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contents
from the editor in memoriam Jemma’s year
Watch her grow! Tasha’s amazing experience.

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the assistant principal is in
Troy’s new job.

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the mom is in

Nicole’s new job.

serving in Peru

in the kitchen with the fernleys

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from the editor
Dear family and friends, We’ve managed to create yet another issue of our little family newsletter/ magazine. We debated on whether we should bother this year since we have a blog that we keep pretty up to date (no, really we do—you can even go check it out at fernleyfamilydoings. blogspot.com), and much of what we would put in a family newsletter risks being a repeat from the blog. But we decided to do it anyway. So, here you have it. The year 2010 has been kind to us, and it has brought us still more life changes. Tasha turned 18 and became recognized as an adult. Jemma turned 1 and has already begun her path to independence. I left my job to become a full-time mom. Troy got a promotion just when we needed it most. We lost a beloved friend. We suddenly got two grandmas living nearby. And lots more. Jemma has been working hard to go from immobile lump to hyper diaper— all in one year. She’s even managed to grow some hair! Already she is expressing strong preferences and interests. You can read more about her year starting on page 4. Tasha is halfway through her senior year, and as of this writing has completed all her college applications. All her hard work through high school has paid off in an important way—so far she has been offered the Dean’s Scholarship at Utah State University, which means she’ll get full tuition for two years. We’re waiting to see if BYU–Idaho can meet or top that offer. She truly hasn’t decided which of the two schools she prefers, but those are really the only schools she’s considering. We would be thrilled with either choice. She has spent this semester in an EMT internship with the Davis Applied Technical College—when she’s done, she’ll be a fully certified EMT. Tasha also spent many, many hours performing community service and raising funds to go on a service trip to Palmeras, Peru—you can read about her experience in greater detail starting on page 8. She has also continued her responsibilities with the Farmington Youth City Council and the high school’s Interact Club (service club). Oh, I should mention, she has managed to do all of this while working part-time at a JoAnn Fabric and Craft store. Troy is enjoying his new position as assistant principal at North Star Academy—read about it on page 12. He and I have been assigned to the nursery in our ward, and we’re having fun with all the little kids (and with not going to Sunday School classes). Of course, Jemma is in there too (a couple months early), but so far she seems to be enjoying nursery. I’m enjoying my new position as full-time mom. Jemma may wear me out before another year is over, but I’m loving the time I get to spend with her. We’ve had a splendid year, and we’re happy to share this bit of it with you. Sincerely,

Nicole Fernley

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In memoriam

Jack Frost
2001–2010

So long, old friend. All dogs go to heaven . . . enjoy your paradise of long walks, unlimited tuna sandwiches (no pilfering required), and an endless supply of tennis balls to chase and chew on. F4 3

Jemma's Year: Watch Her Grow!
January

February

March

A few things Jemma has learned this year:
To sit up To crawl To stand up To walk To run To make animal sounds that match the right animal To scribble To throw a tantrum To tease To eat with a spoon To talk a bit

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April

Jemma likes:

Pooh Bear and Bunny Chocolate milk Big sister Picking tomatoes Books Brushing Daddy's teeth Peaches Songs on Sesame Street Kneebouncers.com Walks in the stroller Being outside Saying "hot" Brushing Mommy's hair Cheese Balls Playing "up" (going up and down the stairs)

May

June

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July

Happy Birthday!

July photos by Lindsey Shaun Photography

Jemma doesn't like:

Strangers Diaper change ffii rst thing in the morning Bedtime Real oatmeal Leaving Grandma’s house Dad getting a haircut No more chocolate milk Having her hair washed

August

September

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October

November

December

Jemma's words so far:

Mom-mom stinky Da-da juice Bubba (Tasha) ball up kick hat eye hot ear nana (banana) teeth cheese mouth bubble knee dirty Jack shoes apple poop Mama (rhymes with grandma, and that’s what it means)

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Serving in Peru
by Tasha Fernley Last fall I heard about a service group called Youthlinc through my high school Interact Club. Youthlinc is a program that takes high school and college students to a third-world country to perform two weeks of service. I applied for a position on the Peru team and was accepted into the program along with my bishop and his daughter. (The only reason my parents were okay with this is because my bishop was coming along.) While in the village in Peru we would be laying concrete for a sidewalk, building a school and a medical shed, and teaching the people education lessons. As part of the program each student was required to perform at 8 F
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least 80 hours of community service, and half of that service had to be at a specific site. For my main service site I chose to volunteer at Davis Hospital and Medical Center. I spent the following 10 months performing service hours and collecting clothes, money, and supplies for the trip. In July our team prepared bags (capable of holding 50 pounds) with clothes; shoes; books; school, medical, and dental supplies; and fabric for the villagers we were going to serve. The next morning we all met at the airport and headed off to Peru. It took us three flights, a bus ride, and one boat ride to finally get to the Heliconia Lodge. The lodge was just off of

the Amazon River in the thick of the jungle. It was a series of hallways and rooms all raised on stilts, and it was going to be our home for the next two weeks. After that our days followed close to the same schedule. We would wake up and have breakfast at seven, leave the lodge by eight and work at the village, called Palmeras, until noon. From there we would travel by boat back to the lodge, have lunch, and head back around one to work for another three hours. Our nights were generally set apart for relaxing. (We did have a couple of activities like a night jungle walk and a shaman visit though.) A lot of us took the time to write in our journals, read, or play a games. The first day in the village, the medical committee, which I was on, and the dental committee taught several health lessons. We didn’t have very many students on medical, so we each got to teach our lessons solo, and luckily we had enough translators. My lessons were on water sanitation and personal hygiene, and thankfully my

Part of Heliconia Lodge

bishop ended up being my translator. He helped a lot with asking questions and helping them understand more fully what I was trying to say. That night we all brought the clothes we had brought and set up the clothing in their school. We each took a person through and found them an outfit and a set of shoes. It was very humbling how grateful they were for the little we had to give them. The rest of the time I spent nailing up the boards for the walls of the school, painting the school, and mixing cement. Most of my time was with the cement. By the end of our two weeks we had laid about one hundred feet of concrete, finished and painted the school, taught many education lessons (mine was on holidays), and nearly finished the medical shed. We also had a medical doctor and a dentist there who performed basic check-ups and extracted teeth. After about the first two days the dentist didn’t have many patients because they were too scared to go to him.

Some of the supplies we brought for the villagers

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Aside from all of the work we did, we found time to have fun. Our guides took us on several jungle walks, a bird watch, and an excursion to see some giant lily pads. We also got to visit the local library and clinic and go piranha fishing. (And no, I didn’t catch one, but a couple of people did.) We also attended several ceremonies put on by the villagers to welcome and thank us, as well as held a carnival on our last day for the village. On our last day in the village we had a heartbreaking farewell ceremony. We stayed longer than we were supposed to because no one wanted to leave. The next day we headed off by boat back to Iquitos. We stayed there for the day and left the next morning to Lima. This was our tourist shopping day, but I ended up getting really sick and didn’t really feel like doing anything. Unfortunately we were on a tour bus all day, which didn’t help at all. That night we ate at a five star restaurant in Lima that was on the coast. And I was still feeling 10 F
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sick so I didn’t eat much of it, but I did take pictures. That night my bishop, his daughter, our team leader, and I separated from the rest of the group. They were all going to the airport to leave for home. We were all diverging to do some sight seeing. I spent the night recuperating for the whirlwind of activities we had in store. For our diversion we went on a bus tour through the sacred valley of the Incas. We got to see several old Incan villages that are still lived in and shopped around for awhile. We also stopped at some ruins called Olantaytambo, a temple that was never quite finished. It is famous for the incredible size of stones that were moved through the valley and up onto the mountain. It is said that they abandoned the work because the Spanish started coming. You can still see stones left halfway up the

Palmeras

ramp that were dropped so they could leave. And of course we did go see Machu Picchu. I could go on and on about that experience alone. I had always thought those ruins were amazing from the pictures I had seen, but it is a total different experience in person. It was fascinating to see how the people lived and how sophisticated their architecture and engineering was. They put their temples together without any mortar or clay. They just cut the stones and fit them perfectly together. It was a truly amazing city! Being there gave me the goal of seeing all seven modern wonders of the world. I doubt it will happen, but I can try—one down; only six more to go.

After two and a half weeks away from home I was really glad to be going back home. I had an amazing experience and was humbled so much by the Peruvian people. They live with so little compared to us, but they manage and are still happy and grateful for all they are given. This experience has changed my perspective on service and has showed me how blessed I really am. And even though there was a language barrier, I made several friends that I will always remember from Palmeras. It was truly one of the most amazing experiences of my life, and I feel so grateful that I had the opportunity to serve the Peruvian people. My life will never be the same because of it.

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The Assistant Principal Is In
to the
by Troy Fernley

I have always claimed I would never get into education administration. The reasoning I put out there was my desire not to be stuck between parents, students, and board members. So, a few weeks ago when I was called into the principal’s office and found myself faced with the school board president and the principal, my first thought was, “Oh crap! What did I do?” After we were all seated and they started talking, my second thought was, “Oh crap! What should I do?” as they offered me the job of assistant principal. I was given a weekend to think on my decision. At first I was very flattered. This offer came out of the blue. There was no hint that our small school was going to hire an assistant principal or even really needed one (after being

on the job for a few weeks I discovered that, yes, the school needs one). That they would single me out among the many capable and incredible teachers at our school was an amazing thing to me. Part of me still thinks one of the reasons they gave me the job was because of my lack of estrogen. There have already been a few times where I was more effective with a student simply because I was a male figure. Some students are funny that way. In any event, I was forced to come home and face all those negative reasons I usually paraded out whenever anyone asked me why I didn’t get into administration. Here they are: 1. I don’t like the idea of being stuck within issues between teachers, parents, students and the board. It always

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looked like the principal was being drawn and quartered. 2. I love being in the classroom. I couldn’t imagine not spending time in the classroom with my students. 3. (This is a little embarrassing to admit because it highlights my lazy side.) I’m not really fond of being “in charge.” For most of my life I’ve been content to let others bear the responsibility of being in charge. It’s less stressful that way. 4. I’ve always been a little frightened of being where the buck stops. Granted, as assistant principal there is one step past me for the buck to go, but it is still just a little too close to the end of the line for my comfort. Even with this short but very finetuned-throughout-the-years list, I was confused on what I should do. There was a small part of me that thrilled at the prospect of being a bigger part of the school. When I came home and told Nicole about it, she was excited for me. (I sure am lucky and blessed to have her as my biggest fan.) I spent the better part of the weekend trying to internalize what the change in position would mean for me as an educator. So, I took my short list and faced them one at a time: 1. I’m a pretty mellow person and have been fairly good at calming volatile situations down as a teacher. I’ve also been in the situation where an administrator has run interference for me and have greatly appreciated it. Maybe this position would give me the opportunity to support the teachers in a more proactive way. (This was my weakest argument for this point, and I still don’t buy it. The honest truth is that being stuck

between all those involved in a child’s education is not a fun place to be.) 2. WoooHooo! With this position I still get to teach—no conflict there. 3. Okay, so I’m not fond of being in charge, but I still like to help where I can. One of the benefits of being in charge is the greater opportunities to help. 4. I just had to tell myself here, “Get over yourself and grow a backbone.” So, the Monday after the offer came, I accepted the position (of course, the pay raise helped in my decision). So far, I’ve been able to read with 4th graders, encourage middle school drama students during a play, affect the outcomes of policies (for the better I think), get to know many of the parents of our students better, and help one very troubled 3rd grader start to come to school on time (actually, help his mom get him to school). I have also had the unfortunate experiences of having to call a teacher out for not conforming to dress code and having to help let a teacher go, but on the flip side of that, I get the unique experience of being on the other side of the interview table as we hire a new teacher. At this point, whether or not my decision was a good one for me is still up in the air. There are aspects of my new responsibilities I’m enjoying quite a bit, but there are also elements I wish I could avoid. I’m just grateful that this new position and the pay raise came at a time that is most helpful for our family. For that alone it is worth it.

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The Mom Is In
by Nicole Fernley

One of my goals for this year was to become a full-time mom, and in August, we made it happen. I had grand ideas about all that I was going to accomplish while staying home with Jemma— everything from cleaning out the garage to training for another triathlon, all while being the perfect nurturing mother. Those of you who have stayed home with small children can stop your cackling now. I know. I KNOW. It’s been quite an adjustment both physically and emotionally. I had been at a fairly sedentary desk job for the last nine years, and suddenly this creaky 40-year-old body had to start carrying around and then eventually chasing after a one-year-old. Oh my. And the abrupt shift in my identity was a bit jarring at first as well. I’ve been so used to being an editor for the Church and having some credibility based on that title alone. I was used to attending important meetings where I felt my input and opinions were valued. Now I think the only person who values my input and opinions is Troy. Ah, but you know

what? That’s okay, isn’t it, because he’s the one who matters. The adjustment has been worth it though—I love being home with Jemma. As much as I loved my office job, I love my mommy job even more. I love knowing that I will be the largest influence on her life, personality, and testimony for the next several years. I love that I’m not sitting in my office feeling guilty because someone else is raising my daughter. I love knowing that we are doing the right thing—and I know we have already been blessed for doing it. I’m also incredibly grateful that we’ve been able to do it—I recognize that it is a luxury that not all families can afford. My days aren’t perfect by any means, nor is every moment with Jemma rosy, but they’re pretty darn good, and I’ll take that.

Here are a few things I DID manage to accomplish this year.

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In the Kitchen with the Fernleys
Here are a couple of the recipes we used or loved the most this year. The peanut butter chocolate chip cookies are a new discovery and may go down as a legend in Troy’s cookie history. He really loves them. Really, really loves them. The chicken stroganoff is so absolutely unphotogenic (how bland it looks!), but it is so yummy and so flippin’ easy. Tasha professes this to be one of her favorites. I think it might qualify for that, um, “comfort food” (read “white trash trailer park”) cookbook we joke about putting together.

Slow-Cooker Chicken Stroganoff
1 pound skinless, boneless chicken breasts, cubed 2 tablespoons butter, melted 1 envelope dry Italian dressing mix 8-ounce package light cream cheese, softened 10 3/4-ounce can cream of chicken soup Place chicken, butter, and dressing mix in slow cooker and stir together. Cover and cook on low for 5–6 hours. Stir in cream cheese and soup. Cover and cook on high for 30 minutes or until heated through. Serve over cooked rice or noodles

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Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies
1 cup (16 tablespoons) butter, softened to room temperature 2 cups smooth or chunky peanut butter 1 ½ cups firmly packed light brown sugar 1 cup granulated sugar 2 large eggs 1 ½ tablespoons milk 1 ½ teaspoons pure vanilla extract 2 ½ cups all-purpose flour 1 ½ teaspoons baking soda 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon salt 2 cups chocolate chips (or a combination of peanut butter and chocolate chips) Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a large bowl combine the butter and peanut butter and beat the mixture until it is light and fluffy. Add the brown and white sugars and mix until well combined. Add the eggs and mix for 1–2 minutes, until the mixture is well combined and light in color. Add the milk and vanilla and mix. Add the dry ingredients and mix just briefly. While there are still large spots of flour, add the chocolate chips (or peanut butter chips or both) and mix until the flour is completely mixed in and the mixture is well combined. Let the cookie dough sit for 15 minutes before scooping onto the baking sheets. It will firm up as it sits. When ready to bake, scoop tablespoon-sized balls of dough onto parchment-lined baking sheets leaving about 1–2 inches in between the cookies to allow for spreading as they bake. Bake for 10–11 minutes, taking care not to overbake in the slightest! Leave the cookies on the baking sheet for 2–3 minutes after baking before removing them to a cooling rack. This will help them set up and be firm enough to transfer without having them overbake in the oven. The cookies may look slightly underbaked but they will firm up as they cool.

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