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AI-EE-YAH!
3d Armored Cavalry Regimental Newsletter
A local Iraqi child waits with his mother at a clinic in the village of Al Hamza, Iraq, during a medical assistance event held by King Battery, 1st Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment.

A group of Iraqi students raise the Iraqi flag during the ribbon cutting ceremony at the Al Shitiaa school in Babil, Iraq Oct. 2, 2010, The school was built by Iraqi contractors.

Capt. Miranda Fowler, Squadron Surgeon, Regimental Support Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, completes a check-up on a Iraqi child in the village of Al Hamza, Iraq. Fowler is a member of a team of 3rd ACR and local Iraqi doctors who worked with King Battery to bring medical services to the village.

Inside
COL Reginald E. Allen and CSM Jonathan J. Hunt New Dawn Update Facts From the Front Feature Story: Keeping Family Ties Facebook Catch The Bug!

Upcoming Events

AI-EE-YAH!

December 2010

VOL 1, ISSUE 1

Happy Holidays from COL Allen
Season’s greetings from southern Iraq! This is the first edition of several monthly AI-EE-YAH! newsletters we plan to send back home to let our Brave Rifles Families know some of the great things your Soldiers are doing here in Operation New Dawn. We’ve already accomplished a great deal in just four short months. The Regiment has assisted in opening schools for Iraqi children, improving the infrastructure in cities and villages, training Iraqi military and police, and providing new hope to tens of thousands of Iraqi citizens. You can be proud of your Soldiers, and we are likewise proud of you. We know the great sacrifices you are making back home as your Soldiers are deployed. Know that our thoughts and prayers are with you always as we finish the mission in Iraq. Brave Rifles! Veterans!

Seasons Greetings from CSM Hunt
Happy Holidays to all the Family and friends of the 3d Armored Cavalry Regiment, As we continue with our mission in Operation New Dawn here in Iraq, we are reminded that we are supported by our loved ones back home. Your support is essential to our success as we put the final “Regimental” touches on our mission of completing America’s involvement in Iraq. Your sacrifice and faithful support of your Soldiers has made our time here easier to bear. All of your efforts have reminded us of the importance of Family during this deployment. Brave Rifles!

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AI-EE-YAH!

December 2010

VOL 1, ISSUE 1

Brave Rifles New Dawn Update

The end of December marks the final year of American military forces involvement in Iraq under the current security agreement. The Brave Rifles Regiment has been busy during the month of December, working hard to ensure that we continue to prepare Iraq for the eventual U.S. withdrawal. The Regiment continues to train, share “best practices” with Iraqi military and police units around Iraq, and remind our leaders and Soldiers that alertness and professionalism remain our best defenses. Brave Rifles leaders across Iraq are meeting daily with leaders in the Iraqi Security Forces in order to help them strengthen their personal and organizational abilities to serve the Iraqi people effectively. Most recently, we concentrated on coordination for support to the Iraqi military and police as well as implementing training for the Iraqi border enforcement authorities. Due in part to these key leader meetings, heightened security on the part of Iraqi Security Forces has resulted in fewer acts of violence in our area. Again, the efforts of your Troopers are the key to providing the training, support and confidence that the Iraqis need to be self reliant and self sufficient. While Sabre Squadron concentrated on conducting meetings with local

leaders, Tiger and Thunder Squadrons prepared to support our Iraqi Army and Police partners during the Muslim religious holiday of Ashura in December. Our task was to advise, train and assist the Iraqi Security Forces to secure key religious shrines and protect the nearly four million pilgrims travelling throughout Regiment’s turf. Terrorist groups have historically launched high profile attacks on individuals and holy sites with the hope of undermining the Government of Iraq’s remarkable march toward stability and self-reliance. The Regiment, with the help of 1st Infantry Division and the Iraqi Air Force, was able to ensure that our Iraqi partners executed one of the most effective large-scale security plans in the country’s recent history. Due to this assistance, Ashura observance was not marred by a single violent attack. With this unprecedented success, our Troopers made a significant and indisputable contribution to the Iraqi Security Forces. Another of the important functions of the Brave Rifles in Operation New Dawn is to oversee critical improvements to the Iraqi infrastructure. Our efforts to build civil capacity within the five provinces for which we are responsible are evidenced in the 144 assistance projects worth $91,000,000 on which we are currently working. These projects are geared to create more stable local

economies. In coordination with our Iraqi partners, we distributed the first of four waves of humanitarian assistance packages of food and personal items to thousands of pilgrims during Ashura, with more to be distributed to the Iraqi people in the coming months. We have all heard the old adage, “If you give a man a fish, he eats for a day. If you teach a man to fish, he eats for a lifetime.” Our Troopers – your Troopers – are teaching the Iraqis to fish. It’s a slow process, and it’s a mission unlike any that has ever been undertaken by an American (or any other) Army before. In this historic mission, the Troopers of the Regiment are performing their mission well, and because of their efforts, so are the Iraqis.

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AI-EE-YAH!

December 2010

VOL 1, ISSUE 1

Facts From the Front: R&R Leave
With the unit’s deployment in its fourth month, the rest and recuperation leave program is well underway. In order to give Families a full understanding of this program, we’ve highlighted the main points below in question and answer format. We hope that, with a full understanding of the process, your mid-tour visit with your Soldier can be an enriching, enjoyable experience.

Q: Who can take R&R leave? A: All Soldiers projected to serve at least 270 days in Iraq receive 15 days of rest and recuperation leave, which is not charged against their annual leave authorization.

Q: How does the process work? A: Soldiers will designate their leave address upon arrival to Ali-Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait. This leave address will define the final stop where the Soldier will be flow to and from for the leave period. If Soldiers travel during leave they must return to the airport where they arrived once the leave period is complete. Soldiers will not be able to arrive at one airport and get a return ticket from a different airport.

Q: Can my Soldier take leave to a place outside of the continental United States? A: Yes. Soldiers going on leave outside of the continental United States will fly from Kuwait International Airport to Germany, and from there, they will fly to the airport nearest their leave destination. Soldiers traveling abroad will wear appropriate civilian clothes for the duration of their travel and must have the appropriate passport for their destination. All return flight procedures are the same as those traveling to the continental United States. Return tickets are stamped for return at the nearest airport to the original leave destination.
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Q: How much advance notice will our Family have of when our Soldier will be home for leave? A: R&R leave slots are allocated on a monthly basis. Soldiers leaving in the upcoming month should know by the first of that month the approximate day they will be leaving theater. The date given to Soldiers is the day they will fly from Iraq to AliAl Salem Air Base in Kuwait. Once in Kuwait, Soldiers will receive flight information for their flight out of theater and their connecting flight from Dallas or Atlanta to the airport nearest their leave address.

AI-EE-YAH!

December 2010

VOL 1, ISSUE 1

Upcoming Events at Fort Hood
Army Community Service, Soldier & Family Readiness Branch

Army Family Covenant - Focus on Families Operation Military Youth Mock Deployment IV

“I ALSO SERVE” Registration is Limited!Register Your Child Now! *Open to school age children (5 years and
older)

Saturday, 12 February 2011 0800-1300 Comanche Chapel, Bldg 52024 Fort Hood, TX
Registration packets available on 3 January 2011 Bldg 121, Rivers Building Bldg 16005, Lane Volunteer Center 288-2794 Bldg 18000, Oveta Culp Hobby Soldier Family Readiness Center or download the forms at http://hoodmwr.com/acs/sfrb_mobdep.html All packets must be received at or faxed to Lane Volunteer Center (Fax: 288-3650)

Deployment station points include: Platoon Assignments Pre-Deployment briefing Hands-on Tactical Gear Demonstration Camouflage Face Painting Mock Shot/Dental/Eye Exam Military Vehicle Static Display Mini-Road March And more.....
KOS (Kids on Site) child care available. Child must be registered with CYSS to use this service. For reservations call ACS/SFRB, 288-2794.
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AI-EE-YAH!

December 2010

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Nature In Lights November 19 – January 2: Nightly, 5:30 – 11 pm Nature In Lights Enjoy the drive through over five miles of holidayinspired scenes. Like magic, BLORA is once again transformed into a winter wonderland for all to enjoy: kids and kids at heart. The 14th Annual Nature in Lights display will be picturesque and the experience will be pleasing to the eye! So, drive through BLORA during the evenings from 5:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. to watch as lights twinkle and glisten with beautiful Christmas colors.

Army vs. SMU
Thursday, December 30, 2010 Gerald J. Ford Stadium – Dallas, Texas 11:00 a.m. Kickoff Ask Your MWR For More Information! Purchas Tickets: 1-877-849-2769

Bowl In The New Year - New Year’s Eve Party
at the Phantom Warrior Lanes December 31 10 pm – 1:30 am Reservations begin December 1 $70 per lane with free shoe rental (up to five bowlers) includes unlimited bowling, shoe rental, party favors and pizza Live DJ, Door prizes Tickets are non-refundable Phantom Warrior Lanes Clear Creek Road at Santa Fe Avenue, Bldg. 49010 254-287-3424

Club Hood Family Pasta Night
Thursdays from 5-7pm Budget-friendly dining never tasted so good! Each Thursday Night Club Hood hosts a Family Pasta Night in the Mesquite Dining Room. The delicious weekly buffet includes spaghetti and fettuccini, marinara and Alfredo sauces, macaroni and cheese, meatballs, bread sticks and a mixed salad. Club Hood dining is open to all. $6.95 adults, $3.95 (5-12 years of age) and FREE (4-under) 24th Street and Tank Destroyer Boulevard 532-5329

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AI-EE-YAH!

December 2010

VOL 1, ISSUE 1

Featured Story from Iraq

Keeping Family Ties
BABIL PROVINCE – Two soldiers sit inside a small office full of computer network routers on Contingency Operating Site Kalsu and talk quietly under the noisy equipment. Both are fixing the computers and joke with each other as they look over the screens. The two resemble one another. Their eyes have the same shape and color, and their smiles seem interchangeable. Their uniforms are the same from the boots to the hats and even bear the same rank and name tape. One Soldier a female and the other a male. That is the only obvious difference. Sgt. Christina Gutierrez, 26, and brother, Sgt. David Gutierrez, 24, both signal systems support specialists from Mesa, AZ, are currently serving tours together in Iraq. Christina is serving her third tour while David serves his second, two of which they have served at the same time, separated by their units. They recently had the opportunity to share a few days together on COS Kalsu. The two are part of a large family that traces many roots to military service. “Our father served in the Army as a rotary wing mechanic,” said Christina. “We have uncles who have prior military service, and a couple of our cousins are Marines.” Before the Army Christina was working full time and trying to keep up with school. She said it was then she began looking at the Army as an option. “I wanted to make sure my education continued and had considered serving,” Christina said. Christina was the first to join beginning active duty Apr. 23, 2003. She picked 25U for her military occupational specialty. “My recruiter told me that I would be working with computers, and I felt like that would be useful later on,” Christina said. Christina served her first assignment in Germany with Fifth Corps. She was assigned to their Special Troops Battalion, monitoring automated connectivity. Her service during this time was a major influence on her brother. “My sister was basically my recruiter,” said David. “She told me how good it was, especially being in Germany.” David began his service in the Army Feb. 16, 2005 and, closely following his sister’s advice, chose 25U just as she did. He even managed to get assigned to the same command in Germany. “I was supposed to go to the same unit my sister was in,” David said. “I guess there would have been some conflict there, so I was sent to a separate unit within the command.” At the time David was a specialist and his sister a sergeant. They agreed that there would have been a problem with her being his supervisor. “I’m sure I would probably let him get away with more than the average Soldier,” Christina said laughing. Both spent time together in Germany traveling and 7

Left - Sgt. Christina Gutierrez and Sgt. David Gutierrez inspect the cable of an antennae mast. Right - Sgt. Christina Gutierrez and Sgt. David Gutierrez pose in front of a painted barrier on Contingency Operating Site Kalsu. US Army photos by Staff Sgt. Garrett Ralston

seeing things around the area where they were stationed. They both deployed to Iraq and were stationed on Camp Victory for the entire tour. This marked their first deployment where both brother and sister were operating in a combat zone together. After their tours in Germany, they were assigned to Fort Hood, TX. Christina was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, while David was assigned to the 21st Combat Support Hospital. “My brother deployed before I did this time and has been operating near Mosul,” said Christina. “Our deployment has overlapped, so I will be here after he goes home.” The two always make sure the other is doing well and try to keep in touch as much as possible. “We keep each other motivated by talking about our plans when we get home,” David said. “It’s still hard to be away from each other for so long.” The two talked about their families’ feelings about their service and their future plans. “Since we have had so many family members in the military, our family really supports us and our service,” David said. “I’ve always been really proud of my sister too.” “I will stay in the Army for awhile, I’m sure,” said Christina. “I’m getting a lot of good experience that will help later on.” David said he plans to stay too but will probably change his MOS. He said he is looking at a job in electronic warfare. “We often go long periods of time without seeing each other, but we are glad for times like these when we get to visit,” Christina said. “We will eventually try to get back to Germany together. We really want to stay close, so I guess we will just keep trying to follow each other around as long as we can.”

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