and Ofgem's adoption of our online process for accreditation and ROC issue. Our role under the Renewables Obligation The Renewables Obligation Order (RO) and the Renewables Obligation (Scotland) (ROS) Order detail Ofgem's powers and functions in respect of the Renewables Obligation in England and Wales and in Scotland respectively. This is the primary legislation from which the RO and ROS were borne.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Summary This document provides guidance to fuelled generating stations that wish to benefit from the Renewables Obligation. The RO was subject to review during 2008-2009. Changes made via the Energy Act 2008 have given the government the enabling powers to introduce the differential rewards that have fundamentally changed the ROC reward structure. This review was undertaken by the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) the Scottish Executive and the NI Department of Enterprise. Trade and Investment (DETI). this document has been altered in each section rather than dedicating a specific section to the changes. It sets out those renewable source technologies and fuels that are likely to be eligible to receive support under the Renewables Obligation Order 2009. SROCs and NIROCs. reference to the review should be taken to encompass the review undertaken by all three departments. the Renewables Obligation (Scotland) Order 2009 and the Renewables Obligation Order (Northern Ireland) 2009 (the Orders). the level that this support will be at and how fuelled generating stations can meet the requirements of the legislation. Those functions include: • • • • • accrediting generating stations as being capable of generating electricity from eligible renewable energy sources issuing Renewable Obligation Certificates (ROCs). Unless apparent from the context. Unless specifically identified. The use of 'Ofgem'. The term "the Act" refers to the Electricity Act 1989 (as amended). ROS and NIRO and where "ROC" is used it denotes ROCs. Scottish Renewable Obligation Certificates (SROCs) establishing and maintaining a register of ROCs and SROCs revoking ROCs and SROCs where necessary monitoring compliance with the requirements of the Orders Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 6 . 'us'. It has been updated since it was last published in March 2007 to take into account changes made to the legislation that will take effect in April 2009. where "RO" is used it denotes the RO. 'our' and 'we' are used interchangeably when referring to the exercise of the Authority's powers and functions under the Orders.

Notification of the guidance will be sent by email to all accredited fuelled generators. However the NIAER continues to retain legislative responsibility for the NIRO. This is a guidance document only. For example. It is not intended to provide comprehensive legal advice on how the Orders should be interpreted. The document does not purport to anticipate every scenario which may arise.gov. Written queries should be sent to the address on the front of this document clearly marked for the attention of the Renewables Administrator.uk with the email clearly marked. Scottish Ministers and the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland. It is intended to be a working document and may be updated from time to time. It replaces our Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance which we published in March 2007. We administer the Northern Ireland Renewables Obligation (NIRO) on behalf of the Northern Ireland Authority for Energy Regulation (NIAER) under an Agency Services Agreement. Any separate guidance published in addition to this document will be posted on our website. we will adopt an approach consistent with the relevant legislation. Queries All queries in relation to our functions under the Orders should be emailed to renewable@ofgem. This guidance document This document describes our procedures for the implementation of the RO for fuelled generating stations. and reflects changes to the legislation in 2009. Under this agreement the Authority is required to carry out the functions listed above in respect of Northern Ireland Renewables Obligation Certificates (NIROCs). Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 7 .Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 • • • • • • calculating annually the buy-out price resulting from the adjustments made to reflect changes in the RPI receiving buy-out payments and redistributing the buy-out fund receiving late payments and redistributing the late payment fund recovering the administration costs of the RO from the buy-out fund publishing an annual report on the operation of and compliance with the requirements of the Orders publishing sustainability details for those stations utilising biomass fuels We carry out these functions as efficiently and effectively as possible according to the provisions of the Orders. Amendments to the relevant legislation in respect of the Renewables Obligation are a matter for the Secretary of State. We cannot act beyond the scope of the powers laid down in the Orders. we have no remit over the operation or regulation of the ROC market itself. Where a scenario arises which is not addressed in these procedures.

Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 8 .

These proposed changes have been published by the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) in a consultation decision document 1 . The document is based on our existing guidance but has been updated to reflect the changes that are due to be introduced by the reform of the Renewables Obligation.gov.html http://www. These differentials are 1 2 http://www. however we may not have the opportunity to consult again on these changes. Question 1: Do you feel that this guidance document accurately represents the draft legislation? If not. We are consulting on the content of this document in order to ensure that our interpretation of the new legislation is clear to industry.gov.berr.pdf Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 9 . where do you feel this balance could be better achieved? Question 3: Are there any specific areas that you think require further guidance? If so which areas and what would you wish to see? Areas of administrative change due new legislation The changes to the RO centre on the introduction of reward differentials through banding and grandfathering which will impact on all stations. Should there be further changes to the legislation before its introduction on 1 April 2009 we will revise our guidance to reflect this.uk/consultations/page46710.berr.uk/files/file49197.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Consultation summary Consultation on guidance for the Renewables Obligation with respect to fuel measurement and sampling Background This document contains our draft guidance on the Renewables Obligation (RO) for fuelled generating stations. we have therefore based this document on the assumption that all their proposed changes will be adopted. The references within this document relate to the draft England and Wales Renewables Obligation Order 2 . At the time of writing the Scottish Executive and Northern Irish Authority are still in the consultation process. where do you feel this document needs reviewing? Question 2: Do you feel that this document achieves a balance of practicality whilst adhering to the legislation? If not.

It would be helpful if responses could be submitted both electronically and in writing. subject to any obligations to disclose information. all responses will be published by placing them in Ofgem’s library and on its website www.gov. SW1P 3GE 020 7901 7094 jonathan.uk.uk Unless marked confidential. Respondents may request that their response is kept confidential. what further information would you wish to see included? Question 5: Do you feel that the information provided in chapter 4 of this document clearly sets out the requirements for generators to provide Ofgem with information on the sustainability of the biomass fuels they use? If not. Renewables Team. Respondents who wish to have their responses remain confidential should clearly mark the document/s to that effect and include the reasons for confidentiality. Respondents are asked to put any confidential material in the appendices to their responses. For fuelled stations.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 based on the technology used by the station. Biomass.blagrove@ofgem.gov. Question 4: Do you feel that the information provided in chapter 3 of this document provides sufficient information to guide generators designing fuel measurement and sampling procedures for waste fuels with a fossil fuel content of less than 50 per cent? If not. what further information would you wish to see included? Consultation response Responses should be received by 09 February 2009 and should be sent to: Jonathan Blagrove Manager. the reform of the RO will in particular result in changes to the way that generators can seek to agree fuel measurement and sampling procedures when using certain types of waste. The introduction of banding and grandfathering will mean that it will be possible for one station to receive ROCs under different bands. Ofgem shall respect this request. These will determine the number of ROCs issued for each Megawatt of eligible electricity a station generates. for example. the fuelling.ofgem. The reform of the RO will also see the introduction of sustainability reporting for generators using biomass fuels and the introduction of specific provisions to account for generators using Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF). either through increases in capacity or the combination of fuels used within a month. the commissioning date and the capacity installed. under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 or the Environmental Information Regulations 2004. Co-firing and Waste 9 Millbank London. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 10 .

Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 11 .

Where used in this document. The nature of the legislation 1. Scotland and Northern Ireland. By using this tool we can assess all procedures on the same basis. The provision of a standard template for generators to complete when describing their proposed FMS procedures. the term "RO" refers to the Renewables Obligation. Our approach Open and consistent 1. the document gives guidance as to how we will exercise that discretion. from generators. 1. This guidance explains the fuel measurement and sampling (FMS) requirements for biomass.2.1. Where the legislation gives us discretion.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 1. Similarly. providing all generators with access to examples of good practice. The term "ROCs" refers to Renewable Obligation Certificates (ROCs). the term "the Orders" is used to describe The Renewables Obligation Order 2009. Scottish Renewables Obligation Certificates (SROCs) and Northern Ireland Renewable Obligation Certificates (NIROCs). 2. co-fired and waste generating stations under the Renewables Obligation (RO). the Renewables Obligation (Scotland) and the Northern Ireland Renewables Obligation. It also explains what we need. Where the legislation is prescriptive. to enable them to meet these requirements. 1. Introduction Chapter Summary This Chapter explains why we have produced this guidance and our approach to fuel measurement and sampling. Throughout our work in this area we aim to take an open and consistent approach.6. The publication of this guidance. practically. others give us discretion. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 12 .7. Some areas of the legislation are prescriptive. The Renewables Obligation Order (Scotland) 2009 and The Renewables Obligation Order (Northern Ireland) 2009. We believe that this approach manifests itself through a number of steps including: 1. This guidance applies to England and Wales. this guidance will help generators understand what we require.

we will do our best to inform generators of the changes and the impact they are likely to have. 1. Legislative and administrative changes 1. we provide a template for determining the amount of biomass and fossil fuel in a liquid mixture using the marker method and will develop additional templates of this nature where the need arises. 4. It is not intended to provide comprehensive legal advice on how the Orders should be interpreted. This is a guidance document only. In instances where parties other than registered holders are involved in the RO (for example data collectors for the provision of providing monthly information). however. we have needed to make a number of changes to our administrative processes. Queries 1. Consultation with stakeholders on important issues. At all times. For example. Written queries should be sent to the address on the front of this document clearly marked for the attention of the Renewables Administrator. Developing standard templates for fuel-specific calculations.uk with the email clearly marked.12. Generators who are in any doubt should seek independent legal advice. All queries in relation to our functions under the Orders should be emailed if possible to renewable@ofgem.13.8. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 13 . the onus is on the operator of a generating station to ensure that it is aware of the requirements of the Orders. that the onus is on generators to ensure that they are complying with the legislation.14.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 3. For example.gov. we support the work of and are available to contribute to the Biomass Working Group. the operator of the generating station is responsible for ensuring any guidance is distributed accordingly. With a widely reformed Renewables Obligation Order due to come into effect on 1 April 2009 and with other developments. As the legislation continues to evolve and/or our administrative processes are developed further. It should be appreciated. This guidance document 1.

e.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 2. taken as a whole.5. The definitions of biomass. the fuel used will ordinarily need to meet the definition of biomass in the Orders.4. Fuel that can treated as biomass 2. The definitions of biomass. and co-firing 2. waste and co-firing are fundamental to the classification of fuelled stations and the issuance of ROCs to fuelled stations under the RO. The term “100% biomass” in this document refers to biomass material that is 100% biomass by energy content (and does not therefore derive any of its energy from fossil fuel or fossil fuel derived sources). Eligibility Chapter Summary This Chapter sets out the eligibility criteria for certain types of fuelled stations. and the combined energy content of these fuels is more than 90 per cent plant or animal matter derived. waste. it will not itself meet the biomass definition. To claim ROCs for electricity generated from biomass.1.2. 2. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 14 . However. then the combination of these fuels can be treated as biomass. Biomass 2. generation types and fuels under the RO. 100% biomass 2. if the fuel is one of two or more non-fossil fuels used at the generating station in any month. To meet the biomass definition an individual fuel must have an energy content of at least 90 per cent that is derived directly or indirectly from plant or animal matter. is itself biomass (i. In particular this Chapter focuses on the eligibility requirements for energy crops. Where a fuel is a fraction of a mixture of wastes that. at least 90% of its energy content is derived directly or indirectly from plant or animal matter) then that fuel is classed as biomass. If less than 90 per cent of the energy content within an individual fuel is derived directly or indirectly from plant or animal matter.3.

Waste is defined in Article 2 (1) of the Orders. 2. the station must ensure that both: • • biomass fuel burned meets the biomass definition or can be treated as biomass under the Orders.11. and any fossil fuel or waste burned meets Article 27 3 in the Orders (see below). For the purpose of this section. we refer to two different classifications of ROCs: standard and co-firing. More information on the eligibility of fuelled stations according to their configuration is given in Appendix 2. contaminated or otherwise spoiled. as per Part 4 of the Orders. 2. “Standard” and “co-fired” ROCs 2.8. and any substance or article which requires to be disposed of as being broken. Where we refer to waste in this guidance we mean any fuel which meets the waste definition in the Orders but does not meet the biomass definition and cannot be treated as biomass. Waste does not include a substance which is an explosive within the meaning of the Explosives Act 1875.12. worn out. To be issued standard ROCs in any month. Co-firing is the term used to describe a generating station fuelled partly by biomass and partly by fossil fuel as defined in Part 4 of the Orders.6.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Waste 2. 3 Article {X} of the Draft Renewables Obligation (Scotland) Order 2009 refers Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 15 . This refers to section 75(2) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 (b) definition of waste which describes waste as including: • • any substance which constitutes a scrap material or an effluent or other unwanted surplus substance arising from the application of any process.7. 2. The relevance of being eligible to claim co-fired ROCs is described later in this chapter.10. The definition only applies to specific station configurations. Co-firing and co-fired ROCs 2.

Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008

And at least one of the following criteria must be met: • • • the station was first commissioned on or after 1 January 1990; or the station was first commissioned before 1 January 1990 and has renewed its main components (including all boilers and turbines); or the station meets the requirements of Article 19 (2) 4 .

Eligibility for claiming co-fired ROCs according to the use of fossil fuel or waste for Article 27 purposes 5 2.13. Any fossil fuel or waste used to generate electricity must always be accounted for when calculating the number of ROCs to be issued. However, the reliance or otherwise of a generator on Article 27 will determine whether a station will be eligible to receive co-fired ROCs or will be eligible to receive standard ROCs. Generating stations relying on Article 27 2.14. Article 27 allows generating stations to use a certain amount (no more than ten per cent of the total energy content of all fuels used at the generating station) of fossil fuel or waste without this fossil fuel or waste impacting on the classification of the ROCs to be issued. As well as the ten per cent limit on the amount of fossil fuel or waste used, Article 27 also specifies that the fossil fuel or waste can only be used for certain purposes as follows: • • • • the ignition of gases of low or variable calorific value; the heating of the station's combustion system to its normal operating temperature or the maintenance of the temperature; emission control; standby generation or the testing of standby generation capacity

Generating stations not relying on Article 27 2.15. Where a generating station use either fossil fuel or waste for a purpose other than those listed under Article 27 and/or where the total energy content of the fossil fuel or waste used at a generating station in any month exceeds ten per cent of the

4

Article {X} in the Draft Renewables Obligation (Scotland) Order 2009 and Article {X} in the Draft Renewables Obligation Northern Ireland Order 2009 refer 5 Article {X} in the Draft Renewables Obligation (Scotland) Order 2009 refers

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Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008

total energy content of all the fuels used at the generating station in that month, the generator will be eligible to claim co-fired ROCs. Redemption of standard and co-fired ROCs 2.16. In meeting its renewables obligation, there is a limit to the number of co-firing of biomass with fossil fuel (co-fired) ROCs that a supplier may present. For obligation periods between 1 April 2009 and 31 March 2010 no more than 10 per cent of a supplier's total obligation can be met by the redemption of co-firing of biomass with fossil fuel (co-fired) ROCs 6 . For obligation periods after this point, no more than 12.5 per cent of a supplier's total obligation can be met by the redemption of co-firing of biomass with fossil fuel (co-fired) ROCs 7 . 2.17. Generators should note that the only classifications of ROCs that falls within the cap are those that are classed as co-firing of biomass with fossil fuel ROCs. The cap does not therefore extend to ROCs that are issued for the co-firing of energy crops with fossil fuel as per Article 14 (5) of the Order.

Eligibility for stations using waste
Article 24 (1) (a) 2.18. Article 24 (1) (a) effectively excludes generating stations from claiming any ROCs when using waste unless the station meets one or more of the following criteria: • • • the waste by which it is fuelled in that month has been converted to a liquid or gas using an Advanced Conversion Technology (ACT); it is a CHP generating station with CHPQA accreditation; or the only waste(s) used are liquid fossil fuels (e.g. RFO) and/or solid recovered fuel

Advanced Conversion Technologies 2.19. An Advanced Conversion Technology (ACT) can be gasification, pyrolysis or anaerobic digestion and any combination of these. Definitions of these generation types are given in Appendix 2.

6 7

Article 14 (4) of the Draft Renewables Obligation Order 2009 refers Article 14 (3) of the Draft Renewables Obligation Order 2009 refers

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Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008

Combined Heat and Power Quality Assurance programme 2.20. Please refer to the section entitled "Eligibility for claiming CHP ROCs" later in this chapter for details of eligibility under the CHPQA programme. A generator must be accredited under this programme in the same way as for claiming CHP ROCs, although the QPO/TPO ratios referred to in the "Eligibility for claiming CHP ROCs" section are not relevant when considering Article 24 (1)(a).

Liquid fossil fuel 2.21. Waste liquid fossil fuels can be used for generation provided they are comprised wholly or mainly of hydrocarbon compounds. This includes Recycled Fuel Oil (RFO). Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) 2.22. For the purposes of Article 24 (1) (a), SRF is defined as a substance that is: • • • prepared from non-hazardous waste as defined in Article 2 (1) of the Order and classified using CEN/TS 15359 8 ; has a maximum Respiratory Index (“RI”) value from point of production to point of use of no greater than 1500 mg O2/kgVS/h; has a maximum particle size of 150 mm

Article 24 (c) 2.23. Under Article 24 (1)(c), a station will be excluded in any month (and will not therefore be eligible to claim any ROCs) where both a fossil fuel and any other fuel (other than biomass) is used, unless that fuel is SRF which meets the definition of SRF as per Article 2 (1). In practice, this means that a generating station will be excluded if both fossil fuel and waste (except for SRF meeting the definition set out in Article 2 (1)) is used in the same month.

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To receive a copy of this standard email SRF-CEN-document@defra.gsi.gov.uk

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We will already be in receipt of these details if a generator claims CHP Levy Exemption Certificates but if we are not already in receipt of these details. Food and Rural Affairs (Defra). CHP generating stations wishing to claim CHP ROCs will need to be accredited under the CHPQA programme before they can be issued ROCs. A qualifying station will hold a valid Secretary of State Combined Heat and Power Exemption Certificate 2 (SoS Certificate) and a CHPQA Certificate. The number of CHP ROCs issued to a station accredited under the CHPQA programme will depend on the efficiency of that station.30. A flow diagram displaying the number of ROCs that will be issued according to the generation type and fuel mix used at a station in a given month is given in Appendix 4. 2. Eligibility for claiming CHP ROCs 2. with further information on grandfathering available in our large generator guidance document.24. The CHPQA programme is a scheme that AEA Technology operate on behalf of the Department for the Environment. Generating stations fuelled wholly or partly by peat are specifically excluded under Article 24 (1)(d) of the Order.28. This will be determined by the relationship between its qualifying power output (QPO) and the total power output (TPO) as highlighted in Article 26 (2). 2. A flow diagram detailing the grandfathering provisions set out in Part 4 is provided in Appendix 3. The calculation of the qualifying power output must be agreed directly with CHPQA who will provide Ofgem with the relevant QPO/TPO values in order for CHP ROCs to be issued. 2. The number of ROCs that can be issued to a fuelled generating station will depend on the application of grandfathering provisions and the application of banding according to the generation type and fuel mix that is used each month. We will require a copy of the details of the station that are sent to AEA Technology annually for qualification under the CHPQA scheme.26.27.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Eligibility of specific fuels Generating stations fuelled by peat 2. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 19 .29.25. The amount of CHP ROCs to be issued 2. Calculating the number of ROCs issued 2. then consent for Defra to disclose information about the station to us will be required.

31. be being grown for a number of purposes (including for use as fuel) then the term 'grown primarily for the purpose…' means that the main purpose of the crop must be for use as fuel. Interpretation 2.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Energy Crops Definition 2. and acreage. (b) salix (also known as short rotation coppice willow). Should a crop.35. in exceptional circumstances. volume. we will consider the proportion of the crop that is to be used as fuel. When looking at the various proportions of a particular crop we will consider criteria such as energy content.32. In coming to a view on whether the main purpose for which a crop was planted was for use as fuel. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 20 . transport fuel or fuel used to generate heat. Energy crops grown overseas 2.33. (c) populus (also known as short rotation coppice poplar)". The first part of the definition is relatively straightforward: to meet the requirements of the Orders an energy crop must be a plant crop planted after 31 December 1989. This means that the main intended purpose. at (or. The term “energy crops” is defined in Article2 (1) of the Orders as follows: “a plant crop planted after 31 December 1989 which is grown primarily for the purpose of being used as fuel or which is one of the following(a) miscanthus giganteus. we will require evidence that the rest of the definition is met. 2. very shortly after) the time of planting for the crop must be for use as fuel. ‘Fuel’ can mean fuel used to generate electricity. If a generator uses any of the three crops listed there is no requirement to meet any other part of the energy crop definition. 2. weight. at the time of planting. The second part states that it must also be grown primarily for the purpose of being used as fuel.36. Crops grown overseas may be eligible as energy crops provided they meet the criteria set out in the Order and this guidance. financial value.34. For all crops other than those specifically listed in Article 2 (1) of the Order. Crops will be considered on a case-by-case basis and it will be for the generator concerned to provide the necessary evidence to support its case. 2.

A binding contract entered into at the time of planting is likely to be good evidence of an intention to grow crops for fuel. 2. Letter of intent 2. For consistency this date will apply irrespective of whether or not a crop is grown under the Energy Aid Payments Scheme. The final piece of evidence we are likely to require is to show that the crops were sold under contract. Letters of intent. and ultimately crops are not being used for fuel. as defined under the Orders. The generator has the responsibility to provide us with sufficient evidence that the fuel that it is using is an energy crop. We require letters of intent to be a genuine reflection of a grower's intention.39. or a number of letters of intent to cover the full chain between generator and grower. 2. We expect the letter of intent to be either directly between the generator and grower. although this is by no means the only evidence that could be presented. We are looking for evidence to show that the farmers intention from the time of planting (or in exceptional circumstances very shortly after) was to grow the crop for use as fuel. but we will expect them to be followed through.38. If it appears letters of intent are not generally resulting in binding contracts. Similarly if a particular individual does not follow through on a letter of intent we are Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 21 . We are also keen that our requirements work alongside the Energy Aid Payments Scheme as far as possible.41.42. as an alternative to a binding contract at the time of planting we will generally accept a letter of intent at the time of planting with a binding contract in place by 15 May following planting.37. then we will reconsider our position.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Evidence 2. Therefore. given the potential lapse in time between a crop being planted and that crop being harvested. A letter of intent should include: • • • • • the common and latin name(s) of the crop the field(s) in which the crops will be grown the expected yield the price the grower will charge for the crop the dates on which supply is expected to start and end 2. 2. Decisions on whether to accept letters of intent will be made on a case-by-case basis.40. One piece of evidence that we will generally require will be contractual. However we realise that putting in place contracts at the time of planting may cause difficulties for generators. We will keep our policy of accepting letters of intent as opposed to binding contracts at the time of planting under review. unlike contracts will not be required to be binding.

Contracts in themselves are not automatic evidence that a crop is to be used for fuel. we would assess this against the requirements of the legislation. other methods are not excluded. 2. in the case of a multi-purpose crop that the primary purpose for which the crop was being grown was for use as a fuel. Should a generator have other evidence to prove that a crop was an energy crop. Similarly if a generator has a contract with a bulk supplier of energy crops then we will require access to all the contracts between the growers and the bulk supplier.45. there are a number of areas that we will consider. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 22 . we will also require access to the contracts between the energy crops grower and the processor. Contracts in respect of energy crops grown overseas should be translated into English where relevant. However.44. Although contractual evidence is stated as the main method by which generators can meet the requirements of the legislation. provided equivalence is not being used (see below).46. For crops planted shortly after 1989. 2.43. We do not wish to be prescriptive about the content of contracts. Binding contracts 2. Inclusion in this scheme is not a prerequisite for a crop to qualify as an energy crop under the RO. The contracts will need to be sufficiently binding to ensure that the crop will actually be used as fuel and that there is no option for the crop to be used for another primary purpose. 2. require copies of contracts in the same way as we would require copies of contracts from generators/growers not participating in those schemes. The duration of the contract will also be relevant. We would however. 2.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 likely to require firmer evidence from them in following years to show that their subsequent intention is genuine. where an explicit contract may not have been signed at the time of planting. If the generator has a contract with a fuel processor then in addition to the contract between the processor and the generator. 2.48.47. We believe that if a crop satisfies these requirements. It should be clear from the contract that the crop was being grown for the purpose of being used as a fuel and. Contracts should detail what is being grown. it is likely to satisfy the requirements of the RO. The Energy Aid Payments Scheme (in the EU) has similar requirements to the RO in relation to the provision of evidence that the crop is an energy crop to be used primarily for fuel. on a case-by-case basis. Both the common and latin names of the crop should be specified to limit the risk of ambiguity. other evidence should be provided demonstrating that the crop has been primarily grown for the purposes of being used as fuel.

The Renewables Obligation does not allow for a "mass balance".53. The point at which we are required to make a decision on whether a crop is an energy crop is when a generator claims ROCs for the electricity produced from burning the crop. oil seed rape used to produce vegetable oil may be a mixture of energy crop oil seed rape and non-energy crop oil seed rape. bulk supplier or processor has multiple letters of intent or contracts with farmers we will not generally require a copy of every single letter or contract. For example. This potentially creates uncertainty for the generator as to whether Ofgem will consider the crop an energy crop at the time of burning. a vegetable oil plant may produce a batch of vegetable oil using 90% oil seed rape that meets the energy crop definition and 10% oil seed rape that does not meet the energy crop definition. Instead we will wish to select one example contract and the names.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Multiple contracts/letters 2. We could not say that if a generator was taking 90% of the output of the vegetable oil plant that they were taking the 90% that was energy crops. addresses and field locations of the crops for all the fuel suppliers that have been contracted with.51. In order to address this we may be prepared (upon receipt of satisfactory contractual evidence) to provide generators with nonbinding comfort letters.49. The calculation will remain the same irrespective of whether the output from the process Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 23 . Where energy crops and non-energy crops are mixed it is more difficult to work out how much of what a generator uses is energy crops and how much is non-energy crops. Comfort Letters 2.50. Unlike the Energy Aid Payments Scheme an equivalent amount of the same type of crop cannot be grown elsewhere and then used in place of the contracted crop. Where a generator. For generators to take advantage of this they will need to provide assurance that we could easily access any one of these letters or contracts on audit. Generators may enter into contracts with growers a number of years before the crop is mature enough for harvesting and burning. In this situation we would issue energy crop/co-firing of energy crops with fossil fuel ROCs for 90% of the vegetable oil used in the generating station and non-energy crop/co-firing of biomass with fossil fuel ROCs for the other 10% of the vegetable oil used. Energy crops going through a process 2.52. 2. The crop burned at the generating station must be the same physical crop as that referred to in the contract for it to qualify as an energy crop. Mass balance 2. In this circumstance we would issue energy crop ROCs (or co-firing of energy crops with fossil fuel ROCs depending on the impact of Article 27 as described earlier in the chapter) according to the percentage of energy crop to non-energy crop oil seed rape used to produce vegetable oil. For example.

the generator will need to provide evidence for all 70 tonnes of vegetable oil. For example. if a generator intends to burn 70 tonnes of a batch of vegetable oil 90% of which is expected to be energy crops. 2.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 is the main product from the process e.g. oil seed rape meal.54. generators that use fuel that is a mixture of energy crops and non-energy crops will need contractual or other evidence to cover all the energy crop and non-energy crop fuel they intend to burn.g. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 24 . vegetable oil or a by-product from it e. To claim the percentage of energy crops as described above.

Generators need to submit new or revised FMS procedures when: • • applying for accreditation or preliminary accreditation using a new fuel at an existing accredited generating station 9 Article {X} in the Draft Renewables Obligation (Scotland) Order 2009 Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 25 .2. Article 26 9 of the RO sets out how to calculate the amount of electricity generated from renewable sources.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 3. Fuel measurement and sampling is usually needed for a generator to be able to provide this information.4.3. A fuel measurement and sampling (FMS) procedure is the general term that we use to describe the agreement with generators of suitable procedures for the measurement and sampling of fuels in order to determine the amount of fuel burned in a month. Whilst the term “FMS procedures” usually refers to the agreement of physical measurement and sampling processes.1. We can only issue ROCs for electricity generated from renewable sources in a given month. it may also refer to the provision of documentary evidence. Why FMS? 3. the energy content of the fuel and the level of any contamination in the fuel. When to submit FMS procedures 3.in principle and in practice Chapter Summary This Chapter explains the key principles behind fuel measurement and sampling and the practicalities of agreeing fuel measurement and sampling procedures. What is FMS? 3. the amount of electricity generated from fossil fuel is determined according to the respective energy contents of the fuels used in a particular month. and in the case of a generating station fuelled partly by fossil fuel and partly by another fuel or fuels. Energy content of a fuel means the gross calorific value (GCV) of that fuel (as expressed per unit of weight or volume) multiplied by the weight or volume of that fuel within the month of burn. 3. FMS .

we do not set an arbitrary timeframe for the agreement of procedures although clearly we aim to work closely with generators to make the process as efficient as possible. The fundamental principle of FMS is that the procedures allow a generator to fully meet the requirements of Article 37 (3) in the RO in that they will be able to provide us with “accurate and reliable” information.5.9. according to the specific setup and conditions at each generating station. Unless a generator will be using solely 100% biomass fuels. The timeframe for agreeing FMS procedures 3. although it should be clear that the onus for the design of suitable procedures lies with the generator. 3. our approach is always to agree fuel measurement and sampling procedures on a case-by-case basis. Our aim is to agree procedures that will enable generators to fully meet the requirements of the legislation (by providing Ofgem with accurate and reliable information as set out in Article 37 (3)). All procedures should be submitted as responses to the FMS procedures questionnaire which is available on our website (see associated documents) with accompanying documentation if necessary. We will work with generators as closely as possible to ensure that a procedure meets this requirement. if new measurement equipment is being used at the station) Accurate and reliable information 3.8.6. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 26 . initial sampling analysis of the fuel(s) should accompany the questionnaire. Given that the complexity of FMS procedures will vary greatly from one station to the next.7. There is no set timeframe for the agreement of FMS procedures. A case-by-case approach 3.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 • amending existing procedures (for example. This will help us to understand what information a generator is planning to submit each month to support their ROC claims and whether this is likely to be appropriate for the fuel(s) being used. We recognise that no single generating station is identical to another and that different generators can use different combinations and volumes of fuels. drawn from different sources. The format of an FMS procedure 3. For these reasons.

12. New and improved FMS procedures 3.14. 3. or alternatively provide a separate specification for each fuel. That said we need to be certain that each of the fuels being used are 100 per cent biomass. There are circumstances where it may be appropriate for a generator to use estimates of either volume or energy content values.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Using estimates 3. Generating stations using only fuels that are 100% biomass (as described in chapter 2 of this guidance) will not generally need to carry out fuel measurement and sampling. we will always seek to err on the side of caution and take a conservative approach so as to ensure that ROCs are only issued for generation attributable to renewable sources. we are happy to assist generators in the development of their FMS procedures but ultimately we look to industry to utilise its expertise and resources to continually improve FMS standards and set the benchmark for good practice. Where generators opt to purchase fuels on the spot market rather than by agreeing a longterm contract with a fuel supplier. for example whether it is not in practice possible for a generator to sample a fuel for its energy content.10. this may be evidenced by the provision of a suitably robust fuel specification by the generator for each fuel. Where estimates are used. This is because there is no need to determine what fraction of electricity generation is attributable to renewable sources and what fraction is attributable to fossil fuel derived sources: where only 100 per cent biomass fuels are used it is clear that all of the net electricity generated is attributable to renewable sources. In these situations we will assess whether the provision of estimates rather than actual measurements will allow a generator to fully meet the requirements of Article 37 (3) (the provision of accurate and reliable information) and other factors. In other cases a generator may still need to perform some initial and possibly periodical sampling to demonstrate that no contamination is present within the fuel(s). 3. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 27 . Stations using only 100 per cent biomass fuels 3.11. We rely heavily on industry to lead the way in piloting new and improved FMS procedures. we will need the generating station to either confirm in writing that they require all of the fuel suppliers they use to provide fuel meeting this specification.13. A sample fuel specification is provided at Appendix 5. Depending on the fuels used. Where we can.

Measuring the weight or volume of biomass burnt in a month is needed to form part of the ROC calculation. This is because. Generators should consider how they might verify the results of their measurement techniques and may want to consider using a second method of measurement at the stage of agreeing FMS procedures. under the Orders. This means that the weight or volume of stocks carried over from the previous month must be measured in the month of burn. Whilst there is some flexibility.18. In deciding when to take weight or volume measurements of stock carried over from one month to the next.21. measurements should be taken at the same time each month so that ROCs can be issued for generation over the period of a month. ROCs are issued to an accredited generator for each MWh of electricity generated from renewable sources. taken at the same time each month. Excluding biomass not used for electricity generation 3. 3. A strict interpretation of the requirement to account accurately for the weight or volume of biomass burned within a month would mean that measurements had to be taken at the stroke of midnight on the last day of each month. weight or volume measurements must relate to the month of burn. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 28 . Verification 3. we will accept reliable estimates of stock levels (as opposed to requiring sheds to be emptied and stock taken back over weighbridges) in certain circumstances.15. Ofgem can only issue ROCs for biomass burned that has resulted in the generation of electricity. Any biomass burned for these purposes must therefore be measured and deducted.00 on the first day of each month. 3. for example at 06. For example.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Weight or volume measurement in the month of burn 3. 3.20. When assessing measurement and sampling information for stock carried over from one month to the next we will take a practical approach. and we will therefore accept measurements taken within twelve hours before or after midnight on the last day of the month. To accurately measure the amount of biomass used for electricity generation in a month. We realise that there are practical implications for some generating stations in achieving this. 3. is being tested or there is a cancelled start it is likely that electricity has not been generated.17.19. If the generating station is on hot standby. good practice would be to measure the fuel at the same time each month. provided that all relevant criteria have been met.16.

take a series of incremental samples. from a whole in such a way that the proportion and distribution of the quantity to be tested is likely to be the same in both the sample and the whole. 3. and then extract a representative sub-sample of the composite sample for analysis. which is convenient in quantity for analysis. The procedure that should invariably be used is to: • • • • develop a sampling plan.24. and it is good practice for sampling to be carried out at the same time as measurement to ensure that the sample is truly representative of what is being burned. When taking weight or volume measurements and conducting sampling.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Weighted averaging 3. The factors that can affect the precision and accuracy of the sampling procedure are: • • • • the size of the sample relative to the whole.25. Good practice when calculating the average GCV of a number of composite samples is to use a weighted average. It can be defined as the operation of removing a part. Samples are usually taken either from each delivery or from the fuel stream immediately prior to combustion. the method used to extract the sample.26. combine these to form a composite sample. 3. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 29 . and the method used to extract a sub-sample from the composite sample for subsequent analysis. generators should consider how they might verify the results and may wish to consider using a second method of weight or volume and/or sampling analysis at the stage of agreeing FMS procedures.27. Sampling fuels for energy content 3. Verification 3.22. Sampling is a statistical technique based on probability. the number of increments taken during the sampling period to produce a composite sample.

The GCV of a biomass fuel used in calculations of electricity generated from renewable sources will generally be the GCV of representative analysed samples.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Sampling frequency 3.28. To avoid deterioration fuels should be stored appropriately.30.31. Storage 3. as long as they are measured and sampled in the month of burn. generators must determine the level of any contamination in a fuel. generators should consider how consistent the GCV of their biomass fuel is. Whilst storage conditions and times should be considered. When considering how frequently to take samples. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 30 . The contamination of biomass fuels with materials derived from fossil fuel can be difficult to establish. This means that monthly sampling is usually required. or measure contamination.31. the energy content used in the calculations must relate to the fuel burned in that month. 3. how many fuel sources they have and how much biomass they are using. as this will affect the calculation of the amount of electricity generated from renewable sources. To enable the relative energy content of the biomass to be determined against what is burned it is also important that the GCV of any fossil fuel used is determined. However. Gross Calorific Value (GCV) 3. To ensure that ROCs are issued for fuel burned in the month. 3. It is also important that the risk of contamination during storage is minimised. Generators must: • • • identify all possible contaminants. Contamination 3. it is also important to remember the fundamental principle behind all fuel measurement and sampling under the RO: that each fuel must be accurately and reliably measured and sampled in the month in which it is burned. Where deterioration occurs. even if they deteriorate. In relation to storage.29. GCV measurements are necessary to calculate the energy content of biomass burned each month. this means that fuels can be kept for long periods. and put in place preventative measures.32. the original sample taken will no longer reflect the properties of the fuel in the store and ultimately the fuel being burned.

to have regard to: • • • • the distance over which the fuel was transported. Data submitted to us each month must be an accurate reflection of what has been burned in that particular month. 10 Article {X} in the Draft Northern Ireland Order 2009 and Article {X} in the Draft Renewables Obligation (Scotland) Order 2009 refer Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 31 . When reviewing their FMS procedures. and any other matters that we consider relevant. the fuel must be measured and sampled within the month of burn. when determining whether information is accurate and reliable where it has originated off-site. 3.34. In addition to the requirements that must be met when fuel is measured onsite. As with on-site measurement. When considering the distance covered. We recognise that this might cause practical difficulties when off-site measurement takes place at the very end of the month and the fuel is burned in the following month. it is also appropriate for us to consider the time taken for the fuel to travel that distance as this could impact on the state of the fuel. Generators will therefore need to have suitable measures in place to assure us that the fuel does not change in composition over the time and distance taken to transport it from the facility where it was measured and sampled to the place where it is burned.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Off-site measurement and sampling 3.35. Article 37(4) of the Orders allows us. the conditions under which the fuel was prepared and transported. 3.36. It is important to ensure that the fuel does not change in composition while it is being transported. Traditionally the measurement and sampling of fuels has taken place on-site.37. the generator will need to re-sample that fuel. 3. we will work with generators to try to find ways to address this.33. Distance and transport conditions 3. Article 37 (4) 10 of the Orders however recognises that measurement and sampling may be conducted off-site. If the fuel has changed in composition during transit. Conditions that might cause a fuel to deteriorate over time or change in composition (for example exposure to moisture causing the fuel to decompose) need to be taken into account. at the generating station (with samples usually analysed off-site). the resources required for Ofgem to verify the accuracy and reliability of the information through audit.

3. This makes it more difficult to measure the energy content of the biomass fraction and to carry out representative sampling.40. This might also allow us to reduce the frequency of our own audit visits. The granting of such access is one of the Standard Conditions of Accreditation to which all accredited generators are subject. taking into account factors including the independence of the auditors. Should we consider the cost to be too high and/or the audit impractical. we will not approve those off-site FMS procedures. As a general rule. The measurement and sampling of waste is much more difficult than the measurement and sampling of biomass fuels principally because it is usually much more heterogeneous in nature. As facilities are often owned and operated by parties other than the generator being audited. To help us assess the potential cost of auditing a generator which is considering off-site measurement and sampling. or one biomass component with one or two non-biomass components. Access to premises 3. FMS procedures for stations using waste with a fossil fuel content greater than 50 per cent 3. the scope of the audit and the quality of the audit reports.42. their technical skills. In order to conduct an audit. the more processed or refined the waste and the smaller the particle size the easier it will be to develop robust FMS procedures. To address our concerns about audit costs. Under Article 37(4) we may take the cost of auditing into account when considering the accuracy and reliability of information drawn from a location other than the generating station. waste can comprise any number of components. a Standard Condition of Accreditation requires the generator to ensure that we can gain access to such off-site measurement facilities for audit purposes.38. We will assess whether these off-site measurement arrangements can be audited practically and at a reasonable cost. The condition relates to the granting of access to premises owned and operated by the generator.43. both biomass and non-biomass. we require access to a generator's premises. generators may wish to propose employing an independent auditor to verify that the information they are providing is accurate and reliable and that their FMS procedures are robust. we will require access for audit purposes to the facility where that measurement and sampling takes place. In the case of a generator which wishes to measure and sample fuel off-site.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Auditing for stations using off-site measurement 3. Rather than being made up of one biomass component. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 32 .41.39. their understanding of relevant aspects of the legislation. 3. We will consider these proposals on a case-by-case basis. we will ask for information on the practicalities of conducting such an audit. 3.

44. Using a standard methodology 3. it is helpful for us if Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 33 .55.56. Calculating the renewable energy content of a waste fuel presents two difficulties. In addition to meeting the measurement and sampling requirements applicable to all non 100 per cent biomass fuels. waste generators' FMS procedures will need to include more information than if the station is burning biomass fuel(s). Only if these two measurements are accurate can the biomass energy content in a sample be calculated. we will consider whether: • • • • • • the variance of an initial set of sample results from the same delivery of fuel the variance of an initial set of sampling results from different deliveries of fuel a set of sampling results to satisfy the two points above for each fuel source the type of fuel how closely the sampling analysis from a verification method matches the sampling analysis from the main method how the generator proposes to deal with large variances in sample results.57. For the reasons described above. an outline proposal for an acceptable FMS procedure for a station using waste should include: • • • an initial set of sampling results from one delivery of fuel from each fuel source an initial set of sampling results from several deliveries of fuel from each fuel source a separate method of sampling to be used for verification 3. Any method for measuring the biomass fraction of waste should include a repeatable and auditable process that is transparent and can be shown to result in an accurate measurement.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Agreeing FMS Procedures 3. if applicable Measuring weight or volume and energy content 3. Following a methodology set out in a standard may help generators to avoid additional work in creating a methodology which is rigorous enough to meet the requirements of the legislation. When agreeing a waste FMS procedure. Also. It requires accurate measurement of the percentage of biomass in the fuel by weight and accurate measurement of the energy content of the biomass in the fuel.

less evidence might be required for a fuel that has well-known and consistent characteristics. 3.59. To have confidence that sampling can be representative.61. Measuring the GCV of the whole fuel could be useful to verify the GCV of the biomass fraction. more than six samples may be necessary. As a guide. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 34 . For example.62. In our assessment of the FMS procedures. the variance between the results of the sampling analysis from the same delivery of fuel must be relatively limited. This number of samples would appear reasonable as any less than this would make it difficult to calculate a narrow enough range in which the percentage by weight and GCV is likely to lie. As a guide to numbers.60. Fuel type 3. For more heterogeneous fuels.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 generators use a common methodology as this ensures consistency of measurement between generators. This information can then be used as a reference point by which to compare monthly figures. the CEN standard for the classification of fuels suggests 40 samples are required to classify a fuel as SRF.58. Generators will need to include an initial set of sampling from a single delivery of fuel from each fuel source. Verifying results 3. the type of fuel will also be taken into account as the variability of the sampling information is likely to be lower from more homogenous fuels such as SRF. Using this set of sampling results it may be possible to calculate the range within which the mean average weight and GCV of the biomass fraction of the fuel is likely to lie. 3. The samples taken from the delivery must be representative of what was burnt. as a more consistent GCV of the whole fuel may indicate a more consistent GCV of the biomass fraction. at least six samples will generally be necessary to demonstrate whether sampling can be representative. This means generators using SRF or other processed fuels may find it easier to get their FMS procedures agreed than generators using unprocessed waste. The type of fuel may also affect the amount of evidence we need. Generators will also almost certainly need to include an initial set of sampling results from several deliveries of fuel from each fuel source. An initial set of samples from a single delivery will help us to assess whether it is possible for a generator to provide sampling information that is both representative of the fuel used and will provide a consistent measurement each month. Initial sampling 3.

Generators may include any information that they believe to be relevant within the FMS proposal.65. Article 3 (3) makes it clear that the onus for the provision of information that is suitable for determining the likely declared renewable content of a fuel lies with the generator. The outcome of these procedures should they be sufficiently robust will be the agreement of the “declared renewable content” within the fuel. plastics etc a demonstration of the likely GCVs that can be attributed to each of the primary categories the results of any sampling analysis that has been undertaken 11 Article 2 (1) of the Draft Renewables Obligation Order 2009 refers Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 35 . Once this information is provided to us we will.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 FMS procedures for stations using heterogeneous waste with a fossil fuel content lower than 50 per cent 3. as with all FMS procedures consider the robustness of the information provided on a case-by-case basis. in other words the percentage biomass content by energy within the fuel.63. for example paper/card. as it should be more practical for a generator to accurately measure and sample their fuel in this case. but some examples of the type of information that could be included are: • • • a breakdown of the fuel into its primary categories. Article 3 (5) in the RO makes provision for those generators using a waste fuel that is not more than 90 per cent fossil fuel derived but unlikely to be less than 50 per cent fossil fuel derived to agree FMS procedures based on the production of documentary evidence rather than the long-term use of direct measurement and sampling. Content of evidence 3. We are less likely to agree to the use of evidential data rather than direct measurement and sampling where a fuel that is more homogeneous in nature than municipal waste is being used. Fuel type 3. Article 3 (5) determines that this approach to FMS procedures is designed for generators using municipal waste as defined in the Order 11 (although generators using other types of waste are not specifically excluded from proposing the use of FMS procedures designed on this basis).64.

This information could be drawn from an allocating authority. our current view is that the percentage agreed would be valid for the remainder of that obligation period. This should allow us enough time to review the revised procedures and raise queries with generators where necessary in order to agree a new declared renewable content percentage prior to the first issue of ROCs for the first month within the new obligation period (approximately 15th June). 3. Article 3 (4) in the Order makes provision for Ofgem to have regard to any other data that it believes may be used to indicate the likely renewable content of a waste fuel when agreeing FMS procedures. Generators are free to draw upon any information that they believe is likely to be sufficient in order to effectively demonstrate the likely renewable content of the fuel that they are using.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Sources of information 3. by 1st March each year. Alternatively.69. Generators will need to inform us if the composition of the waste they are using is likely to change. For example. a waste collection authority or a waste disposal authority 12 . 3. Under the provisions set out in Article 3 (3) of the Order. Changes in the fuel stream 3.67. Our current view is that generators should resubmit their FMS procedures on an annual basis.68. 12 Definitions of these bodies are set out in Article 3 (7) of the Draft Renewables Obligation Order 2009 Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 36 .66. and that the generator would then need to resubmit an FMS procedure for the fuel in question by 1st March prior to the beginning of the following obligation period in order to agree a new declared renewable content percentage. we will seek to periodically review the use of declared renewable content percentages. if a generator agrees a new fuel supply contract it is likely that the overall composition of the waste may change in which case the generator may need to provide new evidence to accurately demonstrate the declared renewable content of the fuel. it may be that contractual evidence or data derived from waste composition studies may be useful in helping to demonstrate the likely renewable content of the fuel being used.70. Where we agree an FMS procedure with a generator wishing to use the declared renewable content of a fuel part-way through an obligation period. Reviewing the level of the declared renewable content 3.

2. whether it was composed of wood). depending on whether and how it has been processed and what it is. 4. What information is required? 4. Example Wood The form of the biomass Sawdust Mass 10000te Volume By-product By-product of the paper Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 37 .Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 4.1 megapascal Whether the biomass was a by-product of a process. Generators need to provide the information listed in the table below as part of their sustainability report for each consignment of biomass fuel used in the generating station. its mass Where the biomass was fluid. Sustainability reporting Chapter Summary This Chapter outlines the requirements for generators using biomass fuel to provide Ofgem with an annual sustainability report. we refer to the provision of this information as “sustainability reporting”. Where the biomass was solid. Where the biomass can take different forms (for example. is to be or has been used for).1. Article 55 in the RO sets out the requirement for generators using biomass fuel to provide Ofgem with an annual report including various pieces of information concerning the biomass fuel(s) used during each obligation period. wood can take a variety of forms. its volume when measured at 25 degrees Celsius and 0. the form of the biomass. In this chapter. Element The type of biomass Detail The material from which the biomass was composed (for example.

Where the information specified in subparagraph (g) is not known or the biomass was not plant matter or derived from plant matter. the country from which the operator obtained the biomass. Whether the biomass or any matter from which it was derived was certified under an environmental quality assurance scheme and. the country where the plant matter was grown. if so. and the type of energy crop contained in the consignment. if so— the proportion of the consignment which was an energy crop. Whether any of the consignment was an energy crop or derived from an energy crop and.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 production process Waste Whether the biomass was waste Where the biomass was plant matter or derived from plant matter. the name of the scheme Where the biomass was plant matter or derived from plant matter. Country of origin UK Country of purchase Energy crop including types and proportions Environmental quality assurance schemes Land us Used for forestry purposes Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 38 . the use to which the land on which the plant matter was grown has been put since 30th November 2005.

Article {X} 13 of the Order allows for generators to take a “mass balance” approach when submitting sustainability reporting information.2. The timeframe for submitting a sustainability report 4. we may by reference to Article 55 (4) opt to postpone the issue of a number of ROCs equivalent to the total number of ROCs that would otherwise have been issued in reliance on data submissions pertaining to the period in question. should a generator burn 1000te of olive cake in a particular obligation period. Guidance on how to use this part of the Register is provided in the Renewables and CHP Register User Guide 14 .e. Sustainability reports must be provided to Ofgem within two months of the end of each obligation period (i. All sustainability reports must be provided to Ofgem via the Sustainability Reporting module of the Renewables and CHP Register. For example. the generator would only need to provide Ofgem with a sustainability report for 1000te of olive cake purchased by the generator.5. Incomplete and overdue sustainability reports 4. Where a generator does not provide Ofgem with the information specified in Article 55 (3) by 31 August. this means that generators are not required to provide sustainability information on the specific fuel that was used a the generating station: instead a generator may provide sustainability reporting information on an equivalent amount of that type of fuel that was purchased by that generating station.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Mass balance 4. we will not issue of a number of ROCs equivalent to the total 13 14 Subject to the publication of the Renewables Obligation Order 2009 This information will be included within the Renewables and CHP Register User Guide subject to the publication of the Renewables Obligation Order 2009 15 Article 55 (5) of the Draft Renewables Obligation Order refers Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 39 .4. Should a generator not provide us with the information specified in Article 55 (3) by 31st May.3. irrespective of whether the 1000te of olive cake upon which the report is based was burned during the obligation period for which the report is being submitted. The format of a sustainability report 4. by 31st May each year). In essence. or a number of ROCs believed to be appropriate taking account of all of the circumstances 15 .

As such generators should ensure that any information that is relevant to the sustainability reporting criteria is available on request to an audit team. 16 Article 30 (1) (d) (i) in the Draft Renewables Obligation Order 2009 refers Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 40 . we will treat each sustainability report on a caseby-case basis. given that generators may. or a number of ROCs believed to be appropriate taking account of all of the circumstances. we recognise that certain information may not be available to a generator at the time of submitting a sustainability report.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 number of ROCs that would otherwise have been issued in reliance on data submissions pertaining to the period in question. to the best of their knowledge and belief. As a result we may be inclined to accept a response of “information not known” as being an acceptable response to certain parts of a sustainability report. not know certain information. When entering a response of “information not known”. Whilst under normal circumstances we expect generators to complete all parts of their sustainability report with full responses. Information that is not available Generators are required to provide Ofgem with the information listed in Article 55 (3) to the best of their knowledge and belief. Generators should be mindful of the fact that Ofgem may wish to conduct an audit of the sustainability reporting information provided. Should such circumstances arise. Audit 4.7. generators should be mindful of Article 30 of the Order which provides Ofgem with the flexibility to revoke ROCs where Ofgem is no longer satisfied that the ROCs in question should have been issued 16 .

In many cases. generators may still add a new fuel to their Fuel Maintenance record and include it within data submissions. In this case. In the first instance.3.uk along with supporting documentation if necessary. Within this section of the Register. Where agreement has not been reached on the use of a specific fuel prior to the first month where that fuel is used. no ROCs can be issued until we have agreed to the use of the fuel in question and are subsequently able to approve the fuel via the Register.2. generators need to inform us of: • • the name of each fossil and renewable fuel they may be using each month whether they have a contract in place for that fuel and if so.ofgem. fuelled generating stations need to complete the Fuel Maintenance section to provide details of all fuels that they plan to burn. the expiry date of that contract Fuel Approval 5.4. 5. this information should be provided electronically as part of an application for accreditation via the Renewables and CHP Register. Once a fuel has been added to the Fuel Maintenance section for the relevant generating station we will need to "approve" this fuel before any ROCs can be claimed for submissions including this fuel. in which cases we will be able to approve the fuel on the Renewables and CHP Register without further liaison with the generator.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 5. the use of a specific fuel will have been agreed well in advance of the first month of generation where that fuel is used.gov. Within the Output Data module of the Renewables and CHP Register.1. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 41 . Fuel Maintenance 5. Submitting information Chapter Summary This Chapter explains what information generators are required to submit to Ofgem and how that information should be submitted. Generators will not be able to include a fuel within their monthly ROC claims until the fuel has been saved in the Fuel Maintenance section for the first time. Fuel measurement and sampling plans 5. All fuel measurement and sampling plans should be submitted in the format of a completed fuel measurement and sampling questionnaire available from our website at www.

5. incorporating any deliveries and/or transfers and clearly denoting any biomass burned that did not result in the generation of electricity (a sample stock level spreadsheet is provided at Appendix 6) a copy of the sampling analysis sheet provided by a laboratory or a copy of sampling analysis output from a company database (a specimen sampling analysis sheet is provided at Appendix 7 17 ) a spreadsheet(s) with any additional calculations.6. otherwise to the nearest 100 if measured in kg. The weight/volume of fuels used should be given to at least the nearest whole number if measured in tonnes. The information should be submitted by the end of the second month following the month of generation.7.uk in support of the main data submission: • a stock level spreadsheet detailing the opening and closing stock levels of each fuel used. To enable ROCs to be issued. The following information should be included as part of a data submission made via the Renewables and CHP Register • • • the weight or volume of all fuels used the GCV of all fuels used the contamination percentage (by energy content) present within any renewable fuels The following information should be submitted via email to monthlyoutputdata@ofgem.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Monthly data 5. such as those for liquid fossil fuels mixed with biomass fuels a spreadsheet including any special circumstances that should be taken into consideration • • • Statistical accuracy 5. generators need to submit certain information to Ofgem on a monthly basis. 5. 17 This appendix will be included in the final version of this document Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 42 .gov.

removing unnecessary information from the monthly submission (for example information that is used internally but has no relevance to the ROC issue) highlighting important numbers in bold. We check a vast amount of information each month. If generators choose to send us sampling analysis from a database rather than the original sampling analysis sheet. GCV's should be given to at least two decimal places if provided in GJ/tonne or MJ/kg.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 5. dates and comments within documents that are resubmitted each month with different values are updated ensuring that sampling date relates to when the sample was taken and not to when the sample was analysed. All these examples are based on our experience. Rounding 5. derived from several analysed samples should show both the GCV result of each sample and how the average has been calculated) 5. we will not be able to issue ROCs until our queries have been answered.12. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 43 . reducing the possibility of delay in issuing ROCs. Clear and accurate information 5. Generators should put in place checking procedures to ensure the accuracy of calculations. otherwise to the nearest ten if provided in kJ/kg or equivalent.11. 5. and explaining the origin of all values (for example.10. so being able to locate the key information quickly is of great value. they should retain the original sampling analysis from the laboratory for audit purposes. If information does not appear clear or accurate. Generators should ensure that the information they send to us is clear and accurate. Ways to make the information clear and avoid delays with ROC issue include: • • • • • • • • • making sure all agreed information is provided. All calculations should be left unrounded. The provision of clear and accurate information will allow us to operate efficiently and effectively.8. retaining formulae within spreadsheets where they have been used clearly indicating the content of each sheet of additional information. ensuring that headings.9. fully explaining any non-standard calculations. a generator submitting an average GCV.

Using the Renewables and CHP Register 5. either via the Renewables and CHP Register or via email to monthlyoutputdata@ofgem.14. Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 44 . Guidance on how to use the fuelling sections of the Renewables and CHP Register is provided in our Renewables and CHP Register User Guide (see Associated Documents).gov.uk for information supporting data submissions.Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Electronic Information 5.13. All fuelling information should be provided in electronic format where possible.

Appendices Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Appendices Index Appendix 1 2 3 4 5 Name of Appendix The Authority's Power and Duties Generation types Grandfathering provisions flow diagram Banding provisions flow diagrams Sample stock level indicator template Page Number 45 47 53 54 58 Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 45 .

principally the Gas Act 1986. the shipping.3.2. However. It is not comprehensive and is not a substitute to reference to the relevant legal instruments (including. distribution or supply of electricity or the provision or use of electricity interconnectors. those referred to below). This Appendix summarises the primary powers and duties of the Authority. the Utilities Act 2000. The Authority's powers and duties are largely provided for in statute. the Competition Act 1998. Ofgem is the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets which supports the Gas and Electricity Markets Authority (“the Authority”).5. This Appendix must be read accordingly 19 . transportation or supply of gas conveyed through pipes. the regulator of the gas and electricity industries in Great Britain. as well as arising from directly effective European Community legislation. and the generation. or in commercial activities connected with. in the case of Gas Act functions. of pensionable age. 1. The need to secure that all reasonable demands for electricity are met. 21 The Authority may have regard to other descriptions of consumers 19 18 Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 46 . 1. 1. but not limited to. The Authority must when carrying out those functions have regard to: • • • • The need to secure that. transmission.Appendices Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Appendix 1 – The Authority’s Powers and Duties 1. and The interests of individuals who are disabled or chronically sick. Entitled “Gas Supply” and “Electricity Supply” respectively. the Electricity Act 1989. the Utilities Act and certain parts of the Energy Act in the case of Electricity Act functions. or residing in rural areas 21 . wherever appropriate by promoting effective competition between persons engaged in. 1. the Enterprise Act 2002 and the Energy Act 2004. The Authority’s principal objective when carrying out its functions under the Gas Act and the Electricity Act is to protect the interests of consumers. 20 Under the Gas Act and the Utilities Act. with low incomes. References to the Gas Act and the Electricity Act in this Appendix are to Part 1 of each of those Acts 18 . all reasonable demands in Great Britain for gas conveyed through pipes are met. The need to secure that licence holders are able to finance the activities which are the subject of obligations on them 20 . or the Electricity Act. Duties and functions relating to gas are set out in the Gas Act and those relating to electricity are set out in the Electricity Act. present and future. so far as it is economical to meet them.4. in exercising a function under the Electricity Act the Authority may have regard to the interests of consumers in relation to gas conveyed through pipes and vice versa in the case of it exercising a function under the Gas Act.1.

the Authority is required to carry out the functions referred to in the manner which it considers is best calculated to: • Promote efficiency and economy on the part of those licensed 22 under the relevant Act and the efficient use of gas conveyed through pipes and electricity conveyed by distribution systems or transmission systems. distribution or supply of electricity. Protect the public from dangers arising from the conveyance of gas through pipes or the use of gas conveyed through pipes and from the generation. transmission. Contribute to the achievement of sustainable development. distribution or supply of electricity.7. Council Regulation (EC) 1/2003 Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 47 . The principles under which regulatory activities should be transparent.8. • • • 1. proportionate. 22 22 Or persons authorised by exemptions to carry on any activity.Appendices Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 1. 1. and • Certain statutory guidance on social and environmental matters issued by the Secretary of State. Subject to the above. accountable.6. The Authority has powers under the Competition Act to investigate suspected anti-competitive activity and take action for breaches of the prohibitions in the legislation in respect of the gas and electricity sectors in Great Britain and is a designated National Competition Authority under the EC Modernisation Regulation 22 and therefore part of the European Competition Network. consistent and targeted only at cases in which action is needed and any other principles that appear to it to represent the best regulatory practice. and Secure a diverse and viable long-term energy supply. the Authority must also have regard to: • The effect on the environment of activities connected with the conveyance of gas through pipes or with the generation. In carrying out the functions referred to. transmission. The Authority also has concurrent powers with the Office of Fair Trading in respect of market investigation references to the Competition Commission.

waves. ocean currents or geothermal sources) and includes all turbines supplied by the same civil works. Electricity generated from wind by a generating station that is offshore. and (b) it is not connected to dry land by means of a permanent structure which provides access to land above the mean low water mark. except any turbine driven by a compensation flow supplied by those civil works in a natural water course where there is a statutory obligation to maintain that compensation flow in that water course (in which case that turbine and associated infrastructure is to be regarded as a separate hydro generating station). Banding is applicable to certain stations (mainly conditional to the date of commission) according to Part 4 of the Order. ROCs/ MWh 1 MWh/ ROC 1 2 3 Onshore Wind Offshore Wind 1 1. “hydro generating station” means a generating station driven by water (other than a generating station driven by tidal flows.5 1 2/3 4 5 Wave Tidal Stream 2 2 1/2 1/2 Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 48 .Appendices Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Appendix 2 – Generation types 1. Electricity generated from the capture of the energy created from the motion of naturally occurring tidal currents in water. and a generating station is offshore if (a) its turbines are situated wholly in offshore waters. Electricity generated from wind by a generating station that is not offshore (see offshore below). Electricity generated from the capture of the energy created from the motion of naturally occurring waves on water. The government has laid out technology and fuelling based bands for the number of ROCs that will be issued to a generation station in a given month. NB The current restrictions on pre-existing hydro above 20MW in capacity will continue to apply.1. Generation type 1 Hydro-electric Definition Electricity generated by a hydro generating station.

25 1/2 1/2 1 4 12 13 Sewage Gas Energy from Waste with CHP 14 Pre-banded gasification Electricity generated from the gas formed by the anaerobic digestion of sewage.(ii) methane. and(b) has a gross calorific value when measured at 25 degrees Celsius and 0.” 2 1/2 2 1/2 2 2 1 0.but does not include electricity generated by a generating station in a calendar month in which it generates electricity partly from fossil fuel and partly from renewable sources.Appendices Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 6 Tidal Impoundment – Tidal Barrage 7 Tidal Impoundment Tidal Lagoon 8 9 10 11 Solar Photovoltaic Geothermal Geopressure Landfill Gas Electricity generated by a generating station driven by the release of water impounded behind a barrier using the difference in tidal levels where the barrier is connected to both banks of a river and [the generating station] has a [declared net capacity] of less than 1 gigawatt. Electricity generated using naturally occurring subterranean heat. Electricity generated from the direct conversion of sunlight to electricity.(iii) hydrogen. Electricity generated by a generating station which is driven by the release of water impounded behind a barrier using the different in tidal levels where the [barrier] is not a tidal barrage and the generating station has a [declared net capacity] of less than 1 gigawatt. Electricity generated from the gas formed by the anaerobic digestion of material in a landfill.1 megapascals at the inlet to the generating station of less than 2 megajoules per metre cubed.5 1 2 1 1 1 Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 49 . “Landfill” has the meaning given in Article 2(g) of the Landfill Directive (1999/31/EC). The appropriate percentage of electricity generated by a relevant generating station from a gaseous fuel which—(a) is produced by the substoichiometric oxidation or steam reformation of waste or biomass to produce a gaseous mixture containing two or all of the following. The relevant proportion of electricity generated from the combustion of waste in a qualifying combined heat and power generating station in a calendar month in which it generates electricity from renewable sources only. Electricity generated using naturally occurring subterranean pressure. 0.(i) oxides of carbon.

Electricity generated from a liquid or gaseous fuel.(iii) hydrogen. and(b) has a gross calorific value when measured at 25 degrees Celsius and 0. but does not include electricity generated by a generating station in a calendar month in which it generates electricity partly from fossil fuel and partly from renewable sources. Electricity generated from a gaseous fuel which—(a) is produced by the substoichiometric oxidation or steam reformation of waste or biomass to produce a gaseous mixture containing two or all of the following—(i) oxides of carbon. and (b) has a gross calorific value when measured at 25 degrees Celsius and 0.1 megapascals at the inlet to the generating station which is at least 2 megajoules per metre cubed but is less than 4 megajoules per metre cubed. which— (a) is produced by the thermal degradation of waste or biomass in the absence of any oxidising agent (other than that which forms part of the waste or biomass itself) to produce char and one or both of gas and liquid.1 megapascals at the inlet to the generating station of less than 2 megajoules per metre cubed. but does not include electricity generated by a generating station in a calendar month in which it generates electricity partly from fossil fuel and partly from renewable sources.Appendices Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 15 Pre-banded pyrolysis 16 Standard gasification The appropriate percentage of electricity generated by a relevant generating station from a liquid or gaseous fuel. or both. or both.but does not include electricity generated by a generating station in a calendar month in which it generates electricity partly from fossil fuel and partly from renewable sources. 1 1 1 1 17 Standard pyrolysis 1 1 Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 50 .1 megapascals at the inlet to the generating station which is at least 2 megajoules per metre cubed but is less than 4 megajoules per metre cubed. and (b) has a gross calorific value when measured at 25 degrees Celsius and 0. which— (a) is produced by the thermal degradation of waste or biomass in the absence of any oxidising agent (other than that which forms part of the waste or biomass itself) to produce char and one or both of gas and liquid.(ii) methane.

(iii) hydrogen. and(b) has a gross calorific value when measured at 25 degrees Celsius and 0.5 2 Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 51 . Electricity generated from biomass (other than sewage gas or landfill gas) by a generating station in a calendar month in which it generates electricity partly from fossil fuel and partly from renewable sources. or both. except for electricity generated by a generating station in a calendar month in which it generates electricity partly from fossil fuel and partly from renewable sources. Electricity generated from a liquid or gaseous fuel.but does not include electricity generated by a generating station in a calendar month in which it generates electricity partly from fossil fuel and partly from renewable sources.(ii) methane. Electricity generated from gas formed by the anaerobic digestion of material which is neither sewage nor material in a landfill. 2 1/2 19 Advanced pyrolysis 2 1/2 20 Anaerobic Digestion 2 1/2 21 Co-firing of Biomass 0. which— (a) is produced by the thermal degradation of waste or biomass in the absence of any oxidising agent (other than that which forms part of the waste or biomass itself) to produce char and one or both of gas and liquid. but does not include electricity generated by a generating station in a calendar month in which it generates electricity partly from fossil fuel and partly from renewable sources.Appendices Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 18 Advanced gasification Electricity generated from a gaseous fuel which—(a) is produced by the substoichiometric oxidation or steam reformation of waste or biomass to produce a gaseous mixture containing two or all of the following—(i) oxides of carbon. and (b) has a gross calorific value when measured at 25 degrees Celsius and 0.1 megapascals at the inlet to the generating station of at least 4 megajoules per metre cubed.1 megapascals at the inlet to the generating station of at least 4 megajoules per metre cubed.

1 1 1. or (c) populus (also known as short rotation coppice poplar).5 2/3 25 Dedicated Biomass 1.(b) salix (also known as short rotation coppice willow). and where the fossil fuel and energy crops have been burned in separate boilers. The relevant proportion of electricity generated from energy crops by a qualifying combined heat and power generating station in a calendar month in which it generates electricity partly from fossil fuel and partly from renewable sources.“Energy crop” means a plant crop planted after 31st December 1989 which is grown primarily for the purpose of being used as fuel or which is one of the following:(a) miscanthus giganteus. Electricity generated from biomass (other than sewage gas or landfill gas) by a generating station in a calendar month in which it generates electricity from biomass only. or(c) populus (also known as short rotation coppice poplar).Appendices Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 22 Co-firing of Energy Crops Electricity generated from energy crops by a generating station in a calendar month in which it generates electricity partly from fossil fuel and partly from renewable sources. and where the fossil fuel and biomass have been burned in separate boilers. 1 1 23 Co-firing of Biomass with CHP 24 Co-firing of Energy Crop with CHP Electricity generated from biomass by a qualifying combined heat and power generating station in a calendar month in which it has generated electricity partly from fossil fuel and partly from biomass. (b) salix (also known as short rotation coppice willow). “Energy crop” means a plant crop planted after 31st December 1989 which is grown primarily for the purpose of being used as fuel or which is one of the following: (a) miscanthus giganteus.5 2/3 Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 52 .

Electricity generated from energy crops by a qualifying combined heat and power generating station in a calendar month in which it is fuelled wholly by biomass. (b) salix (also known as short rotation coppice willow).Appendices Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 26 Dedicated Energy Crops Electricity generated from energy crops by a generating station in a calendar month in which it generates electricity from biomass only.(b) salix (also known as short rotation coppice willow). or(c) populus (also known as short rotation coppice poplar). 2 1/2 27 Dedicated Biomass with CHP Dedicated Energy Crops with CHP 28 Electricity generated from biomass by a qualifying combined heat and power generating station in a calendar month in which it is fuelled wholly by biomass. or (c) populus (also known as short rotation coppice poplar). 2 1/2 2 1/2 Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 53 .“Energy crop” means a plant crop planted after 31st December 1989 which is grown primarily for the purpose of being used as fuel or which is one of the following:(a) miscanthus giganteus. “Energy crop” means a plant crop planted after 31st December 1989 which is grown primarily for the purpose of being used as fuel or which is one of the following: (a) miscanthus giganteus.

0 ROCs/MWh Grant scheme notified to EU th Comms pre 11 July 2006. e. • Co-firing with regular biomass (0. will receive Microgeneration Band (2 ROCs/MWh) Dedicated Biomass or Anaerobic No Grandfathered at 1.g. will receive appropriate band. Electricity generated from biomass by a generating station in a calendar month in which it has generated electricity partly from fossil fuel and partly from biomass No Yes Generation Station was th accredited as at 11 July 2006 Yes Not grandfathered. unless sewage gas or landfill gas which would be banded down which will be grandfathered at 1. or if Dedicated Biomass or Anaerobic Digestion generation station at any time Station is in receipt of a grant No Receive banded ROCs on basis of technology.0 ROCs/MWh.g. • Co-firing with energy crops (1. unless takes up option to surrender grant when it will receive banded ROCs on basis of technology unless sewage gas or landfill gas which would be banded down which will be grandfathered at 1. e.0 ROCs/MWh Yes No New Generating Station New generation station achieving full accreditation after 11th July 2006 and before 1st April 2009 Or New generation station achieving preliminary accreditation after 11th July 2006 and before 1st April 2009 and achieves full accreditation by 31st March 2011 Additional Capacity Generation station adding th additional capacity after 11 July 2006 and before 1st April 2009 Or Generation station adding additional capacity after 11th July 2006 which has been notified to st Ofgem before 1 April 2009 and achieves full accreditation by 31 March 2011 Yes Yes Grant scheme notified to EU Comms pre 11th July 2006.5 ROCs/MWh).Appendices Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Appendix 3 – Grandfathering provisions flow diagram Generation station which is operational and has received full accreditation with a declared net capacity of less than or equal to 50kW No Co-fired Plant without CHP. or if Dedicated Biomass or Anaerobic Digestion generation station at any time Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 54 .0 ROCs/MWh Yes No Yes Grandfathered at grant plus 1.0 ROCs/MWh) Yes Not grandfathered.

Appendices Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Appendix 4 – Banding provisions flow diagram Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 55 .

Appendices Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 56 .

Appendices Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 57 .

Appendices Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance December 2008 Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 58 .

Appendices Renewables Obligation: Draft Fuel Measurement and Sampling Guidance 2008 December Appendix 5 – Stock level indicator template Month: Fuel: Opening stock Deliveries Transfers Adjustments Consumed Closing stock Office of Gas and Electricity Markets 59 .

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