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Music for Advent

A.D. 2010

1st Sunday of Advent Prelude: Savior of the Nations, Come arrang. by Paul Manz(1919-2009)
The text of this Advent hymn is attributed to St. Ambrose (340-397). Each of the seven stanzas proclaim a reason for the Messiah’s coming. The Latin hymn was first translated into the vernacular by Martin Luther (1483-1546) and titled, “Num komin, der heiden Heiland.” The hymn was later translated into English by William Reynolds (1812-1876). He was the son of a Revolutionary War captain. Paul Manz composed this arrangement the year I graduated from Bishop Flaget High School.

Opening Chant: O Come, O Come Emmanuel (vs. 1&2)

#19 M

The chant melody of this Advent carol is from the Latin tradition of the 9th century. The seven antiphons were sung at Vespers in the Medieval Church before the Magnificat. Sometime in the 13th century the “Rejoice” refrain was added. The French church used this hymn as a processional piece in the 15th century. Each stanza has a biblical reference to the Messiah: verse 1 refers to “Emmanuel” (Is. 7:14) and verse 2 refers to “O Wisdom” (Is.11:2).

Psalm of the Day Gospel Acclamation: Alleluia, pg.272 Gold Hymnal Prayers of the Faithful: Plain Chant Presentation Song: Patience People # 29 M

David Clark Isele

This drawn out melody reflects the text of James 5:7-9. 11. It was composed in 1977 by the Jesuit priest and songwriter, John B. Foley.

Holy: from People’s Mass, pg. 274 Gold Hymnal Jan Vermulst Memorial Acclamation: Danish Setting Great Amen: Danish Setting Lamb of God: Latin Plainsong, page 280, Gold Hymnal from the Gregorian Chant Mass, XVIII Agnus Dei, qui tollis Lamb of God, who takes away (removes, destroys, abolishes) peccata mundi sins(mistakes, faults, errors) of the world (i.e. humankind) Miserere nobis. Dona nobis pacem. (You) have pity to us. (You) grant to us peace (calm, quiet, grace, favor). Communion Hymn: Maranatha #22 M
Both the music and the lyrics of this song were written in 1979 by Tim Schoenbachler. The text is based upon Isaiah chapter 35, James chapter 5 and Romans chapter 13.

Closing Song: Enter in the Wilderness page 56, Gold Hymnal
Fr. Willard Jabusch wrote the text of this song and set it to a Hasidic folk tune in 1966. This is one of the earliest post Vatican II Advent carols.

2nd Sunday of Advent
Prelude: Wake, Awake for Night is Flying arranged by Paul Manz
Paul Manz wrote this setting of “Wachet auf” in the summer of 1959 in Chiasso, Switzerland. That was my first summer of assigned music ministry; playing the early (6:30 A.M.) week-day Mass at St. Mary’s. The organ was placed in the north corner of the choir loft, facing the bell tower. When I wasn’t playing, I had to stand on the organ bench to see the sanctuary. I was too scared to stand by the loft railing. At that time the railing did not have the additional iron railing affixed to the wooden rail. Plus, from the wooden rail, I could see at eye level the paintings which graced both sides of the main aisle: the OX, the LION, the EAGLE, and the Mysterious Man. The choir loft was the scariest place in the whole church.

Opening Chant: O Come, O Come (vs. 3&4)

#19 M

Verse 3 refers to Messiah as “O Lord of Might” (Deut. 4:32ffl.). Verse 4 refers to Messiah as “O Rod of Jesse” (Is.11:10)

Psalm of the Day Gospel Acclamation: Alleluia, pg. 272 Gold Hymnal Prayers of the Faithful: Plain Chant Presentation Hymn: On Jordan’s Bank #21M

David Clark Isele

Charles Coffin (1676-1749) was a French scholar who wrote over 100 hymns in Latin. This particular hymn was included in the Paris Breviary of 1736. John Chandler(18061878) translated the text into English. The melody first appeared in the 1690 Hamburg edition of Musikalisches Hand-Buch.

Holy: from People’s Mass page 274 Gold Hymnal Memorial Acclamation: Danish Setting Great Amen: Danish Setting Lamb of God: Latin Plainsong, page 280, Gold Hymnal (for an inter-linear translation see 1st Sunday of Advent) Communion Hymn: See How the Virgin Waits # 48 M
This Slovak folk melody accompanies another text by Fr. Jabusch.

Jan Vermulst

Closing Hymn: The Advent of our King # 42 M
Another Advent carol written by Coffin, this text is set to the hymn tune composed by Aaron Williams (1731-1776) called, St. Thomas(Williams).

3rd Sunday of Advent Prelude: Pour l’Advent

Dom Paul Benoit

This organ composition is based on two themes: the Latin chant, “Rorate Caeli de Super” and the French Noel, “Venez Divin Messie”. The composition appears in a collection of organ works, entitled Pieces d’ Orgue, copyrighted in 1953. Dom Paul

Benoit O.S.B. was the “organiste de l’Abbaye Saint-Maurice and Saint Maur de Clervaux”. He was also a collegue of my organ professor.

Opening Chant: O Come, O Come (vs. 5&6) #19 M
Verse 5 refers to Messiah as, “O Key of David” (Is.22:22). Verse 6 refers to Messiah as, “ O Dayspring” (Malachi 4:2).

Psalm of the Day Gospel Acclamation: Alleluia page. 272 Gold Hymnal David Clark Isele Prayers of the Faithful: Plain Chant Presentation Hymn: O Come Divine Messiah # 32 M
The music of this hymn is a traditional French advent carol of the 16th century. The text of the piece was written by Abbe Simon-Joseph Pellegrino (1663-1745). In 1877 the text was translated by Sister Mary of St. Philip ( 1825-1904).

Holy: from People’s Mass page 274 Gold Hymnal Jan Vermulst Memorial Acclamation: Danish Setting Great Amen: Danish Setting Lamb of God: Latin Plainsong, page 280, Gold Hymnal (for an inter-linear translation see 1st Sunday of Advent) Communion Song: The King Shall Come when Morning Dawns #31M
This source for this Greek hymn has never been discovered. John Brownlie (1857-1925) translated this hymn and many others. Brownlie, a Scotsman, published these hymns in the book, Hymns from the East, in 1907. This hymn reflects the Greek emphasis on light and salvation.

Closing Song: The Coming of Our God #53 M
Appeared in the Paris Breviary of 1736 and was written by Charles Coffin (1676-1749). This hymn was translated from the Latin to English by Robert Campbell (1814-1868).

4th Sunday of Advent Prelude: O Come, O come, Immanuel

setting by Paul Manz

This expressive setting was composed in September of 1968 while Mr. Manz was in Mechelen, Belgium. I have chosen his pieces as prelude pieces this Advent to honor is memory as an outstanding church musician, organist, composer and more importantly as a faithful witness and disciple of the Lord Jesus. I recently heard that Mr. Manz had passed away on Oct.28,2009. He was a very humble man. I am grateful to have had the opportunity to participate in a few of his many famous “hymn festivals” and organ seminars. May the eternal light of Christ shine on him. I cannot wait to hear the hymn festival he is putting together in the heavenly kingdom. No doubt he is entertaining the “company of angels and saints” with delightful organ improvisations.

Opening Chant: O Come, O Come (vs. 1&7) #19 M Verse 7 refers to Messiah as the “Desire of Nations” ( Isaiah) Psalm of the Day Gospel Acclamation: Alleluia p. 272 Gold Hymnal David Clark Isele Prayers of the Faithful: Plain Chant Presentation Song: Let the King of Glory Come #43 M

Michael Joncas wrote the words and composed the music of the antiphonal hymn in 1979. The text is based on Psalm 24 and the “O Antiphons”.

Holy: from People’s Mass page 274 Gold Hymnal Memorial Acclamation: Danish Setting Great Amen: Danish Setting Lamb of God: Plain Chant page 280, Gold Hymnal (for an inter-linear translation see 1st Sunday of Advent) Communion Hymn: People, Look East #30 M Closing Hymn: Come, Thou Long-Expected Jesus # 20 M

Jan Vermulst

This French traditional advent melody is called Besancon. The text was written by Eleanor Farjeon (1881-1965). This hymn was written by Charles Wesley (1707-1788). It first appeared in a 1774 music book called, Hymns For the Nativity of Our Lord. Wesley focused on the names of Jesus in this poem: strength, hope, dear desire, joy, and king. The hymn tune is named, Stuttgart and was composed by Christian F. Witt (1660-1716).