From the Van Wert

County Health Department
Winter is here and with
the season, unfortunately
comes illness. Now that most
have wrapped up their holi-
day festivities, often times
the focus shifts to health in
the New Year. The Van Wert
County Health Department
staff offers several sugges-
tions for health and wellness
that may keep everyone in a
good state of mind, body and
spirit this winter.
Many people are very
busy around the holidays and
may neglect simple practices
to stay healthy. Eating a well
balanced diet, getting exer-
cise, drinking plenty of water
and getting a good night’s
sleep are basics that can be
forgotten in the hustle and
bustle. Since daylight hours
are shorter in the winter, it’s
harder to soak up sunlight that
is still needed by your body
to make vitamin D. Sunlight
has also been proven to have
positive effects on mood and
has been said to ward off
depression.
Hand washing is always
the most effective tool in dis-
ease prevention all year long
but in winter months when
germs are rampant it is espe-
cially important. Effective
hand-washing techniques
entail washing with soap and
warm water thoroughly for at
least 30 seconds to one min-
ute. If soap and water are not
always available, purchase
alcohol-based hand sanitizer
for use when you are on the
go.
Remember, shopping
carts, public bathroom fau-
cets and door-handles and
frequently touched areas
like elevator buttons and gas
pumps are high traffic germ
infested areas.
Always remember to
cough and sneeze into the
crook of the arm and not into
hands to help stop the spread
of germs to these places.
Flu season ranges from
October through April. For
anyone who has not received
a flu vaccine yet this sea-
son, vaccines are available at
the Van Wert County Health
Department any day between
8 a.m. and 4 p.m. without
an appointment. Medicare
and Medicaid are accepted
after presenting the card. The
price of the vaccine this year
is $25 for adults and $10
for children. Flu shots are
recommended for all persons
over 6 months of age, with
emphasis on the need for
pregnant women and people
Thursday, december 30, 2010
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Baby boomers fear outliving
Medicare, p4

Van Wert blazes through Jays, p6
Upfront
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6
Classifieds 8
TV 9
World News 10
Index
Cloudy Friday;
20 percent chance
of showers and
high in low 50s.
See page 2.
Sadler
Philanthropist
dies Wednesday
Long-time local philan-
thropist Edna Jane Sadler,
96, died Wednesday at
Vancrest Healthcare Center.
Sadler was the first woman
appointed to the Delphos
Recreation Board and was The
Delphos Herald Tri-county
Woman of the Year in 1975.
She served on the Arnold C.
Dienstberger Foundation for 42
years and was an active partici-
pant in planning the building of
the nursing home and organized
and chaired the volunteer activ-
ities until Vancrest purchased it.
She was a charter member
of the Delphos Ohio Child
Conservation League and was
a member and president of Phi
Delta Sorority and member of
Delphos Chapter 26, Order of
Eastern Star, where she was
Worthy Matron in 1953 and
was appointed Grand Martha
for the Grand Chapter of Ohio
Order of Eastern Star in 1956.
A working Republican, she
served on the Allen County
Republican Central Committee
and was a past officer of the
Delphos Republican Club.
She worked on the local elec-
tion board and was a judge
and election-day worker
for more than 50 years.
Sadler was also very active
at Trinity United Methodist
Church, teaching Sunday
School and was a charter
member of the local Official
Board and was a representative
of West Ohio Conference at
the Jurisdictional Conferences
and the Council of Ministries
of the Lima District. She was
district president of W.S.C.S.
and served as district leader
for four terms. On the local
level, she was lay-delegate
to the annual church confer-
ence at Lakeside for many
years. In 1955, she and Toddy
Rozelle formed Trinity United
Methodist Church’s first
Altar Guild, which still car-
ries on those duties to this
day. She helped organize and
served as president of Church
Women United of Delphos.
See page 2 for full obituary.
Court upholds law that
lets Ohio set gun rules
By KANTELE FRANKO
The Associated Press
COLUMBUS — The Ohio
Supreme Court has upheld a
2006 law that allows the state,
rather than cities, to deter-
mine firearm restrictions.
The decision means gun
owners traveling among
Ohio cities won’t have to
worry about variations in
gun restrictions along the
way, Ohio Attorney General
Richard Cordray said after
Wednesday’s ruling.
Cleveland had challenged
the state on grounds that the
law intruded on the constitu-
tionally guaranteed right to
home rule, which allows a
municipality to govern itself.
The city’s ban on assault
weapons was among those
invalidated by the law.
In reversing an earlier
appeals court decision, the
state’s highest court ruled 5-2
on Wednesday that the law
is constitutional and does not
infringe on home rule powers.
Cordray had asked the
court to decide the case, say-
ing lawmakers determined
Ohio should have one com-
prehensive state law defin-
ing gun owner rights instead
of a patchwork of measures
in different jurisdictions. The
law was passed in a dramatic
showdown in 2006 between
Republican Gov. Bob Taft
and the GOP-controlled
Legislature, which overrode
his veto.
The justices rejected an
appeals court finding that the
law was not “part of a com-
prehensive statewide legisla-
tive enactment” and found
it qualified as a general law,
taking precedence over local
ordinances.
The office of Cleveland
Mayor Frank Jackson said
the Supreme Court’s decision
“puts urban populations at
greater risk for gun violence
and eviscerates the state con-
stitution’s home rule provi-
sion.”
In the dissent, Justice Paul
E. Pfeifer concluded, based
on a previous court case, that
“the General Assembly is
incapable of casting a pre-
emption blanket over an entire
field” of legislation.
Radio Shack
closing Friday
BY MIKE FORD
mford@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — The end of
2010 marks the end of Radio
Shack in Delphos. After 32
years in business, the store
will officially close as a
Radio Shack when Owner
Judy Williams closes up shop
on Friday. She said she had
been thinking about retiring
for some time but had made
no formal plans until Radio
Shack expressed a desire for
her to invest untold dollars in
the store.
“I had been thinking of
retiring but didn’t know when
or how. Radio Shack pretty
much told me when but I
haven’t figured out the how
part yet. They wanted me to
remodel my store and change
my sign, which is white and
their’s is black. They wanted
me to get a new sign and
change the store — I have
thousands of dollars in inven-
tory and I’m 68 years old, so
I said ‘nope. I’m out’,” she
said. “Technically, they didn’t
order me to close but they did
say I could keep it open and
call it ‘Judy’s Electronics’ or
something like that but they
would cut me off from their
supply.”
Williams regrets seeing
the store close in this way but
looks back with gratitude for
the community’s support.
“I never thought we’d be
here so long; we opened right
here in 1979. The custom-
ers have been good to me. I
can count the ones that gave
me a hard time on one hand;
I’ve made a lot of friends and
will sorely miss it but I love
volunteering and will do that
someway, somehow,” she
said. “Officially, my last day
is at the end of the year but
I will still have inventory. I
won’t have any set hours like
I’ve been having, so I will
be in and out but I’ve been
telling customers to stop in if
they see my car here.”
2010
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Each year at this time,
The Herald staff takes a
look back at the happenings
in the area in the last year.
Here is the third of four
year-end wrapups. (Due to
a server failure, The Herald
lost many pictures from the
third quarter of 2010.)
July
July 1 — Area business-
es, including K&M Tire,
teamed up with United
Way Extreme Community
Makeover initiative to help
with landscaping and paint-
ing projects at the Delphos
Senior Citizens Center.
Director Joyce Hale said the
contributions were greatly
appreciated, due to the cuts
in funding the center has
received. “Our transporta-
tion is so vital to our peo-
ple and that has to come
from our levy dollars, so we
don’t have extra money for
maintenance and landscap-
ing,” she said. “It means so
much to us.”
July 6 — The annual
Delphos Kiwanis Club
Fourth of July celebration
was deemed a success, with
a good turnout of people in
the evenings and no inci-
dents at the “beverage” tent.
While many communities
went without fireworks due
to financial strain, Delphos
continued the tradition.
“Our local businesses and
individual donors made it
possible for us to have fire-
works this year,” organizer
Jamey Wisher said.
July 7 — With tempera-
tures in the mid-90’s, tri-
county residents prepared
themselves for sweat and
possible heat-stroke as
they went about their daily
obligations in a heat wave.
Fire Chief David McNeal
advised everyone to stay
in the air-conditioning or
shade and to drink water
throughout the day.
July 9 — Karla and
Robert Hoying awoke to a
surprise in their Koi pond
one morning when they
discovered fresh-water jel-
lyfish had appeared out of
nowhere. Scientists claim
these ancient organisms
lay in wait in the form of
polyps. Once they reach
the right temperature and
environmental conditions,
they develop into buds and
eventually progress into the
medusa stage, or mature jel-
lyfish stage.
July 16 — The Delphos
Public Library Board of
Trustees made the deci-
sion to resume renovating
the First Street building.
During its monthly meeting,
the board discussed ways
to keep the project under
$25,000 with a representa-
tive from Garmann/Miller.
The remaining renovations
were selective demolition,
cabinetry, wall construc-
tion, ceiling work, painting,
flooring, plumbing, HVAC
and electrical.
July 28 — The Delphos
Sisters of Notre Dame wel-
comed their fellow sisters
from Germany and provid-
ed them with a tour of St.
John’s. Margaret Fischer
acted as tour guide. “We
re-did the church 12 years
ago because the paint was
peeling and the plaster was
falling down in places. It
needed it badly,” she said.
July 29 — Incumbent
Suzie Teman was re-elected
Marbletown Mayor for the
annual Marbletown Festival.
Teman won the “vote” by a
landslide, 600 to 60 against
opponent Chris Boop.
Candidates in the election
collected donations, with
each dollar representing a
“vote.”
July 31 — The Carson
& Barnes Circus came to
Delphos, bringing exotic
animals, acrobatics and
feats of strength. In addi-
tion to the usual clowning
around and comical antics,
audiences were treated to
contortionists, unicyclists
and animal tricks. Children
and adults alike enjoyed
The Carson & Barnes Circus came to Delphos, bring-
ing exotic animals, acrobatics and feats of strength. In
addition to the usual clowning around and comical antics,
audiences were treated to contortionists, unicyclists and
animal tricks.
See WRAP UP, page 10
Nancy Spencer photo
Today one of biggest garbage days of year
Allen County Refuse will pick up more garbage today and Friday in Delphos than
any other days of the year. An ACR representative confirmed the collection after
Christmas is the largest.
The Delphos Herald -
Closes at noon New Year’s
Eve, no publication on New
Year’s Day
Delphos Public Library
- Closed New Year’s Eve,
closed New Year’s Day
Speedway - Fifth Street,
regular hours; Main Street,
regular hours
Circle K - Regular hours
Point Marathon - Regular
hours
Bellmann’s Party Shop -
Closes at 6 p.m. New Year’s
Eve, closed New Year’s Day
Chief’s Supermarket - reg-
ular hours
ACE Hardware - Closes
at 4 p.m. New Year’s Eve,
Closed New Year’s Day
Tri-County Do-It Center -
Closes at noon Friday, busi-
ness resumes Monday
ALCO - Closes at 7 p.m.
New Year’s Eve, closes at 6
p.m. New Year’s Day
Holiday hours
for local
merchants
Tips to stay healthy this winter
See HEALTHY, page 2
Magnitude 3.8
quake rattles Ind.
INDIANAPOLIS (AP)
— The U.S. Geological
Survey has lowered the
estimated magnitude of an
earthquake that shook parts
of Indiana and four other
states to magnitude 3.8.
The agency’s initial esti-
mate of the quake’s strength
was magnitude 4.2. The
USGS said the 7:55 a.m. EST
today was centered about five
miles south of Greentown in
Howard County, about 50
miles north of Indianapolis.
The USGS said the
quake was felt by people as
far away as Illinois, Ohio,
Kentucky and Wisconsin.
2
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NEW YEARS EVE
SCOTCH DOUBLES
BOWLING PARTY
December 31 - 9pm
Bowling, prize money
Party favors & Pizza buffet..
All for only $30 couple
Make reservations now.. 48 couple limit
939 E. Fifth St, Delphos
419-692-2695 (BOWL)
21 DAYS OF
W
EIGHT LOSS
COACHING
FOR FREE
Jessica Keysor
Lost 30lbs &
54 inches*
*Results shown are typical for members following the Thin&Healthy’s Total Solution program. Offer expires 1/31/2011. First time visitors only.
000-000-0000
( Locat i on)
www.THINANDHEALTHY.com
PRESENT THIS COUPONAT OURFRONT DESKTOACTIVATE YOURCOMPLIMENTARY WEIGHT LOSS COACHING
LOSE 6-21 POUNDS IN 21 DAYS!
• Must have at least 20 pounds to lose and agree to
meet with a weight loss coach three times a week for
three weeks.
• There is no obligation to purchase Thin&Healthy®
products or services.
• This offer is limited to the first 50 participants so call
today!
• Membership must be activated by January 31st, 2011
to qualify.
Name:
Expires: _______ / _______ / _______
Date Time
Date Time
Date Time
Date Time
Date Time
Date Time
Date Time
Date Time
Date Time
COACHING APPOINTMENTS
AFTER
BEFORE
E
X
P
IR
E
S
1/
3
1/
11
E
X
P
IR
E
S
1/
3
1/
11
21 DAYS OF
WEIGHT LOSS
COACHING
FOR FREE
Jessica Keysor
Lost 30lbs &
54 inches*
*Results shown are typical for members following the Thin&Healthy’s Total Solution program. Offer expires 1/31/2011. First time visitors only.
000-000-0000
( Locat i on)
www.THINANDHEALTHY.com
PRESENT THIS COUPONAT OURFRONT DESKTOACTIVATE YOURCOMPLIMENTARY WEIGHT LOSS COACHING
LOSE 6-21 POUNDS IN 21 DAYS!
• Must have at least 20 pounds to lose and agree to
meet with a weight loss coach three times a week for
three weeks.
• There is no obligation to purchase Thin&Healthy®
products or services.
• This offer is limited to the first 50 participants so call
today!
• Membership must be activated by January 31st, 2011
to qualify.
Name:
Expires: _______ / _______ / _______
Date Time
Date Time
Date Time
Date Time
Date Time
Date Time
Date Time
Date Time
Date Time
COACHING APPOINTMENTS
AFTER
BEFORE
EXPIR
ES
1/3
1/11
EXPIR
ES
1/3
1/11
419-692-3488
Stadium Park Office Complex
2 – The Herald Thursday, December 30, 2010
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARY
FUNERALS
BIRTHS
LOTTERY
VAN WERT COURT NEWS
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
TODAY IN HISTORY
The Delphos Herald wants
to correct published errors in
its news, sports and feature
articles. To inform the news-
room of a mistake in published
information, call the editorial
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.
CorreCtions
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 141 No. 168
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
William Kohl,
general manager/Eagle Print
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily except
Sundays and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $2.09 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $105
per year. Outside these counties
$119 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $2.09
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Wednesday:
Classic Lotto
03-07-14-29-40-47
Estimated jackpot: $17.4
million
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $237
million
Midday 3
9-7-3
Midday 4
0-0-4-1
Pick 3
3-2-8
Pick 4
4-0-2-4
Powerball
0 3 - 1 6 - 1 8 - 2 0 - 3 7 ,
Powerball: 30, Power Play: 2
Estimated jackpot: $20
million
rolling Cash 5
01-14-18-36-39
Estimated jackpot:
$140,000
ten oH
06-08-12-13-17-23-25-28-
38-41-45-46-48-52-65-68-69-
72-74-78
ten oH Midday
01-11-13-15-16-22-31-33-
35-36-38-39-43-46-55-58-64-
73-75-78
High temperature
Wednesday was 36 degrees,
low was 18. Rainfall was
recorded at .07 inch. High a
year ago today was 33, low
was 14. Record high for today
is 66, set in 1965. Record low
is -13, set in 1983.
new postage stamps
are ‘forever’
By DoUGLAss
K. DAnieL
Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Rummaging around for 1-
and 2-cent postage stamps
when postal rates go up
is heading the way of the
Pony Express. Beginning in
January, all new stamps good
for 1 ounce of first-class mail
will be marked as “forever.”
The move is designed
to help customers cope
with postage increases, a
U.S. Postal Service official
told The Associated Press
on Tuesday. The official
requested anonymity to dis-
cuss a policy that hasn’t been
announced formally.
Postmaster General
Patrick R. Donahoe plans to
announce the new policy Jan.
14, the official said.
“I think that’s a great idea,”
Sean Swilling, a research
analyst for commercial prop-
erty, said inside a downtown
Washington post office dur-
ing a mail run. “For me, a guy
who uses snail-mail regularly,
it’s a hassle to get 1- or 2-cent
stamps. Streamline things —
that would be perfect.”
When the Postal Service
unveiled its first-class com-
memorative stamps for 2011
on Tuesday, all were marked
“forever” instead of the cur-
rent rate of 44 cents.
The initial first-class stamp
under the new policy will be
the Lunar New Year: Year of
the Rabbit stamp, to be issued
Jan. 22. It will be followed
by stamps commemorating
Kansas statehood on Jan. 29
and, in February, the cen-
tennial of President Ronald
Reagan’s birth.
The Forever Stamp, first
issued in April 2007 and fea-
turing the Liberty Bell, was
designed for use regardless of
changes in postal rates. They
are sold at the prevailing price
of 1 ounce of domestic first-
class postage.
The Postal Service says that
28 billion Forever Stamps have
been sold since, generating
$12.1 billion in total revenue.
The stamps without denomina-
tions already account for 85
percent of its stamp program,
the service says.
The Postal Service sought
a 2-cent increase in post-
age rates for 2011, but the
independent Postal Rate
Commission rejected the
request. The post office is
appealing the decision in fed-
eral court.
Use of the Internet as well
as the economic downturn
have been cited for a 3.5 per-
cent decline in mail volume
from 2009 to 2010.
The Postal Service lost
$8.5 billion in the year ending
Sept. 30, even after trimming
more than 100,000 jobs in
recent years, and estimates it
will lose $6 billion to $7 bil-
lion in the next year. One of
its proposals for dealing with
its financial troubles calls for
cutting delivery to five days a
week instead of six, a change
Congress must approve.
the next meeting of the
Delphos Council Catholic
Ladies of Columbia will
begin at 7 p.m. tuesday at
the Knights of Columbus
hall.
WeAtHer ForeCAst
tri-county
the Associated Press
toniGHt: Cloudy.
Lows around 40. South winds
around 15 mph.
FriDAY: Cloudy with a
20 percent chance of showers.
Highs in the lower 50s. South
winds around 15 mph with
gusts up to 25 mph.
neW YeAr’s eVe:
Occasional showers. Lows
in the mid 40s. South winds
around 15 mph with gusts up
to 25 mph. Chance of rain 90
percent.
neW YeAr’s DAY:
Mostly cloudy. A chance of
showers in the morning. Highs
in the upper 40s. Temperatures
falling into the lower 40s
in the afternoon. Southwest
winds 10 to 15 mph with gusts
up to 25 mph. Chance of rain
50 percent.
eXtenDeD ForeCAst
neW YeAr’s niGHt:
Mostly cloudy in the evening
becoming partly cloudy. Lows
in the lower 20s.
sUnDAY: Partly cloudy
in the morning then clearing.
Highs around 30.
sUnDAY niGHt: Mostly
clear. Lows around 20.
MonDAY: Mostly sunny
in the morning becoming
partly cloudy. Highs in the
mid 30s.
MonDAY niGHt: Partly
cloudy in the evening becom-
ing mostly cloudy. Lows in
the lower 20s.
tUesDAY: Partly cloudy.
Highs in the mid 30s.
The following individuals
appeared Wednesday before
Judge Charles Steele in Van
Wert County Common Pleas
Court:
Michael J. Missler,
21, Convoy, entered a not
guilty plea to an indict-
ment issued by the March
2010 session of the Grand
Jury charging him with
burglary, a felony of the
second degree; and break-
ing and entering, a felony
of the fifth degree.
According to a Van Wert
County Sheriff’s Department
investigation, Missler had
allegedly entered a home on
Old Tie Factory Road in
November 2009 and took a
number of items. Sheriff’s
Deputies also alleged that
Missler was involved in the
breaking and entering of
Barb’s Party Shop in Convoy
in November 2009.
Missler was just recent-
ly returned to Ohio from
Indiana authorities after
serving jail time for auto
theft.
Magistrate Joseph E.
Quatman set bond at $10,000
cash and scheduled a pretrial
hearing for Missler at 8 a.m.
on Tuesday.
Jessica rhine, 23, Lima,
entered a plea of not guilty to
theft, a fifth degree felony.
A Van Wert City Police
Department investigation
alleges Rhine was responsi-
ble for the theft of a Walmart
employee’s purse which
contained credit cards. The
alleged theft took place in
October.
Rhine was released on
a $5,000 unsecured person-
al surety bond with a pre-
trial scheduled for 8 a.m.
Tuesday.
Delphos weather
sept. 4, 1914 - Dec. 29, 2010
Edna Jane Sadler, 96, of
Delphos died at 12:20 p.m.
Wednesday at Vancrest
Healthcare Center.
She was born Sept. 4, 1914,
in Columbus and adopted as
an infant by Fred and Pearl
Leininger.
On Feb. 13, 1934, she
married Howard Sadler. They
were married for 58 years
before he preceded her in
death.
Survivors include a son,
Paul (Jane) Sadler of Delphos;
four grandchildren, Jill Sadler
of Phoenix, Lisa (Michael)
Hefner of Lafayette and Paul
(Kim) Sadler of St. Marys;
and five great-grandchil-
dren, Nathan, Allison and
Alexander Hefner and Ryan
and Aaron Sadler.
She was preceded in death
by a son, Howard Frederick
Sadler; a half sister, Ethel
Baker; and a half brother,
Walter Leininger.
Mrs. Sadler was first and
foremost an active Methodist,
Republican and volunteer. She
was the first woman appoint-
ed to the Delphos Recreation
Board and was The Delphos
Herald Tri-county Woman of
the Year in 1975. She served
on the Arnold C. Dienstberger
Foundation for 42 years and
was an active participant in
planning the building of the
nursing home and organized
and chaired the volunteer
activities until Vancrest pur-
chased it.
She taught Sunday School,
was a charter member of
the local Official Board
and was a representative of
West Ohio Conference at the
Jurisdictional Conferences
and the Council of Ministries
of the Lima District. She was
district president of W.S.C.S.
and served as district leader
for four terms. On the local
level, she was lay-delegate
to the annual church confer-
ence at Lakeside for many
years. In 1955, she and Toddy
Rozelle formed Trinity United
Methodist Church’s first Altar
Guild, which still carries on
those duties to this day. She
helped organize and served as
president of Church Women
United of Delphos.
She was a charter member
of the Delphos Ohio Child
Conservation League and was
a member and president of
Phi Delta Sorority and mem-
ber of Delphos Chapter 26,
Order of Eastern Star, where
she was a Worthy Matron
in 1953 and was appointed
Grand Martha for the Grand
Chapter of Ohio Order of
Eastern Star in 1956.
A working Republican,
she served on the Allen
County Republican Central
Committee and was a past
officer of the Delphos
Republican Club. She worked
on the local election board
and was a judge and election
day worker for more than 50
years.
She supported both
Jefferson and St. John’s
schools. She was especially
proud of the athletic abili-
ties of her son, grandson
and great-grandnephews and
when at 93 she could not lon-
ger go the games, her radio
was always tuned in to the
Delphos-Lima station so she
wouldn’t miss a play.
Funeral services will begin
at 2 p.m. Sunday at Trinity
United Methodist Church, the
Rev. David Howell officiat-
ing. Burial will be in Walnut
Grove Cemetery.
Friends may call from 2-8
p.m. Saturday and one hour
prior to the service Sunday
at Harter and Schier Funeral
Home, where an Easter Star
service will begin at 3 p.m.
Saturday.
Preferred memorials are
to TUMC Building Fund,
Eastern Star or donor’s
choice.
edna Jane sadler
st. ritA’s
A girl was born Dec. 29 to
Jason and Erin Klir of Elida.
A boy was born Dec. 29 to
Jeff and Darci Swick of Fort
Jennings.
HArPster, Harold
A., 88, of Delphos, Mass of
Christian Burial will begin at
10 a.m. Friday at St. John the
Evangelist Catholic Church,
with military rites by the
Delphos Veterans Council at
the church. The Rev. Melvin
Verhoff will officiate. Burial
will be in Walnut Grove
Cemetery. Friends may call
from 2-8 p.m. today at Harter
and Schier Funeral Home,
where a parish wake service
will be held at 7:30 p.m.
Memorial contributions may
be made to Veterans Honor
Flight or St. John Parish
Foundation.
LoZAno, Ramiro
“Romie,” 80, of Delphos,
Mass of Christian Burial will
be held at 11 a.m. Monday
at St. John the Evangelist
Catholic Church, the Rev.
Jacob Gordon officiating. The
Delphos Veterans Council
will hold a military service
directly after Mass. Burial will
be in Resurrection Cemetery.
Friends may call from 2-8 p.m.
Sunday at Harter and Schier
Funeral Home. Preferred
memorials are to the Delphos
Veterans Council.
JoHnson, Helen J.,
87, of Delphos, Mass of
Christian Burial will begin at
11 a.m. Saturday at St. John
the Evangelist Catholic Church,
the Rev. Melvin Verhoff
officiating. Burial will be in
Resurrection Cemetery. Friends
may call from 2-8 p.m. Friday
at Harter and Schier Funeral
Home, where a parish wake
service will be held at 7:30
p.m. Memorial contributions
may be made to St. John’s
School or the Delphos Senior
Citizens.
Corn: $6.06
Wheat: $6.99
Beans: $13.41
COLUMBUS (AP) — A
change in Ohio rules will
limit the number of times
a prescription may be trans-
ferred between pharmacies
to once a year, beginning
Saturday.
The Ohio State Board
of Pharmacy approved the
restriction last month because
of pharmacists’ concerns
about paperwork and possible
communication glitches that
can endanger patients, said
Tim Benedict, the board’s
assistant director.
“If you keep transferring
(prescriptions) around, you’re
eventually going to have
problems,” Benedict told The
Columbus Dispatch.
Also, several retailers
offer deals, such as gift cards
and percentage-off coupons,
for prescription transfers.
Pharmacists have complained
that they spend too much time
dealing with transfers that are
often initiated solely because
of bargain offers, Benedict
said.
“There’s a difference
between penny-pinching and
coupon-shopping to the point
it becomes unsafe,” said Bill
Winsley, the executive direc-
tor of the pharmacy board.
Prescription transfers with-
in the same retail chain, such
as from a CVS store in Ohio to
one in Florida, are exempt from
the one-per-year limit because
the stores share the same sys-
tem of computer records, the
Dispatch reported.
The rule change could
cause hardships for Ohio
snowbirds, older residents
who go elsewhere for the
winter, critics charge.
They could transfer a pre-
scription from Ohio to their
winter home state. But unless
the switch is made within one
pharmacy chain, they would
not be able to make the trans-
fer back to Ohio when they
return with warmer weather.
Tom Stone, a Columbus
resident and critic of the
change, wrote the pharmacy
panel that those prescriptions
are then “marooned” in the
other state.
Patients can avoid that
problem through planning
and by having a doctor write
two separate prescriptions,
Benedict said.
Ohio to limit prescription
transfers to once a year
(Continued from page 1)
underlying health conditions
like diabetes or heart prob-
lems being in a high risk
population.
The first year children
receive a flu shot, two doses
are required separated by at
least 4 weeks. If a child has
not received a second dose,
it is necessary to adequately
protect against the flu virus.
For persons 65 and
older also consider call-
ing the Van Wert County
Health Department to make
an appointment to obtain a
Pneumonia vaccination. Call
the health department at 419-
238-0808 ext. 103 or 107.
The flu shot protects
against influenza, which is a
respiratory illness most com-
monly consisting of cough,
body aches, fever, chills and
headache. Usually nausea and
vomiting do not accompany
influenza. Flu shots do not
protect against “stomach flu”
which is actually gastroenteri-
tis and can have some similar
symptoms but in addition
nausea, vomiting and diar-
rhea. Gastroenteritis does not
commonly have respiratory
involvement. Gastroenteritis,
or gastro for short, is similar
to influenza in that gastro is
also a virus and is generally
picked up from contact with
a surface that a sick person
has touched.
If exhibiting the symptoms
of either virus or a fever,
staying home from work or
school is especially impor-
tant in stopping the spread of
disease. If symptoms persist
or become severe, contact a
health-care provider for eval-
uation.
Additional resources to
fight disease and maintain
health are available at odh.
ohio.gov, as well ascdc.gov.
Contact the Van Wert
County Health Department at
419-238-0808, or visit van-
wertcountyhealth.org.
Healthy A girl was born Dec. 29
to Haley Miller and Andrew
Hammer of Elida.
By the Associated Press
Today is Thursday, Dec.
30, the 364th day of 2010.
There is one day left in the
year.
today’s Highlight in
History:
On Dec. 30, 1860, 10 days
after South Carolina seceded
from the Union, the state mili-
tia seized the United States
Arsenal in Charleston, com-
pleting a takeover of all fed-
eral property in the city except
Fort Sumter.
on this date:
In 1813, the British burned
Buffalo, N.Y., during the War
of 1812.
In 1853, the United States
and Mexico signed a treaty
under which the U.S. agreed
to buy some 45,000 square
miles of land from Mexico for
$10 million in a deal known as
the Gadsden Purchase.
In 1903, about 600 people
died when fire broke out at
the recently opened Iroquois
Theater in Chicago.
1
Thursday, December 30, 2010 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
EarthTalk®
From the Editors of E/The
Environmental Magazine
Dear EarthTalk: Why
did 34 million wild sock-
eye salmon return to the
Fraser River in British
Columbia this year? The
run had been declining for
20 years before now.
— David B., Seattle,
WA
The miraculous sock-
eye salmon run in western
Canada’s Fraser River water-
shed in the summer and fall
of 2010—indeed the biggest
run in 97 years—still has
fishers, researchers and fish-
ery managers baffled. Just a
year earlier only one million
fish returned to spawn. No
one seems to be able to say
for sure what caused the
massive 2010 run, but most
agree that it probably had
to do with the very favor-
able water conditions that
were present in 2008 when
the sockeyes were juveniles.
“They’re very vulnerable
at that stage of their life,”
reports John Reynolds, a
salmon conservation expert
at Canada’s Simon Fraser
University.
Roberta Hamme, a
researcher with Canada’s
University of Victoria,
suggests in a recent study
published in Geophysical
Research Letters that the
ash fall from the eruption of
Alaska’s Kasatochi volcano
in 2008 may be one rea-
son for the huge 2010 run.
Iron in the ash, which was
spewed far and wide by the
erupting volcano and then
dispersed further by turbu-
lent weather, served as a fer-
tilizer throughout the North
Pacific. The result was huge
algae blooms that dramati-
cally improved the fish’s
food supply. A similar large
Fraser River salmon run in
1958 was likewise preceded
by a huge volcanic eruption
in Alaska.
What was particularly
striking about 2010’s mam-
moth run was the contrast
against 2009, when the
Fraser River sockeye run was
a disaster by all accounts. It
capped 20 years of decline
and was so much worse than
anyone had expected that
the Canadian government
formed a commission to
investigate possible causes,
reported Daniel Jack Chasan
on the Pacific Northwest
news website, Crosscut.
The situation was terrible
in 2008, as well, so much
so that on the U.S. side of
the border, then-Commerce
Secretary Carlos Gutierrez
declared the Fraser salm-
on fishery a disaster and
allocated $2 million to U.S.
tribes and commercial fish-
ermen to make up for their
loss of income. But strangely
enough, just as the Canadian
commission began investi-
gating the paltry 2009 run,
said Chasan, commercial
fishermen “started hauling
in more Fraser River sock-
eye than any of them had
ever seen.”
Generally speaking, sci-
entists and environmental-
ists are well aware of why
wild West Coast salmon
runs have been declining
over the past century: name-
ly pollution at almost every
inch along the thousand
mile river-to-sea-and-back
underwater journey, over-
fishing in both rivers and
the ocean, and man-made
obstructions to fish pas-
sage. But environmentalists
are now optimistic that the
huge 2010 sockeye run is a
sign of better times ahead.
Perhaps improved logging
practices, a resurgence in
organic farming, new protec-
tions for upstream habitat or
restrained commercial fish-
ing catch limits—or some
combination thereof—has
begun to make a difference
in salmon survival.
In any event, the salmon
runs typically peak every
fourth year—2010 was sup-
posed to be a peak year
but substantially exceeded
expectations. Only time will
tell if the masses of sock-
eyes in the Fraser in 2010
were a fluke or foreshadow
better days ahead for the
environment—and for the
fish and people in it.

Dear EarthTalk: Can
you explain what “frack-
ing” is with regard to nat-
ural gas exploration and
why it is controversial?
— Jonas Kern, Bellevue,
WA

Fracking is shorthand
within the oil and gas indus-
try for “hydraulic fractur-
ing,” a process in which drill-
ers blast millions of gallons
of water, sand and hazard-
ous chemicals at high-pres-
sure into sub-surface rock
formations to create frac-
tures that facilitate the flow
of recoverable oil or gas.
According to the Interstate
Oil and Gas Compact
Commission, 90 percent of
all oil and gas wells in the
U.S. are “fracked” to boost
production. Fracking usu-
ally occurs just after a new
well is drilled, but many
wells are fractured numer-
ous times to get as much
production out of a profit-
able site as possible.
But after a series of acci-
dents in Pennsylvania and
elsewhere over the last few
years, fracking has come
under attack as dangerous
to both human health and
the environment. The most
common problem involves
the disposal of the toxic
sludge that results from
fracking. Texas-based XTO
Energy, for instance, racked
up 31 fracking-related pol-
lution violations at 20 wells
in Pennsylvania’s Marcellus
Shale in 2010 alone. But
the fact that between 20 and
40 percent of the chemi-
cals remain stranded under-
ground — where they can
contaminate drinking water,
soils and other features
of the environment that
plants, animals and humans
rely on — is perhaps even
more troubling. According
to the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA),
a least nine different chemi-
cals commonly used in
fracking are injected into oil
and gas wells at concentra-
tions that pose a threat to
human health.
With Americans getting
half of their drinking water
from underground sources,
it’s no wonder that people
are concerned about the risks
of fracking — especially
since 2005 when George
W. Bush exempted oil and
gas companies from feder-
al regulations designed to
protect our drinking water.
Meanwhile, most state oil
and gas regulatory agencies
don’t require companies to
report the volumes or names
of chemicals being used in
extraction (benzene, chlo-
ride, toluene and sulfates are
among them). The result,
according to the non-profit
Oil and Gas Accountability
Project, is that one of the
country’s dirtiest industries
enjoys an exclusive right to
“inject toxic fluids directly
into good quality groundwa-
ter without oversight.”
There are other poten-
tial issues with fracking as
well. The non-profit Natural
Resources Defense Council
(NRDC) warns that beyond
contaminating drinking
water with toxic and in some
cases carcinogenic chemi-
cals, fracking could trigger
earthquakes, poison graz-
ing livestock, and overbur-
den our wastewater systems
— especially since drilling
expanded during Bush’s
tenure in the White House.
In response to public
concern about the potential
risks associated from frack-
ing, the EPA recently com-
menced a comprehensive
study on the topic. Oil com-
panies and environmental-
ists alike hope that the study
puts to rest any debate over
the environmental impacts
of the process. In the mean-
time, the city council in
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
recently voted to outlaw
fracking there, while New
York governor David
Paterson extended a morato-
rium on fracking in his state
through July of 2011, citing
concerns about whether the
technique is safe enough to
allow it at all moving for-
ward. Other municipalities
and states are waiting to see
what the EPA finds before
making their own decisions
on fracking.
Shaleshock.org. photo
Fracking, shorthand for “hydraulic fracturing,” involves
blasting millions of gallons of water, sand and hazardous
chemicals at high-pressure into sub-surface rock forma-
tions to create fractures that facilitate the flow of recover-
able oil or gas. It has come under serious attack of late
due to fears about contaminated drinking water and other
threats to public health. Pictured: A hydraulic fracturing
site, one of several concentrated in a small area in and
around Troy, Pennsylvania.
John Warrenchuk, courtesy Wikipedia
Some 34 million sockeye salmon returned to Canada’s
Fraser River this past summer and fall, following years of
decline that had many scientists worried about the future
of the fish and the industry built around it. There is now
great optimism for better times ahead.
YOUR NEWSPAPER ... STILL LOADED
WITH EXTRAS.
The way newspapers are sold may have
changed, but fact is, newspapers are
still the most “value-added” source of
information around. Where else can you
find facts, food, fashion, finance, “funnies”,
football, and of course good old-fashioned
reporting, for just pennies a day? With
something new to greet you each day,
from cover to cover, your newspaper is
really one extraordinary buy, so pick it up
and “read all about it” daily!
Group works
to restore Ga.
Civil War
monument
By HOWARD
WILKINSON
The Cincinnati Enquirer
CINCINNATI — About
five years ago, a small party
of men from Cincinnati — all
of them descendants of Civil
War veterans — made the
600-mile trip down Interstate
75 to the Chickamauga
National Battlefield Park to
see the monument to Gen.
William Haines Lytle, the
Cincinnati poet-soldier who
died on that field.
They were appalled at
what they found on the north
Georgia battlefield.
“There was nothing left
of it,” said Kerry Langdon
of Union Township, com-
mander of the Cincinnati Sons
of Union Veterans camp that
bears Lytle’s name. “We were
surprised, saddened and dis-
appointed.”
What they found was the
bare remains of what used to
be a majestic pyramid of about
350 black cannonballs, with a
bronze placard noting that this
was the spot where, on Sept.
20, 1863, Gen. Lytle, a mem-
ber of one of Cincinnati’s
founding families, was killed
while on horseback, leading
his brigade in a counterattack.
Now, they are working
with a Civil War preservation
group at Chickamauga to do
something about it.
The Lytle Monument,
erected in 1894, was one of
eight “memorial monuments”
built by Union veterans on
the Chickamauga battlefield
to mark the location where
general officers died.
But by the time the
Cincinnati Sons of the Union
Veterans arrived on the battle-
field five years ago, the Lytle
Monument, tucked away in
an obscure, hard-to-reach area
of the battlefield, had been
reduced to a single layer of
cannonballs.
What happened to the mon-
ument sounds bizarre and sets
the teeth of historical preser-
vationists on edge: the miss-
ing cannonballs were either
stolen by souvenir seekers or,
years ago, by park officials
who grabbed the cannonballs
on the out-of-the-way monu-
ment to make repairs to other,
more visible monuments.
“It may be that, during
the early days of preserva-
tion, it was considered OK to
borrow from one monument
to fix another,” said Patrice
Glass, executive director of
the Friends of the National
Parks at Chickamauga and
Chattanooga, the group that is
working with Langdon’s orga-
nization to restore the statue.
“That kind of thing would
never happen today,” Glass
said. “And it only hap-
pened here because the Lytle
Monument is in a place
off the beaten path. I guess
they thought no one would
notice.”
But Langdon and the 25
members of his organization
— all the direct descendants
of Civil War veterans — have
noticed, and they believe it
would be dishonorable to the
memory of a brave and dis-
tinguished soldier to let the
diminished monument stand.
They have joined with the
Friends organization to raise
$65,000 to buy 323 new can-
nonballs and restore the Lytle
Monument to its 1894 appear-
ance and rededicate it on Sept.
20, 2013 — the 150th anni-
versary of Lytle’s death.
So far, the two groups have
raised $8,400, with most of it
coming from the Cincinnati
area.
“This is important to the
history of Cincinnati,” said
Langdon. “This is a favor-
ite son of the city, a brilliant
leader. His life was significant
to the history of Cincinnati.”
Many here know the Lytle
name because of the down-
town park that sits on the
site of the family home, the
highway tunnel underneath it;
and anyone who has been to
Spring Grove Cemetery has
seen the towering monument
near the cemetery gates that
marks the place where he is
buried.
The son of one of the city’s
founding families, William
Haines Lytle practiced law
here, serving in the state leg-
islature as a Democrat, run-
ning unsuccessfully for Ohio
lieutenant governor and serv-
ing with distinction in the 2nd
Ohio Volunteer Infantry in
war with Mexico.
By the time the Civil War
began in 1861, Lytle was one
of the best known poets in the
country, in a time when poetry
was a popular form of lit-
erature, read and memorized
by most Americans. Many
Americans could recite his
most famous poem, “Antony
and Cleopatra,” with its ironic
references to a soldier killed
in battle.
When the war broke out,
Lytle was appointed to lead
an Ohio infantry regiment. He
was severely wounded in bat-
tle in Sept. 1861 and returned
to Cincinnati, but, four months
later, was back in the saddle
— now a general — and lead-
ing troops in battle.
In Sept. 1863, Lytle found
himself leading a brigade in
the battle of Chickamauga,
which ended in defeat for the
Union army and was one of the
bloodiest battles of the war,
exceeded in casualties only
by the battle of Gettysburg,
which had taken place about
10 weeks earlier.
Lytle was mortally wound-
ed on the second day of the
battle on a hillside that is now
known as “Lytle Hill.”
Lytle the poet was as well-
known and well-regarded
among Confederate soldiers
as he was to those on the
Union side.
That is why Confederate
soldiers placed a guard around
his body until Union soldiers
could remove his remains.
“It is one of the wonder-
ful stories of Chickamauga,”
Glass said. “The respect those
Confederate soldiers showed
for an opposing general was
really touching.”
Lytle’s body was returned
to Cincinnati and an early
afternoon funeral was held
at Christ Church downtown.
Thousands of Cincinnatians
lined the route from downtown
to Spring Grove Cemetery.
“He was a beloved figure
in Cincinnati,” Langdon said.
“The whole city mourned his
death.”
A man of Lytle’s stature,
Langdon said, “should have
a proper monument on the
battlefield where he died.”
Lytle will have it, if the
Sons of the Union Veterans
and the Friends organization
reach the fundraising goal.
Glass said the National Park
Service, which operates the
military parks at Chickamauga
and Chattanooga, will bid out
a contract with a foundry to
cast the solid-shot cannon-
balls, which will cost about
$200 each.
The rest of the money
raised, Glass said, will be
used to build a better walk-
way from the main road to
the Lytle Monument and put
up new signage directing park
visitors to the spot.
YOUR NEWSPAPER ... STILL THE BEST
BUY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD.
In today’s world, fifty cents doesn’t
buy a heck of a lot — except of
course, when it comes to your
newspaper.
For less than the cost of a bus
ride, you can get word from across
town or across the nation. For less
than the price of a cup of coffee,
you can get your fill of food,
fashion, politics, or whatever else
is your cup of tea. With something
new to greet you each day, from
cover to cover, your newspaper
is still the most “streetwise” buy
in town!
“This is
important to
the history of
Cincinnati. This
is a favorite son
of the city, a
brilliant leader.
His life was
significant to
the history of
Cincinnati.”
— Kerry Langdon,
commander of the
Cincinnati Sons of Union
Veterans camp that
bears Lytle’s name
4 — The Herald Thursday, December 30, 2010
POLITICS
“I respect faith, but doubt is what gives you an education.”
— Wilson Mizner, American playwright (1876-1933)
www.delphosherald.com
IT WAS NEWS THEN
One Year Ago
• Van Wert Elks Lodge 1197, Benevolent and Protective
Order of Elks adopted several families in the Van Wert area
to help make their Christmas a little brighter again this year.
Ornaments or tags were placed in the lodge Christmas Sharing
Tree which contained the items needed for the families.
25 Years Ago — 1985
• The undefeated Antwerp Archers brought Delphos
Jefferson girls’ four-game winning streak to a resounding
halt Saturday night by defeating the Wildcats 79-35. The loss
drops Jefferson’s record to 4-3. Antwerp improved to 7-0.
Sarah Wurst was the only Jefferson player to reach double
figures as she hit for six field goals and one free throw for
13 points.
• Airman Steve M. Reed, son of Thomas and Dortha L.
Reed of Columbus Grove, has graduated from the U.S. Air
Force management course at Lowry Air Force Base, Colo.
Reed is scheduled to serve with the 401st Supply Squadron
in Sprain. He is a 1985 graduate of Columbus Grove High
School.
• Field goal percentages told the story Saturday night
in the Van Wert Holiday Tournament as the Crestview
Knights defeated the Fort Jennings Musketeers 70-59. The
Musketeers placed three men in double figures, Gary Menke
led with 16, Brad Miehls chipped in 12 and Dean Von Sossan
contributed 10.
50 Years Ago — 1960
• One of the biggest events of the holidays was held in
Delphos Thursday night and was voted a big success. More
than 200 persons attended the Phi Delta Sorority-sponsored
Charity Ball, held in the Knights of Columbus club rooms. In
previous years the sorority held its dance on Christmas night
but this year decided to hold it mid-way between Christmas
and New Years, giving more persons an opportunity to attend.
Proceeds from the dance go toward the sorority’s civic
project, that of furnishing shoes and boots for youngsters
in Delphos whose parents are unable to purchase them.
This project has been carried on for many years by the
sorority with hundreds of dollars being spent for this
worthy cause. Thursday night’s affair was voted one of the
most successful dances ever staged here. Christmas decora-
tions in the club rooms added to the festive occasion and
good, danceable music was furnished by the Dean Kohler
Combo of Lima.
75 Years Ago — 1935
• A shipment of canned beef, part of the surplus com-
modities distributed for relief by the federal government, was
received for Allen County distribution here Monday and will
be given out at the city building Tuesday morning. Further
plans are being made for the opening of recreation centers in
Delphos under the WPA and it is believed that this project
will go through and will provide recreational activities for the
people of Delphos.
• Van Wert Post American Legion will sponsor a county
boxing show in connection with the fifth annual Ohio State
American Legion Amateur Boxing Tournament. The Van
Wert event will be held the night of Jan. 22 in the gymnasium
of the YMCA.
• St. John’s High made it nine straight wins Sunday after-
noon when they took Fostoria St. Wendelin’s scalps in a
game played at St. Wendelin’s High gymnasium. The final
score was 40 to 20. The final period was almost entirely
Delphos. Schmelzer, Lang and R. Brandehoff took turns in
scoring and added 13 to the local count while holding the
opposition to a lone field goal.
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
(AP) — An American aid
worker has been released from
a notoriously overcrowded
Haitian prison after a judge
apparently cleared him of alle-
gations that he kidnapped an
infant from a hospital where
he worked as a volunteer.
Paul Waggoner was
receiving medical treatment
Wednesday at an undisclosed
location following his release
from the National Penitentiary
in Port-au-Prince, Materials
Management Relief Corps,
the aid group he co-founded
after the Jan. 12 earthquake,
said in a statement on the
group’s Web site.
Earlier, his supporters had
feared he could get cholera or
some other illness in a prison
that has long been criticized
by human rights groups for its
abysmal conditions.
The group said a judge
declined to bring kidnapping
charges against Waggoner.
Haitian judicial authorities
could not be reached for com-
ment.
Waggoner’s lawyer, Gary
Lisade, told The Associated
Press on Wednesday that he
had submitted to a judge in the
case a death certificate from
the hospital where the infant
he was accused of kidnap-
ping had died. He also gave
the court an affidavit from the
American doctor who treated
the 15-month-old boy.
“We are so glad it’s finally
over,” Paul Sebring, the other
co-founder of the group, said
in a statement, describing con-
ditions at the prison as “hor-
rific.”
Waggoner, who was living
in Nantucket, Massachusetts,
before selling his construc-
tion business and moving to
Haiti following the earth-
quake, had been in custody
for 18 days while authorities
investigated the allegations of
Frantz Philistin, a Haitian man
whose infant son was treated
at a hospital in Petionville in
February.
Sebring and others said
Waggoner was helping to
move supplies at the hospital
and was not involved with
the treatment of the baby. The
doctor said in his affidavit
that Philistin declined to take
the body, saying he couldn’t
afford to bury it, Sebring said.
Later, he began making accu-
sations against Waggoner, at
one point accusing him of put-
ting the infant into a Voodoo
trance to kidnap him and sell
his organs.
Sebring said that Materials
Management Relief Corps
would continue its work in
Haiti.
“This has been a tremen-
dously difficult time for
MMRC but it is not the end of
us,” he said. We will continue
to help those that cannot help
themselves. I will not leave
(Waggoner’s) side until he has
made a full recovery from his
time in the Haitian National
Penitentiary.”
Waggoner, who grew up
in DeFuniak Springs, Florida,
suggested he will step back
from his work in Haiti — at
least for now.
“I could have continued
working in Haiti and would’ve
been happy,” he said. “It sad-
dens me that MMRC’s mis-
sion has to be put on the back
burner ... I love Haiti and fear
this incident will stop many
aid workers from coming to
help.”
By MATTHEW DALY
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — By
any measure, 2010 was a ban-
ner year on Capitol Hill for
Native Americans.
And a huge factor was the
pending retirement of a lone
senator — North Dakota’s
Byron Dorgan.
After years of trying,
Congress passed several
landmark bills for Native
Americans, including laws
overhauling tribal health care
and law enforcement and set-
tling a 15-year legal battle
over lost royalties for mis-
managed Native American
lands.
Congress continued par-
celing out $2.5 billion in
economic stimulus money to
tribes and resolved four long-
standing water disputes total-
ing more than $1 billion.
Tribal leaders and advo-
cates call the two-year ses-
sion that ended last week the
most productive for Native
Americans in four decades.
They offer several reasons,
including strong support from
the Obama administration,
which has made tribal issues
a priority.
And there was the Dorgan
factor.
Dorgan, a Democrat,
announced last January he
wouldn’t seek re-election
after almost 30 years in
Congress. Dorgan, chair-
man of the Senate Indian
Affairs Committee, said he
then “focused like a laser” on
unfinished business, includ-
ing the long-stalled bills on
health care and crime.
Dorgan also championed
the Tribal Law and Order Act,
which aims to give tribes more
authority to combat crime on
their reservations.
The measure authorizes
more federal law enforce-
ment officers and makes
federal agencies collect data
on crimes committed in
Native American Country.
It also requires the Justice
Department to maintain crim-
inal data on cases that U.S.
attorneys decline to prosecute
for various reasons, including
a lack of evidence. A recent
report found that federal offi-
cials decline to prosecute
more than 50 percent of vio-
lent crimes on reservations.
On some reservations,
fewer than a dozen offi-
cers patrol areas the size of
Connecticut.
“If you report a rape, a
cop might show up the next
day,” Dorgan said. “It’s a full-
blown scandal.”
Congress approved $3.4
billion to settle the lost royal-
ties case, which covers claims
that Native Americans were
swindled out of payments for
oil, gas, timber and grazing
rights for more than a century.
As many as 500,000 Native
Americans will receive at
least $1,500 apiece; some will
get significantly more.
Dorgan, 68, denies any
attempt to craft a legacy,
saying he merely wanted to
complete legislation he had
worked on for years.
“When children are
dying and elders are dying,
the time for talk is past,” he
said, noting that many Native
Americans still “live in third
world conditions in much of
this country.“
The health care law, for-
mally known as the Indian
Health Care Improvement
Act, was included in the larg-
er health care overhaul passed
by Congress last spring. It
clears the way for more pre-
ventive care, boosts mental
health resources and address-
es recruiting and retaining
physicians throughout Native
American Country. It also
focuses on teen suicide — an
epidemic on many reserva-
tions — and improves treat-
ment for diabetes, another
chronic problem.
Dorgan said he told Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid
he would not vote for the larg-
er health bill unless it included
Native American health care.
“That’s not a threat, just a
statement of fact,” he said.
A total of $2 billion will
be used to buy broken-up
Native American lands from
individual owners willing to
sell, with the lands turned
over to tribes. Another $60
million will go to a scholar-
ship fund for young Native
Americans.
By RICARDO ALONSO-
ZALDIVAR and
JENNIFER AGIESTA
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
first baby boomers will be
old enough to qualify for
Medicare Jan. 1, and many
fear the program’s obituary
will be written before their
own.
A new Associated Press-
GfK poll finds that baby
boomers believe by a ratio of
2-to-1 they won’t be able to
rely on the giant health insur-
ance plan throughout their
retirement.
The boomers took a run-
ning dive into adolescence
and went on to redefine work
and family, but getting old is
making them nervous.
Now, forty-three percent
say they don’t expect to be
able to depend on Medicare
forever, while only 20 percent
think their Medicare is secure.
The rest have mixed feelings.
Yet the survey also shows a
surprising willingness among
adults of all ages to sacrifice
to preserve Medicare benefits
that most Americans say they
deserve after years of paying
taxes into the system at work.
Take the contentious issue
of Medicare’s eligibility age,
fixed at 65, while the qualify-
ing age for Social Security is
rising gradually to 67.
Initially, 63 percent of
boomers in the poll dismissed
the idea of raising the eligi-
bility age to keep Medicare
afloat financially. But when
the survey forced them to
choose between raising the
age or cutting benefits, 59
percent said raise the age and
keep the benefits.
“I don’t mind the fact that
people may have to work
a little longer,” said Lynn
Barlow, 60, a real estate agent
who lives outside Atlanta.
Especially if there’s time to
plan, laboring a few extra
years allows people to save
more for retirement.
Bring up benefit cuts and
Barlow isn’t nearly as accom-
modating. “I started working
when I was 16 and I expect a
benefit after putting into it for
so many years,” she said.
As Medicare reaches a his-
toric threshold, the poll also
found differences by age,
gender and income among
baby boomers. For example,
baby boom women, who can
expect to live longer than both
their mothers and their hus-
bands, are much more pes-
simistic than men about the
program’s future.
Medicare is a middle-class
bulwark against the ravages of
illness in old age. It covers
46 million elderly and disabled
people at an annual cost of
about $500 billion. But the high
price of American-style medi-
cine, stressing intensive treat-
ment and the latest innovations,
is already straining program
finances. Add the number of
baby boomers, more than 70
million born between 1946 and
1964, and Medicare’s fiscal
foundation starts to shake.
Here’s the math: when the
last of the boomers reaches
age 65 in about two decades,
Medicare will be covering
more than 80 million people.
At the same time, the ratio of
workers paying taxes to sup-
port the program will have
plunged from 3.5 for each
person receiving benefits cur-
rently, to 2.3.
“The 800-pound gorilla is
eating like mad and grow-
ing to 1,200 pounds,” said
economist Eugene Steuerle of
the Urban Institute, warning
about the imbalance. “The
switch from worker to retiree
status has implications for
everything.”
The government can’t bal-
ance its books without deal-
ing with health care costs,
and Medicare is in the middle.
Some leading Republicans
and a few Democrats have
called for phasing out the pro-
gram and instead giving each
retiree a fixed payment — or
voucher —to help them buy
private medical insurance of
their choice. The poll found
doubts about the idea, and a
generational debate.
Overall, a narrow major-
ity (51 percent) of Americans
opposed the voucher plan. But
those born after 1980 favored
it by 47 percent to 41 per-
cent, while seniors opposed it
4-to-1. A majority of boomers
were also opposed, with 43
percent strongly objecting.
Changes that don’t involve
a full-scale re-engineering of
Medicare tended to draw more
support in the poll, especially
when the survey forced peo-
ple to choose between giving
up benefits or making some
other kind of sacrifice.
By MATTHEW LEE
Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez dared the U.S. to
expel his ambassador in retal-
iation for his move to reject
the U.S. envoy to the South
American country.
On Wednesday, that’s just
what the Obama administra-
tion did.
Chavez issued his dare a
day earlier, saying he would
not allow the U.S. diplomat,
Larry Palmer, to be ambassa-
dor because the U.S. official
made what Chavez described
as blatantly disrespectful
remarks about Venezuela.
“If the government is going
to expel our ambassador there,
let them do it,” Chavez said,
adding, “If they’re going to
cut diplomatic relations, let
them do it.”
U.S. diplomats familiar with
the situation said the decision
to revoke Bernardo Alvarez
Herrera’s visa came after
Chavez’s decision to withdraw
his approval of Palmer. The
diplomats said Alvarez is cur-
rently not in the U.S.
They spoke on condition
of anonymity because they
were not authorized to speak
publicly on the matter.
Palmer, who is awaiting
Senate confirmation, angered
Chavez by suggesting earlier
this year that morale is low in
Venezuela’s military and he is
concerned Colombian rebels are
finding refuge in Venezuela.
Chavez, whose economy
relies heavily on oil sales
to the United States, has
accused Palmer of dishonor-
ing the Venezuelan govern-
ment by expressing concerns
on several sensitive subjects
— including 2008 accusa-
tions by the U.S. Treasury
Department that three mem-
bers of Chavez’s inner circle
helped Colombian rebels by
supplying arms and aiding
drug-trafficking operations.
“For an ambassador to
come, he has to respect this
homeland,” Chavez said.
State Department spokes-
man P.J. Crowley said late
Wednesday that the U.S. has
taken “appropriate, propor-
tional and reciprocal action.”
Department officials also
addressed the diplomatic
standoff in their daily briefing
Wednesday.
“We believe it’s in our
national interest to have an
ambassador in Caracas so that
we can candidly express our
views and engage with the
government of Venezuela,”
State Department spokesman
Mark Toner said. “There are
tensions in the relationship,
and it’s precisely because
of that that we feel that it’s
important to have appropriate
diplomatic relations.”
Toner said the U.S. regrets
the Venezuelan government’s
decision to block Palmer’s
appointment, saying, “It
affects our ability to carry out
normal diplomatic relations.”
The State Department has
been strongly critical of decree
powers granted to Chavez by
his congressional allies this
month, a maneuver Crowley
described as one more way for
the leftist president to “justify
autocratic powers.”
“Now the U.S. government
is threatening us that they’re
going to take reprisals. Well,
let them do whatever they
want, but that man will not
come,” Chavez said Tuesday.
Moderately confused
Retiring senator spurs action
for Native American rights
Baby boomers fear outliving Medicare
Ambassadors in diplomatic spat evicted
Charges against
US aid worker
cleared by judge
1
Thursday, December 30, 2010 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
Happy Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Delphos Post Offce
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
FRIDAY
NEW’S YEAR EVE!
SATURDAY
HAPPY NEW YEAR!
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Annex
Museum, 241 N. Main St.,
will be open.
MONDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
7 p.m. — Delphos Parks
and Recreation board meets
at the recreation building at
Stadium Park.
Washington Township
trustees meet at the township
house.
7:30 p.m. — Spencerville
village council meets at the
mayor’s office.
Delphos Eagles Auxiliary
meets at the Eagles Lodge,
1600 Fifth St.
Delphos Civil Service
Commission meets at
Municipal Building.
8 p.m. — The Veterans
of Foreign Wars meet at the
hall.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
6 p.m. — Weight Watchers
meets at Trinity United
Methodist Church, 211 E.
Third St.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Lions Club, Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
7 p.m. — Delphos Coon
and Sportsman’s Club meets.
7:30 p.m. — Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Presbyterian
Church, 310 W. Second St.

WEDNESDAY
9 a.m. - noon — Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St., Kalida.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
11:45 a.m. — Rotary Club
meets at the Delphos Eagles
Lodge, 1600 E. Fifth St.
6 p.m. — Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. John’s Chapel.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Kiwanis Club meets at the
Eagles Lodge, 1600 E. Fifth
St.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
7:30 p.m. — Hope Lodge
214 Free and Accepted
Masons, Masonic Temple,
North Main Street.
9 p.m. — Fort Jennings
Lions Club meets at the
Outpost Restaurant.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Annex
Museum, 241 N. Main St.,
will be open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Ladies Club, Trinity United
Methodist Church.
7 p.m. — Delphos
Emergency Medical Service
meeting, EMS building,
Second Street.
7:30 p.m. — Delphos
Chapter 23, Order of Eastern
Star, meets at the Masonic
Temple, North Main Street.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club meets at the
A&W Drive-In, 924 E. Fifth
St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
Please notify the Delphos
Herald at 419-695-0015 if
there are any corrections
or additions to the Coming
Events column.
DEC. 31
Jim Schroeder
Nicole Williams
Jordan Heitmeyer
Brendon Stoner
Kitchen
Press
Kitchen
Press
Here are some
recipes to take
along to your New
Year’s Eve party!
Sweet-and-Sour
Meatballs
1 20-ounce can pine-
apple chunks
½ cup packed brown
sugar
3 tablespoons corn-
starch
1/3 cup cold water
3 tablespoons cider vin-
egar
1 tablespoon soy sauce
30 frozen fully cooked
meatballs (1/2 ounce
each), thawed
1 large green pepper,
cut into 1-inch pieces
Hot cooked rice,
optional
Drain pineapple, reserv-
ing juice. Set pineapple
aside. Add water to juice
if needed to measure 1
cup. Pour into a large skil-
let. In a bowl, combine the
brown sugar, cornstarch,
cold water, vinegar, and
soy sauce until smooth.
Stir into skillet. Bring
to a boil over medium
heat Cook and stir until
thickened. Add pineapple,
meatballs and green pep-
per. Simmer, uncovered,
for 20 minutes or until
heated through. Serve with
rice, if desired.

Reuben Dip
16 ounces sauer-
kraut, drained, rinsed and
chopped
1 3-ounce package
corned beef, shredded
2 cups swiss cheese,
shredded
1 8-ounce package
cream cheese, cubed
Horseradish, to taste
3 tablespoons Thousand
Island dressing
Put in slow cooker for 2
hours or until warm. Serve
with rye crackers.
To comment on these recipes,
add changes or share one, e-mail
kitchenpress@yahoo.com
IN THE SERVICE
THRIFT SHOP WORKERS
SENIOR LUNCHEON CAFE
Winter energy bill assistance
COLUMBUS — As
another winter approach-
es, the Office of the Ohio
Consumers’ Counsel (OCC)
reminds consumers having
difficulty paying their energy
bills that several options are
available to help stay con-
nected.
Continuing through
April 15, the Public Utilities
Commission of Ohio (PUCO)
has instructed the state’s
investor-owned electric and
natural gas utilities to recon-
nect or maintain services
for residential customers
either disconnected or threat-
ened with disconnection.
According to the “Winter
Reconnection Order,” cus-
tomers can have their service
restored by paying the amount
owed or $175, whichever is
less, plus a $36 reconnection
fee. This option is available
on a one-time basis.
For income-eligible
households (detailed below),
funds provided through
the Emergency Home
Energy Assistance Program
(E-HEAP) or other energy
assistance programs may be
used to pay the $175 charge.
Customers must enter a pay-
ment plan for any remaining
balance and apply for other
available public benefits.
“The OCC is pleased the
PUCO has again implement-
ed special winter reconnec-
tion procedures but remains
concerned about the num-
ber of residential customers
struggling to keep their utili-
ties connected,” Consumers’
Counsel Janine L. Migden-
Ostrander said. “We urge
consumers who are behind
on their utility bills to seek
help from the OCC or their
local utility before being
faced with a service disrup-
tion and expensive reconnec-
tion fees.”
In addition to the winter
reconnection provision, the
following federally and state-
funded programs are avail-
able:
Percentage of Income
Payment Plan (PIPP Plus)
PIPP is an extended
payment arrangement that
requires regulated gas and
electric companies to accept
payments based on a per-
centage of the household
income. As a part of the
Universal Service Fund pro-
gram enabled by Substitute
Senate Bill 3, the Office of
Community Services will
administer the PIPP for elec-
tricity customers.
Under PIPP, if heat-
ing with gas, customers pay
10 percent of the monthly
household income to the gas
company and five percent
to the electric company. (If
monthly household income
is at or below 50 percent
of the Federal Poverty level,
most PIPP customers will
pay three percent instead of
five percent for the second-
ary source of heat. If the util-
ity company provides both
gas and electric, or if heating
with electricity only, custom-
ers pay 15 percent of the
monthly household income.
The community action agen-
cy or utility company will
inform customers of their
PIPP amount.
The Office of Community
Services (OCS), Ohio
Department of Development
is responsible for the reverify-
ing incomes of the Percentage
of Income Payment Program
(PIPP) clients for regulated
utilities. All PIPP customers
must reverify their incomes
annually with the exception
of Zero-PIPP customers who
must reverify their income
every 90 days. By complet-
ing the Energy Assistance
Application, customers can
reverify their PIPP income,
as well as apply for a Home
Energy Assistance Program
(HEAP) benefit. PIPP cus-
tomers can also visit their
local Community Action
Agency (CAA) to reverify
their income.
PIPP Eligibility
Requirements:
To be eligible for the PIPP
program, a customer must
receive his or her primary or
secondary heat source from
a company regulated by the
Public Utilities Commission
of Ohio (PUCO), must have
a total household income
which is at or below 150
percent of the federal poverty
level and must apply for all
energy assistance programs
for which he or she is eli-
gible.
How to apply for the
PIPP
When applying for an
Emergency HEAP benefit,
customers must also enroll
in PIPP or another payment
plan. The Combined Energy
Assistance Application must
be completed at the local
agency. The agency staff will
forward the necessary infor-
mation for PIPP enrollment
for your main heating source
and electric service, as appro-
priate.

Home Energy Assistance
Program (HEAP)
HEAP, administered
by the Ohio Department of
Development (ODOD), is
designed to help income-eli-
gible consumers at or below
200 percent of the federal pov-
erty guidelines pay for their
heating costs. Consumers can
use this program one time per
heating season. The benefit
amounts may vary depending
on individual circumstances
and the amount of federal
funding available.
Budget Billing
Budget billing allows con-
sumers to spread energy costs
over a 12-month period to
have more uniform monthly
payments. Consumers should
contact their utility company
to learn more about the pro-
gram.
Payment Plans
When facing disconnec-
tion, consumers may propose
to their utility company a
payment arrangement that
works best for them. Utilities
are required to provide one of
the following payment plans:
“One-ninth” payment plan
- Customers make nine equal
payments on their outstand-
ing balance along with a bud-
get payment amount. The
budget amount spreads elec-
tric or natural gas payments
uniformly over 12 months;
“One-sixth” payment plan
- Customers pay one-sixth
of the total past due amount
in six equal payments along
with current charges; or
“One-third” payment plan
- Customers pay one-third of
the total bill (current monthly
charges plus past due charg-
es) each month. Utilities are
required to offer this plan
during the winter heating sea-
son (Nov. 1 – April 15).
For additional information
about all available assistance
options, customers can visit
the OCC’s web site, www.
pickocc.org, or call toll free
at 1-877-742-5622. For addi-
tional information about the
HEAP and electric PIPP Plus
programs, customers can
contact the ODOD toll free,
1-800-282-0880.
WEEK OF JAN. 2-7
MONDAY: Swedish meatballs with gravy, broccoli, pear,
cucumber and onion salad, noodles, white or whole wheat
bread, margarine, coffee and 2% milk.
TUESDAY: Chicken patty on wheat bun, scalloped pota-
toes, crackers, Capri-blend vegetables, orange juice, coffee and
2% milk.
WEDNESDAY: Baked ham steak, au gratin potatoes, peas,
apricot halves, white or whole wheat roll, margarine, angel
food cake, coffee and 2% milk.
THURSDAY: Chili with beans and crackers, cottage
cheese, baked potato, pineapple chunks, corn bread muffin,
margarine, coffee and 2% milk.
FRIDAY: Parmesan chicken breast with sauce, spaghetti
noodles, Italian veggies, tossed salad with dressing, warm
peach crisp, bread stick, coffee and 2% milk.
DEC. 30-Jan. 1
THURSDAY: Delores German, Norma Zalar, Janet
Kroeger, Mary Lou Gerdeman, Christine Siebeneck and Mary
Lou Miller.
FRIDAY: Closed.
SATURDAY: Closed.
REGULAR THRIFT SHOP HOURS: 5-7 p.m. Thursday;
1-4 p.m. Friday; and 9 a.m.- noon Saturday.
Anyone who would like to volunteer should contact
Catharine Gerdemann, 419-695-8440; Alice Heidenescher,
419-692-5362; Linda Bockey 419-692-7145; or Lorene
Jettinghoff, 419-692-7331.
If help is needed, contact the Thrift Shop at 419-692-2942
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. and leave a message.
COLUMN
Announce you or your family member’s
birthday in our Happy Birthday column.
Complete the coupon below and return it to
The Delphos Herald newsroom,
405 North Main St., Delphos, OH 45833.
Please use the coupon also to make changes,
additions or to delete a name from the column.
THE DELPHOS HERALD
HAPPY BIRTHDAY COLUMN
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Address

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Check one:
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Swint passes
basic training
Army Pvt. Jeremy S.
Swint has graduated from
basic infantry training at
Fort Benning, Columbus,
Ga.
During the nine weeks
of training, the soldier
received training in drill
and ceremonies, weap-
ons, map reading, tactics,
military courtesy, military
justice, physical fitness,
first aid, and Army his-
tory, core values and tra-
ditions. Additional train-
ing included development
of basic combat skills and
battlefield operations and
tactics, and experiencing
use of various weapons and
weapons defenses available
to the infantry crewman.
He is the son of Terry and
stepson of Mary Swint of W.
Lincoln Highway, Elida, and
a 2005 Elida High School
graduate.
CL of C meet at
7 p.m. Tuesday
The next meeting of the
Delphos Council Catholic
Ladies of Columbia will begin
at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday.
Meetings are held at the K
of C hall.

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STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business December 29, 2010
6 – The Herald Thursday, December 30, 2010
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
Senior Ryan Musser controls his opponent
Wednesday during the Marion Harding Invitational.
He earned the 99th win of his high school grappling
career and goes for his 100th today.
St. John’s senior Jordan Leininger gets inside Van
Wert’s Reggie Phillips for a deuce during Wednesday
night’s second half of action at Arnzen Gymnasium. The
Blue Jays could not overcome an early 13-point deficit in
falling to the archrival Cougars by 11.
By Kirk Dougal
Times Bulletin Editor
kdougal@timesbulletin.com
ROCKFORD — A night
after Lincolnview tied down a
victory in overtime, the Lady
Lancers proved it was no
fluke, beating Riverside 53-47
to win the Chatt Insurance
Holiday Tournament at
Parkway High School. Abbi
Alvarez was named tourna-
ment MVP after averaging
15.5 points per game over the
two days while Katie Dye was
named to the All-Tournament
Team.
According to Lincolnview
coach Dan Williamson, the
great play did not stop with
Alvarez and Dye. Especially
since the Lancers were playing
short-handed with post player
Audrey Bowen unable to play
with a banged-up ankle. That
left the bulk of the paint work
to Carley Springer.
“Carley in the whole tour-
nament did a really nice job,”
he said. “I’m not sure how
many points she had tonight
but last night she had 11 and
did a nice job rebounding,
tonight another excellent job.
It seems like every night we
have somebody different step
up for us. Abbi obviously is
being that constant scoring
leader that we’ve got to have
but everybody else - whether
it’s scoring or rebounding or
playing defense - it is some-
body different every night.
Their point guard gave us
trouble all night - she is very
quick - and we told Kaylee
(Thatcher) to shut her down
the best you can and she did.”
Katie Dye led all scor-
ers with 17 points but it was
her passing that Williamson
wanted to talk about.
“The great thing about
Katie is she’s so unselfish.
I didn’t even know she had
17 points because it was a
quiet 17,” he continued. “She
almost looks to pass before
she takes her shot and we
have got to have that. She did
a good job of handling the
pressure.”
After trading baskets
at the start of the game,
Riverside went on a 4-0 run
that put them up 13-10 and
forced Williamson to call a
timeout with 2:48 left in the
first. Although Lincolnview
trailed, they had forced the
Pirates into nine turnovers.
It was Alvarez and Dye who
paced the Lancer offense
early, scoring six and four
points respectively. At the
end of one, Riverside led
15-12.
Lincolnview came out fir-
ing on all cylinders in the sec-
ond period, scoring the first
six points to take an 18-15
advantage. Eight lead changes
would characterize how close
the rest of the quarter would
be but with less than a min-
ute left, Riverside’s Whitney
Jenkins drove the lane for two
points to put the Pirates on
top, 25-24. Not to be outdone,
Alvarez drove the left side of
the paint to hit a bucket with
only three seconds left to take
the Lancers into halftime in
front 26-25.
Lincolnview found ways
to score in all facets of the
game as was evidenced by
the first three trips in the
third quarter. Kaitlin Brant
scored off the block on a spin
move, Springer got two on
a put back and Dye found a
flying Thatcher on the right
side on a 3-on-1 break for
two more points. The Lancers
led by as many as five during
the quarter but after Dye hit
Thatcher again, this time on a
back door cut on the baseline,
Lincolnview led 38-34 at the
end of three periods.
Dye opened up the fourth
quarter with a jumper on the
wing and a shot beyond the
arc for a nine-point lead at
43-34. Riverside immediately
closed the gap on another
Jenkins drive and a Brittany
Shough trey. Dye stopped
the bleeding with her sixth
and seventh points of the
quarter on a little stop-and-
pop from 12 feet. The first
seven Lancer points had all
been Dye and she would not
score again but the rest of
the team came running in to
help. Thatcher hit a jumper
in the lane and then Morgan
Peel took a bullet pass from
Dye off the break for two
points to put the Lancers up
49-47. But it was Alvarez
who answered the call again.
On Tuesday she had gone
five of six from the free throw
line in the fourth quarter and
overtime to seal the Lancer
win. She would do the same
on Wednesday, making four
of five in the final minutes of
the game to keep the lead for
Lincolnview.
“I think we were a little bit
rusty last night but Abbi came
out and shot the ball very well
and I think that gave every-
one else more confidence to
shoot, too,” said Williamson.
“We’ll take the win.”
Riverside was led by
Erica Snapp with 14 points
and Sarah Schindewolf with
12. The Pirates were 17-of-
51 (33.3%) from the field
but only 3-of-18 from beyond
the arc, a dismal 17 percent.
They were 10-of-19 from the
free-throw line for 53 per-
cent.
Lincolnview stayed con-
sistent throughout the game,
making 22-of-40 field-goal
attempts, a solid 55 percent,
including 1-of-2 from 3-point
land. Although only 8-of-20
(40%) from the charity stripe,
they hit them when it count-
ed, downing 8-of-11 in the
second half with the game on
the line.
Lincolnview goes to 3-5
on the year while Riverside
falls to 2-7.
Riverside barely won
the battle of the boards
27-26 and turnovers 22-24.
Lincolnview’s Springer led
everyone with 11 rebounds.
The All-Tournament team
was named as follows: Haley
Burtch (Parkway), Katie Dye
(Lincolnview), Erica Snapp
(Riverside), Taylor Bradley
(River Valley) and Abby
Guinther (River Valley).
Abbi Alvarez of Lincolnview
was named the tournament
MVP.
River Valley dominated
undermanned Parkway in
the consolation game 82-32.
Finals
RIVERSIDE (47)
Schindewolf 2-8-12, Snapp 5-2-14,
Covault 0-0-0, Shough 1-0-3, Jenkins
4-0-8, Thompson 3-0-6, Longbrake
2-0-4. Totals 17-10-47.
LINCOLNVIEW (53)
Abbi Alvarez 6-4-16, Kylee
Thatcher 3-1-7, Katie Dye 7-2-17,
Carley Springer 1-0-2, Morgan Peel
3-0-6, Kaitlyn Brant 2-1-5. Totals 22-8-
53.
Score by Quarters:
Riverside 15 10 9 13 - 47
Lincolnview 12 14 12 15 - 53
Three-point goals: Riverside 3
(Snapp 2, Shough); Lincolnview 1
(Dye).
Consolation
PARKWAY (32)
Long 1-0-2, Stutz 0-0-0, Burtch
6-2-15, Fisher 3-0-9, Jutte 0-0-0,
Samaniego 0-0-0, Schumm 0-0-0,
DeLeon 0-0-0, Fent 1-0-2, Hellwarth
2-0-4. Totals 13-2-32.
RIVER VALLEY (82)
Kelley 0-0-0, Hall 2-0-6, Salyer
5-1-11, Bradley 3-4-10, Rengert 2-0-
4, A. Guinther 8-1-18, Fittro 3-0-6, C.
Guinther 4-0-8, Klingel 9-1-19. Totals
36-7-82.
Score by Quarters:
Parkway 11 12 7 2 – 32
River Valley 16 23 29 14 – 82
Three-point goals: Parkway 4
(Fisher 3, Burtch); River Valley 3 (Hall
2, A. Guinther).
Amy Musser photo
Tom Morris photo
Lady Lancers win Chatt
Insurance Holiday Tournament
VARSITY
VAN WERT (61)
Corey Clifton 6-9-23, Kirby Doidge
0-0-0, Joey Hurless 0-0-0, Jacob
Hood 1-1-4, Jacob Myers 9-6-28,
Reggie Phillips 0-0-0, Austin Fleming
3-0-6, Jack Moonshower 0-0-0, Joe
Moonshower 0-0-0. Totals 19-16-61.
ST. JOHN’S (50)
Alex Recker 3-1-10, Derek Klaus
1-2-4, Scott Klausing 0-2-2, Ryan
Densel 0-0-0, Alex Clark 0-0-0, Curtis
Geise 5-0-13, Ty Bergfeld 2-2-6, AJ
Klausing 1-0-3, Jordan Leininger 3-2-8,
Austin Vogt 1-2-4. Totals 16-11-50.
Score by Quarters:
Van Wert 15 13 16 17 - 61
St. John’s 7 12 18 13 - 50
Three-point goals: Van Wert, Myers
4, Clifton 2, Hood; St. John’s, Geise 3,
Recker 3, AJ Klausing.
-----
JUNIOR VARSITY
VAN WERT (43)
Matt Bidlack 0-0-0, Caleb Markward
0-2-2, AJ Smith 5-2-15, Jared Fleming
2-1-7, Logan Ray 3-0-6, Hunter Munroe
0-0-0, Steve Barnhart 0-0-0, Kyle
Kieber 0-0-0, Tyler Coil 2-0-6, Austin
Reichert 2-3-7. Totals 14-8/11-43.
ST. JOHN’S (48)
Troy Warnecke 2-2-7, Ryan
Buescher 3-0-7, Ben Warnecke 1-0-2,
Cole Fischbach 0-0-0, Andrew Metzger
3-1-8, Seth Bockey 5-7-17, Josh Rode
0-0-0, Ryan Densel 2-3-7, Tanner
Calvelage 0-0-0. Totals 16-13/17-48.
Score by Quarters:
Van Wert 12 7 5 19 - 43
St. John’s 16 10 11 11 - 48
Three-point goals: Van Wert, Smith
3, Fleming 2, Coil 2; St. John’s, T.
Warnecke, Buescher, Metzger.
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Van
Wert’s boys basketball team
came out like a house a-fire
Wednesday night at Robert
A. Arnzen Gymnasium, scor-
ing the first 10 points and
building a 13-point lead in the
first period.
The Cougar defense made
it stand up, repelling every
St. John’s challenge to grab
a 61-50 non-conference tri-
umph in the annual battle of
long-time archrivals.
“Any time you are play-
ing your first back-to-back
games, you aren’t sure of what
you’ll get. It looked like we
weren’t quite ready or didn’t
have the energy needed from
the start,” Jays coach Aaron
Elwer explained. “Van Wert
took advantage of that with
their early run and we could
never quite get back. The big-
gest concern we had with Van
Wert was their transition game
because they can really push
the tempo. They beat us in tran-
sition a couple of times early.
(Corey) Clifton and (Jacob)
Myers were the guys we really
had to defend; Clifton in par-
ticular does so much for them,
especially offensively. He’s a
terrific player.”
As they would be all game
long, the Cougar duo of the
junior Myers (28 markers on
4 treys) and the senior Clifton
(23 counters, 14 boards, 6
assists, 5 steals) were the big-
gest thorns in the Blue Jay
(1-3) side. Myers netted eight
of his markers in the first
period in helping the Cougars
(7-0) build that 15-2 lead on
a basket by senior Austin
Fleming (6 points) with 2:40
showing. The Jays had a 5-0
mini-run: a 3-ball by sopho-
more Curtis Geise (13 coun-
ters with 3 treys, 4 boards) at
2:11 and two singles by senior
Austin Vogt with 25.7 ticks
left; to get them within 15-7.
“You always want to get
off to a good start, especial-
ly when you’re at a difficult
place to play. The concern
I have is that we seemed to
settle after that, especially
shooting the 3s,” Van Wert
mentor Dave Froelich noted.
“St. John’s is such a good
defensive team, you really
have to work hard to get your
shooters free. You have to
work to your strengths, which
aren’t necessarily physical
ones but quickness and break-
ing defenders down.”
The Cougars appeared
ready to run away with the
contest in the second, scoot-
ing to a 25-11 spread on a
basket by Clifton with five
minutes showing. Back came
the Jays with an 8-3 closing
span, capped by a free throw
from junior Scott Klausing
with 1:38 left, for a 28-19
halftime margin.
The Jays kept on battling,
trying to lessen the gap in
the third period. They twice
got within five, the last at
35-30 on a basket by senior
Jordan Leininger (8 markers)
with 5:10 showing. However,
every time they seemed ready
to come even closer, either
Clifton or Myers — split-
ting 16 markers between them
in the period — came up
with the big shot. A 3-ball by
Clifton built the lead back to
44-32 before Leininger scored
inside and senior Alex Recker
(10 markers on 3 triples)
swished a 24-footer from left
of the key to beat the horn and
make a 44-37 scoreboard.
Two times in the fourth
period, the Blue and Gold
were within two points, the
final time at 3:14 remaining
on a pair of singles by senior
Tyler Bergfeld (6 counters,
3 assists) to make it 49-47.
However, the Jays needed
to be perfect and weren’t,
missing six straight shots
(5 triples), and were forced
to foul. From the 3-minute
mark, Clifton led a 10-of-12
team shooting performance
at the line (16-of-22 for the
night for 72.7% versus 11-of-
19 for the hosts for 57.9%) by
hitting 7-of-8 himself as the
Cougars remained unbeaten.
“We showed a lot more
energy the second quar-
ter and the second half. We
just couldn’t quite get over
the hump after digging that
deep of a hole,” Elwer added.
“Van Wert is very quick and
it seemed that they beat us to
every loose ball; every time
the rebound hit the floor or
there was a ball up for grabs,
they seemed a step quicker.
Those are the hustle plays we
need to make to win.”
Van Wert drained 19-of-
40 from the floor (7-of-15
downtown) for 47.5 percent.
They outrebounded the Jays
31-21 (9-6 offensive) and
totaled 13 turnovers (11 for
the hosts) and 20 fouls (20
for the Jays). Van Wert visits
Elida Jan. 7.
“Corey and Jacob scoring
all those points aren’t usually
part of the game plan; it just
turned out that way in the
flow of the game,” Froelich
added. “For me, though,
Jacob Hood, usually a con-
sistent third scorer, made key
plays that helped us. He did
a nice job of making Geise
work for everything and he
made the hustle plays.”
St. John’s dropped in
16-of-41 shots (7-of-20
3-balls) for 39.0 percent.
They entertain another long-
time rival, Celina, Tuesday
with a 6 p.m. (junior varsity)
start time.
In the JV battle, Jays
moved to 4-0 by hitting 5-of-
6 free throws in the final 41.4
seconds to grab a 48-43 win.
Sophomore Seth Bockey
drained 17 to pace the hosts.
Sophomore AJ Smith coun-
tered with 15 for the Cougars
(4-3).
Cougars’ quick start
leads to win over Jays
By FRANK GERMAN
The Delphos Herald
fjohngerman@gmail.com
ELIDA — Fans of
the Vicki Mauk Holiday
Tournament were expecting a
battle between girls basketball
powers Minster and Liberty-
Benton in Wednesday night’s
finals. They weren’t disap-
pointed.
The Wildcats used their
prowess in the paint, outscor-
ing the Lady Eagles 28-14
in the lane, to down Liberty-
Benton 43-39.
Tara Clune, a 6-2 junior,
controlled the paint for 12
markers and nine boards for
the Wildcats (7-0), getting aid
from Kayla Wuebker’s nine
counters and eight from Erica
Fullenkamp. The Wildcats
built a 24-13 halftime lead and
made it stand up.
They counted 16-of-34
shots (1-of-5 downtown) for
47.1 percent and 10-of-17 free
throws (58.8%). They out-
rebounded the Lady Eagles
(6-2) 23-21 (3-6 offensive);
got 14 points from the bench
players to none for the Eagles;
had 11 turnovers (12 for the
foe); had five assists and five
steals (5 and 8, respectively,
for L-B); had four blocks (1
for L-B); and totaled 14 fouls
to 11 for the opponent.
Caitie Craft topped the
Eagles with 20 points and
seven boards and Rachel
Myers added nine counters.
They connected on 12-of-38
shots (3-of-8 long range) for
31.6 percent and 12-of-16 sin-
gles (75%).
In the consolation tossup,
Miller City downed host Elida
64-48.
The Lady Wildcats came
out right away with a 3-point-
er from Jessica Nienberg at
6:48, the first of her 17 points.
Elida struck back when Julie
Stirn (12 points) hit two foul
shots at the 6:05 mark. Elida
took its only lead of the night
when Lindsay Peters (8 coun-
ters, 6 boards, 4 assists, 3
steals) made a steal that led
to a layup with 5:48 left in
the first. Miller City took the
lead for the rest of the night at
5:21 left on a 3-point play the
old way by J. Michel. Miller
City’s Schroeder scored six
points in 21 seconds: a tradi-
tional 3-pointer and a 3-pointer
from the right wing at 4:22,
making it 12-4. The Wildcats
scored four more uncontested
points before Elida got back
on the board on a Stirn layup.
Kaylin Duffy pulled Elida
within seven on a 3-pointer
from the left wing for a 16-9
Miller City edge. The Wildcats
were not done and added more
points with a 3-pointer from
Schroeder and Drummelsmith
came off the bench to get the
first of her 11 points with a
putback to end the scoring in
the first quarter at the 1:42
mark and a 21-9 Wildcat lead.
“I thought our inside game
was better tonight, which
opened it up for our outside
game,” Miller City coach Chris
Rump opined.
Miller City started the sec-
ond quarter where they left off.
M. Michel hit an 8-footer 33
seconds in. Peters got a layup
in traffic but Nienberg hit a
3-pointer. Elida’s Kelsey Smith
(12 points, 3 steals) tried to
spark the ’Dawgs with a half-
court steal and layup at half
court and Duffy’s 3-ball from
the corner got them within 10
points, 26-16, with 4:54 in
the second. Miller City’s Leis
answered with a pair of layups
in less than a minute. Miller
City kept widening the gap until
they had a 20-point lead with 22
seconds left in the half — 40-20
— but Stirn hit a shot inside
with just three ticks left for a
40-22 Miller City lead.
“It was not our night. I
think we let their defense get
to us mentally,” Elida coach
Deb Stetler commented. “We
talked after the game about our
mental break down and how
we have to handle the pressure.
I don’t think we did a good job
of that tonight but I told the
girls it will come and we will
be a hard practice tomorrow.”
The third quarter was the
only period that Elida out-
scored Miller City — by three
points. Elida got the first and
last points of the quarter. Stirn
started it off by hitting both
of her foul shots at 6:43 left,
Smith hit a hoop-and-the-harm
at 4:16 point and Stirn a layup
at 4:08 mark to make the score
43-29, Wildcats. Both teams
went back in forth keeping
about the same point spread.
Elida senior Amber Saddler
(8 boards) capped off the third
quarter with the final bucket
from under the basket to make
it a 15-point game — 52-37 —
on behalf of the Wildcats.
The Wildcats scored first
in the fourth quarter with Leis
hitting a short jumper just
37 seconds in. Elida needed
to change things up and did
with a press. This gave them
a spark and they scored the
next six points to pulling to
within 11 points, 54-43. Miller
City regained its composure,
scoring the next nine points in
giving them a 19-point lead —
62-43 — with a minute left.
“Jessica had the flu bug
yesterday and every shot she
took then was off of the rim.
Tonight she was more relaxed
and was in a rhythm, looking
better, and was the key of the
game. Leis and Drummelsmith
did a yeoman’s job on the
inside tonight,” Rump added.
Miller City canned 24-of-
55 (7-of-16 triples) for 43.6
percent and 9-of-19 at the line
(47.4%). They dominated the
glass 39-26 (16-9 offensive) as
Drummelsmith nabbed eight
and Leis and Gerschutz six
each. Leis added 15 markers.
They had 11 assists (8 for
the home team) as M. Michel
had five. They forced 22 turn-
overs (15 of their own) and
grabbed six steals (10 for the
Lady ’Dawgs) as Nienberg
and Schroeder had two each.
Miller City blocked six shots
(Drummelsmith 5) and had
13 fouls (16 for Bulldogs).
Wildcats outscored Elida 28-16
in the paint and 16-2 off the
bench. Miller City improves to
5-5 and host Jefferson Jan. 4.
Elida notched 19-of-53
shots (3-of-6 treys) for 35.8
percent and 7-of-9 free throws
(77.8%).
Consolation
MILLER CITY (64)
Nienberg 6-0-17, Leis 7-1-15,
Drummelsmith 5-1-11, Schroeder 3-1-
9, M. Michel 2-0-4, J. Michel 1-1-3, S.
Michel 0-3-3, Gerschutz 0-2-2. Totals
24-9-64.
ELIDA (48)
Julie Stirn 5-2-12, Kelsey Smith
4-3-12, Lindsay Peters 3-2-8, Amber
Saddler 4-0-8, Kaylin Duffy 2-0-6,
Kerstein Shurelds 1-0-2, Osha Owens
0-0-0, Torie McAdams 0-0-0, Carly
Stetler 0-0-0, Bo Kim 0-0-0. Totals
19-7-48.
Score by Quarters:
Miller City 21 19 12 12 - 64
Elida 9 13 15 11 - 48
Three-point goals: Miller City,
Nienberg 5, Schroeder 2; Elida, Duffy
2, Smith.
Finals
MINSTER (43)
Tara Clune 5-2-12, Kayla Wuebker
3-3-9, Erica Fullenkamp 3-1-8, Maria
Dahlinghaus 1-2-4, Delanie Wolf 2-0-
4, Heather Schmiesing 2-0-4, Kayla
Albers 0-2-2, Samantha Hoelscher
0-0-0. Totals 16-10-43.
LIBERTY-BENTON (39)
Caitie Craft 5-9-20, Rachel Myers
3-1-9, Ashley Snider 3-0-6, Marisa
Burkett 1-0-2, Samantha Rhodes 0-2-
2. Totals 12-12-39.
Score by Quarters:
Minster 10 14 10 9 - 43
Lib.-Bent. 8 5 16 10 - 39
Three-point goals: Minster,
Fullenkamp; Liberty-Benton, Myers 2,
Craft.
Minster captures Mauk Holiday Tournament
Thomas M. Art
Clay E. Carnes
General Managers
Elida Auto Service
612 E. Kiracofe Avenue, Elida, Ohio 45807
(419) 331-2301
24 Hour Towing Service
Stop in and see us for all your automotive repairs.
Formerly Elida 76
• In 2006 there were 17,941 driving fatalities related to alcohol. This
was 41 percent of the total 43,000 fatalities.
• Half of all holiday driving fatalities are alcohol-related.
• Most people with DUIs are not alcoholics.
• About 80 percent of alcohol-related fatalities are caused by beer con-
sumption.
• About 30 percent of Americans are involved in an alcohol-related
crash sometime during their lifetime
• In 2004, 30 percent of all fatal crashes during the week were alcohol-
related, compared to 51 percent on weekends. For all crashes, the alcohol
involvement rate was 5 percent during the week and 12 percent during the
weekend. alcohol-related crashes tend to be much more serious.
• 18-20 year olds are responsible for more than 10 percent of the drunk-
en driving trips in America.
• In addition to possible jail time and fines, a DUI conviction is cause to
have your insurance policy revoked and rates to sky rocket. Many people
will be forced to get SR-22 insurance.
• In 2003 about 1 in 135 drivers were arrested for DUI. Thats’ about 1.4
million people.
• One judge in Texas ordered a drunk driver who killed another person
to stand on the side of a busy street holding a sign stating that he killed
somebody while driving drunk.
• Australians call drunk driving “drink driving”.
• Ways to Avoid Driving Drunk
With lack of adequate public transportation in many cities, it is some-
times difficult to get home late at night. Here are some suggestions:
• Get a designated driver
• Drink at locations within walking distance of your home
• Call a cab
• Search for services that will take both you and your car home if you
are drunk
• Look for public transportation in larger cities
• Ask the bartender for help and let him know if you are the designated
driver
• Offer to pay for a cab or drive friends home if they are drunk
Drink nonalcoholic beverages
A DUI arrest and resulting acci-
dent can leave you on the hook for
far more than vehicle repair costs.
(MS) - Anyone who has ever
been behind the wheel of a motor
vehicle knows of the potential dan-
gers that come with operating an
automobile. Such dangers are only
heightened when motorists make
the decision to drive while under
the influence of alcohol.
Though some might feel a DUI
is no different than your run-of-
the-mill traffic citation, nothing
could be further from the truth. In
fact, many unforeseen problems
can arise as a result of driving
drunk.
Insurance concerns
Insurance companies routinely
check driving records when new
applicants are applying for insur-
ance. However, companies also
might check driving records of
current policy holders. Sometimes,
a DUI arrest can slip through the
cracks. However, more often than
not, drivers can expect one of
two things to result from a DUI
arrest when it comes to insurance:
higher premiums or being dropped
entirely.
Some states prohibit companies
from dropping drivers because of
a DUI arrest, though most states
don’t. Even if your insurance com-
pany does decide to keep you
on, expect your premiums to go
through the roof. The state of
California, for instance, in the past
has reported that alcohol-related
crashes accounted for 20 percent
of the state’s auto insurance pay-
ments. Such figures make it easy
to understand why insurance com-
panies typically come down so
hard on DUI offenders.
Civil suits
Should you get into an auto-
mobile accident with a blood alco-
hol content (BAC) lower than the
relatively standard .08 most states
use as a line of demarcation for
sobriety, that may only clear you
from criminal charges. If you’re
involved in an accident where oth-
ers are hurt or property is damaged
and your BAC was .05 or .06, it’s
not outlandish to expect a civil
jury to find you liable. The term
“legally intoxicated” only refers to
criminal liability, not civil liabil-
ity.
Employment concerns
Should your DUI arrest result in
a criminal conviction, by no means
is a judge mandated to reinstate
your license for work or school
privileges. This could very well
cost you your job. Though most
first-time offenders will receive
work or school privileges, it’s not
set in stone. In addition, even if you
are granted privileges, the increase
in your insurance premiums might
be far more than you can afford,
which can create a sticky situation
if you have no access to public
transportation that can get you to
and from work.
Financial considerations
In addition to increased insur-
ance rates, expect an immediate
and very negative impact on your
finances within days of being
arrested for DUI. The aforemen-
tioned California, for instance, has
proven somewhat of a trailblazer
with respect to penalizing DUI
offenders. The repercussions are
often harsh, making it necessary
for anyone hoping to avoid the
full brunt of those penalties to
obtain a competent DUI attorney.
Attorney’s fees in those instance
are often several thousand dol-
lars. In addition to attorney’s fees,
court costs, car impound fees and
towing costs can pile up. There’s
also a strong chance you’ll need to
take time off from work, be it for
a court appearance or to meet with
a lawyer.
While none of these things are
on the minds of people out having
a good time with a few drinks, that
isn’t to say they shouldn’t be. As
devastating as these consequences
can be, all of them can be avoided
by simply calling a cab or using a
designated driver.
DUI Arrest
A lot more than a slap on the wrist
Hard and complicated accident?
Quick and easy claims service.
Get fast, hassle-free claims service from Nationwide®.
G A BROWN INS AGENCY INC
Greg Brown
346 E. Main St.
Ottawa, OH 45875
(419) 523-5527
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Company. Not avallable lnall states.
20 W. Second St., Ft. Jennings
(419) 286-2660
710 ELIDA AVE. DELPHOS, OH 45833
PHONE 419-695-2931 FAX 419-695-9930
Email: info@aeroprinting.com www.aeroprinting.com
Let our high speed color and black and white
printers print your files. When quality, speed
and large quantities are needed, call us.
710 ELIDA AVE. DELPHOS, OH 45833
PHONE 419-695-2931 FAX 419-695-9930
Email: info@aeroprinting.com www.aeroprinting.com
Let our high speed color and black and white
printers print your files. When quality, speed
and large quantities are needed, call us.
Harter and Schier
Funeral Home
Phone 419-692-8055 Fax 419-692-8065
209 W. Third St., Delphos, OH 45833
“Locally Owned and Operated
14620 Landeck Rd.
419-692-0833
www.KeithsLandeckTavern.com
944 E. Fifth St.
419-692-2202
PIZZA-SUBS-WINGS-SALADS
SUEVER’S
TOWN HOUSE
ELIDA
105 S. Greenlawn
(419) 331-8015
LIMA
2600 Allentown Rd.
(419) 224-2265
2565 Shawnee Rd.
(419) 221-1312
Apply Online:
www.first-fed.com
Bank with the people you know and trust
All Purpose
Contracting
24533 Rd. U-20
Delphos, Ohio
419-695-4165
Flowers
on Fifth
940 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
(419) 692-6856
flowersonfifth@woh.rr.com
In Business Since 1925
MPH Insurance
Agency, Inc.
121 N. Broadway
Spencerville, OH 45887
Office Phone (419) 647-4051 • Fax (419) 647-6724
Steve Paulus Troy Perry Steve Smith Rick Homan
NIEDECKEN INSURANCE AGENCY
50 years young and growing
161 W. Canal Street PO Box 458 Ottoville OH 45876
toll free: 1.888.321.7269 ph: 419.453.3448
fax: 419.453.3049
James H. Niedecken: Owner C.I.C., L.U.T.C.F.
Lisa Horstman: Agent, C.I.S.R.
Kim Hilvers: Agent, Life & Health Specialist
Thursday, December 30, 2010 The Herald – 7
RAABE
FORD-LINCOLN-MERCURY
Where You Come In A Customer And Leave A Friend.
www.raabeford.com
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
1-800-589-7876
419-692-0055
8 – The Herald Thursday, December 30, 2010 www.delphosherald.com
The Daily Herald
CLASSIFIED ADS
To place an ad call: 419-695-0015
950 Miscellaneous
GOLD
CANYON
CANDLES
Gina M. Fox
419-236-4134
I’ve got GIFTS for *ALL* on your
list including *Stocking Stuffers*
Call Black Friday, spend $100,
get $25 in FREE products!
Life Tastes
Good Again
Eating Gluten Free
New Product Line
Elida Health Foods
101 W. Main Street
Elida, Ohio 45807
419-339-2771
M-F 10:30-5:30 PM, Sat. 10:00-1 PM
950 Car Care
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
950 Construction
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
HERRON
CONSTRUCTION
419-692-2329
Kitchen and Bath- •
room Remodeling
Roofing •
Siding •
Replacement •
Windows
Garages •
Plumbing and •
Electrical Service
for both new and
existing homes
Drywall •
Give Us A Call Year Round For
All Of Your Home Improvement
Needs Both Large And Small
FREE ESTIMATE
Chris Herron
950 Electricians
RETIRED LICENSED
ELECTRICIAN NEEDS
TO STAY BUSY
RESIDENTAL &
COMMERCIAL
WIRING
WELDING
ED PAXTON
419-692-5193
950 Home Improvement
950 Home Improvement
Hohlbein’s
Ph. 419-339-4938
or 419-230-8128
30%
TAX REBATE
ON WINDOWS
Windows, Doors,
Siding, Roofing,
Sunrooms,
Kitchens & Bathroom
Remodeling,
Pole Buildings,
Garages
Home
Improvement
PJ’s
Contracting
567-279-3730
Roofing - Siding -
Windows
Doors
General Remodeling
Small add-ons
950 Transmission
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
950 Tree Service
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
Advertise Your Business
DAILY
For a low, low price!
Place
Your Ad
Today
419 695-0015
Service
AT YOUR
001

Card Of Thanks
THE FAMILY of Vince
Metzner would like to
thank you for your kind-
ness and support shown
to our family during the
loss of our father. To the
staff at Vancrest Nursing
Home for the wonderful
care you provided over the
last four years. St. Rita’s
Emergency Room Staff,
Dr. Amy Hovest, and the
Nurses on 4K and Hos-
pice Staff for your care
and compassion. Harter
and Schier Funeral Home
for your guidance and
support, Father Mel Ver-
hoff and Mary Beth Will for
the beautiful service and
the VFW Honor Guard. To
our relatives, friends and
neighbors we are deeply
touched by the many ex-
pressions of sympathy
whether a monetary dona-
tion, food, gifts, visits dur-
ing this difficult time.
Dennis Metzner & Diane
Trentman
Barbara Metzner
Richard & Denise Metzner
Marty & Mike Clark &
Family
Mary Lou & Tim Gasser &
Family
005

Lost & Found
LOST: RING
In Nov. or Dec.
Gold ring, diamond shape
with diamonds.
REWARD.
Call (419)692-3122
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
010

Announcements
D E L P HOS
TR A DI NG
P OST
528 N. Washington St.
419-692-0044
NEED EXTRA
OR LOOKING FOR A
GREAT DEAL?
BUY-SELL-TRADE
tools, games, electronics,
DVD’s, jewelry, firearms,
gold and silver, anything
of value in good to
excellent condition.
Tues.-Thurs. 8:30 to 5
Fri. 8:30 to 6, Sat. 9 to 2
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
BOOTH RENT positions
available for 3 managing
cosmetologists and 1 nail
tech. Call for more infor-
mation. (419)695-1811.
DRIVER WANTED, home
weekends, 2 yrs. experi-
ence, Class A, CDL. New
equipment, Call D K
Trucking (419)549-0668
DRIVERS
CDL Drivers
Local family owned &
operated company hiring
FULL AND PART TIME
2 years tractor-trailer Combo Req.
Must Have Good MVR
HOME WEEKENDS
Very Competitive pay with Quar-
terly and Yearly Safety Bonuses.
Benefits Include: Health, Dental
and Life Ins. Pd-Short/Long Term
Disability. Pd-Holidays and Vaca-
tion. 401K with Co. Contribution.
Hopper, Pneumatic and Van work
servicing the livestock feed indus-
try. Come work for a company
where you are part of the family.
Apply in person or email for ap-
plication or questions:
info@d-dfeed.com
D&D Trucking
and Services, INC
5025 N Kill Rd Delphos,OH 45833
080

Help Wanted
EXPERIENCED GRILL
Cook. Apply in person.
Rambler’s Roost Restau-
rant on Lincoln Hwy., Mid-
dle Point, OH.
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware, Pocket
Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
NEW, QUEEN plush top
mattress, never used, still
sealed in original wrapper.
$75.00. (260)220-1596.
600

Apts. for Rent
1 BDRM Apt. 321 S. Ca-
nal St. Available Soon.
(419)695-2761
620

Duplex For Rent
1/2 off first month’s rent
with 1 year lease. 2 BR
duplex. Stove, refrigerator,
washer/dryer, dishwasher.
All electric. $450/mo. De-
posit and utilities. No pets.
567-204-0347.
1/2 OFF first month’s rent
with 1 year lease. 2 BR
duplex. Stove, refrigerator,
washer/dryer, dishwasher.
All electric, $450/mo. De-
posit and utilities. No pets.
567-204-0347.
800

House For Sale
FULL REMODEL com-
pleted soon. Can custom-
ize to you. 607 W. 7th St.,
Delphos. 0 Down, Home
Warranty, Free appli -
ances. 419-586-8220
chbsinc.com
800

House For Sale
FULL REMODEL com-
plete soon at 829 Moening
St. Delphos. Can custom-
ize to you. 0 Down, Home
Warranty, Free appli -
ances. 419-586-8220
www.chbsinc.com
0 DOWN, warranty, free
appliances, Remodeled
home. A great country 4
bed, 1 1/2 Bath home
in Lincolnview school dis-
trict. Has new carpet,
paint, landscape, new
cent r al ai r , wat er
heater, new lighting, up-
dated plumbing and elec-
t r i c , s ome new
windows, 19176 Venedo-
cia-Eastern Rd., Venedo-
cia. 419-586-8220.
www.creativehomebuying-
solutions.com
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
890

Autos for Sale
Over 85
years
experience
www.raabeford.com
RAABE
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
M 7:30-8 ; T.-F. 7:30-6:00
Sat. 9-2
419-692-0055
BRAKE
SERVICE
GENUINE
MOTORCRAFT
®
$
109
95
GET THE BRAKES
ENGINEERED
SPECIFICALLY FOR
YOUR VEHICLE
Install genuine Motorcraft® pre-
ferred Value pads of shoes on
most cars/light trucks. One axle.
Excludes machining rotors and
drums. Some vehicles slightly
higher. taxes extra. See Service
Advisor for details.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
EPSON COLOR Printer.
Only used 2 times. Works
Great! $25 OBO. Call
(419)692-2215.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
FREE BLACK Lab Mixed
Puppies. 2 male, 1 female,
8 weeks ol d. Cal l
(419)695-0328
FREE PET Rabbit with
cage. (419)695-1875
999

Legals
ORDINANCE #2010-31
AN ORDINANCE AUK-
T HORI Z I NG T HE
SAFETY SERVICE DI -
RECTOR TO ENTER
INTO A PERSONAL
SERVICE CONTRACT
WITH GLEN LAUSE TO
PROVIDE LEGAL SERV-
ICES TO THE CITY OF
DELPHOS AND DECLAR-
ING IT AN EMERGENCY.
ORDINANCE #2010-32
AN ORDINANCE ESTAB-
LISHING THE PAY SAL-
ARY FOR THE ADMIN-
ISTRATION AND DE-
PARTMENT SUPERVI-
SORS AND DECLARING
IT AN EMERGENCY.
ORDINANCE #2010-33
AN ORDINANCE ESTAB-
LI SHI NG THE PAY
RATES FOR THE
HOURLY EMPLOYEES
AND DECLARING IT AN
EMERGENCY.
ORDINANCE #2010-37
ANNUAL APPROPRIA-
TION ORDINANCE AND
DECLARI NG I T AN
EMERGENCY.
ORDINANCE #2010-40
AN ORDINANCE ESTAB-
LISHING THE MEETING
DATES AND TIME FOR
DELPHOS CITY COUN-
CIL MEETINGS AND DE-
CLARING IT AN EMER-
GENCY.
ORDINANCE #2010-41
AN ORDI NANCE
AUTHORIZING THE CITY
AUDITOR TO TRANSFER
CERTAI N FUNDS
WITHIN THE FUNDS OF
THE CITY OF DELPHOS,
ALLEN AND VAN WERT
COUNTIES AND DE-
CLARING IT AN EMER-
GENCY.
ORDINANCE #2010-42
AN ORDINANCE TO
AMEND ORDINANCE
2009-58, THE ANNUAL
APPROPRIATION ORDI-
NANCE, AND DECLAR-
ING IT AN EMERGENCY.
Passed and Approved this
27th day of December
2010.

Robert Ulm, Council Pres.
ATTEST:
Marsha Mueller,
Council Clerk
Michael H. Gallmeier,
Mayor
A complete copy of this
legislation is on record at
the Municipal Building
and can be viewed during
regular office hours.
Marsha Mueller, Council
Clerk
12-30-10, 1-6-11
120

Financial
Place Your
Ad Today
419 695-0015
Antiques Antique
Show/Hudson, Ohio.
Clarion Inn Formerly
Holiday Inn, Hines Hill
Rd. & Rt. 8/Boston Hts.
Jan 8 (11-5) Jan 9 (11-
4). 55 Dealers featuring
Great Antiques!!! Adm.
$6.00. Lynne Dingus
606-305-1189. “Don' t
Miss this One”.

A u t o m o b i l e s
AUTOMOTIVE PARTS
SWAP MEET & CAR
SALE. All Make &
Model - All Indoor - 700
Spaces. JANUARY
9, 2011. Indiana
State Fairgrounds.
Indianapolis, IN 8AM-
3PM Info. 708-563-4300.
www.SuperSundayIndy.
com.

Business Opportunity
Do You earn $800.00
in a Day? Your Own
Local Candy Route. 25
Machines and Candy
all for $9995.00. All
Major Credit Cards
Accepted. 1-877-915-
8222.

Business Services
REACH 2 MILLION
N E W S P A P E R
READERS with one
ad placement. ONLY
$295.00. Ohio's best
community newspapers.
Call Kathy at AdOhio
Statewide Classified
Network, 614-486-6677,
or E-MAIL at: kmc-
cutcheon@adohio.net
or check out our website
at: www.adohio.net.

Business Services
REACH OVER 1
MILLION OHIO ADULTS
with one ad placement.
Only $975.00. Ask
your local newspaper
about our 2X2 Display
Network or Call Kathy
at 614-486-6677/E-mail
kmccutcheon@adohio.
net. or check out our
website: www.adohio.
net.

Help Wanted CDL-A
Drivers: 'Tis The Season
For Providing All The
extras to our Drivers!
Bonuses, Mi l es,
Equipment. $500 Sign-
On For Flatbed. CDL-A,
6 mo. OTR. Western
Express. 1-888-801-5295.

Help Wanted Driver-
Home Weekly! No Touch
Freight! No forced NE/
NYC! 6 months expe-
rience. No felon/DUI
last 5 yrs. Solons &
Teams Wanted. New
Pay Package! 877-740-
6262. www.ptl-inc.com.

Help Wanted Drivers
- 100% Tuition Paid CDL
Training! No Credit
Check, No Experience
Required! TRAINERS
EARN .49/Mile. Call:
888-417-7564 CRST
Expedited. www.join-
CRST.com.

Hel p Wanted
Drivers - $1,000 Sign
On Bonus!! REGIONAL
and OTR . Freight
Increase, Great Pay and
Benefts! Class A CDL
and 1 year experience
required. 800-677-5627
www.westsidetransport.
com.

Help Wanted Drivers
- Flatbed. Earn $1.85/
mi. or more! OWNER
OPERATORS Up to
$1,000 Sign On Bonus.
No Age restriction on
tractor/trailers. CRST
Malone
800-352-5580 www.
JoinMalone.com.

Help Wanted Drivers-
Owner Operators. $2K-
$3K Sign-On Bonus.
Paid FSC on loaded &
empty miles. Weekly
Hometime. 75% Drop
& Hook. Paid OH & IN
Tolls. Call Comtrak at
866-722-0291, or apply
at www.comtraklogis-
tics.com.

Help Wanted Dri-
vers- Owner Operators.
*Industry Leading
Revenue per Mile +
100% FSC *No Money
Down, Tractor Purchase
Program *No Lease On
Costs* Class-A CDL,
Hazmat and Tanker
Required. 888-240-
4808. www.millerdriv-
ing.com.

Hel p Wanted
Drivers-Company FFE
seeks 1yr. exp. OTR.
($1000 Sign on Bonus)!
Start your new Career,
Students Welcome! Also
seek Owner Operators.
Call 800-569-9232 or
recruit@ffex.net.

Hel p Wanted
Drivers/CDL Training
- CAREER CENTRAL.
We train and EMPLOY
you. Company Drivers
Up to 40k First Year.
New Team Pay! Up to
.48c/Mile Class A CDL
Training. Regional
Locations (877) 369-
7195 www.centraldriv-
ingjobs.net.

Hel p Wanted
NUCLEAR POWER
TRAINEE- Qualified
candidates needed for
unique training program
in the nuclear power
feld. Ideal applicant
must have a high school
diploma with above
average math skills.
Age 17-34. Salary,
bonus, medical/dental
and earned vacation
while in training. Call
1-800-282-1384.

Help Wanted Reefer,
Tanker & Flatbed Drivers
Needed! Prime's exten-
sive freight network
offers you: *Plenty of
Miles* Steady Freight.
Call Prime Today
1-800-277-0212 www.
primeinc.com.

Hel p Wanted
Wanted: Life Agents.
Earn $500 a Day.
Great Agent Benefts.
Commissions Paid Daily,
Liberal Underwriting.
Leads, Leads, Leads.
Life Insurance, License
Required. Call 1-888-
713-6020.

Help Wanted WOOD
TRUCKING, Inc./MCT.
Job Guaranteed after
FREE 3 week CDL-A
Training. Live with-
in 100 mile radius of
Wauseon, Ohio 1-800-
621-4878. Also, Hiring
Drivers!

Help Wanted WTI
Transport Flatbed
Drivers. Hauling High
Paying Freight On
Percentage Pay. Make
more in less miles,
Homet i me 93%
Weekends...ask us how
we do it! 800-828-6452
www.wtitransport.com.

Help Wanted “'You
got the drive, We Have
the Direction” OTR
Drivers APU Equipped
PrePass EZ-pass.
Pets/Passenger Policy.
Newer equipment.
100% No touch. 1-800-
528-7825.

Homes For Sale TWO
STORY MODULAR
MODEL CLOSEOUT
2160 sf. 3Bed 2-1/2Bath
42' Cherry cabinets,
Ceramic tile foors in kit,
Glamour Bath, Loaded
with Extras. Free 8'x36'
Front Covered Porch.
ONLY $88,438 SAVE
$42,192. 1-800-686-
1763 www.williamsburg-
square.com.

Instruction Attend
College Online from
Home. Medical,
Business, Paralegal,
Accounting, Criminal
Justice. Job Placement
Assistance. Computer
Available. Financial
Aid if Qualifed. Call
877-295-1667. www.
CenturaOnline.com.

M a n u f a c t u r e d
Homes for Sale MODEL
BLOWOUT NEW
16x80 3Bed 2Bath Vinyl
& Shingle. Includes:
Delivery, Set, Skirting,
Steps & Tie Downs.
ONLY $29,995. 1-800-
686-1763 www.williams-
burgsquare.com.

Misc. Airlines Are
Hiring - Train for high
paying Aviation Career.
FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualifed
- Job Placement assis-
tance. Call Aviation
Institute of Maintenance.
877-676-3836.

Misc. CANADIAN
FISHING CABINS FOR
RENT. Walleyes,
jumbo perch, northerns.
Call Hugh or Doris toll
free 800-426-2550 for
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Q U I L T G R I D S
A U N T I E B O O K I E
B E F A L L O R I E N T
B U I L T A X E L
Y E T I W R Y E V E R
C O A T A D A G E
C A R I R I S H L A P
A G O N E C K S E D S
W H A C K L E O N
S A N E D E W U S S R
D E U S P L A T O
P A L A T E G A L L O N
O P E R A S O C E A N S
T R E S S T E D D Y
Answer to Puzzle
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Comforter
6 Football felds
11 Daddy’s sister
12 Bet taker
13 Happen to
14 Determine one’s position
15 Erected
16 Figure-skating jump
17 Sasquatch cousin
18 Kind of grin
19 Anon’s companion
23 Jacket
25 Aphorism
26 Jalopy
29 South Bend team
31 Racing circuit
32 Way back when
33 Blouse parts
34 Mag execs
35 Swat
37 — Uris of “Topaz”
39 Compos mentis
40 Morning dampness
41 Gorby’s realm
45 — ex machina
47 Socrates’ pupil
48 Gourmet’s pride
51 Fuel measure
52 Puccini works
53 Dolphin habitats
54 Ringlet
55 Name for a bear
DOWN
1 Line for waiting
2 Out of shape
3 Slanted print
4 Hum
5 — Aviv
6 Wound a matador
7 Made cloudy
8 Harry’s successor
9 Racket
10 Congeal
11 Advice columnist
12 Square-shaped
16 Things
18 Suffx for silver
20 Goodbye, to Gaius
21 Mild oath
22 Agents
24 Piglet plea
25 Mr. Moto remark (2 wds.)
26 Harsh calls
27 Turkish title of honor
28 Sorrel or bay
30 Distort, as data
36 Fragrant trees
38 Canceled
40 Membership fees
42 Dieter’s lunch
43 Frozen-faced
44 Howard and Reagan
46 LGA postings
47 Tempo
48 Stovetop item
49 Calendar abbr.
50 Protective shelter
51 Landed
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12
13 14
15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31
32 33 34
35 36 37 38
39 40 41 42 43 44
45 46 47
48 49 50 51
52 53
54 55
In Kansas, fate meets fame
Ask Mr. Know-It-All
By Gary Clothier
Q: The movie “Capote” followed
Truman Capote’s exploits during
the time he wrote the book “In
Cold Blood.” He had an assistant
with him named Nelle. What was
their relationship? -- T.W., Buffalo,
N.Y.
A: First, some background
information. In November 1959,
two former convicts broke into
the home of a wealthy farmer in
Holcomb, Kan., with intent to rob
him. They had been given a tip from
a fellow inmate that a large amount
of money could be found in a home
safe. There was no money and no
safe. The husband, wife and two of
their children were all shot to death.
Capote became fascinated with the
murders and decided to pursue
the story. He enlisted the help of
Nelle Harper Lee, a childhood
friend as well as the author of “To
Kill a Mockingbird” (for which
she would win the Pulitzer Prize
in 1961). Along with assisting
in the research of the novel, Lee
also approached locals, requesting
input into the killings. About six
weeks after the crime, two men --
Richard Hickock and Perry Smith
-- were captured in Las Vegas,
Nev. Convicted in March 1960,
the two men were executed by
hanging on April 14, 1965. After
the executions, Capote finished his
book. “In Cold Blood” was first
published in January 1966.
Did you know ... actress Susan
Weaver began using the name
Sigourney after a minor character,
Sigourney Howard, in F. Scott
Fitzgerald’s novel “The Great
Gatsby”?
Copyright 2010, Gary Clothier
DON’T DRINK
& DRIVE
Drinking and Driving:
A Disaster Waiting to Happen
Use your head.
If you plan to drink alcohol, you can avoid a
disaster by appointing a designated driver, or
call a friend to drive you home.
HALF DupLEx in Delphos.
3 BR, basement $450/
mo. plus $500 deposit.
Plus all utilities. No pets.
References required.
(419)695-2881.
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BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
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GRIZZWELLS
PEANUTS
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HI AND LOIS
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Thursday, December 30, 2010 The Herald – 9
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Bad-mouthing
spouse is unfair
to children
Dear Annie: I am a
17-year-old girl, and my par-
ents are in the middle of a
divorce. That is not the prob-
lem. I am really happy they
are divorcing.
The problem is, my mother
has been telling everyone that
Dad had an affair and that the
other woman is the cause of
the divorce. This makes things
really awkward
for me, especially
around my friends
whose parents
know my mom.
Annie, I don’t
care if my Dad
had an affair, and
the truth is, I don’t
blame him. I have
sat on the stairs and
listened to my par-
ents fight for years.
I have heard my
dad beg Mom to
love him back, to talk to him,
to do things with him and be
affectionate. I love my moth-
er, but she is the real reason
they are getting divorced.
Dad is now living with his
“friend,” and I secretly hope
they stay together. I like her.
He is happy and so much
more relaxed now. I love
being around him and his girl-
friend, but of course, I can’t
tell anyone this.
Mom has poisoned every-
one in the family, making
them believe Dad is a hor-
rible person who left her for
another woman. How do I
get her to stop saying things
that will make people blame
my father and feel sorry for
Mom? -- Me
Dear Me: Neither of your
parents should be bad-mouth-
ing the other. It is grossly
unfair to you. Tell your moth-
er to please stop saying terri-
ble things about Dad because
you love him and her com-
ments make him an object of
derision in your community,
which reflects poorly on the
entire family. Then speak to
your school counselor and ask
for help.
Dear Annie: My son and
his beautiful wife, “Marie,”
just had their second child.
The entire pregnancy was tur-
bulent, and Marie needed a
C-section. My granddaughter
was born healthy and wonder-
ful, but I have been in com-
plete shock since.
While Marie was being
moved into her hospital room,
there was already a line of
well-wishers forming outside
the door, all of them carrying
stuffed animals, little outfits,
baby blankets and on and on.
It was almost like a competi-
tion, with everyone trying to
out-do the other with gifts. I
thought at any moment some-
one would walk in with a pony.
Many were dropping gift bags
onto Marie’s stomach, no less,
and they were so unbeliev-
ably loud. Although Marie was
appreciative and tried to show
enthusiasm for the gifts, she
was exhausted and in pain. She
wanted to hold and feed her
new daughter. Even the nurs-
ing staff was having difficulty
doing their job.
This was the rudest, most
inconsiderate thing I have
ever witnessed. Is this some
new trend for friends and rela-
tives to show up with gifts
immediately after the birth?
-- Please End My
Confusion
Dear Confusion:
People can be enor-
mously insensitive
when visiting a new
mother. Usually, a
family member or
one of the hospital
staff will toss visi-
tors out of the room
when there are too
many or the chaos
is too great. We are
surprised no one did
this for Marie and can only
assume she was enjoying it
more than you thought.
Dear Annie: This is in
response to “Confused,”
whose wife has their mortgage
in her name only, even though
he helps pay for it. If his wife
will not consider adding him
to the mortgage, please, please
have her add him as a benefi-
ciary to the mortgage loan.
My late husband had our
mortgage in his name only with
no beneficiary listed. Three
years later, I am still pay-
ing the mortgage and building
his credit instead of my own.
When married couples do not
have jointly owned property,
the death of one can create a
huge burden for the surviving
spouse. -- Still Attempting
To Find a Solution
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie’s Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 5777
W. Century Blvd., Ste. 700,
Los Angeles, CA 90045.
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
Friday, Dec. 31, 2010
Significant long-range plans will
be implemented in the next year, with
impressive possibilities for success.
However, it is to your advantage not
to discuss them with those who are
not directly involved.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) - What a wonderful way to end
the year with two great things going
for you! First is your natural ability
to form amicable relationships and
second is having Lady Luck in your
corner.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -
A number of substantial opportunities
are hovering over you, regarding both
tangible situations and intangible
circumstances. Breaks could be
happening for you in each venue.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -
You are likely to be lucky when a well-
calculated risk is involved, but not so
much with an out-and-out gamble.
When you know the difference, you
can play the hand that is dealt you
quite well.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) - A
change in conditions that you were
hoping would take place is likely to
show some signs of starting to do so.
What occurs will be out of your hands
but still quite lucky for you.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -
This is a good day to call it quits on
stuff that you want in your rearview
mirror. Conditions are stirring that
you’ll want to be part of, but you’ll
need to be unencumbered to do so.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -
With a new year about to begin, you’ll
want to be free to focus on several
new meaningful objectives, so do
what you can to clean up as many old
obligations as you can.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -
Wherever and whenever you make an
appearance, you’ll be well-received.
However, if you want to have a
great time, do things with persons
with whom you share some special
interests.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) - Do not
put any limitations on expectations
or probabilities for what you want.
If you want to paint rainbows in your
life, use a brush that cleans out what is
old and refreshes the colors.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Get
out and circulate, because good things
happen when you mingle with people
from all walks of life. The more you
move about, the bigger your chances
will be for meeting someone great.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Additional ways can be found
for expanding and improving on
something good that you already have
going for you. You’ll find what you’re
looking for when you elevate your
expectations.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - If
you are inclined to take a gamble, do
so on your own talents and knowledge,
not on someone else’s. The former is
within striking distance for success;
the latter isn’t.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) - People in general are likely to
do nice things for you, especially your
relatives and friends. It’ll pay to keep
track of who does what so you can
return the favor later.
Copyright 2010, United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
2
PIZZA • SUBS • SALADS • WINGS • PIZZA • SUBS
PIZZA • SUBS • SALADS • WINGS • PIZZA • SUBS
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Soup Supreme
SOUPS
Just heat and serve
• Chicken Noodle • Vegetable Beef
• Cream of Broccoli • Chicken Dumplings
• Cream of Potato • Beef Stew
formerly sold at Delphos Food Locker
Monday
Special
50
¢

WINGS
BBQ • Hot ’n
Spicy • Plain
Boneless wings
also available
Wings available every-
day at regular price
Chocolate covered peanuts,
Chocolate covered peanut brittle,
Chocolate covered pretzels,
Vanilla, maple, carmel clusters
Tuesday
Special
Large
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available
everyday at
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Large Chef Salad
$4.75
Chef Salad available Everyday at regular price
SUEVER’S TOWN HOUSE
$
10
It Doesn’t Get
Any Better
Than This!
15”
5
pizza up to
of your choice
items
10 – The Herald Thursday, December 30, 2010
www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Wednesday’s questions:
The average Kashmir goat produces only 4-6 ounces of
cashmere fiber annually. It takes from 10-12 ounces of the
goat’s soft, fine undercoat to make a woman’s singly-ply
cashmere sweater.
Jimmy Kimmel, as a high school student, had “L8
NITE” on his vanity license plate and decorating his
birthday cake in admiration for his talk show idol, David
Letterman.
Today’s questions:
In “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,” what was the
name of Tom’s half-brother?
What is unusual about the 120 stones embedded in
the exterior wall at the base of the Tribune Tower in
Chicago?
Answers in Friday’s Herald.
Today’s words:
Ichnogram: a footprint
Ravening: greed, voracious, preying
Fun
Friendship
Good Fortune
h e a l t h
Wishing You Every
Happiness In The New Year
With heartfelt thanks for your
generous support this past year.
...You deserve it!
www.e-farmcredit.com
Farm Credit Services
of Mid-AMericA
1120 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833-1779
419-695-6000 1-800-522-7728
Fax: 419-695-6007
Succes s
Love
2010
2010
2
0
1
0
2010
2
0
1
0
2010
2
0
1
0
2010
2
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1
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A look back . . .
2
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1
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(Continued from page 1)
themselves at the first circus
Delphos had seen in many
years.
August
Aug. 4 — The Village of
Elida held its annual “Elida
Night Out,” giving commu-
nity members an opportunity
to get a closer look at the
equipment used by the local
sheriff’s dept., mounted
posse, police and fire dept.
as well as S.W.A.T., K-9
unit, Life Flight and bomb
squad. The items which
attracted the most curiosity
were the bomb suit and the
helicopter from Life Flight/
Mobile Life Critical Care
Transport Network.
Aug. 5 — Members of
the religious group, Glory
International rode horses
through Delphos to pray for
the nation. The Glory Riders
began their journey on April
5 and would continue on
through Pennsylvania and
Maryland to end their jour-
ney in Washington D.C.
They hoped to complete their
trek by mid-September.
Aug. 6 — The Elida Board
of Education held a special
meeting to vote Gregory
Leeth in as Elida High
School Dean of Students.
“Elida has such super peo-
ple and I’m looking forward
to being a part of such a
great administrative team,”
Leeth said. “There are very
few schools I would’ve left
Lincolnview for and Elida is
one of them.”
Aug. 10 — Eagle Print
received the honor of being
the only web press quad
stack printer of approximate-
ly 200 to be SNAP certified
by US Ink. SNAP stands for
Specifications for Newsprint
Advertising Production and
is the standard coldset com-
mercial printers and newspa-
pers use to assure production
quality.
Aug. 17 — The Delphos
Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 3035 presented the
Stadium Club the final
$5,000 check of a $15,000
pledge made by the VFW
for the work on the stadi-
um the past two summers.
The year’s work included
removing all stadium seat-
ing, cleaning and repairing
the stadium, painting it and
replacing the seats as well
as opening the tunnel under-
neath the stadium and ren-
ovating and improving the
handicapped seating area.
Aug. 18 — Jeffrey L.
Knebel, 22, of Delphos, pled
guilty to attempted murder
with a gun in Allen County
Common Pleas Court, for
the shooting of Aaron J.
Eblin, 27, at a June gradua-
tion party.
Aug. 24 — The Putnam
County Health Department
announced the state’s first
recorded case of the West
Nile Virus. A 74 year old
Putnam County man was
hospitalized and recovering.
The virus, transmitted by
mosquitoes, includes symp-
toms such as fever, head-
ache, confusion, nausea,
seizures, alerted nerve reac-
tions, abnormal movements
and coma.
Aug. 26 — Siblings
Gavin and Lauren Shobe
of Delphos took Grand and
Reserve Champion, respec-
tively, in the Allen County
Junior Fair Born and Raised
Market Hog Show. Both
second-year showmen, the
Shobes attributed their wins
to hard work rather than
experience.
Aug. 28 — St. John’s
graduate Allison Reindel and
Jefferson graduate Meghan
Dunlap both sold their
champion steers at the Allen
County Junior Fair Large
Animal Auction. Reindel’s
steer, which she won
Grand Champion, went for
$10,000, while Dunlaps two
steers, both from the Reindel
farm, went for $2,700 for the
Reserve Grand Champion
Market Steer and $4,500 for
Grand Champion Born and
Raised. Together they raised
$17,200.
September
Sept. 3 — Tender Times
Child Development Center
held an open house for pro-
spective parents and chil-
dren. Tender Times is a
non-profit faith-based cen-
ter run by Trinity United
Methodist Church. Director
Anne Winings was on hand
to give tours.
Sept. 4 — The Delphos
Food Locker was demol-
ished. Workers from
Calvelage Excavating were
hired to tear down the build-
ing. The Delphos Trading
Post was erected just south
of the lot.
Sept. 7 — Kim Schnipke,
17, won Senior Showmanship
at the Van Wert County
Fair for her steer and Ethan
Bonifas, 11, took Junior
Showmanship with his hog.
Both Bonifas and Schnipke
represented Delphos
Pathfinder 4-H club. It was
Bonifas’ second year show-
ing goats, but his first for
hogs. Schnipke began show-
ing animals at the fair when
she was in third grade.
Sept. 13 — St. John’s
High School senior Cassie
Schimmoeller was crowned
the 2010 Delphos Canal
Days Queen. She is the
daughter of James and Lena
Schimmoeller. The compe-
tition included talent, eve-
ning wear and question-and-
answer categories.
Sept. 9 — The Ohio
Department of Natural
Resources lowered a dam
in the Auglaize River by 18
inches. The modification was
made to make the dam safer
and to allow fish to journey
upstream. The department’s
Mike Wilkerson oversaw the
project.
Sept. 11 — The Delphos
Senior Citizens Center held
a dedication ceremony for
its new garage. The build-
ing was built to house the
center’s vehicles and pro-
tect them from elements and
tampering. “I want to thank
everyone who helped get this
built,” Director Joyce Hale
said. “It wouldn’t have been
possible without them.”
Sept. 17 — The Delphos
Canal Days fifth annual
“Toast to the City” was
attended by a record 400
people. Hosted by the Canal
Days Committee, the toast
included entertainment such
as Elvis an Marilyn Monroe
impersonation acts. It was
reported an estimated 100
people were turned away
from the toast, due to limited
space.
Sept. 21 — The Delphos
Police Department arrested
two local teenagers for a
string of car break-ins.
Devon Schoffner, 18, and
Brent Binkley, 14, were
arrested after stolen GPS
and stereo components were
found in their possession.
Binkley was taken to Allen
County Juvenile Detention
Center and Schoffner to
Allen County Justice Center
on theft-related violations.
Sept. 24 — Community
Unity’s “Supper’s On Us”
hit its one year anniversary
of serving meals to those in
need within the community.
Supper’s On Us provides a
weekly meal every Thursday,
hosted by a different group
each week. The number of
clients at any given meal has
ranged from 39 to 103.
Elvis entertained a record crowd at the Delphos Canal
Days fifth annual “Toast to the City” on Sept. 17. It was
reported an estimated 100 people were turned away from
the toast, due to limited space.
Members of the religious group Glory International rode horses through Delphos Aug.
5 to pray for the nation. The Glory Riders began their journey on April 5 and ended their
journey in Washington, D.C., in mid-September.
Securing Times
Square for New
Year’s Eve
By COLLEEN LONG
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — It’s the
biggest public party in the
country. Nearly a million rev-
elers will cram into the streets
of Times Square to watch
the ball drop on New Year’s
Eve.
It’s also remarkably
crime-free, safe and orderly.
In the past decade, there have
been few arrests and virtually
no major problems funnel-
ing people in and out of the
confetti-filled streets to ring
in the New Year.
That’s due mostly to what
the partygoers don’t notice:
Throngs of police and coun-
terterrorism officers blanket-
ing the area, working from
a security plan specifically
tailored for the event.
Manhole covers are sealed.
Counter-snipers are stationed
on secret rooftops. Officers
carry beeper-sized radiation
detectors. Plainclothes officers
are stationed in the pens with
the crowds, along with a uni-
formed presence and under-
cover officers. Bomb-sniffing
dogs are on site. Purses are
searched. Checkpoints are set
up and perimeters are cre-
ated using concrete blocks.
Passing vehicles are checked
for safety. Haz-mat teams are
on standby.
NYPD brass tweak the
plan every year, using les-
sons learned from previ-
ous scares like the botched
Times Square car bombing
in May and the attempted
bombing of a Christmas tree
lighting in Portland, Oregon
near Thanksgiving. NYPD
counterterrorism chief James
Waters mined informa-
tion on the suicide bomb-
ing this month in Stockholm,
Sweden.
“Intelligence informs a lot
of what we do,” Waters said.
“Understanding the threat,
always the basics, under-
standing what the threat is
against New York, what’s the
threat against the country, and
everything that comes behind
that.”
After Sept. 11, 2001,
“we added a counterterror-
ism overlay” to New Year’s
security, said Paul Browne,
the NYPD’s deputy commis-
sioner for public informa-
tion. “We have kept changing
it based on the needs ever
since.”
Since the terror attack,
there have been at least six
foiled plots against the city —
including the plot by Faisal
Shahzad to bomb Times
Square with a used car stuffed
with a propane-and-gasoline
bomb on May 1.
The department has
answered with ever-develop-
ing tools, like the network
of private and police cam-
eras called the Lower and
Midtown Manhattan Security
initiatives. The department
recently added 500 camer-
as to the subway stops at
Times Square, Grand Central
Terminal and Penn Station.
The cameras are managed
at a command center in lower
Manhattan, where a single
high-bandwidth fiber optic
network connects the cameras
to police. It will be used New
Year’s Eve to help track any
suspicious activity.
The department meets
months in advance to set rules
and share plans with the area
restaurants and hotels that
host fancy parties, along with
the Times Square Alliance.
They plot out where TV
trucks will be stationed, and
the best exit routes in case of
an emergency.
Metal pens are set up to
hold crowds around 3 p.m.
on Dec. 31 and go back as
far as Central Park depending
on the crowds. Backpacks are
banned. Once you leave your
place, you can’t return to the
same spot. The 20-inch snow-
storm that left the streets far
from Times Square unplowed
will be a memory, either
melted or completely plowed
by midday Friday. Garages in
the area are swept for explo-
sives.
Hotel staff are on alert
for anything unusual. Guests
at the 2,000-room Marriott
Marquis in the heart of Times
Square aren’t allowed to leave
the hotel or enter it after a cer-
tain time.
Police also station officers
on boats in New York Harbor
and send additional uniformed
officers to every major trans-
portation hub in the city. They
monitor fireworks displays
at the Statue of Liberty and
Central and Prospect Parks.
Officers on horseback patrol
Times Square.
As the holiday has become
more secure and organized, it
has also become more com-
mercial. There was no live
music until 2003, when the
Times Square Alliance orga-
nized a sing-along at mid-
night to ring in 2004: A three-
minute rendition of “Ring My
Bell,” with Anita Ward.