You are on page 1of 63

 

 
 
High speed motion generated by an oscillating microfiber 
 
 
By 
He(Rick) Qi 
B.S., Zhejiang University, 2008 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thesis 
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the  
Degree of Master of Science in the Department of Engineering at Brown University 
 
 
 
 
PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND 
MAY 2010
ii 
 
 
This thesis by He(Rick) Qi is accepted in its present form  
by the Brown University Department of Engineering as satisfying the  
thesis requirements for the degree of Master of Science. 
 
 
 
 
Date_______                  ___________________ 
          Kenny Breuer, Advisor 
 
 
 
                                   Approved by the Graduate Council 
 
Date______________               _________________________________________ 
                 Sheila Bonde, Dean of the Graduate School 
iii 
 
Vita 
He(Rick) Qi was born in Guangzhou, China, on 21 May 1986, to Daihua Yang and Yong Qi.  Rick 
graduated with honors of his Guangdong Experimental High School (Guangzhou, China) class in 
June  2004.    He  then  attended  Zhejiang  University  in  Hangzhou,  China  where  he  studied 
Mechanical  Engineering  and  received  his  Bachelor  of  Science  degree  in  June  2008.  Rick  is 
currently finishing his Master of Science degree requirements in the Department of Engineering 
at Brown University. 
 
IV 
 
Preface & Acknowledgement 
My foremost thank you goes to my advisor, Dr. Kenneth Breuer, for his continuous guidance and 
invaluable engineering and research experience. Also, for his patience and passion, I am grateful. 
I thank Dr. Shane Woody from Insitutec, for his generosity in providing experiment equipments. 
My  graduate  program  is  supported  by  Zhejiang  University,  Chinese  Scholarship  Council  and 
Brown University. I thank them. 
The  work  present  in  throughout  this  paper  is  under  the  guidance  of  Dr.  Bian  Qian  of 
Microfluidics  Lab  of  Brown  University.    His  enormous  experience  and  passion  in  research  have 
motivated me along the road. Without him, I cannot finish this project.  I thank him for that. 
Thank  you  to  the  members  of  Kenny  Breuer’s  Lab  for  generating  a  fun  and  creative  work 
environment.  Members include:  Bian Qian, John DiBenedetto, Jun Kudo, David Gagnon, Charles 
Peguero, Arnold Song, Rye Waldman and Adam Hoffman.  The time we hanged out will certainly 
be missed.  
I thank my friend Qian Zhu for her unconditional and long‐time support and Dr. Jianzhong Zhang 
for his help in advancing my tennis skills and guiding me through hard times. 
I  thank  my  grandparents,  parents,  and  cousins  for  their  tireless  and  unconditional  love  and 
support. 
 

 
Table of Contents 
VITA .................................................................................................................................... III 
PREFACE & ACKNOWLEDGEMENT ..................................................................................... IV 
TABLE OF CONTENTS........................................................................................................... V 
LIST OF FIGURES ................................................................................................................ VII 
LIST OF SYMBOLS .............................................................................................................. XII 
1.  ABSTRACT ................................................................................................................. XIII 
2.  INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND ........................................................................... 1 
2.1 Experimental observations ........................................................................................ 1 
2.2 Theoretical analysis ................................................................................................... 6 
3.  EXPERIMENTAL SETUP AND PROCEDURE .................................................................. 10 
3.1 The overall setup ..................................................................................................... 10 
3.2 Mechanical design ................................................................................................... 11 
3.3 Control system ........................................................................................................ 15 
3.4 Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) ........................................................................ 16 
3.4.1 Advantages of PTV ............................................................................................ 16 
3.4.2 Principles of PTV ............................................................................................... 17 
3.4.3 Choose seed particles ....................................................................................... 19 
3.4.4 Tracking uncertainties ...................................................................................... 21 
3.5 Experiment procedure and data summarized ........................................................ 22 
4.  RESULTS AND DISCUSSION ........................................................................................ 25 
4.1 Calibration ............................................................................................................... 25 
vi 
 
4.2 2‐D Flow field ........................................................................................................... 30 
4.3 3‐D Flow field ........................................................................................................... 32 
4.4 Amplitude effects .................................................................................................... 35 
4.4.1 Energy versus Reynolds number ...................................................................... 35 
4.4.2 Streamlines versus Reynolds number .............................................................. 40 
4.4.3 Distance effect .................................................................................................. 44 
5. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE STUDY ............................................................................... 46 
 
 
 
vii 
 
List of Figures 
Figure 1: Vortex system formed by vibrating air round a cylinder. Cylinder diameter is 
0.475cm and air is driven by a loud speaker. [3] ................................................................ 2 
Figure 2: MgO particles in the oscillating air. Circular cylinder is photographed from 
above. Radius of the cylinder is 0.11 cm, frequency of oscillation is 200Hz, temperature 
of air is 20°C and exposure time is 1/20 second. [1] .......................................................... 3 
Figure 3: Frequency dependence of predicted (Upper) and measured (Lower) reagent 
concentrations. Eddies function as a microchemical trap. Because the electrode eddies 
are hydrodynamically isolated from the bulk fluid, chemicals added to the eddies can 
escape only by slow molecular diffusion (mass‐transfer‐limited dosing). Experimental 
concentration images were acquired by using imaging Raman spectroscopy in 25 mM 
ferricyanide and ferrocyanide solution supported with 1 M NaOH. An illumination 
shadow does not allow imaging behind the electrode. [8] ................................................ 4 
Figure 4: Schematic of the flow channel and flow symmetry planes. Each plane was 
illuminated in turn through transparent channel walls using a line‐focused laser beam 
(left). Schematic of representative streamlines for 3‐D steady streaming within one 
channel quadrant. Planes B and C define two quadrant boundaries, and the full cylinder 
length (channel height) is shown. Streamlines near the cylinder middle represent the 2‐
D eddy formed within the channel core. The lower flow represents the junction 
streaming formed near the cylinder ends (right). [9] ......................................................... 5 
Figure 5: The flow with a microvortex on the right is generated by a sharp edge. Movie 
images show 3‐D recirculating flow by a nonsharp edge on the left. [10] ......................... 6 
viii 
 
Figure 6: The phase lag between the radial and the tangential velocity. It is obtained 
from the zeroth approximation. [1] .................................................................................... 8 
Figure 7: Streamlines of the stationary flow in one quadrant. The streamline is obtained 
from the first order approximation. The radius of the cylinder a=0.11cm and the radius 
of the outer boundary R=20*a.[1] ...................................................................................... 9 
Figure 8: Experimental setup 1, tuning fork, oscillating fiber, microscopy and 
video/image taking system. 2, Photron APX RS high speed camera. 3, Nikon TE200 
inverted fluorescence microscopy. ................................................................................... 11 
Figure 9: The “Quater Research and Development” micropositioner has a resolution of 
0.01 mm per marking on the micrometers and travel range 0.5’’ on X, Y, Z directions. 
The “Thorlab” goniometer has a resolution of 0.167° and ranges of ±15° and ±10° at two 
rotational axes respectively. The micropositioner is used to move stage in X‐, Y‐ and Z‐ 
directions and goniometer is used to make sure the probe (fiber) is vertically placed. .. 12 
Figure 10: The front view of goniometer setup. The whole setup is placed on the micro 
stage of microscopy. The micro stage itself can move too. ............................................. 13 
Figure 11: Oscillating fiber and its driven system. The fiber is attached to a tuning fork 
which is controlled by the probe amplifier and oscillates at 32 kHz. ............................... 13 
Figure 12: The actual image of standing wave fiber. The total length is 1mm and the 
distance from the tip to the first node is 270μm. ............................................................. 14 
Figure 13: Adjust tip inclination. Image of the tip and the top are overlapped in one 
image. If we know the length of fiber, we are able to calculate the inclination angle. ... 15 
ix 
 
Figure 14: Schematic of the control system. Fast camera, image intensifier and micro 
stage are all connected to computer via NIDAQ card. They can be all controlled by a 
single Matlab file, which reduces a large amount of manual work. ................................ 15 
Figure 15: Basic principles of PTV. The velocity (speed and direction) is obtained by 
dividing the distance between two indentified particles in two subsequent frames by the 
time interval between the frames. ................................................................................... 17 
Figure 16: Comparison of PIV and PTV images. This is an ideal PTV image taken by our 
experimental setup. The distance among each particle is larger than its displacement 
between two frames. Also the particle light intensity is strong contrast to the 
background. They can be easily identified. ...................................................................... 19 
Figure 17: Particle center locating principle. Through Gaussian fit at X and Y axis, we 
identify the center (X
0
 and Y
0
) of particle with sub micron precision. The distribution 
shown in the figure is the theoretical intensity distribution. A is a constant here. ......... 21 
Figure 18: Tip oscillating images in water. The fiber material is glass and the solution is 
water. Driven voltage starts from 0V to 2.5V. Images are taken by IDT camera. ............ 25 
Figure 19: Image processing for tip amplitude. ................................................................ 26 
Figure 20: Tip oscillating center shifts as the amplitude increases. D is the tip diameter 
and Y0, X0 are the beginning locations. ........................................................................... 27 
Figure 21: Length of short axis vs. driven voltage. D is the tip diameter and L is the actual 
length of short axis. .......................................................................................................... 28 
Figure 22: Viscosity of water and glycerol solution. X‐axis is the weight percentage of 
glycerol in solution. ........................................................................................................... 28 

 
Figure 23: Amplitude vs. driven voltage. Blue, red and green means water, 34% glycerol 
and 65% glycerol solution respectively. Vrms means the root mean square velocity. 
Under different percentage of glycerol and water mixture, the amplitude changes 
significantly. But they all remain linear. ........................................................................... 29 
Figure 24: video processing results‐‐Streamlines and contours for horizontal velocities. 
The tip is placed 10μm above the substrate, oscillating along X‐axis with 1.38μm 
amplitude. The Reynolds number is 0.25. Red means flow goes to the positive side of 
the axis and blue means flow goes to the negative side of the axis. ............................... 30 
Figure 25: Processing images of different flow layers. The left one shows how focal plane 
moves up by 3μm each time and records videos. The right one quantitatively shows the 
image processing results of multi‐layer video recording and tells us how the horizontal 
velocities increase from the substrate. (Re=0.25) ............................................................ 31 
Figure 26: 3‐D streamlines. (1), top view, the streamlines in the green rectangular box is 
shown in 3‐D in the rest of the plots; (2), 3‐D view of streamlines and W velocity contour; 
(3), U velocity contour; (4), V velocity contour.(Re=0.25) ................................................ 33 
Figure 27: Velocity vector cross‐section manifestation. The left one is on the plane 
parallel with X at y=0, the right one is parallel with Y at x=0. Red means the flow is going 
up and blue means the flow is going down. (Re=0.25) .................................................... 34 
Figure 28: Calculating the energy. The red circle in left figure shows where we 
interpolate the surrounding fluid to get the flow field energy. The right figure tells we 
calculate the flow field energy at different heights. ........................................................ 35 
Figure 29: Energy versus height under four different Reynolds numbers. ...................... 36 
xi 
 
Figure 30: Normalized energy versus height under four different Reynolds numbers. ... 36 
Figure 31: Energy based on different radii. We defined circles with different radii 
surrounding the tip. By interpolating velocities u, v and w on the circle, we can calculate 
the flow field energy. The black dot in the center represents the tip of the oscillating 
fiber. .................................................................................................................................. 37 
Figure 32: Energy decay from the center for four different Reynolds numbers. ............. 37 
Figure 33: Horizontal energy versus vertical energy obtained at the case Re=0.25. It is 
taken at the height where the tip is. D is the diameter and R is the radius of the tip. .... 38 
Figure 34: Energy integrated by volume. We sum all the velocities lying on the volume of 
the cylinder by different radii (red, black, green and dark), from the height z=0 to 
z=24μm. The cylinders radius increase from r/D=2 to r/D=6, where D is the diameter of 
the tip. The black column in the middle represents the fiber. ......................................... 39 
Figure 35: Energy integrated by volume ........................................................................... 39 
Figure 36: Results of the energy integrated on surface. The radius increases from r/R=2 
to r/R=12. .......................................................................................................................... 40 
Figure 37: Flow fields transform as the Reynolds number changes.  ............................... 41 
Figure 38: Tangential velocity decays along the center. Tangential velocities are 
interpolated on the red and black straight line. Re=0.98 (above). Re=0.04 (below). ...... 43 
Figure 39: Energy decays from the center for the case Re=0.04. ..................................... 44 
Figure 40: Pumping & boundary effect. Tip is placed above substrate 10μm or 20μm. The 
Y‐axis shows the number of particles per frame at time t divided by the number of 
particles at the initial frame. ............................................................................................. 45 
xii 
 
List of symbols 
A, amplitude 
a & R, radius 
D, diameter 
t & T, time 
u & U, velocity 
æ, frequency 
n, kinematic viscosity 
Re, Reynolds number 
¢, streamline function 
µ, density 
o
u
, root‐mean‐square error in the velocity measurement 
o
Δx
, root‐mean‐square error in displacement measurement 
J
c
, diameter of diffracted particle image 
J
¡
, resolution of recording medium 
J
p
, the tracer particle diameter 
H
0
, image magnification 
z, the wave length of illumination light 
¡
#
, f‐number 
 
 
 
xiii 
 
1. Abstract 
Since  the  introduction  of  the  first  microfluidic  device,  manipulating  fluid  in  micron  or 
even  nano  scales  has  captured  increasing  attention.  Investigation  into  its  application  in 
biotechnology  has  been  the  most  intense.  Such  applications  include  immunosensors, 
reagent mixing, content sorting and drug delivery. Microfluidic devices are preferable to 
conventional  technology  because  they  require  few  samples  and  produce  rapid  results. 
This thesis carefully studies the flow phenomena caused by a high frequency oscillating 
micro  fiber,  which  is  potentially  available  for  mixing  on  microfluidic  devices.  The 
oscillation induces 3‐D steady steaming which has not been studied nearly as thoroughly 
as its 2‐D counterpart. In this experiment, strong three dimensional steady streaming is 
observed. By changing the viscosity and driven amplitude, we can control the Reynolds 
numbers  and  have  different  flow  phenomena.  After  applying  Particle  Tracking 
Velocimetry  (PTV),  we  carefully  measure  this  three  dimensional  flow  from  the 
perspectives of strongness of Z‐direction flow, energy distribution, transition of the flow 
pattern  and  tangential  and  radial  flow  speed.  My  results  show  similarities  and 
differences to previous 2‐D steady streaming results. 

 
2. Introduction and Background 
2.1 Experimental observations 
Steady  streaming  is  one  kind  of  time‐averaged  flow  effect.  Usually  the  fluctuating  flow 
results in a nonzero mean. According to Holtsmark, streaming effects in flow were first 
discovered by  the  great  experimentalist  Michael  Faraday  in 1831  [1],  the  same  year  he 
discovered  that  magnetic  fields  can  induce  electricity.  There  are  two  main  types  of 
streaming effects. The first, which we will discuss in this thesis, is associated with energy 
dissipation  within  the  Stokes  boundary  layer  adjacent  to  a  solid  boundary  when  the 
oscillating  flow  is  interacting  with  the  solid  surface.  The  second  one  usually  happens 
when a sound wave propagates through an unlimited volume of fluid. More commonly 
known  as  “quartz  wind”,  it  is  named  for  the  wind  observed  to  blow  away  from 
oscillating quartz crystals. Because the intensity of quartz wind decays quickly along the 
direction  it  propagates  and  the  energy  it  carries  is  too  small  [2],  we  are  generally  not 
interested  in  applying  the  effect  to  microfluidic  devices.  In  our  study,  we  focus  on  the 
first kind of steady streaming effect. 
The earliest demonstration of steady streaming we can find is given by Andrade et al. in 
1931  [3].  He  vibrated  the  air  around  a  cylinder  tube  at  diameters  between  1mm  and 
5mm,  using  smoke  particles  as  tracers.  This  can  be  shown  by  Figure  1.  The  streaming 
flow  was  induced  by  the  interaction  between  the  main  fluid  body  and  the  non‐slip 
boundary.  We  can  clearly  see  the  outer  vortex  while  the  inner  vortex  is  a  little  bit 
obscure.  

 
 
Figure  1:  Vortex  system  formed  by  vibrating  air  round  a  cylinder.  Cylinder  diameter  is 
0.475cm and air is driven by a loud speaker. [3] 
Unlike  Andrade  who  made  no  quantitative  analysis,  Holtsmark  et  al.  [1]  performed  a 
carefully  designed  experiment  based  on  his  numerical  analysis.  He  placed  a  cylindrical 
obstacle with a diameter of 0.11cm at the antinode of a Kundt’s tube. MgO was used as 
tracer particles (Figure 2).  All images were taken through an objective placed above the 
Kundt’s tube. Holtsmark observed that the thickness of the boundary layer is a function 
of Ð(
o
n
)
1¡2
 and  decreases  as Ð(
o
n
)
1¡2
 increases.  Here  D  is  the  diameter  of  the  cylinder, 
æ is the frequency and η is the kinematic viscosity. 
 

 
Figure  2:  MgO  particles  in  the  oscillating  air.  Circular  cylinder  is  photographed  from 
above. Radius of the cylinder is 0.11 cm, frequency of oscillation is 200Hz, temperature 
of air is 20°C and exposure time is 1/20 second. [1] 
In recent years, people are most interested in applying streaming effects to microfluidics 
control.  Rife  et  al.  [4]  used  quartz  wind  type  streaming  to  propel  fluid.  Due  to  the  low 
back  pressure  (about  0.15Pa),  “quartz  wind”  type  pressure  driven  flow  is  only 
competitive  in  low‐impedance  flow  or  closed‐loop  flow.  Also,  heating  may  ultimately 
limit the intensity. Yang et al. [5] employed acoustic vibration generated by piezoelectric 
ceramic  to  actively  mix  water  and  fluorescent  dye  in  a  6mm×6mm×0.06mm  chamber. 
Sritharan et al. [6] also did an acoustic mixing  experiment in a micro channel 75μm high 
and  100μm  wide  and  he  was  able  to  observe  different  mixing  fractions  under  different 
amplitudes. 
Beyond  the  “quartz  wind”  type  acoustic  streaming,  there  are  more  efforts  to  study 
boundary  induced  type  steady  streaming.  The  first  reason  is  because  its  amplitude  is 
independent of fluid viscosity. As shown by Squires et al. [7], the steady inertial force is 
balanced by steady viscous forces, so the streaming velocity is independent of viscosity. 
The velocity scale for steady boundary‐driven streaming is 
u
s
~
u
0
2
æI
 
(1) 
Here U
0
 is the amplitude of oscillating flow, ш is frequency and L is characteristic length. 
Thus  the  streaming  effects  are  much  stronger  than  the  quartz  wind  type.  Second,  heat 
and bubble generation is not associated with the streaming. A group at the University of 

 
Washington led by Professor Daniel Schwartz has used streaming induced stokes layers 
to trap high concentration chemical reagents at a scale smaller than 500μm(Figure 3) [8].  
 
Figure  3:  Frequency  dependence  of  predicted  (Upper)  and  measured  (Lower)  reagent 
concentrations.  Eddies  function  as  a  microchemical  trap.  Because  the  electrode  eddies 
are  hydrodynamically  isolated  from  the  bulk  fluid,  chemicals  added  to  the  eddies  can 
escape  only  by  slow  molecular  diffusion  (mass‐transfer‐limited  dosing).  Experimental 
concentration  images  were  acquired  by  using  imaging  Raman  spectroscopy  in  25  mM 
ferricyanide  and  ferrocyanide  solution  supported  with  1  M  NaOH.  An  illumination 
shadow does not allow imaging behind the electrode. [8] 
In 2005, they did another carefully designed experiment which was able to visualize the 
3‐D steady streaming flow at sub millimeter scale [9]. The experiment setup is shown in 
Figure  4.  Here,  polystyrene  microspheres  were  seed  particles  and  the  flow  was 
oscillated by a piezoelectric diaphragm. 

 
 
 
Figure  4:  Schematic  of  the  flow  channel  and  flow  symmetry  planes.  Each  plane  was 
illuminated  in  turn  through  transparent  channel  walls  using  a  line‐focused  laser  beam 
(left).  Schematic  of  representative  streamlines  for  3‐D  steady  streaming  within  one 
channel quadrant. Planes B and C define two quadrant boundaries, and the full cylinder 
length (channel height) is shown. Streamlines near the cylinder middle represent the 2‐
D  eddy  formed  within  the  channel  core.  The  lower  flow  represents  the  junction 
streaming formed near the cylinder ends (right). [9]  
A  group  in  Taiwan  also  visualized  the  3‐D  nature  of  steady  streaming  under  their 
designed  environment  [10].  They  actuated  a  micro  plate  (100×100×1.2μm
3
)  by  Lorentz 
force.  The  generated  microvortices  were  about  100μm  in  diameter.  They  found  the 
sharpness  of  the  edge  of  the  micro  plate  played  a  crucial  role  in  the  formation  of 
streaming flow because sharp edge induced flow detachment (Figure 5). 

 
                        
Figure 5: The flow with a microvortex on the right is generated by a sharp edge. Movie 
images show 3‐D recirculating flow by a nonsharp edge on the left. [10] 
2.2 Theoretical analysis 
The first theoretical work on steady streaming (which was called “acoustic streaming” at 
that time) should be attributed to Rayleigh in 1883. In his book, “Theory of Sound” [11], 
he  studied  the  standing  sound  wave  between  plane  walls.  He  also  pointed  out  that 
acoustic  streaming,  which  requires  the  solution  of  the  hydrodynamic  equations  of 
higher degree, was different from elementary treatment of sound [12]. 
Rayleigh  explained  acoustic  streaming  intuitively,  but  not  until  Eckart  et  al.  [2]  were 
people  able  to  give  out  a  solution  for  second  order  viscous  force.  He  started  with  an 
inviscid fluid, 

ot
+v · (µu) = u 
(2)
o(µu)
ot
+µu · vu +uv · (µu) = -vp 
(3)
He then applied the perturbation method, writing the density and velocity as 
µ = µ
0
+Nµ
1
+N
2
µ
2
… (4)
u = u
0
+Nu
1
+N
2
u
2
… (5)
N is defined 

 
N =
uI
X
 
 (6)
U  (velocity),  T  (time)  and  X  (length)  are  chosen  to  represent  different  problems. 
N < 1, N~1, N > 1. 
After  adding  back  the  viscous  term,  acoustic  energy  conservation  condition  and 
boundary  conditions  (a  long  tube  with  rigid  walls  and  both  ends  permit  an  axial  sound 
beam to enter and leave the tube without reflection), he found that the wind speed in 
any given fluid depends on the bulk viscosity coefficient µ
i
 of that fluid. 
Based on the earlier work of Eckart et al. [2] and Nyborg et al. [13], Holtsmark et al. [1] 
studied  boundary‐induced  type  streaming  and  gave  a  semi‐numerical  analysis.  He 
considered  an  oscillating  motion  in  a  viscous  fluid  surrounding  a  circular  cylinder  with 
radius a and axis normal to the x, y plane and passing through the origin. He interpreted 
the  problem  in  two  parts:  flow  in  the  viscous  boundary  layer ¢
2
(0)
 and  flow  outside  the 
boundary layer ¢
1
(0)
 which represents a potential laminar flow field. 
v
2
¢
2
(0)
= u 
(7) 
|v
2
-
1
n
o
ot
1 ¢
2
(0)
= u  (8) 
¢
(0)
= ¢
1
(0)

2
(0)
 
(9) 
Here n is  the  kinematic  viscosity.  After  applying  the  boundary  conditions  (like  no‐slip 
boundary  condition  at  rigid  walls  and  oscillating  flow  field),  Holtsmark  used  a  semi‐
numerical  method  to  solve  the  Hankel  functions  and  phase  lag  (Figure  6)  between  the 

 
radial  velocities  and  tangential  velocities  near  the  cylinder  wall  which  caused  the 
elliptical motion of fluid elements. 
 
Figure  6:  The  phase  lag  between  the  radial  and  the  tangential  velocity.  It  is  obtained 
from the zeroth approximation. [1] 
Here R
0
= o(
o
n
)
1
2
= 1u. With a similar successive approximation like Eckart et al. [2], 
¢ = ¢
(0)

(1)

(2)
+· 
(10)
The  first  approximation  gives  a  stationary  circulation  with  symmetry  of sin20,  so  we 
have  elliptical  orbits  at  every  quadrant  near  the  cylinder.  The  second  approximation 
does  not  contribute  anything  to  the  stationary  flow  but  indicates  the  thickness  of  the 
inner vortices. 

 
 
Figure 7: Streamlines of the stationary flow in one quadrant. The streamline is obtained 
from the first order approximation.  The radius  of the cylinder a=0.11cm and the radius 
of the outer boundary R=20*a.[1] 
Here  R
0
= o(
o
n
)
1
2
= 1u.  Holtsmark  draws  an  important  conclusion  based  on  his 
theoretical and semi‐numerical analysis. As we can see from the above figure, the core 
of  the  inner  vortex  is  located  at 1 <
¡
u
< 2 (Figure  7).  In  a  limited  space,  the  third  core 
can also be obtained, but for infinite space, the calculation shows that the core for outer 
vortex  will  move  to  infinity  together  with  the  outer  boundary.    The  removing  of  the 
outer  boundary  is  seen  to  have  a  negligible  influence  on  the  velocities  in  the  inner 
system and on the thickness of it. The thickness of the inner vortex system is, however, 
compressed as Ð(
o
n
)
1¡2
 increases.  
After  Holtsmark,  Wang  et  al.  [14]  studied  the  boundary‐induced  type  streaming  under 
low Reynolds number and high oscillating frequency flow. In his analysis, he broke down 
the  variables  in  a  steady  and  an  unsteady  parts  and  divided  the  study  into  different 
10 
 
regions based on different Reynolds numbers and Strouhal numbers, S = læ u

⁄ , which 
is used to characterize frequency. l is a characteristic length of the body, æ is frequency 
of  oscillation  and v is  kinematic  viscosity.  His  theory  also  obtained  the  same  result  as 
Holtsmark.  The  thickness  of  the  recirculating  flow  depends  on Ð(
o
n
)
1¡2
.  Bertelsen  et  al. 
[15] also has new numerical analysis and experiments to prove Holtsmark’s result. 
In  recent  years,  there  has  been  less  theoretical  work  on  steady  streaming.  Riley  has 
summarized a lot of this work [16], [17] based on the discoveries of previous people. 
3. Experimental Setup and Procedure 
In  our  experiment,  we  measured  the  steady  streaming  flow  field  induced  by  high‐
frequency oscillation (32 kHz).  The flow field is small (~100μm) and it has a very strong 
3‐D  motion.  The  objective  of  this  experiment  is  trying  to  investigate  the  3‐D  flow  field 
and explore the possibility of using this technique for mixing in micro‐scale. 
3.1 The overall setup 
The below figure shows the overall set up of this experiment. One end of a carbon fiber 
is  put  in  a  small  amount  of  fluid  and  the  other  end  is  attached  to  a  tuning  fork  (probe 
amplifier) which is oscillating at 32kHz, so the whole fiber and tuning fork are oscillating 
at  32k  Hz.  The  glass  used  to  hold  the  fluid  is  placed  above  a  60X  Nikon  objective.  The 
image/video  taking  system  consists  of  an  image  intensifier  and  a  high  speed  camera 
(Figure 8). The high speed camera can take images up to 70,000 frames per second with 
a  Region  of  Interest  (ROI)  of  128×128,  and  5000  frames  per  second  with  full  resolution 
1024×1024.  
11 
 
 
                             

 

 

Figure  8:  Experimental  setup  1,  tuning  fork,  oscillating  fiber,  microscopy  and 
video/image  taking  system.  2,  Photron  APX  RS  high  speed  camera.  3,  Nikon  TE200 
inverted fluorescence microscopy. 
3.2 Mechanical design  
The mechanical part of the system is as shown below. Because of the very small field of 
view (60X objective) and the small travel range of the nano stage, a carefully measured 
mechanical design  is  needed  (Figure  9),  (Figure  10)  in  order  to  make  sure  the  fiber  can 
be positioned right above the objective and within the travel range of the nano stage. 


Image Intensifier &
high speed camera
Tuning fork
Hg Arc
lamp
Substr
Oscillating 
standing wave 
fiber; 
Diameter: 7 
μm; Length: 
1.1 mm 
60X 
objective 
Dichro
ic 
mirror 
12 
 
The goniometer adjusts the inclination with a fiber. It is hard to tell the fiber inclination 
to naked eye. In order to do so, the objective is moved up and down. If the tip position 
does not move, then the fiber is vertically placed (Figure 13).  
 
Figure  9:  The  “Quater  Research  and  Development”  micropositioner  has  a  resolution  of 
0.01  mm  per  marking  on  the  micrometers  and  travel  range  0.5’’  on  X,  Y,  Z  directions. 
The “Thorlab” goniometer has a resolution of 0.167° and ranges of ±15° and ±10° at two 
rotational  axes  respectively.  The  micropositioner  is  used  to  move  stage  in  X‐,  Y‐  and  Z‐ 
directions and goniometer is used to make sure the probe (fiber) is vertically placed. 
 
13 
 
Figure 10: The front view of goniometer setup. The whole setup is placed on the micro 
stage of microscopy. The micro stage itself can move too. 
 
Figure  11:  Oscillating  fiber  and  its  driven  system.  The  fiber  is  attached  to  a  tuning  fork 
which is controlled by the probe amplifier and oscillates at 32 kHz.  
The tuning fork, fiber, probe amplifier and control box (which are not shown in Figure 11) 
are  provided  by  Insitutec,  Inc.  Because  the  fiber  is  tiny  (1mm  in  length  and  7μm  in 
diameter),  an  appropriate  mechanical  setup  is  needed  to  make  sure  the  fiber  can  be 
appropriately  placed  above  the  substrate  and  objective.  Both  the  tuning  fork  and  fiber 
are oscillating, but only the fiber is inserted in the fluid. If the tuning fork gets in touch 
with the fluid, a short circuit may results.  
More importantly, the fiber is not just simply oscillating back and forth, but is vibrating 
as  a  standing  wave  (see  Figure  12).  Together  with  the  boundary  layer  (the  substrate 
beneath  the  tip),  this  causes  the  flow  in  our  experiment  to  have  a  strong  3‐D  motion, 
significantly different from the work done by previous people. 
14 
 
 
Figure 12: The actual image of standing wave fiber. The total length is 1mm and the 
distance from the tip to the first node is 270μm. 
The first node of the standing wave fiber (probe) is 270μm away from the tip. Although 
most of the fiber is immersed in fluid, we are only able to see a small part of the motion 
(50μm above the substrate) through the microscope, because of the optical limit of the 
60X objective.  
 
15 
 
Figure  13:  Adjust  tip  inclination.  Image  of  the  tip  and  the  top  are  overlapped  in  one 
image. If we know the length of fiber, we are able to calculate the inclination angle. 
3.3 Control system 
The  control  system  is  a  key  part  in  synchronizing  the  high  speed  camera,  image 
intensifier and the micro motor that control the Z‐direction objective movement. Once a 
trigger  signal  is  sent  by  the  programmed  NIDAQ  card,  the  objective  will  move  to  the 
designated  position.  Then  the  image  intensifier  is  turned  on  and  finally  the  camera 
starts to record image/video (Figure 14). 
In  the  image  intensifier,  the  electric  potential  gradient  between  the  photocathode  and 
the  MCP  screen  determines  the  exposure.  We  can  control  the  shutter  and  exposure 
time through a function generator. The function generator is controlled by Matlab code. 
 
Figure  14:  Schematic  of  the  control  system.  Fast  camera,  image  intensifier  and  micro 
stage  are  all  connected  to  computer  via  NIDAQ  card.  They  can  be  all  controlled  by  a 
single Matlab file, which reduces a large amount of manual work. 
16 
 
3.4 Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) 
3.4.1 Advantages of PTV 
Currently, micro‐PIV techniques have been widely used to explore flow phenomenon in 
small scales. For instance, most of the inkjet printers consist of an array of nozzles with 
exit  orifices  on  the  order  of  tens  of  microns  in  diameter.  The  biomedical  industry  is 
currently  developing  and  using  micro  fabricated  fluidic  devices  for  patient  diagnosis, 
patient  monitoring  and  drug  delivery  [18].  Micro‐PIV  setup  usually  consists  of  a  high‐
resolution  camera,  an  epi‐fluorescent  microscope  equipped  with  color  filters,  seeding 
particles with a fluorescence dye and a light source (Mercury lamp for low illumination 
or laser. Hg lamp is used when only low illumination is required). With almost the same 
equipment,  we  used  Particle  Tracking  Velocimetry  (PTV)  instead  of  PIV.  The  reasons  as 
follows: 
1. PIV usually requires a high density of seeding particles for cross‐correlation purposes. 
Light emitted out of the focused particles reduces the signal‐to‐noise ratio in all the 
images. In our experiment, we have to penetrate the focal plane into the flow, up to 
24μm from the substrate. Taking this into consideration, PTV is a suitable technique 
and  algorithm  as  it  requires  fewer  particles  than  PIV.  Also,  as  PTV  tracks  individual 
particles along its path line, the algorithm indentifies particles within certain radii in 
the previous or next frame as the identical particle in the current frame. If there are 
too many particles around one target particle, it increases the tracking uncertainties. 
17 
 
2. PIV  detects  the  shifting  of  flow  patterns  and  uses  cross‐correlation  to  calculate  the 
displacement  and  velocities.  It  requires  a  stable  background  noise  during  the 
image/video  taking  period.  In  our  microscopy  system,  the  mercury  lamp  intensity 
has a certain degree of fluctuation. This is not a serious problem in PTV because PTV 
tracks single particles. 
3.4.2 Principles of PTV 
Figure 15 shows a simple illustration of PTV principles. 
                      
Figure  15:  Basic  principles  of  PTV.  The  velocity  (speed  and  direction)  is  obtained  by 
dividing the distance between two indentified particles in two subsequent frames by the 
time interval between the frames. 
PTV  tracks  and  identifies  the  location  (center)  of  individual  particles  across  several 
frames,  and  uses  the  time  difference  between  each  frame  to  calculate  the  velocity 

t
2
t
1

u=x/t
p
d
f
18 
 
vector  of  each  particle.  The  principles  of  identifying  and  correlating  particles  in  the 
previous and next frame are stated below: 
1. The  closest  (nearest‐neighbor)  principle.  We  define  a  “displacement  threshold”. 
Within this threshold, all the particles have the possibility of being the same particle 
in the previous or next frame. 
2. The  minimum  acceleration  principle.  We  identify  the  length  of  displacement  and 
direction  of  movement  for  each  particle  in  the  previous  frame.  Particles  in  the 
following  frame  which  fall  out  of  the  predefined  circle  are  judged  as  different 
particles.  
If there is more than one particle identified after applying the above principles, the code 
will skip this particle and process others. 
A typical PTV image is shown in Figure 16. The black spot in the PTV image is the fiber tip. 
The  typical  PIV  image  requires  at  least  3‐4  particles  in  a 16 × 16 pixel  window.  For  a 
1u24 × 1u24 image usually consists more than 1000 particles, which will overwhelmed 
our flow field.  
19 
 
 
Figure  16:  Comparison  of  PIV  and  PTV  images.  This  is  an  ideal  PTV  image  taken  by  our 
experimental  setup.  The  distance  among  each  particle  is  larger  than  its  displacement 
between  two  frames.  Also  the  particle  light  intensity  is  strong  contrast  to  the 
background. They can be easily identified.  
3.4.3 Choose seed particles 
There  are  different  sizes  of  particles  we  can  use.  They  range  from  several  nano  meters 
(quantum  dots)  to  several  micrometers  (fluorescent  polystyrene).  In  order  to  achieve 
micro  scale spatial  resolution,  the  particles  chosen  are  small  enough  to  follow  the  flow 
faithfully  without  (1)  disrupting  the  flow  field,  (2)  clogging  the  microdevice  by 
accumulation  (3)  producing  unnecessarily  large  images.  At  the  same  time,  the  particles 
chosen must be large enough so that they scatter sufficient light to be detected [19]. For 
the  material  of  particles,  polystyrene  is  widely  used  because  it  has  similar  density  to 
water (µ
p
= 1.uSS) and can be dyed by fluorescence. 
20 
 
If  the  particle  diameter  is  smaller  than  the  wavelength  of  illumination  light,  normal 
elastic  scattering  techniques  will  not  work  quite  well.  Since  all  the  tracing  particles  we 
use are fluorescent, fluorescent excitation makes the sub micron imaging possible. 
We  now  evaluate  the  diffusion  effect  of  a  1μm  particle  due  to  Brownian  motion.  The 
following  function  is  for  a  first  order  estimate  relative  to  the  displacement  in  the  x‐
direction. [20] 
e
B
=
< S
2
>
1¡2
∆x
=
1
u


∆t
 
(11)
Here  S
2
  is  the  random  mean  square  particle  displacement  associated  with  Brownian 
motion, D is the Brownian diffusion coefficient, u is the characteristic velocity, and ∆t is 
the time interval between pulses. If we use a 1μm size particle, 1500 frames per second 
and u = Suuµm¡s, e
B
is  about  10%.  Because  Brownian  motion  is  unbiased,  it  can  be 
substantially reduced by averaging over several particle images. 
In  our  experiment,  we  use  1μm  diameter  fluorescent  particles  because  they  offer 
adequate  resolution  and  faithfully  follow  the  flow  outside  the  inner  vortex  (particle 
following the inner vortex flow is not possible due to 32 KHz oscillating frequency). 
Figure 17 depicts the function (normal distribution) we use to detect the particle center. 
21 
 
 
Figure  17:  Particle  center  locating  principle.  Through  Gaussian  fit  at  X  and  Y  axis,  we 
identify  the  center  (X
0
  and  Y
0
)  of  particle  with  sub  micron  precision.  The  distribution 
shown in the figure is the theoretical intensity distribution. A is a constant here. 
3.4.4 Tracking uncertainties 
Brownian  motion  and  imaging  artifacts  play  a  small  role  in  the  measurement 
uncertainties  because  of  the  use  of  1μm  size  particles,  which  not  only  limit  the 
diffusivity but also increase the particle light intensity as we have discussed above.  
For  Micro  PTV,  the  spatial  resolution  is  limited  by  the  effective  diameter  of  particle 
images when projected back into the flow field. For magnification larger than unity, the 
diameter of the diffraction‐limited point spread function, in the image plane, it is given 
by 
J
s
= |2.44(1 +H
0

#
z]
2
   (12)
where¡
#
=
1
2NA
= u.S6 and NA is the numerical aperture of the lens. z = S1unm is the 
wavelength  of  the  recording  light.  H
0
= 6u is  the  magnification  of  the  Nikon  oil 
22 
 
immersion objective. So d
s
=0.14μm The actual image recorded is the convolution of the 
diffraction‐limited  image  with  the  geometric  image  [21].  Approximating  both  the 
geometric  images  and  the  diameter J
c
of  the  diffraction‐limited  particle  image,  the 
resulting effective particle diameter J
c
2
, where 
J
c
2
= H
0
2
J
p
2
+J
s
2
 
(13)
The  tracer  particle  diameter  is J
p
= 1µm.  So  the  effective  particle  diameter  projected 
onto  the  CCD  camera  is J
c
= 6S.9µm.  The  effective  particle  diameter  when  projected 
back  into  the  flow  is  1.09μm.  According  to  Prasad  [22],  if  a  particle  image  diameter  is 
resolved  by  3‐4  pixels,  the  location  of  a  particle‐image  correlation  peak  can  be 
determined  to  within  1/10th  the  particle‐image  diameter.  This  yields  a  measurement 
uncertainty of o
x
= 1u9nm.  
From  the  above  analysis,  we  can  see  that  by  resolving  the  image  with 3‐4  pixels  across 
the  image  diameter,  one  can  determine  particle  position  to  within  an  order  of 
magnitude better resolution than the diffraction‐limited resolution of the microscope. 
3.5 Experiment procedure and data summarized 
In  order  to  observe  the  three  dimensional  movement  of  particles,  the objective  should 
be able to move up and down based on the need of our observation depth in the fluid. 
The  working  distance  of  the  60X  objective  is  200μm.  But  as  we  have  mentioned  in 
section  3.4.1,  because  of  the  volume  illumination,  the  light  emitted  by  the  out  of 
focused  fluorescent  particles  blurs  the  contrast  between  tracking  particles  and  the 
surrounding.  This  limits  the  particle  density  as  well  as  the  observation  depth.  The 
23 
 
maximum  observation  depth  is  50μm  in  our  experiment.  The  memory  of  the  Photron 
camera  is  only  2GB.  It  can  store  up  90,000  images  with  resolution  of  256*256.  If  we 
move  up  the  objective  3μm  each  time,  we  can  record  flow  information  up  to  24μm. 
Although  our  system  has  limited  capability  in  observing  the  flow  field,  but  this  24μm 
depth gives us enough information to analyze the flow characteristics. 
The  following  tables  show  all  the  data  collected  so  far.  In  order  to  have  flow  with 
different  Reynolds  numbers,  we  can  either  change  the  viscosity  of  the  fluid  or  the 
amplitude  of  the  tip  oscillation.  The  distance  between  the  tip  and  substrate  can  be 
changed too. 
Tip above substrate 10μm 
  Material  Solution  Amplitude Vrms ωA
2
η ⁄  
a(ω η ⁄ )
1
2
1  Carbon  74.5% glycerol 0.7  2  0.007  0.02 
2  Carbon  65% glycerol  0.7  1  0.013  0.04 
3  Glass  34% glycerol  0.7  0.5  0.07  0.08 
4  Carbon  34% glycerol  1.11  1  0.12  0.12 
5  Carbon  Water  1.38  0.5  0.31  0.25 
6  Glass  34% glycerol  5.03  2.9  0.54  0.55 
7  Carbon  Water  5.47  1  1.23  0.98 
8  Carbon  Water  10.15  1.5  2.27  1.82 
9  Carbon  Water  14.74  2  3.30  2.64 
 
Tip above substrate 5μm 
Material  Solution Amplitude Vrms ωA
2
η ⁄
B(ω η ⁄ )
1
2
 
Carbon  Water  1.38  0.5  0.31  0.25 
Carbon  Water  5.47  1  1.23  0.98 
 
Tip above substrate 10μm, 30°  inclined 
Material  Solution Amplitude Vrms ωA
2
η ⁄
B(ω η ⁄ )
1
2
 
Carbon  Water  5.47  1  1.23  0.98 
 
24 
 
PUMP 
Description  Particles at each layer become less significant after long time 
Distance  Solution  Amplitude Vrms ωA
2
η ⁄
B(ω η ⁄ )
1
2
NOTE 
10  Water  5.47  1  1.23  0.98 
Images before and 
after pumping 
20  Water  5.47  1  1.23  0.98 
Images before and 
after pumping 
 
PUMP 
Description  An obstacle presenting, particle transferred to the other side 
Distance  Solution  Amplitude Vrms ωA
2
η ⁄
B(ω η ⁄ )
1
2
 
Process
10  65% glycerol 0.7  1  0.013  0.04  done 
 
Table 1: Summarization of all the experimental data, Rc =
oA
2
n
 or Rc = Ð(
o
n
)
1
2
 
æ is  the  frequency,  A  is  the  amplitude  and n is  the  kinematic  viscosity.  V
rms
  is  the  root‐
mean‐square  of  the  driven  voltage.  Both  Re  can  be  used  to  describe  flow  field. 
According  to  existing  literatures, Rc = Ð(
o
n
)
1
2
 has  been  used  more  frequently.  All  the 
Reynolds  number  described  followed  are  all  referred  to Rc = Ð(
o
n
)
1
2
 if  not  otherwise 
stated. 
25 
 
4. Results and discussion 
4.1 Calibration 
 
Figure 18: Tip oscillating images in water. The fiber material is glass and the solution is 
water. Driven voltage starts from 0V to 2.5V. Images are taken by IDT camera. 
The series of images (Figure 18) show the tip of a glass fiber oscillating in the water. The 
Dichroic mirror in the microscope’s light path can only allow emitted fluorescent light to 
pass. The reason we can see the tip moving is that its surface is coated with rhodamine 
solution.  Also  the  oscillating  frequency  is  high  enough  (32  KHz)  that  many  oscillation 
cycles can be seen, within the set exposure time. That is why we can get a clear image of 
the oscillating amplitude. The camera is an IDT camera with sensor of 7μm pixels size, a 
significant improvement from the Photron (fast speed) camera (17μm). 
 
26 
 
 
 
Figure 19: Image processing for tip amplitude.  
(1),  corp  the  region  of  interest  from  the  original  image;  (2),  saturate  the  lowest  and 
highest 10% of pixels in the image; (3), calculate a threshold and binarize the image; (4), 
fill  in  the  black  gaps  surrounded  by  white  pixels;  (5),  calculate  the  major  axis  of  the 
ellipse that has the same normalized second central moments as the region; (6), Plot the 
long  axis  and  short  axis  on  the  original  image.  The  reasons  we  are  trying  to  measure 
oscillation  amplitude  by  the  above  mentioned  steps  are  because  the  first  intensity  is 
gradually  decaying  from  the  tip  center  to  the  fluid.  There  is  no  sharp  edge  telling  us 
where  the  end  motion  of  the  tip  is.  The  second  is  that  amplitude  will  tend  to  be  very 
small  when  the  driven  voltage  is  low  and  viscosity  of  fluid  is  high.  In  this  situation,  it  is 
very inaccurate to measure by eye. From the 6
th
 plot in the above image, we can see the 
27 
 
measured  long  axis  and  short  axis  fit  the  original  image  very  well.  It  gives  a  high 
confidence in measuring the amplitude.  
 
Figure 20: Tip oscillating center shifts as the amplitude increases. D is the tip diameter 
and Y0, X0 are the beginning locations. 
From  Figure  20,  we  can  see  the  shifting  is  mostly  limited  on  the  X‐axis,  with  which  the 
tip  is  oscillating.  It  has  little  or  no  motion  on  the  Y‐axis.  It  is  interesting  that  the  tip 
center moves in the same direction (positive X‐axis) when the amplitude increases. The 
shifting is smaller for higher viscosity as the oscillation is damped by the viscosity. 
 
-0.2 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8
-0.5
0
0.5
Center shifting
(X-X
0
)/D
(
Y
-
Y
0
)
/
D


Water
34% glycerol
65% glycerol
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
1.4
V
rms
L
/
D
Oscillating short axis


Water
34% glycerol
65% glycerol
28 
 
Figure 21: Length of short axis vs. driven voltage. D is the tip diameter and L is the actual 
length of short axis. 
The short axis should be the same as tip diameter if the movement is just on the X‐axis 
(Figure 21). From the above figure, we are very confident in saying that the tip is moving 
in a straight line on X‐axis. 
 
Figure  22:  Viscosity  of  water  and  glycerol  solution.  X‐axis  is  the  weight  percentage  of 
glycerol in solution. 
Because  it  is  not  possible  to  determine  the  kinematic  viscosity  of  specific  glycerol  and 
water  mixture,  we  interpolated  the  data  give  by  Archbutt  [23]  and  Shankar  [24].  The 
10
th
 degree polynomial interpolation (Figure 22) fits the data very well. 
 
0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
Weight percentage
C
e
n
t
i
p
o
i
s
e

m
2
/
s
Kinematic viscosity of glycerol-water mixture


Actual data
10th degree
polynomial interpolate
29 
 
 
 
Figure 23: Amplitude vs. driven voltage. Blue, red and green means water, 34% glycerol 
and  65%  glycerol  solution  respectively.  Vrms  means  the  root  mean  square  velocity. 
Under  different  percentage  of  glycerol  and  water  mixture,  the  amplitude  changes 
significantly. But they all remain linear.  
For  both  the  glass  and  carbon  fibers,  their  amplitudes  change  linearly  with  the  driven 
voltage  (Figure  23).  For  the  glass  fiber,  amplitudes  decrease  gradually  with  viscosity 
changes.  But  for  the  carbon  fiber,  its  amplitude  decreases  sharply,  between  water  and 
0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
Vrms (V)
Glass fiber
A
m
p
l
i
t
u
d
e

(

m
)


water
34% glycerol
65% glycerol
water
34% glycerol
65% glycerol
0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5
0
5
10
15
20
25
Vrms (V)
A
m
p
l
i
t
u
d
e

(

m
)
Carbon fiber


water
34% glycerol
65% glycerol
water
34% glycerol
65% glycerol
30 
 
34% glycerol.  The slope also decreases as the viscosity of fluid increases, which means 
the damping confines the tip movement.  
4.2 2‐D Flow field 
Figure  24:  video  processing  results‐‐Streamlines  and  contours  for  horizontal  velocities. 
The  tip  is  placed  10μm  above  the  substrate,  oscillating  along  X‐axis  with  1.38μm 
amplitude.  The  Reynolds  number  is  0.25.  Red  means  flow  goes  to  the  positive  side  of 
the axis and blue means flow goes to the negative side of the axis. 
 
 
31 
 
From  Figure  24,  we  can  see  the  tip  is  oscillating  along  the  X‐axis.  The  flow  comes  into 
the  center  along  the  X‐axis  and  goes  out  the  center  along  the  Y‐axis.  The  horizontal 
streamlines do not show the actual path line of seed particles, because the flow is three 
dimensional. All the horizontal motion of particles form into four eddies adjacent to the 
oscillating center. The results are very similar to the 2‐D experiments people have done 
before [9]. Four eddies are formed by Reynolds stress which comes from viscosity of the 
fluid and non linearity of the inertial effect. The horizontal speed gradually decays from 
the  center  where  we  can  see  the  symmetry  and  gradual  decay  in  the  contour.  The 
tracking  uncertainties  (standard  deviation  of  velocity  vectors)  are  kept  below  5%  at  all 
the locations. The amplitude of tip oscillation is 1.38μm and the whole velocity field has 
a radius of about 60μm.  
   
Figure 25: Processing images of different flow layers. The left one shows how focal plane 
moves up by 3μm each time and records videos. The right one quantitatively shows the 
image  processing  results  of  multi‐layer  video  recording  and  tells  us  how  the  horizontal 
velocities increase from the substrate. (Re=0.25) 
Substrate 
32 
 
One  of  the  major  differences  of  our  experiment  compared  with  previous  people  is  our 
accurate measurement of the flow field not just in one 2‐D plane but several 2‐D planes. 
But this multi‐layer measurement (Figure 25) has its own limit. As shown in the previous 
chapter,  the  total  length  of  fiber  is  larger  than  1mm,  which  is  much  larger  than  24μm, 
the largest depth we penetrate into the flow field. What we are capturing here is a very 
small  region  of  the  whole  3‐D  flow  field,  and  it  is  far  below  the  first  node  (h=270μm). 
The amplitude changes roughly linearly from tip to node. So we know if the amplitude at 
the  tip  is  D,  the  amplitude  14μm  above  the  tip  (24μm  above  substrate)  will  be  0.95D. 
From  the  observed  regions  (h=0μmh=24μm),  the  velocity  keeps  increasing  as 
evidenced  by  the  color  become  darker  in  the  contour  plots.  Thus,  we  think  the  flow  is 
more influenced by the boundary (substrate) than the difference of the amplitude. 
4.3 3‐D Flow field 
 
ou
ox
+
oI
oy
+
ow
oz
= u 
(14)
w = J -(
ou
ox
+
oI
oy
)Jz
h
0
 
(15)
Once  all  the  PTV  data  are  obtained  at  different  heights,  we  have  the  information  of 
horizontal  velocities  (U  and  V)  at  different  heights.  If  we  assume  incompressible  and 
steady  flow,  based  on  the  continuity  equations  shown  above,  velocity  along  the  Z‐axis 
(W)  can  be  reconstructed.  Here  we  use  a  no‐slip  boundary  to  define  the  boundary 
condition at the substrate and Simpson's rule of integration with an interval of 3μm for 
each step. 
33 
 
 
 
Figure 26: 3‐D streamlines. (1), top view, the streamlines in the green rectangular box is 
shown in 3‐D in the rest of the plots; (2), 3‐D view of streamlines and W velocity contour; 
(3), U velocity contour; (4), V velocity contour.(Re=0.25) 
The  3‐D  reconstruction  results  (Figure  26)  not  only  show  qualitative  but  also 
quantitative  Z‐axis  motion.  The  first  one  shows  the  top  view  of  streamlines  (Re=0.25). 
The rest show the streamlines and contours of the region within the green square box in 
the  first  one.  For  contours  of  plot  2,  3  and  4,  blue  means  flow  goes  to  the  negative 
direction of the axis while red is the positive. From the streamlines and contours, we can 
34 
 
tell: (1), the flow converges at the center on the axis which the tip is oscillating on. (2), 
the  flow  converges  at  the  center  with  upward  motion,  and  is  propelled  away  from  the 
center with downward motion. (3), the Z‐axis velocity is the strongest in the center. This 
can be also shown by watching the video. Particles quickly disappear or appear again at 
the center. 
 
Figure  27:  Velocity  vector  cross‐section  manifestation.  The  left  one  is  on  the  plane 
parallel with X at y=0, the right one is parallel with Y at x=0. Red means the flow is going 
up and blue means the flow is going down. (Re=0.25) 
Here  we  try  to  investigate  more  the  velocity  at  the  cross‐plane  at  X=0  and  Y=0, 
respectively (Figure 27). Blue means the flow goes to the negative side of the axis. Red 
means the opposite. From the above figures we can see, after the flow converges at the 
center,  the  oscillation  propels  the  flow  outwards  with  downward  motion.  This  repeats 
during the whole recording period.  
35 
 
4.4 Amplitude effects 
4.4.1 Energy versus Reynolds number 
If  we  define  a  circle  around  the  oscillating  center  and  interpolate  the  surrounding  fluid 
velocity  onto  this  circle,  including  U,  V  and  W.  The  circle  has  certain  radius  R  and  is 
placed  at  different  heights  (Figure  28).  Energy  is  defined  as (u
2
+I
2
+w
2
) × r × 2n.  
D is the diameter and R is the radius of the tip. 
 
Figure  28:  Calculating  the  energy.  The  red  circle  in  left  figure  shows  where  we 
interpolate  the  surrounding  fluid  to  get  the  flow  field  energy.  The  right  figure  tells  we 
calculate the flow field energy at different heights. 
-5 0 5 10
-8
-6
-4
-2
0
2
4
6
8
10
X-position X/D
Y
-
p
o
s
i
t
i
o
n

Y
/
D
-5
0
5
-5
0
5
0
5
10
15
20
25
Z
-
p
o
s
i
t
i
o
n


m
X-position X/D
Y-position Y/D
36 
 
 
Figure 29: Energy versus height under four different Reynolds numbers.  
 
Figure 30: Normalized energy versus height under four different Reynolds numbers.  
Normalized energy is defined as Encrgy Ð · (æA)
2
⁄ . The energy increases as the height 
increases.  Figure  29  shows  the  absolute  energy  and  Figure  30  normalizes  it  with  tip 
oscillation  energy.  We  speculate  that  at  certain  height,  the  energy  will  reach  its 
maximum. Due to the limit of our optical system, we are not able to clearly see the flow 
field above 24μm.  
0 5 10 15 20 25
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
x 10
-3
Height Z(m)
E
n
e
r
g
y
/
D
*
(

A
)
2
r/R=10


Re=0.25
Re=1.82
Re=2.64
tip position
0 5 10 15 20 25
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
x 10
-3
Height Z(m)
E
n
e
r
g
y
/
D
*
(

A
)
2
r/R=10


Re=0.25
Re=1.82
Re=2.64
tip position
37 
 
 
Figure  31:  Energy  based  on  different  radii.  We  defined  circles  with  different  radii 
surrounding the tip. By interpolating velocities u, v and w on the circle, we can calculate 
the  flow  field  energy.  The  black  dot  in  the  center  represents  the  tip  of  the  oscillating 
fiber. 
 
Figure 32: Energy decays from the center for four different Reynolds numbers.  
As shown by Figure 32, energy is damped by viscosity. It reaches its maximum at r/R=5. 
The  further  away  from  the  center  that  the  tip  oscillates,  the  less  energy  the  fluid  can 
obtain.  Because  the  flow  field  is  3‐D,  except  for  knowing  the  total  energy,  we  are  also 
-5 0 5 10
-8
-6
-4
-2
0
2
4
6
8
10
X-position X/D
Y
-
p
o
s
i
t
i
o
n

Y
/
D
2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
x 10
-3
r/R
E
n
e
r
g
y
/
D
*
(

A
)
2
At the tip


Re=0.25
Re=1.82
Re=2.64
38 
 
interested  in  seeing  the  contribution  from  horizontal  motion  and  vertical  motion, 
respectively  (Figure  33).  If  we  break  down  the  total  energy  into  horizontal  energy  and 
vertical energy, we have the following plot. 
 
Figure  33:  Horizontal  energy  versus  vertical  energy  obtained  at  the  case  Re=0.25.  It  is 
taken at the height where the tip is. D is the diameter and R is the radius of the tip.  
The  horizontal  energy  is  defined  as (u
2
+I
2
) × r × 2n and  the  vertical  energy  is 
defined  as(w
2
) × r × 2n.  The  vertical  energy  reaches  its  maximum  before  horizontal 
energy and  decays sharply after that. After r/R  =8, the total energy is solely due to the 
horizontal energy.  We also want to see the total energy which is confined by a volume, 
such as the total energy that is included in a cylindrical volume space where the fiber is 
at the center. 
2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
x 10
-3
r/R
E
n
e
r
g
y
/
D
*
(

A
)
2
Re=0.25


Total energy
Horizontal energy
Vertical energy
39 
 
 
Figure 34: Energy integrated by volume. We sum all the velocities lying on the volume of 
the  cylinder  by  different  radii  (red,  black,  green  and  dark),  from  the  height  z=0  to 
z=24μm. The cylinders radius increase from r/D=2 to r/D=6, where D is the diameter of 
the tip. The black column in the middle represents the fiber. 
 
Figure 35: Energy integrated by volume. 
At  first,  the  energy  integrated  by  volume  increases  as  the  radius  increases  (Figure  35). 
This  is  intuitive  because  the  bigger  the  volume,  the  more  energy  it  contains.  Second, 
from  the  figure,  the  higher  the  Reynolds  number,  the  more  efficient  the  energy 
-5
0
5
-5
0
5
0
5
10
15
20
25
Z
-
p
o
s
i
t
i
o
n


m
X-position X/D
Y-position Y/D
4 5 6 7 8
0
1
2
3
4
5
r/D
E
n
e
r
g
y
/
D
3
(

A
)
2
Energy by volume


Re=0.25
Re=0.98
Re=1.82
Re=2.64
40 
 
transfers from the tip to the flow. Third, the linear relation tells us the energy generated 
by the oscillating tip distributes to the flow in a linear way. 
If  we  only  integrate  the  energy  on  the  cylindrical  surface where  the  tip  is  at  the center 
as shown in Figure 34,  we have the following plots. (Figure 35 is integrated by volume, 
and Figure 36 is integrated by surface) 
 
Figure 36: Results of the energy integrated on surface. The radius increases from r/R=2 
to r/R=12. 
As  the  radius  increases,  the  energy does  not  drop  too  much  until  r/R=8.  Figure  36  tells 
us that the energy is conserved over certain distances but viscosity finally dampens the 
velocity. It is interesting that the energy first increases and then decreases. We perceive 
the energy as low at the center because we are lacking flow field information since the 
camera is not able to capture such high speed motion at the tip. 
4.4.2 Streamlines versus Reynolds number 
  
2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16
0
0.005
0.01
0.015
0.02
0.025
0.03
r/R
E
n
e
r
g
y
/
D
2
(

A
)
2
Energy by surface


Re=0.25
Re=1.82
Re=2.64
41 
 
Figure 37: Flow fields transform as the Reynolds number changes.  
Re=0.98  Re=0.25  Re=0.12 
 
Re=0.04  Re=0.02   
 
 
42 
 
As already shown in Table 1, we have flow fields under different Reynolds numbers. The 
reason  why  we  are  interested  in  low  Re  number  is  because  in  many  biomedical 
application, we are dealing with polymers or none Newtonian fluids that have very low 
Re  numbers.  If  we  want  to  prove  our  device  can  be  used  to  mix  reagents  in  very  small 
scale, we should investigate flows under low Re numbers. Although currently there is no 
theory  of  3‐D  steady  streaming,  Wang  [14]  stated  he  stated  that  with  a  low  Reynolds 
number (high viscosity) and high Strouhal number (high frequency), the inner  
Case one 
Case two 
43 
 
Figure  38:  Tangential  velocity  decays  along  the  center.  Tangential  velocities  are 
interpolated on the red and black straight line. Re=0.98 (above). Re=0.04 (below).  
Vortex or the unsteady vorticity would not be confined in a boundary layer but would be 
spread all over the flow field. Also from Holtsmark [1] and Wang [14], it has been shown 
that the thickness of inner vortex will grow as Ð(
o
n
)
1
2
  decreases.  We think the previous 
theories can explain the phenomena here. 
In  Holtsmark’s  paper  [1],  he  stated  that  the  second  zero  point  where  the  tangential 
velocity  curve  crosses  the  X‐axis  was  the  core  of  the  inner  vortex.  It  was  located 
between 1/2D and D, where D is the diameter of the tip. In the top right image of Figure 
38,  tangential  velocities in  two  quadrants  cross  X‐axis,  but  at  different  positions,  so  we 
cannot state here the zero point is the core of inner vortex. Because the tip moves back 
and  forth  very  quickly  and  the  theoretical  core  of  the  inner  vortex  lies  between  1/2D 
and  D,  the  tangential  velocity  turns  around  and  decays  very  fast  at  r/D=2  in  both  case 
one  and  two,  In  case  two  because  there  is  only  one  circulation  around  the  tip,  the 
tangential velocities always move in the same direction and with a smaller initial speed. 
We are also interested in seeing the Z‐axis motion intensity in the low Reynolds number 
case.  
44 
 
 
Figure 39: Energy decays from the center for the case Re=0.04. 
So  from  the  Figure  39  and  Figure  33,  we  can  see  the  vertical  energy  in  low  Re  number 
case  is  much  smaller  compared  with  horizontal  energy.  This  means  that  Z‐axis 
movement is weaker than the horizontal movement. 
4.4.3 Distance effect 
 
2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
x 10
-3
r/R
E
n
e
r
g
y
/
D
*
(

A
)
2
Re=0.013


Total energy
Horizontal energy
Vertical energy
0 10 20 30 40
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
Seconds
P
e
r

f
r
a
m
e
/
I
n
i
t
i
a
l


Tip above 10m
Tip above 20m
45 
 
Figure 40: Pumping & boundary effect. Tip is placed above substrate 10μm or 20μm. The 
Y‐axis  shows  the  number  of  particles  per  frame  at  time  t  divided  by  the  number  of 
particles at the initial frame. 
When the tip is placed closer to the substrate, it has a strong pumping effect. As we can 
see  from  the  blue  line  in  Figure  40,  the  number  of  particles  has  been  significantly 
decreased  until  it  reaches  a  certain  level.  If  we  place  the  tip  further  away  from  the 
substrate,  the  pumping  effect  disappears  (green  line)  as  the  interaction  with  the 
boundary decreases. 
46 
 
5. Conclusion and future study 
In  this  thesis,  we  study  the  high  speed  3‐D  steady  streaming  motion  generated  by  an 
oscillating microfiber. First, we used our own optical system setup to take videos of flow 
fields  at  different  heights.  Second,  we  used  our  own‐programmed  PTV  code  to  analyze 
videos  and  obtain  velocity  contours  and  streamlines.  Third,  based  on  the  continuity 
equation and flow information at different heights, 3‐D streamlines were reconstructed. 
We  can  understand  what  the  3‐D  motion  looks  like  in  a  very  intuitive  way.    Fourth,  by 
looking  at  the  flow  field  energy  for  different  Reynolds  numbers,  different  heights, 
different radii and by volume integral or surface integral, we are able to study the flow 
field  energy  in  a  quantitative  way.  For  the  horizontal  plane,  the  energy  decays  as  the 
radius  increases  and  the  vertical  contribution  decays  much  faster  than  the  horizontal 
one. For the volume integral, the flow field energy stays stable but finally drops after a 
certain  distance  away  from  the  center.  Fifth,  I  looked  at  the  flow  field  under  different 
Reynolds numbers. The flow field changes significantly under low Re numbers. With high 
frequency  and  high  viscosity,  the  inner  vortex  layer  expands  to  the  whole  flow  field. 
Thus instead of having four eddies, we have one big circulation around the center. Sixth, 
we studied the tangential velocity decays and found that this is similar to the 2‐D cases 
people have previously studied. We also found out that the Z‐axis fluid motion is much 
47 
 
smaller relative to horizontal fluid  motion for  a low Re number. Finally, we verified the 
strong  influence  of  a  boundary  (substrate)  by  looking  at  the  pumping  effect.  When  the 
tip is further away from the substrate, the pumping effect will decrease or disappear. 
So  far,  we  have  been  qualitatively  and  quantitatively  studying  the  flow  induced  by  an 
oscillating microfiber. This is the first time that 3‐D steady streaming has been studied in 
a quantitative way, especially in considering the flow field energy and velocity decay. 
For  future  study,  more  experiments  under  the  low  Reynolds  number  region  and  the 
mixing  effect  caused  by  3‐D  steady  streaming  can  be  studied.  Mixing  in  microfluidic 
devices is still a challenge remaining to be solved.  
48 
 
Bibliography 
1.  Holtsmark, J., et al., Boundary layer flow near a cylindrical obstacle in an oscillating, 
imcompressible fluid. The journal of the acoustical society of America, 1954. 26(1). 
2.  Eckart, C., Vortices and Streams Caused by Sound Waves. Physical Review, 1948. 
73(Copyright (C) 2010 The American Physical Society): p. 68. 
3.  da C. Andrade, E.N., On the Circulations Caused by the Vibration of Air in a Tube. 
Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, 1931. 134(824): p. 445‐470. 
4.  Rife, J.C., et al., Miniature valveless ultrasonic pumps and mixers. Sensors and Actuators 
A: Physical, 2000. 86(1‐2): p. 135‐140. 
5.  Yang, Z., et al., Ultrasonic micromixer for microfluidic systems. Sensors and Actuators A: 
Physical, 2001. 93(3): p. 266‐272. 
6.  Sritharan, K., et al., Acoustic mixing at low Reynold's numbers. Applied Physics Letters, 
2006. 88(5). 
7.  Squires, T.M. and S.R. Quake, Microfluidics: Fluid physics at the nanoliter scale. Reviews 
of Modern Physics, 2005. 77(3): p. 977‐1026. 
8.  Lutz, B.R., J. Chen, and D.T. Schwartz, Microfluidics without microfabrication. 
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2003. 
100(8): p. 4395‐4398. 
49 
 
9.  Lutz, B.R., J. Chen, and D.T. Schwartz, Microscopic steady streaming eddies created 
around short cylinders in a channel: Flow visualization and Stokes layer scaling. Physics 
of Fluids, 2005. 17(2). 
10.  Lin, C.M., et al., Microvortices and recirculating flow generated by an oscillatory 
microplate for microfluidic applications. Applied Physics Letters, 2008. 93(13). 
11.  Rayleigh, J.W.S., Scientific Papers. Vol. 108. 1883, Teddington: Cambridge University 
Press. 
12.  Rayleigh, J.W.S., Theory of Sound. second ed. 1894, London: Macmillan. 
13.  Nyborg, W.L., Acoustic Streaming due to Attenuated Plane Waves. The journal of the 
acoustical society of America, 1953. 25(1): p. 68‐75. 
14.  Wang, C.‐Y., On high‐frequency oscillatory viscous flows. Journal of Fluid Mechanics 
Digital Archive, 1968. 32(01): p. 55‐68. 
15.  Bertelsen, A., et al., Nonlinear streaming effects associated with oscillating cylinders. 
Journal of Fluid Mechanics Digital Archive, 1973. 59(03): p. 493‐511. 
16.  Riley, N., Acoustic streaming. Theoretical and Computational Fluid Dynamics, 1998. 
10(1‐4): p. 349‐356. 
17.  Riley, N., Steady streaming. Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics, 2001. 33: p. 43‐65. 
50 
 
18.  Vennemann, P., et al., In vivo micro particle image velocimetry measurements of blood‐
plasma in the embryonic avian heart. Journal of Biomechanics, 2006. 39(7): p. 1191‐
1200. 
19.  Meinhart, C.D., S.T.Wereley, and J.G.Santiago, PIV measurements of a microchannel flow. 
Experiments in Fluids, 1999. 27(5): p. 414‐419. 
20.  Santiago, J.G., et al., A particle image velocimetry system for microfluidics. Experiments 
in Fluids, 1998. 25(4): p. 316‐319. 
21.  Keane, R.D. and R.J. Adrian, THEORY OF CROSS‐CORRELATION ANALYSIS OF PIV IMAGES. 
Applied Scientific Research, 1992. 49(3): p. 191‐215. 
22.  Prasad, A.K., et al., EFFECT OF RESOLUTION ON THE SPEED AND ACCURACY OF PARTICLE 
IMAGE VELOCIMETRY INTERROGATION. Experiments in Fluids, 1992. 13(2‐3): p. 105‐116. 
23.  Archbutt, Deeley, and Gerlack, Viscosity and density of glycerol in aqueous solution at 20 
celcius
 
1918, National Bureur of Standards Technology. 
24.  Shankar, P.N. and M. Kumar, Experimental Determination of the Kinematic Viscosity of 
Glycerol‐Water Mixtures. Proceedings: Mathematical and Physical Sciences, 1994. 
444(1922): p. 573‐581. 
 
 
 

  This thesis by He(Rick) Qi is accepted in its present form   by the Brown University Department of Engineering as satisfying the   thesis requirements for the degree of Master of Science.          Date_______                          ___________________    Kenny Breuer, Advisor 

 

 

 

                                   Approved by the Graduate Council 

  Date______________                     _________________________________________             Sheila Bonde, Dean of the Graduate School 

ii   

Vita 
He(Rick) Qi was born in Guangzhou, China, on 21 May 1986, to Daihua Yang and Yong Qi.  Rick  graduated with honors of his Guangdong Experimental High School (Guangzhou, China) class in  June  2004.    He  then  attended  Zhejiang  University  in  Hangzhou,  China  where  he  studied  Mechanical  Engineering  and  received  his  Bachelor  of  Science  degree  in  June  2008.  Rick  is  currently finishing his Master of Science degree requirements in the Department of Engineering  at Brown University.   

iii   

 John DiBenedetto.  His enormous experience and passion in research have  motivated me along the road.    IV    .  My  graduate  program  is  supported  by  Zhejiang  University.  Chinese  Scholarship  Council  and  Brown University.  Members include:  Bian Qian.  Thank  you  to  the  members  of  Kenny  Breuer’s  Lab  for  generating  a  fun  and  creative  work  environment. Also. Rye Waldman and Adam Hoffman.  I thank Dr.  Bian  Qian  of  Microfluidics Lab of Brown University. for his patience and passion.  parents.  The  work  present  in  throughout  this  paper  is  under  the  guidance  of  Dr. Arnold Song. Shane Woody from Insitutec.  The time we hanged out will certainly  be missed.   I thank my friend Qian Zhu for her unconditional and long‐time support and Dr. for his continuous guidance and  invaluable engineering and research experience. I thank them. Jianzhong Zhang  for his help in advancing my tennis skills and guiding me through hard times.Preface & Acknowledgement  My foremost thank you goes to my advisor. I am grateful. for his generosity in providing experiment equipments. Without him.  I  thank  my  grandparents. Charles  Peguero.  I thank him for that. Jun Kudo.  and  cousins  for  their  tireless  and  unconditional  love  and  support. Kenneth Breuer. David Gagnon. Dr. I cannot finish this project.

.......................... 10  .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 1  ....................  INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND ..................3 Choose seed particles .............. 15  3...................................................................................................................... XIII  2...........................4 Tracking uncertainties ......................................  EXPERIMENTAL SETUP AND PROCEDURE  .............. 1  2.............................................................................5 Experiment procedure and data summarized ....... 6  3.......4.......................................... 2.........................................................................................4......................................................................................................................... 10  3............................ IV  TABLE OF CONTENTS................4............................................................  ABSTRACT ..................... 22  4.................... 25  4.........................  RESULTS AND DISCUSSION ...............2 Theoretical analysis .................................................................................... 16  3.....................................Table of Contents  VITA .............................. III  PREFACE & ACKNOWLEDGEMENT ............................................................. 25  v    . VII  LIST OF SYMBOLS .. 19  3...................................................................................................3 Control system ....................... 17  3.........................1 Experimental observations  ..................................1 Advantages of PTV . 16  3.............................................................................2 Mechanical design ...........................1 Calibration ............................................... XII  1...............................................................................................4.................................. 21  3...................... V  LIST OF FIGURES .........................................................2 Principles of PTV ............................................................... 11  3...........4 Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) .................................. 3..................................................1 The overall setup ................................................................

................................................. 32  . 35  4............. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE STUDY .....4.........................................................................2 Streamlines versus Reynolds number ....................2 2‐D Flow field  .....................4....................................4 Amplitude effects ............................................................................. 4.................................................................1 Energy versus Reynolds number .................. 35  4..4..3 3‐D Flow field  .. 30  .............. 46        vi    ............... 44  5.......4.................................................................................................................. 40  4............................................. 4................................3 Distance effect .......................

............. and the full cylinder  length (channel height) is shown.... Experimental  concentration images were acquired by using imaging Raman spectroscopy in 25 mM  ferricyanide and ferrocyanide solution supported with 1 M NaOH...................... Because the electrode eddies  are hydrodynamically isolated from the bulk fluid........................ The lower flow represents the junction  streaming formed near the cylinder ends (right)......................... Radius of the cylinder is 0.. [8] .................... 4  Figure 4: Schematic of the flow channel and flow symmetry planes.......................... Each plane was  illuminated in turn through transparent channel walls using a line‐focused laser beam  (left).... Planes B and C define two quadrant boundaries.... [1] ... [9] .. 3  Figure 3: Frequency dependence of predicted (Upper) and measured (Lower) reagent  concentrations........ Streamlines near the cylinder middle represent the 2‐ D eddy formed within the channel core.11 cm.... temperature  of air is 20°C and exposure time is 1/20 second........... 5  Figure 5: The flow with a microvortex on the right is generated by a sharp edge. An illumination  shadow does not allow imaging behind the electrode............... Cylinder diameter is  0...................................List of Figures  Figure 1: Vortex system formed by vibrating air round a cylinder.475cm and air is driven by a loud speaker...... Circular cylinder is photographed from  above... Eddies function as a microchemical trap....... Schematic of representative streamlines for 3‐D steady streaming within one  channel quadrant.... frequency of oscillation is 200Hz... [3] .. 2  Figure 2: MgO particles in the oscillating air............. [10] ..... 6  vii    ...... Movie  images show 3‐D recirculating flow by a nonsharp edge on the left.. chemicals added to the eddies can  escape only by slow molecular diffusion (mass‐transfer‐limited dosing).

............. Nikon TE200  inverted fluorescence microscopy.................. 15  viii    .... The streamline is obtained  from the first order approximation... 9  Figure 8: Experimental setup 1. The fiber is attached to a tuning fork  which is controlled by the probe amplifier and oscillates at 32 kHz. Photron APX RS high speed camera................. It is obtained  from the zeroth approximation............. we are able to calculate the inclination angle.................... 14  .... Figure 13: Adjust tip inclination.......... 3................ The whole setup is placed on the micro  stage of microscopy....... microscopy and  video/image taking system.....................................11cm and the radius  of the outer boundary R=20*a....... ..Figure 6: The phase lag between the radial and the tangential velocity...... Image of the tip and the top are overlapped in one  image...... [1] ......................... 12  Figure 10: The front view of goniometer setup.. .. 8  Figure 7: Streamlines of the stationary flow in one quadrant. 2... The radius of the cylinder a=0.................. 13  Figure 11: Oscillating fiber and its driven system................... The micro stage itself can move too...... ........................167° and ranges of ±15° and ±10° at two  rotational axes respectively... ... The micropositioner is used to move stage in X‐...........01 mm per marking on the micrometers and travel range 0. .. Y. oscillating fiber... .............................. The total length is 1mm and the  distance from the tip to the first node is 270μm..... If we know the length of fiber......... 13  Figure 12: The actual image of standing wave fiber........ Z directions.........................[1] ..5’’ on X........ Y‐ and Z‐  directions and goniometer is used to make sure the probe (fiber) is vertically placed....  The “Thorlab” goniometer has a resolution of 0. 11  Figure 9: The “Quater Research and Development” micropositioner has a resolution of  0....... tuning fork......................

. The velocity (speed and direction) is obtained by  dividing the distance between two indentified particles in two subsequent frames by the  time interval between the frames..................5V..... ............................................. 15  Figure 15: Basic principles of PTV.................................. This is an ideal PTV image taken by our  experimental setup... 25  Figure 19: Image processing for tip amplitude........................ They can be all controlled by a  single Matlab file... Through Gaussian fit at X and Y axis. which reduces a large amount of manual work........................ They can be easily identified........................ A is a constant here.......... X0 are the beginning locations.. Driven voltage starts from 0V to 2. 19  Figure 17: Particle center locating principle....................... ... .............Figure 14: Schematic of the control system. image intensifier and micro  stage are all connected to computer via NIDAQ card............................................ Also the particle light intensity is strong contrast to the  background........... D is the tip diameter and L is the actual  length of short axis... 27  Figure 21: Length of short axis vs.......... 28  Figure 22: Viscosity of water and glycerol solution..... .. The distribution  shown in the figure is the theoretical intensity distribution. Images are taken by IDT camera.......... 17  Figure 16: Comparison of PIV and PTV images......................... ................... ............ The fiber material is glass and the solution is  water.............. ........... we  identify the center (X0 and Y0) of particle with sub micron precision............ ........................... Fast camera..................................... 26  Figure 20: Tip oscillating center shifts as the amplitude increases.. X‐axis is the weight percentage of  glycerol in solution........... D is the tip diameter  and Y0....................... ............. 28  ix    ................. The distance among each particle is larger than its displacement  between two frames......................... 21  Figure 18: Tip oscillating images in water..... driven voltage................

......... the streamlines in the green rectangular box is  shown in 3‐D in the rest of the plots....... 3‐D view of streamlines and W velocity contour.. Red means flow goes to the positive side of  the axis and blue means flow goes to the negative side of the axis................... the amplitude changes  significantly....Figure 23: Amplitude vs...................... (Re=0. V velocity contour.............. The right one quantitatively shows the  image processing results of multi‐layer video recording and tells us how the horizontal  velocities increase from the substrate. 33  Figure 27: Velocity vector cross‐section manifestation... But they all remain linear....... U velocity contour.. the right one is parallel with Y at x=0............... oscillating along X‐axis with 1............ Vrms means the root mean square velocity... ....25) .............. The right figure tells we  calculate the flow field energy at different heights............. 35  Figure 29: Energy versus height under four different Reynolds numbers......... The red circle in left figure shows where we  interpolate the surrounding fluid to get the flow field energy..... driven voltage..... The left one is on the plane  parallel with X at y=0................  Under different percentage of glycerol and water mixture...25......... 34% glycerol  and 65% glycerol solution respectively.......................................... The Reynolds number is 0....25) .. (2). 34  Figure 28: Calculating the energy.. 30  Figure 25: Processing images of different flow layers.........(Re=0......25) ......... top view......... 31  Figure 26: 3‐D streamlines. red and green means water....38μm  amplitude...........  (3)............ Blue........... (4).. (1).... 29  Figure 24: video processing results‐‐Streamlines and contours for horizontal velocities......  The tip is placed 10μm above the substrate. 36  x    .. Red means the flow is going  up and blue means the flow is going down..... .. The left one shows how focal plane  moves up by 3μm each time and records videos... (Re=0.......... .................... ........

............ ....................................... 39  ........................................... 37  Figure 32: Energy decay from the center for four different Reynolds numbers................ 43  Figure 39: Energy decays from the center for the case Re=0..... The black column in the middle represents the fiber.............. By interpolating velocities u................... 36  ...  ....................................... ......... We sum all the velocities lying on the volume of  the cylinder by different radii (red....25.........................98 (above)...... Figure 36: Results of the energy integrated on surface.. Re=0.... It is  taken at the height where the tip is....... Tip is placed above substrate 10μm or 20μm..........04.Figure 30: Normalized energy versus height under four different Reynolds numbers. 45  ...... from the height z=0 to  z=24μm........................ D is the diameter and R is the radius of the tip........04 (below)........ 41  Figure 38: Tangential velocity decays along the center.. The radius increases from r/R=2  to r/R=12.............. 44  Figure 40: Pumping & boundary effect..... xi    . The cylinders radius increase from r/D=2 to r/D=6.. 38  Figure 34: Energy integrated by volume.... we can calculate  the flow field energy............................. where D is the diameter of  the tip. 37  Figure 33: Horizontal energy versus vertical energy obtained at the case Re=0.............. Figure 31: Energy based on different radii........ The black dot in the center represents the tip of the oscillating  fiber.............. .....  ........................... .. v and w on the circle........ The  Y‐axis shows the number of particles per frame at time t divided by the number of  particles at the initial frame......  . We defined circles with different radii  surrounding the tip.......... black........... Tangential velocities are  interpolated on the red and black straight line............. 39  Figure 35: Energy integrated by volume  ..................... green and dark).................... 40  Figure 37: Flow fields transform as the Reynolds number changes........... ........... Re=0...................... ......... ..............

 image magnification  . streamline function  . f‐number        xii    . velocity  . resolution of recording medium  . the wave length of illumination light  # .List of symbols  A. root‐mean‐square error in displacement measurement  . root‐mean‐square error in the velocity measurement  Δ . the tracer particle diameter  . amplitude  a & R. density  . radius  D. time  u & U. diameter  t & T. kinematic viscosity  Re. frequency  . diameter of diffracted particle image  . Reynolds number  .

  we  carefully  measure  this  three  dimensional  flow  from  the  perspectives of strongness of Z‐direction flow. In this experiment. we can control the Reynolds  numbers  and  have  different  flow  phenomena.  After  applying  Particle  Tracking  Velocimetry  (PTV).  reagent mixing. energy distribution.  The  oscillation induces 3‐D steady steaming which has not been studied nearly as thoroughly  as its 2‐D counterpart. Investigation into its application in  biotechnology  has  been  the  most  intense.1. strong three dimensional steady streaming is  observed. Abstract  Since  the  introduction  of  the  first  microfluidic  device.  My  results  show  similarities  and  differences to previous 2‐D steady streaming results. Microfluidic devices are preferable to  conventional technology because they require few samples and produce rapid results. By changing the viscosity and driven amplitude. transition of the flow  pattern  and  tangential  and  radial  flow  speed.  Such  applications  include  immunosensors. content sorting and drug delivery.  This thesis carefully studies the flow phenomena caused by a high frequency oscillating  micro  fiber.  which  is  potentially  available  for  mixing  on  microfluidic  devices.  xiii    .  manipulating  fluid  in  micron  or  even nano scales has captured increasing attention.

  we  are  generally  not  interested in applying the effect to microfluidic devices. in  1931  [3]. streaming effects in flow were first  discovered by the great experimentalist Michael Faraday in 1831 [1]. In our study. Introduction and Background  2.  it  is  named  for  the  wind  observed  to  blow  away  from  oscillating quartz crystals. According to Holtsmark. Usually the fluctuating flow  results in a nonzero mean.  The earliest demonstration of steady streaming we can find is given by Andrade et al.  We  can  clearly  see  the  outer  vortex  while  the  inner  vortex  is  a  little  bit  obscure.  using  smoke  particles  as  tracers.2. we focus on the  first kind of steady streaming effect.  The  streaming  flow  was  induced  by  the  interaction  between  the  main  fluid  body  and  the  non‐slip  boundary. The first. More commonly  known  as  “quartz  wind”.  He  vibrated  the  air  around  a  cylinder  tube  at  diameters  between  1mm  and  5mm.  The  second  one  usually  happens  when a sound wave propagates through an unlimited volume of fluid. Because the intensity of quartz wind decays quickly along the  direction  it  propagates  and  the  energy  it  carries  is  too  small  [2].  There  are  two  main  types  of  streaming effects. is associated with energy  dissipation  within  the  Stokes  boundary  layer  adjacent  to  a  solid  boundary  when  the  oscillating  flow  is  interacting  with  the  solid  surface.   1    .  This  can  be  shown  by  Figure  1. which we will discuss in this thesis.1 Experimental observations  Steady streaming is one kind of time‐averaged flow effect. the same year he  discovered  that  magnetic  fields  can  induce  electricity.

11cm at the antinode of a Kundt’s tube.  Cylinder  diameter  is  0.    2    . Here D is the diameter of the cylinder.  All images were taken through an objective placed above the  Kundt’s tube. Holtsmark observed that the thickness of the boundary layer is a function  of  /  and decreases as  /  increases.   is the frequency and η is the kinematic viscosity. MgO was used as  tracer particles (Figure 2).  [1]  performed  a  carefully  designed  experiment  based  on  his  numerical  analysis.  He  placed  a  cylindrical  obstacle with a diameter of 0.475cm and air is driven by a loud speaker. [3]  Unlike  Andrade  who  made  no  quantitative  analysis.  Figure  1:  Vortex  system  formed  by  vibrating  air  round  a  cylinder.  Holtsmark  et  al.

  there  are  more  efforts  to  study  boundary  induced  type  steady  streaming.  heating  may  ultimately  limit the intensity. heat  and bubble generation is not associated with the streaming. so the streaming velocity is independent of viscosity. frequency of oscillation is 200Hz.  Thus the streaming effects are much stronger than the quartz wind type. people are most interested in applying streaming effects to microfluidics  control. [1]  In recent years. the steady inertial force is  balanced by steady viscous forces. Second.  “quartz  wind”  type  pressure  driven  flow  is  only  competitive  in  low‐impedance  flow  or  closed‐loop  flow. A group at the University of  3    .  Beyond  the  “quartz  wind”  type  acoustic  streaming.Figure  2:  MgO  particles  in  the  oscillating  air.15Pa). [4] used quartz wind type streaming to propel fluid.  Sritharan et al.06mm  chamber. temperature  of air is 20°C and exposure time is 1/20 second.  Circular  cylinder  is  photographed  from  above. ш is frequency and L is characteristic length.11 cm. As shown by Squires et al. [7]. Yang et al. Due to the low  back  pressure  (about  0.  The  first  reason  is  because  its  amplitude  is  independent of fluid viscosity. [5] employed acoustic vibration generated by piezoelectric  ceramic  to  actively  mix  water  and  fluorescent  dye  in  a  6mm×6mm×0.  The velocity scale for steady boundary‐driven streaming is  ~   (1)  Here U0 is the amplitude of oscillating flow. Radius of the cylinder is 0. [6] also did an acoustic mixing  experiment in a micro channel 75μm high  and 100μm wide and he was able to observe different mixing fractions under different  amplitudes. Rife et al.  Also.

 Eddies function as a microchemical trap.  polystyrene  microspheres  were  seed  particles  and  the  flow  was  oscillated by a piezoelectric diaphragm. [8]  In 2005.  4    .     Figure  3:  Frequency  dependence  of  predicted  (Upper)  and  measured  (Lower)  reagent  concentrations.  chemicals  added  to  the  eddies  can  escape  only  by  slow  molecular  diffusion  (mass‐transfer‐limited  dosing).  Here. Because the electrode eddies  are  hydrodynamically  isolated  from  the  bulk  fluid.  An  illumination  shadow does not allow imaging behind the electrode.Washington led by Professor Daniel Schwartz has used streaming induced stokes layers  to trap high concentration chemical reagents at a scale smaller than 500μm(Figure 3) [8]. The experiment setup is shown in  Figure  4.  Experimental  concentration  images  were  acquired  by  using  imaging  Raman  spectroscopy  in  25  mM  ferricyanide  and  ferrocyanide  solution  supported  with  1  M  NaOH. they did another carefully designed experiment which was able to visualize the  3‐D steady streaming flow at sub millimeter scale [9].

 Streamlines near the cylinder middle represent the 2‐ D  eddy  formed  within  the  channel  core. and the full cylinder  length (channel height) is shown.  The  generated  microvortices  were  about  100μm  in  diameter. They actuated a micro plate (100×100×1. Planes B and C define two quadrant boundaries.  They  found  the  sharpness  of  the  edge  of  the  micro  plate  played  a  crucial  role  in  the  formation  of  streaming flow because sharp edge induced flow detachment (Figure 5). [9]   A  group  in  Taiwan  also  visualized  the  3‐D  nature  of  steady  streaming  under  their  designed environment [10].  5    .  Each  plane  was  illuminated  in  turn  through  transparent  channel  walls  using  a  line‐focused  laser  beam  (left).  Schematic  of  representative  streamlines  for  3‐D  steady  streaming  within  one  channel quadrant.2μm3) by Lorentz  force.    Figure  4:  Schematic  of  the  flow  channel  and  flow  symmetry  planes.  The  lower  flow  represents  the  junction  streaming formed near the cylinder ends (right).

  He  started  with  an  inviscid fluid. “Theory of Sound” [11].  but  not  until  Eckart  et  al. In his book.  Rayleigh  explained  acoustic  streaming  intuitively.  which  requires  the  solution  of  the  hydrodynamic  equations  of  higher degree. [10]  2.  (2) (3) · · · 0    He then applied the perturbation method. writing the density and velocity as  … … N is defined  6    (4) (5) .  He  also  pointed  out  that  acoustic  streaming. was different from elementary treatment of sound [12].  he  studied  the  standing  sound  wave  between  plane  walls.2 Theoretical analysis  The first theoretical work on steady streaming (which was called “acoustic streaming” at  that time) should be attributed to Rayleigh in 1883.                         Figure 5: The flow with a microvortex on the right is generated by a sharp edge.  [2]  were  people  able  to  give  out  a  solution  for  second  order  viscous  force. Movie  images show 3‐D recirculating flow by a nonsharp edge on the left.

  acoustic  energy  conservation  condition  and  boundary conditions (a long tube with rigid walls and both ends permit an axial sound  beam to enter and leave the tube without reflection). y plane and passing through the origin.  After  applying  the  boundary  conditions  (like  no‐slip  boundary  condition  at  rigid  walls  and  oscillating  flow  field).  0  1 0    (7)  (8)  (9)  Here   is  the  kinematic  viscosity.  1. Holtsmark et al.  T  (time)  and  X  (length)  are  chosen  to  represent  different  problems. [1]  studied  boundary‐induced  type  streaming  and  gave  a  semi‐numerical  analysis. He interpreted  the problem in two parts: flow in the viscous boundary layer  boundary layer   and flow outside the   which represents a potential laminar flow field. [2] and Nyborg et al.  Based on the earlier work of Eckart et al. [13]. he found that the wind speed in  any given fluid depends on the bulk viscosity coefficient   of that fluid.  Holtsmark  used  a  semi‐ numerical method to solve the Hankel functions and phase lag (Figure 6) between the  7    .  After  adding  back  the  viscous  term. 1.  He  considered  an  oscillating  motion  in  a  viscous  fluid  surrounding  a  circular  cylinder  with  radius a and axis normal to the x. ~1.   (6) U  (velocity).

  8    .    (10) 2 .    Figure  6:  The  phase  lag  between  the  radial  and  the  tangential  velocity.  so  we  The  first  approximation  gives  a  stationary  circulation  with  symmetry  of  have  elliptical  orbits  at  every  quadrant  near  the  cylinder.  The  second  approximation  does  not  contribute  anything  to  the  stationary  flow  but  indicates  the  thickness  of  the  inner vortices.radial  velocities  and  tangential  velocities  near  the  cylinder  wall  which  caused  the  elliptical motion of fluid elements.  It  is  obtained  from the zeroth approximation. With a similar successive approximation like Eckart et al. [2]. [1]  Here  10.

 The thickness of the inner vortex system is. The streamline is obtained  from the first order approximation. he broke down  the  variables  in  a  steady  and  an  unsteady  parts  and  divided  the  study  into  different  9    . As we can see from the above figure. Wang et al. In a limited space.  compressed as  /  increases. the core  of the inner vortex is located at 1 2 (Figure 7).  Holtsmark  draws  an  important  conclusion  based  on  his  theoretical and semi‐numerical analysis.11cm and the radius  of the outer boundary R=20*a.   After Holtsmark.    The  removing  of  the  outer  boundary  is  seen  to  have  a  negligible  influence  on  the  velocities  in  the  inner  system and on the thickness of it. In his analysis. The radius of the cylinder a=0.  Figure 7: Streamlines of the stationary flow in one quadrant. but for infinite space. the third core  can also be obtained. [14] studied the boundary‐induced type streaming under  low Reynolds number and high oscillating frequency flow. however. the calculation shows that the core for outer  vortex  will  move  to  infinity  together  with  the  outer  boundary.[1]  Here  10 .

  ⁄ ∞ .  3.regions based on different Reynolds numbers and Strouhal numbers.  The  thickness  of  the  recirculating  flow  depends  on  / . so the whole fiber and tuning fork are oscillating  at 32k Hz. and 5000 frames per second with full resolution  1024×1024.  Riley  has  summarized a lot of this work [16].000 frames per second with  a Region of Interest (ROI) of 128×128. which  is used to characterize frequency.   10    .  The flow field is small (~100μm) and it has a very strong  3‐D motion. The glass used to hold the fluid is placed above a 60X Nikon objective.  In  recent  years. The high speed camera can take images up to 70.  Bertelsen  et  al.  3.  there  has  been  less  theoretical  work  on  steady  streaming. One end of a carbon fiber  is put in a small amount of fluid and the other end is attached to a tuning fork (probe  amplifier) which is oscillating at 32kHz. The objective of this experiment is trying to investigate the 3‐D flow field  and explore the possibility of using this technique for mixing in micro‐scale. The  image/video  taking  system  consists  of  an  image  intensifier  and  a  high  speed  camera  (Figure 8).1 The overall setup  The below figure shows the overall set up of this experiment.  His  theory  also  obtained  the  same  result  as  Holtsmark. [17] based on the discoveries of previous people.   is a characteristic length of the body. Experimental Setup and Procedure  In  our  experiment.   is frequency  of  oscillation  and   is  kinematic  viscosity.  [15] also has new numerical analysis and experiments to prove Holtsmark’s result.  we  measured  the  steady  streaming  flow  field  induced  by  high‐ frequency oscillation (32 kHz).

  oscillating  fiber.  3.  Nikon  TE200  inverted fluorescence microscopy.  Photron  APX  RS  high  speed  camera.  Diameter: 7  μm.2 Mechanical design   The mechanical part of the system is as shown below.  11      .  3. a carefully measured  mechanical design is needed (Figure 9). Because of the very small field of  view (60X objective) and the small travel range of the nano stage.  tuning  fork.  2.1 mm  60X  objective  2    Dichro ic  mirror  Hg Arc lamp Image Intensifier & high speed camera 1  3  Figure  8:  Experimental  setup  1. (Figure 10) in order to make sure the fiber can  be positioned right above the objective and within the travel range of the nano stage. Length:  1.                                Tuning fork Substr Oscillating  standing wave  fiber.  microscopy  and  video/image  taking  system.

  The “Thorlab” goniometer has a resolution of 0.The goniometer adjusts the inclination with a fiber.01  mm  per  marking  on  the  micrometers  and  travel  range  0.    12    . the objective is moved up and down.167° and ranges of ±15° and ±10° at two  rotational axes respectively.     Figure 9: The “Quater Research and Development” micropositioner has a resolution of  0.  Z  directions.5’’  on  X. then the fiber is vertically placed (Figure 13). If the tip position  does not move. Y‐ and Z‐  directions and goniometer is used to make sure the probe (fiber) is vertically placed. The micropositioner is used to move stage in X‐. It is hard to tell the fiber inclination  to naked eye. In order to do so.  Y.

 The micro stage itself can move too. a short circuit may results. The fiber is attached to a tuning fork  which is controlled by the probe amplifier and oscillates at 32 kHz.  Inc. The whole setup is placed on the micro  stage of microscopy.  this  causes  the  flow  in  our  experiment  to  have  a  strong  3‐D  motion.   More importantly.   The tuning fork.  significantly different from the work done by previous people.  Together  with  the  boundary  layer  (the  substrate  beneath  the  tip). but only the fiber is inserted in the fluid. the fiber is not just simply oscillating back and forth.    Figure 11: Oscillating fiber and its driven system.  13    .  an  appropriate  mechanical  setup  is  needed  to  make  sure  the  fiber  can  be  appropriately placed above the substrate and objective. If the tuning fork gets in touch  with the fluid.  Because  the  fiber  is  tiny  (1mm  in  length  and  7μm  in  diameter). probe amplifier and control box (which are not shown in Figure 11)  are  provided  by  Insitutec. Both the tuning fork and fiber  are oscillating.Figure 10: The front view of goniometer setup. fiber. but is vibrating  as  a  standing  wave  (see  Figure  12).

 because of the optical limit of the  60X objective.  Figure 12: The actual image of standing wave fiber.  The first node of the standing wave fiber (probe) is 270μm away from the tip. we are only able to see a small part of the motion  (50μm above the substrate) through the microscope. Although  most of the fiber is immersed in fluid.     14    . The total length is 1mm and the  distance from the tip to the first node is 270μm.

  3. the electric potential gradient between the photocathode and  the  MCP  screen  determines  the  exposure.Figure  13:  Adjust  tip  inclination.3 Control system  The  control  system  is  a  key  part  in  synchronizing  the  high  speed  camera.  Image  of  the  tip  and  the  top  are  overlapped  in  one  image.  15    . which reduces a large amount of manual work.  image  intensifier  and  micro  stage  are  all  connected  to  computer  via  NIDAQ  card.  Fast  camera.  In the image intensifier. The function generator is controlled by Matlab code.    Figure  14:  Schematic  of  the  control  system. If we know the length of fiber.  image  intensifier and the micro motor that control the Z‐direction objective movement.  They  can  be  all  controlled  by  a  single Matlab file.  the  objective  will  move  to  the  designated  position.  Then  the  image  intensifier  is  turned  on  and  finally  the  camera  starts to record image/video (Figure 14). Once a  trigger  signal  is  sent  by  the  programmed  NIDAQ  card.  We  can  control  the  shutter  and  exposure  time through a function generator. we are able to calculate the inclination angle.

  seeding  particles with a fluorescence dye and a light source (Mercury lamp for low illumination  or laser. the algorithm indentifies particles within certain radii in  the previous or next frame as the identical particle in the current frame.  an  epi‐fluorescent  microscope  equipped  with  color  filters.4. The reasons as  follows:  1. we used Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) instead of PIV. Hg lamp is used when only low illumination is required). Taking this into consideration. With almost the same  equipment. In our experiment. up to  24μm from the substrate.  patient  monitoring  and  drug  delivery  [18]. PIV usually requires a high density of seeding particles for cross‐correlation purposes.  Light emitted out of the focused particles reduces the signal‐to‐noise ratio in all the  images.  The  biomedical  industry  is  currently  developing  and  using  micro  fabricated  fluidic  devices  for  patient  diagnosis. Also.  Micro‐PIV  setup  usually  consists  of  a  high‐ resolution  camera. PTV is a suitable technique  and algorithm as it requires fewer particles than PIV.  16    . as PTV tracks individual  particles along its path line. most of the inkjet printers consist of an array of nozzles with  exit  orifices  on  the  order  of  tens  of  microns  in  diameter.4 Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV)  3. it increases the tracking uncertainties.3.1 Advantages of PTV  Currently. If there are  too many particles around one target particle. we have to penetrate the focal plane into the flow. micro‐PIV techniques have been widely used to explore flow phenomenon in  small scales. For instance.

  the  mercury  lamp  intensity  has a certain degree of fluctuation.  PTV  tracks  and  identifies  the  location  (center)  of  individual  particles  across  several  frames.2 Principles of PTV  Figure 15 shows a simple illustration of PTV principles. This is not a serious problem in PTV because PTV  tracks single particles. PIV detects the shifting of flow patterns and uses cross‐correlation to calculate the  displacement  and  velocities.  pdf u=x/t t1                      t2    Figure  15:  Basic  principles  of  PTV.2.  and  uses  the  time  difference  between  each  frame  to  calculate  the  velocity  17    .4.  It  requires  a  stable  background  noise  during  the  image/video  taking  period.  3.  The  velocity  (speed  and  direction)  is  obtained  by  dividing the distance between two indentified particles in two subsequent frames by the  time interval between the frames.  In  our  microscopy  system.

   If there is more than one particle identified after applying the above principles.  Particles  in  the  following  frame  which  fall  out  of  the  predefined  circle  are  judged  as  different  particles. The black spot in the PTV image is the fiber tip.  A typical PTV image is shown in Figure 16.   18    . which will overwhelmed  our flow field.  We  define  a  “displacement  threshold”.  We  identify  the  length  of  displacement  and  direction  of  movement  for  each  particle  in  the  previous  frame. The  minimum  acceleration  principle.  2.vector  of  each  particle.  Within this threshold.  The  typical  PIV  image  requires  at  least  3‐4  particles  in  a 16 1024 16 pixel  window. The  closest  (nearest‐neighbor)  principle.  The  principles  of  identifying  and  correlating  particles  in  the  previous and next frame are stated below:  1. all the particles have the possibility of being the same particle  in the previous or next frame.  For  a  1024 image usually consists more than 1000 particles. the code  will skip this particle and process others.

  (2)  clogging  the  microdevice  by  accumulation (3) producing unnecessarily large images.  In  order  to  achieve  micro scale spatial resolution.055) and can be dyed by fluorescence. For  the  material  of  particles.  19    .4.   3. At the same time. They range from several nano meters  (quantum  dots)  to  several  micrometers  (fluorescent  polystyrene).3 Choose seed particles  There are different sizes of particles we can use. They can be easily identified. This is an ideal PTV image taken by our  experimental  setup. the particles chosen are small enough to follow the flow  faithfully  without  (1)  disrupting  the  flow  field.  Also  the  particle  light  intensity  is  strong  contrast  to  the  background.  Figure 16: Comparison of PIV and PTV images.  The  distance  among  each  particle  is  larger  than  its  displacement  between  two  frames. the particles  chosen must be large enough so that they scatter sufficient light to be detected [19].  polystyrene  is  widely  used  because  it  has  similar  density  to  water ( 1.

  normal  elastic scattering techniques will not work quite well.If  the  particle  diameter  is  smaller  than  the  wavelength  of  illumination  light.  Figure 17 depicts the function (normal distribution) we use to detect the particle center.  is  about  10%.  20    . 1500 frames per second  and  500 / . Since all the tracing particles we  use are fluorescent. D is the Brownian diffusion coefficient.  it  can  be  substantially reduced by averaging over several particle images.  In  our  experiment.  Because  Brownian  motion  is  unbiased. u is the characteristic velocity.  The  following  function  is  for  a  first  order  estimate  relative  to  the  displacement  in  the  x‐ direction. [20]  (11) / ∆ 1 2   ∆ Here  S2  is  the  random  mean  square  particle  displacement  associated  with  Brownian  motion.  we  use  1μm  diameter  fluorescent  particles  because  they  offer  adequate  resolution  and  faithfully  follow  the  flow  outside  the  inner  vortex  (particle  following the inner vortex flow is not possible due to 32 KHz oscillating frequency). If we use a 1μm size particle. fluorescent excitation makes the sub micron imaging possible. and ∆  is  the time interval between pulses.  We  now  evaluate  the  diffusion  effect  of  a  1μm  particle  due  to  Brownian  motion.

 A is a constant here.  wavelength  of  the  recording  light.4.   For  Micro  PTV.  60 is  the  magnification  of  the  Nikon  oil  21    .44 1 where # #   510  (12)  is the  0.  Figure  17:  Particle  center  locating  principle.4 Tracking uncertainties  Brownian  motion  and  imaging  artifacts  play  a  small  role  in  the  measurement  uncertainties  because  of  the  use  of  1μm  size  particles. in the image plane. For magnification larger than unity. the  diameter of the diffraction‐limited point spread function.  The  distribution  shown in the figure is the theoretical intensity distribution.36 and NA is the numerical aperture of the lens.  we  identify  the  center  (X0  and  Y0)  of  particle  with  sub  micron  precision.  3.  the  spatial  resolution  is  limited  by  the  effective  diameter  of  particle  images when projected back into the flow field.  which  not  only  limit  the  diffusivity but also increase the particle light intensity as we have discussed above.  Through  Gaussian  fit  at  X  and  Y  axis. it is given  by  2.

  the  light  emitted  by  the  out  of  focused  fluorescent  particles  blurs  the  contrast  between  tracking  particles  and  the  surrounding.  This  limits  the  particle  density  as  well  as  the  observation  depth.  the  .  This  yields  a  measurement  uncertainty of  109 .  the  location  of  a  particle‐image  correlation  peak  can  be  determined  to  within  1/10th  the  particle‐image  diameter. where    The tracer particle diameter is  onto  the  CCD  camera  is  65. So ds=0.   From the above analysis.4.  The  effective  particle diameter  when  projected  back  into  the  flow  is  1.  The  22    .  The  working  distance  of  the  60X  objective  is  200μm.  one  can  determine  particle  position  to  within  an  order  of  magnitude better resolution than the diffraction‐limited resolution of the microscope.  because  of  the  volume  illumination.  But  as  we  have  mentioned  in  section  3.  3. we can see that by resolving the image with 3‐4 pixels across  the  image  diameter. So the effective particle diameter projected  .1.  Approximating  both  the  geometric  images  and  the  diameter  resulting effective particle diameter  of  the  diffraction‐limited  particle  image.  if  a  particle  image  diameter  is  resolved  by  3‐4  pixels.9 1 (13) .14μm The actual image recorded is the convolution of the  diffraction‐limited  image  with  the  geometric  image  [21]. the objective should  be able to move up and down based on the need of our observation depth in the fluid.5 Experiment procedure and data summarized  In order to observe the three dimensional movement of particles.immersion objective.09μm.  According  to  Prasad  [22].

maximum  observation  depth  is  50μm  in  our  experiment.  we  can  record  flow  information  up  to  24μm.04  3  Glass  34% glycerol  0.30  2.54  0.  Tip above substrate 10μm  Amplitude Vrms ωA ⁄η  a ω⁄η 1  Carbon  74. 30°  inclined  Material  Solution Amplitude Vrms ωA ⁄η D ω⁄η   Carbon  Water  5.  but  this  24μm  depth gives us enough information to analyze the flow characteristics.12  0.  The  following  tables  show  all  the  data  collected  so  far.25  6  Glass  34% glycerol  5.  It  can  store  up  90.98    Tip above substrate 10μm.47  1  1.7  2  0.  Although  our  system  has  limited  capability  in  observing  the  flow  field.7  1  0.11  1  0.98  8  Carbon  Water  10.5  2.74  2  3.  The  memory  of  the  Photron  camera  is  only  2GB.23  0.31  0.5  0.55  7  Carbon  Water  5.007  0.82  9  Carbon  Water  14.47  1  1.15  1.5% glycerol 0.23  0.08  4  Carbon  34% glycerol  1.013  0.12  5  Carbon  Water  1.23  0.38  0.07  0.000  images  with  resolution  of  256*256.02  2  Carbon  65% glycerol  0.25  Carbon  Water  5.7  0.5  0.31  0.9  0.38  0.  In  order  to  have  flow  with  different  Reynolds  numbers.03  2.98    23    .  If  we  move  up  the  objective  3μm  each  time.  The  distance  between  the  tip  and  substrate  can  be  changed too.27  1.5  0.  we  can  either  change  the  viscosity  of  the  fluid  or  the  amplitude  of  the  tip  oscillation.47  1  1.64    Material  Solution    Tip above substrate 5μm  Material  Solution Amplitude Vrms ωA ⁄η D ω⁄η   Carbon  Water  1.

  24    . Vrms is the root‐ mean‐square  of  the  driven  voltage.  According  to  existing  literatures. particle transferred to the other side  Solution  Amplitude Vrms ωA ⁄η D ω⁄η   Process 65% glycerol 0.  All  the   if  not  otherwise  Reynolds  number  described  followed  are  all  referred  to  stated.23  1.013   or  0.98  0.7  1  0.23  0.   has  been  used  more  frequently.04  done    Table 1: Summarization of all the experimental data. A is the amplitude and   is the kinematic viscosity.98  NOTE  Images before and  after pumping  Images before and  after pumping    Description  Distance  10    PUMP  An obstacle presenting.   is the frequency.47  1  1  1.47  5.  Both  Re  can  be  used  to  describe  flow  field.Description  Distance  10  20  PUMP  Particles at each layer become less significant after long time  Solution  Amplitude Vrms ωA ⁄η D ω⁄η Water  Water  5.

  The series of images (Figure 18) show the tip of a glass fiber oscillating in the water. That is why we can get a clear image of  the oscillating amplitude. Images are taken by IDT camera. Driven voltage starts from 0V to 2.4.5V. The camera is an IDT camera with sensor of 7μm pixels size. The reason we can see the tip moving is that its surface is coated with rhodamine  solution. Results and discussion  4. a  significant improvement from the Photron (fast speed) camera (17μm). The fiber material is glass and the solution is  water. The  Dichroic mirror in the microscope’s light path can only allow emitted fluorescent light to  pass. within the set exposure time.    25    .  Also  the  oscillating  frequency  is  high  enough  (32  KHz)  that  many  oscillation  cycles can be seen.1 Calibration    Figure 18: Tip oscillating images in water.

 calculate a threshold and binarize the image. From the 6th plot in the above image. we can see the  26    . (4). it is  very inaccurate to measure by eye.  (5).  calculate  the  major  axis  of  the  ellipse that has the same normalized second central moments as the region.  fill  in  the  black  gaps  surrounded  by  white  pixels.   (1).    Figure 19: Image processing for tip amplitude. In this situation.  There  is  no  sharp  edge  telling  us  where  the  end  motion  of  the  tip  is.  corp  the  region  of  interest  from  the  original  image. (6).  (2).  saturate  the  lowest  and  highest 10% of pixels in the image.  The  reasons  we  are  trying  to  measure  oscillation  amplitude  by  the  above  mentioned  steps  are  because  the  first  intensity  is  gradually  decaying  from  the  tip  center  to  the  fluid. (3). Plot the  long  axis  and  short  axis  on  the  original  image.  The  second  is  that  amplitude  will  tend  to  be  very  small when the driven voltage is low and viscosity of fluid is high.

 with which the  tip  is  oscillating.  It  gives  a  high  confidence in measuring the amplitude. The  shifting is smaller for higher viscosity as the oscillation is damped by the viscosity.2 1 L/D 0. X0 are the beginning locations.  It  is  interesting  that  the  tip  center moves in the same direction (positive X‐axis) when the amplitude increases.4 0.  It  has  little  or  no  motion  on  the  Y‐axis.4 1. we can see the shifting is mostly limited on the X‐axis.8 0.8   Figure 20: Tip oscillating center shifts as the amplitude increases.6 0.5 (Y-Y )/D 0 0 -0.6 0. D is the tip diameter  and Y0.  Oscillating short axis Water 34% glycerol 65% glycerol 1.4 (X-X )/D 0 0.2 0 0.   Center shifting Water 34% glycerol 65% glycerol 0.2 0.2 0 V rms   27    .measured  long  axis  and  short  axis  fit  the  original  image  very  well.  From Figure 20.5 -0.

4 0.  The  10th degree polynomial interpolation (Figure 22) fits the data very well. D is the tip diameter and L is the actual  length of short axis. driven voltage. we are very confident in saying that the tip is moving  in a straight line on X‐axis. From the above figure.    28    .  Because  it  is  not  possible  to  determine  the  kinematic  viscosity  of  specific  glycerol  and  water  mixture.  we  interpolated  the  data  give  by  Archbutt  [23]  and  Shankar  [24].  X‐axis  is  the  weight  percentage  of  glycerol in solution.Figure 21: Length of short axis vs.8 1   Figure  22:  Viscosity  of  water  and  glycerol  solution.  The short axis should be the same as tip diameter if the movement is just on the X‐axis  (Figure 21).2 0.  1200 1000 Centipoise m2/s 800 600 400 200 0 0 Kinematic viscosity of glycerol-water mixture Actual data 10th degree polynomial interpolate 0.6 Weight percentage 0.

 between water and  29    .  For  the  glass  fiber.   For  both  the  glass  and  carbon  fibers.  Under  different  percentage  of  glycerol  and  water  mixture.12 10 Amplitude (m) 8 6 4 2 0 0. Blue.5 Glass fiber water 34% glycerol 65% glycerol water 34% glycerol 65% glycerol 1 1. red and green means water. But for the carbon fiber.  Vrms  means  the  root  mean  square  velocity.  their  amplitudes  change  linearly  with  the  driven  voltage  (Figure  23).  amplitudes  decrease  gradually  with  viscosity  changes.5 Vrms (V) 3 3. driven voltage.5   Carbon fiber water 34% glycerol 65% glycerol water 34% glycerol 65% glycerol 25 Amplitude (m) 20 15 10 5 0 0.5 2 2. But they all remain linear.  the  amplitude  changes  significantly. 34% glycerol  and  65%  glycerol  solution  respectively.5 2 Vrms (V) 2. its amplitude decreases sharply.5   Figure 23: Amplitude vs.5 1 1.

  30    .2 2‐D Flow field      Figure  24:  video  processing  results‐‐Streamlines  and  contours  for  horizontal  velocities.  The  Reynolds  number  is  0. which means  the damping confines the tip movement.   4.  Red  means  flow  goes  to  the  positive  side  of  the axis and blue means flow goes to the negative side of the axis.38μm  amplitude.  oscillating  along  X‐axis  with  1.  The slope also decreases as the viscosity of fluid increases.25.  The  tip  is  placed  10μm  above  the  substrate.34% glycerol.

 The results are very similar to the 2‐D experiments people have done  before [9].38μm and the whole velocity field has  a radius of about 60μm. All the horizontal motion of particles form into four eddies adjacent to the  oscillating center.25)  31    . The amplitude of tip oscillation is 1.   Substrate      Figure 25: Processing images of different flow layers. The left one shows how focal plane  moves up by 3μm each time and records videos. The right one quantitatively shows the  image processing results of multi‐layer video recording and tells us how the horizontal  velocities increase from the substrate.  The  tracking uncertainties (standard deviation of velocity vectors) are kept below 5% at all  the locations.  The  horizontal  streamlines do not show the actual path line of seed particles. The horizontal speed gradually decays from  the  center  where  we  can  see  the  symmetry  and  gradual  decay  in  the  contour. Four eddies are formed by Reynolds stress which comes from viscosity of the  fluid and non linearity of the inertial effect. The flow comes into  the  center  along  the  X‐axis  and  goes  out  the  center  along  the  Y‐axis.From Figure 24. because the flow is three  dimensional. we can see the tip is oscillating along the X‐axis. (Re=0.

  From  the  observed  regions  (h=0μmh=24μm).95D.  we  have  the  information  of  horizontal  velocities  (U  and  V)  at  different  heights. based on the continuity equations shown above. the total length of fiber is larger than 1mm. and it is far below the first node (h=270μm). So we know if the amplitude at  the  tip  is  D. Thus.  the largest depth we penetrate into the flow field. What we are capturing here is a very  small region of the whole 3‐D flow  field.  the  amplitude  14μm  above  the  tip  (24μm  above  substrate)  will  be  0.  32    .  the  velocity  keeps  increasing  as  evidenced by the color become darker in the contour plots.  If  we  assume  incompressible  and  steady flow.3 3‐D Flow field    0  (14) (15)   Once  all  the  PTV  data  are  obtained  at  different  heights. As shown in the previous  chapter. we think the flow is  more influenced by the boundary (substrate) than the difference of the amplitude.  But this multi‐layer measurement (Figure 25) has its own limit.One of the major differences of our experiment compared with previous people is our  accurate measurement of the flow field not just in one 2‐D plane but several 2‐D planes.  4. velocity along the Z‐axis  (W)  can  be  reconstructed.  Here  we  use  a  no‐slip  boundary  to  define  the  boundary  condition at the substrate and Simpson's rule of integration with an interval of 3μm for  each step.  The amplitude changes roughly linearly from tip to node. which is much larger than 24μm.

25). (2).  blue  means  flow  goes  to  the  negative  direction of the axis while red is the positive.(Re=0. U velocity contour.    Figure 26: 3‐D streamlines. V velocity contour. top view.  3  and  4.25)  The  3‐D  reconstruction  results  (Figure  26)  not  only  show  qualitative  but  also  quantitative  Z‐axis  motion. 3‐D view of streamlines and W velocity contour. From the streamlines and contours.  For  contours  of  plot  2. (4). we can  33    .  (3).  The rest show the streamlines and contours of the region within the green square box in  the  first  one. (1). the streamlines in the green rectangular box is  shown in 3‐D in the rest of the plots.  The  first  one  shows  the  top  view  of  streamlines  (Re=0.

 the Z‐axis velocity is the strongest in the center. and is propelled away from the  center with downward motion. the right one is parallel with Y at x=0.  the flow converges at the center with upward motion. after the flow converges at the  center. Blue means the flow goes to the negative side of the axis. This  can be also shown by watching the video.25)  Here  we  try  to  investigate  more  the  velocity  at  the  cross‐plane  at  X=0  and  Y=0. (3). Particles quickly disappear or appear again at  the center. This repeats  during the whole recording period. (2). Red means the flow is going  up and blue means the flow is going down. Red  means the opposite. the oscillation propels the flow outwards with downward motion. the flow converges at the center on the axis which the tip is oscillating on. (Re=0.   34    . From the above figures we can see.  respectively (Figure 27).  The  left  one  is  on  the  plane  parallel with X at y=0.tell: (1).    Figure  27:  Velocity  vector  cross‐section  manifestation.

4.4 Amplitude effects  4.4.1 Energy versus Reynolds number  If we define a circle around the oscillating center and interpolate the surrounding fluid  velocity  onto  this  circle,  including  U,  V  and  W.  The  circle  has  certain  radius  R  and  is  placed at different heights (Figure 28). Energy is defined as  D is the diameter and R is the radius of the tip.  2 .  

10 8 6 Y-position Y/D 4 2 0 -2 -4 -6 -8 -5 0 5 X-position X/D 10 Z-position m 25 20 15 10 5 0 5 0 -5 Y-position Y/D -5 0 X-position X/D 5

 

Figure  28:  Calculating  the  energy.  The  red  circle  in  left  figure  shows  where  we  interpolate the surrounding fluid to get the flow field energy. The right figure tells we  calculate the flow field energy at different heights. 

35   

8 7 6 Energy/D*(A)2 5 4 3 2 1

x 10

-3

r/R=10 Re=0.25 Re=1.82 Re=2.64

tip position

0 0

5

10 15 Height Z(m)

20

25

 

Figure 29: Energy versus height under four different Reynolds numbers.  
8 7 6 Energy/D*(A)2 5 4 3 2 1 0 0 5 10 15 Height Z(m) 20 25 x 10
-3

r/R=10 Re=0.25 Re=1.82 Re=2.64

tip position

 

Figure 30: Normalized energy versus height under four different Reynolds numbers.   Normalized energy is defined as  ⁄ . The energy increases as the height 

increases.  Figure  29  shows  the  absolute  energy  and  Figure  30  normalizes  it  with  tip  oscillation  energy.  We  speculate  that  at  certain  height,  the  energy  will  reach  its  maximum. Due to the limit of our optical system, we are not able to clearly see the flow  field above 24μm.  

36   

10 8 6 Y-position Y/D 4 2 0 -2 -4 -6 -8 -5 0 5 X-position X/D 10

 

Figure  31:  Energy  based  on  different  radii.  We  defined  circles  with  different  radii  surrounding the tip. By interpolating velocities u, v and w on the circle, we can calculate  the  flow  field  energy.  The  black  dot  in  the  center  represents  the  tip  of  the  oscillating  fiber. 
x 10
-3

7 6 5 Energy/D*(A)2 4 3 2 1

At the tip Re=0.25 Re=1.82 Re=2.64

0 2

4

6

8 r/R

10

12

14

16

 

Figure 32: Energy decays from the center for four different Reynolds numbers.   As shown by Figure 32, energy is damped by viscosity. It reaches its maximum at r/R=5.  The  further  away  from  the  center  that  the  tip  oscillates,  the  less  energy  the  fluid  can  obtain. Because the flow field is 3‐D, except for knowing the total energy, we are also 

37   

5 1 0. D is the diameter and R is the radius of the tip.  x 10 -3 3. After r/R =8.  respectively (Figure 33).  such as the total energy that is included in a cylindrical volume space where the fiber is  at the center.25 Total energy Horizontal energy Vertical energy 0 2 4 6 8 r/R 10 12 14 16   Figure  33:  Horizontal  energy  versus  vertical  energy  obtained  at  the  case  Re=0.   The  horizontal  energy  is  defined  as  defined  as 2  and  the  vertical  energy  is  2 .  It  is  taken at the height where the tip is.5 Re=0. If we break down the total energy into horizontal energy and  vertical energy. the total energy is solely due to the  horizontal energy.25.  38    .  The  vertical  energy  reaches  its  maximum  before  horizontal  energy and decays sharply after that. we have the following plot.5 3 2.5 Energy/D*(A)2 2 1.interested  in  seeing  the  contribution  from  horizontal  motion  and  vertical  motion.  We also want to see the total energy which is confined by a volume.

 the energy integrated by volume increases as the radius increases (Figure 35).25 Z-position m 20 15 10 5 0 5 0 -5 Y-position Y/D -5 0 X-position X/D 5   Figure 34: Energy integrated by volume.  This  is  intuitive  because  the  bigger  the  volume.  green  and  dark).  the  more  efficient  the  energy  39    .  from  the  figure.64 5 4 Energy/D3( A)2 3 2 1 0 4 5 6 r/D 7 8   Figure 35: Energy integrated by volume.  Energy by volume Re=0.98 Re=1. We sum all the velocities lying on the volume of  the  cylinder  by  different  radii  (red.82 Re=2.25 Re=0.  from  the  height  z=0  to  z=24μm.  black.  At first.  the  more  energy  it  contains. where D is the diameter of  the tip. The cylinders radius increase from r/D=2 to r/D=6.  the  higher  the  Reynolds  number. The black column in the middle represents the fiber.  Second.

 the linear relation tells us the energy generated  by the oscillating tip distributes to the flow in a linear way.transfers from the tip to the flow.005 0 2 4 6 8 r/R 10 12 14 16   Figure 36: Results of the energy integrated on surface. Third.2 Streamlines versus Reynolds number     40    .015 0.  4.03 0.25 Re=1.  If we only integrate the energy on the cylindrical surface where the tip is at the center  as shown in Figure 34.02 0. Figure 36 tells  us that the energy is conserved over certain distances but viscosity finally dampens the  velocity.01 0.  and Figure 36 is integrated by surface)  Energy by surface Re=0.4. We perceive  the energy as low at the center because we are lacking flow field information since the  camera is not able to capture such high speed motion at the tip.025 Energy/D2( A)2 0. It is interesting that the energy first increases and then decreases. the energy does not drop too much until r/R=8.82 Re=2.  As the radius increases. The radius increases from r/R=2  to r/R=12.64 0. we have the following plots. (Figure 35 is integrated by volume.

04  Re=0.     41    .12  Re=0.02        Figure 37: Flow fields transform as the Reynolds number changes.25  Re=0.Re=0.98  Re=0.

 we are dealing with polymers or none Newtonian fluids that have very low  Re numbers. Although currently there is no  theory  of  3‐D  steady  streaming. we should investigate flows under low Re numbers. If we want to prove our device can be used to mix reagents in very small  scale. we have flow fields under different Reynolds numbers. the inner   Case one  Case two  42    . The  reason  why  we  are  interested  in  low  Re  number  is  because  in  many  biomedical  application.  Wang  [14]  stated  he  stated  that  with  a  low  Reynolds  number (high viscosity) and high Strouhal number (high frequency).As already shown in Table 1.

 so we  cannot state here the zero point is the core of inner vortex.  the  tangential velocities always move in the same direction and with a smaller initial speed.04 (below). where D is the diameter of the tip. Re=0. Because the tip moves back  and  forth  very  quickly  and  the  theoretical  core  of  the  inner  vortex  lies  between  1/2D  and D. Re=0.  It  was  located  between 1/2D and D. it has been shown  that the thickness of inner vortex will grow as  theories can explain the phenomena here.  We think the previous  In  Holtsmark’s  paper  [1].  Tangential  velocities  are  interpolated on the red and black straight line.   43    . Also from Holtsmark [1] and Wang [14].   Vortex or the unsteady vorticity would not be confined in a boundary layer but would be  spread all over the flow field. tangential velocities in two quadrants cross X‐axis. but at different positions.    decreases. the tangential velocity turns around and decays very fast at r/D=2 in both case  one  and  two.  In  case  two  because  there  is  only  one  circulation  around  the  tip.98 (above).  he  stated  that  the  second  zero  point  where  the  tangential  velocity  curve  crosses  the  X‐axis  was  the  core  of  the  inner  vortex.  We are also interested in seeing the Z‐axis motion intensity in the low Reynolds number  case. In the top right image of Figure  38.Figure  38:  Tangential  velocity  decays  along  the  center.

4.5 1 0.8 Energy/D*(A)2 0.6 0.3 Distance effect  2. we can see the vertical energy in low Re number  case  is  much  smaller  compared  with  horizontal  energy.013 Total energy Horizontal energy Vertical energy 0.4 0.5 2 Per frame/Initial 1.5 0 0 Tip above 10m Tip above 20m 10 20 Seconds 30 40   44    .  So from the Figure 39 and Figure 33.  4.2 0 2 4 6 8 r/R 10 12 14 16   Figure 39: Energy decays from the center for the case Re=0.  This  means  that  Z‐axis  movement is weaker than the horizontal movement.04.1 x 10 -3 Re=0.

  When the tip is placed closer to the substrate. it has a strong pumping effect. As we can  see  from  the  blue  line  in  Figure  40.  the  number  of  particles  has  been  significantly  decreased  until  it  reaches  a  certain  level. The  Y‐axis  shows  the  number  of  particles  per  frame  at  time  t  divided  by  the  number  of  particles at the initial frame.  If  we  place  the  tip  further  away  from  the  substrate.Figure 40: Pumping & boundary effect.  the  pumping  effect  disappears  (green  line)  as  the  interaction  with  the  boundary decreases.  45    . Tip is placed above substrate 10μm or 20μm.

  the  energy  decays  as  the  radius  increases  and  the  vertical  contribution  decays  much  faster  than  the  horizontal  one. we used our own optical system setup to take videos of flow  fields at different heights.  based  on  the  continuity  equation and flow information at different heights. 3‐D streamlines were reconstructed. With high  frequency  and  high  viscosity.  We can understand what the 3‐D motion looks like in a very intuitive way.  different radii and by volume integral or surface integral.  we  study  the  high  speed  3‐D  steady  streaming  motion  generated  by  an  oscillating microfiber.  we studied the tangential velocity decays and found that this is similar to the 2‐D cases  people have previously studied. Sixth. Fifth. The flow field changes significantly under low Re numbers.  Thus instead of having four eddies. I looked at the flow field under different  Reynolds numbers. the flow field energy stays stable but finally drops after a  certain distance away from the center.  the  inner  vortex  layer  expands  to  the  whole  flow  field. by  looking  at  the  flow  field  energy  for  different  Reynolds  numbers. First. Second. we used our own‐programmed PTV code to analyze  videos  and  obtain  velocity  contours  and  streamlines.5.  Fourth. we are able to study the flow  field  energy  in  a  quantitative  way. We also found out that the Z‐axis fluid motion is much  46    .  Third.  For  the  horizontal  plane. Conclusion and future study  In  this  thesis.  different  heights. For the volume integral. we have one big circulation around the center.

 This is the first time that 3‐D steady streaming has been studied in  a quantitative way.  Mixing  in  microfluidic  devices is still a challenge remaining to be solved.  So  far. we verified the  strong influence of a boundary (substrate) by looking at the pumping effect.   47    .  more  experiments  under  the  low  Reynolds  number  region  and  the  mixing  effect  caused  by  3‐D  steady  streaming  can  be  studied. the pumping effect will decrease or disappear.smaller relative to horizontal fluid motion for a low Re number. When the  tip is further away from the substrate.  For  future  study. especially in considering the flow field energy and velocity decay.  we  have  been  qualitatively  and  quantitatively  studying  the  flow  induced  by  an  oscillating microfiber. Finally.

 1931.  Squires. et al..R. Chen..C. Applied Physics Letters. and S. Acoustic mixing at low Reynold's numbers. The journal of the acoustical society of America. 68. 1954.T.. C.  Holtsmark.  Yang. Boundary layer flow near a cylindrical obstacle in an oscillating... Quake. 266‐272. Schwartz. Sensors and Actuators  A: Physical. 135‐140. E. 2005. Miniature valveless ultrasonic pumps and mixers. 4395‐4398. 86(1‐2): p. 445‐470. J. B.  6. 1948. et al.  imcompressible fluid. 93(3): p. K.  4. 2001.R.  3. Sensors and Actuators A:  Physical.  100(8): p. 2003.  73(Copyright (C) 2010 The American Physical Society): p. T. et al. Andrade.  Rife.  2006.  7.  da C.  8. Physical Review.  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 77(3): p. J. and D. et al. Reviews  of Modern Physics..  Sritharan.  5. Microfluidics without microfabrication.N. 26(1). Series A.. 134(824): p. J. 88(5)..  Lutz.  Proceedings of the Royal Society of London.  48    .  Eckart.  2.M. Z..Bibliography  1. Ultrasonic micromixer for microfluidic systems.. 2000. Vortices and Streams Caused by Sound Waves. 977‐1026.. Microfluidics: Fluid physics at the nanoliter scale. On the Circulations Caused by the Vibration of Air in a Tube.

 Theory of Sound. 2001..  10. Vol. N.‐Y. Applied Physics Letters. et al. Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics..T.  11. Scientific Papers. Journal of Fluid Mechanics  Digital Archive. 43‐65. J. Microscopic steady streaming eddies created  around short cylinders in a channel: Flow visualization and Stokes layer scaling.  Bertelsen..  Rayleigh. Physics  of Fluids. B.  17.. C. 32(01): p.  Riley. 1973.  Lutz. W.S. 1998.. Acoustic Streaming due to Attenuated Plane Waves. 93(13).9.  Wang.. Microvortices and recirculating flow generated by an oscillatory  microplate for microfluidic applications. 2005..R. 1953.  12.  Riley. 1883.W.  13. J. 25(1): p. Nonlinear streaming effects associated with oscillating cylinders.  14. 493‐511. N.W. Steady streaming. Schwartz. 1968. and D. 17(2).S.  Nyborg. second ed. 349‐356.  Lin.  49    . 68‐75. On high‐frequency oscillatory viscous flows.. London: Macmillan.  Rayleigh. 33: p. 2008. Acoustic streaming. 1894. The journal of the  acoustical society of America. 55‐68.  15. 59(03): p. A. Teddington: Cambridge University  Press.  Journal of Fluid Mechanics Digital Archive.L.. Theoretical and Computational Fluid Dynamics.. J. 108. Chen. et al. C.  10(1‐4): p.  16.M..

  23.D.  Experiments in Fluids.  Applied Scientific Research.. et al.  22. Experimental Determination of the Kinematic Viscosity of  Glycerol‐Water Mixtures. Deeley. 1992. Experiments in Fluids.  Shankar. 13(2‐3): p.  20. and R.. Viscosity and density of glycerol in aqueous solution at 20  celcius 1918. R.. 191‐215. THEORY OF CROSS‐CORRELATION ANALYSIS OF PIV IMAGES.        50    .  Prasad. Proceedings: Mathematical and Physical Sciences. 1992. 1998.G. 49(3): p. 1994..K. S. 1999. 573‐581. 27(5): p. 414‐419.G.  Santiago.. and Gerlack. P.  444(1922): p. 105‐116. 316‐319. A particle image velocimetry system for microfluidics.Santiago. 39(7): p.  Meinhart.18. 1191‐ 1200. In vivo micro particle image velocimetry measurements of blood‐ plasma in the embryonic avian heart.N.  19. Experiments  in Fluids.  24. Adrian.  Archbutt. et al.Wereley. P.J.  21.T. and J. PIV measurements of a microchannel flow. C.  Keane. et al. 25(4): p. J.. National Bureur of Standards Technology.. Journal of Biomechanics. Kumar. 2006. and M. A.  Vennemann. EFFECT OF RESOLUTION ON THE SPEED AND ACCURACY OF PARTICLE  IMAGE VELOCIMETRY INTERROGATION.D.