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E

DUQUESNE SPY RING


9

19 2,
On January 2, 33 membersof a Nazi spy ring ,
headed by Frederick Joubert serve
Duquesne were sentenced to a
total over
of years
300 in prison. They were brought to Justice
after espionage
a lengthy investigation by the FBI. William
been
Sebold, who had a
recruited as spy for Germany, was a major
factor in the FBI&#39;s
successful resolution of this case through
his work as a double agent for the United States.
Ow
A native of Germany, William Sebold served in the ~
I. German army during World War I. in
After leaving Germany 1921,
he worked in industrial and aircraft plants throughout the
United States and South America. 1936,
On February 10, he became
E9 a naturalized eitizen.Qf the United tates. U ~

Q4 to
Sebold returned 1939,
Germany in February, to visit
his mother in Mulheim. Upon his arrival in Hamburg, Germany, he
s was approached by a member of the Gestapo who said that Sebeld
t would be contacted in the near future. Sebold proceeded to 2
Mulheim where he obtained employment. .
A
~ 1939,
in September, a Dr. Gassnervisited Sebold in
L
&#39;-> Mulheim and interrogated him regarding military planes and
equipment in the United States. He also asked Sebold to return
r
to the United States as an espionage agent for Germany.
Subsequent visits by Dr. Gassner and a "Dr. Renken," later 9
identified as Major Nickolaus Bitter of the German Secret
Service, persuaded Sebold to cooperate with the Reich because he
feared reprisals against family membersstill living in Germany.
§
Since Sebold&#39;s
passport had been stolen-shortly after
his first visit from Dr. Gassner, Sebold went to the American
Consulate in Cologne, Germany,to obtain a7newone. While doing
so, Sebold secretly told personnel of the American Consulate
future
_about his role as a Germanagent.and expressed.his wish to
cooperate with the FBI upon his return to America. u

Z Sebold reported to Hamburg, Germany, where he was


3 as
instructed in such areas preparing coded messages and
Upon
microphotographs completion of training, he was given five
microphotographs containing instructions for preparing a code and
detailing the type of information he was to transmit to Germany
from the United States. Sebold was told to retain two of the
* r-microphotograph§-and to deliver the other thnee to German-
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operatives
in.tha;Un§ted d al_ f V
States, Afterreceining
£i
instruotions,.inoluding using the assumed
namh5of,§§arrySahysr,"
r
he sailed from G§naa,§1taly, and arrived i q§@WYork Citroen "
February 8,l1940; *o _» by V t it= pg "V ,r
_ The FBI previously advised
had been of Sebold&#39;s M
expected arrival, his mission and his intentions to assist theme-
in identifying Germanagents in the United States. Under thee j
guidance of Special Agents, Sebold established residence in 5
NewYork City as Harry Sawyer. Also, an office was establishedn
a
for him as consultant diesel engineer, to be used as a cover in
establishing contacts with membersof the spy ring. In selecting
could
this office for Sebold, FBI Agents ensured that they T
observe any meetings taking place there. -

_ In May, 19 0, a shortwave radio transmitting station.


operated by FBI Agents on Long Island established contact with
the German shortwave station abroad. This radio station served
&#39;
as a main channel of communicationbetween Germanspies in ,
New York City and their superiors in Germany for 16 months.?
During this time, the FBI&#39;s
radio station transmitted over.30O
messagesto Ger anyasandreceived ZQQm¢§§a5¢§hf&#39;°m
Germany.
Seholdjs success asia counterespiona e agent against
Nazi spies in the United States is demonstrated
by thevsuccessful
prosecution of the 33 Germanagents in New Xerhe Qt those, t
arrested on charges of espionage, 19 pleaded guilty. the it men
whoentered pleas of not guilty were broughtto trial in Federal
K District Court, Brooklyn, NewYork, on September3, i9M1, and
they were all found guilty by Jury on December13, t9§1.
&#39; The activities of each of these convicted spies and
$ebo1d&#39;s
role in uncovering their espionage activities for the
.,»;;2= Reich -
follo .

FREDERICK JOUBERT DUQUESNE . e

Born in Cape Colony, South Africa, on September 21,


_
1877, Frederick Joubert Duquesneemigrated from Hamilton,
Bermuda,to the United States in 1902 and becamea naturalized
United States citizen on December N, 1913. Duquesne was
implicated in fraudulent insurance claims, including one that
resulted from a fire aboard the British steamship Tennyson which
caused the vessel to sink on February 18, 1916 When he was
% arrestedon November
17, 1917;whe
hadin his=possessionea&#39;larg
file of news clippings concerning bombexplosions on ships, as
well as a letter from the Assistant German Vice Consul at
Managua, Nicaragua. The letter indicated that "Captain Duquesne"
¥
was "one who has rendered considerable service to the German
"
cause." ¢

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yahp, huquesne
was ¢<=~Y
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husiness
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he
T ér"=r1Iie%e1s
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first contact with vgqgeeaasyaieteaa, seaeia met w&%h;h¥m$in
1*;
Duquesne&#39;s
office. During their initial meeting, uquesne, whoT*
-wasextremely concerned about the possibility of electronic ~.A i
surveillance devices being present in his office, gave Sebold ay
note stating elsewhere;
that they should talk After relocating;
to an Automat, the two men exchangedinformation about members_og
the Germanespionage system with whomthey had been in oontactgnv
_ provided Sebold with information for
Duquesne
¢.
transmittal to Germany during subsequent meetings, and the
meetings which occurred in SebQldY5 °ffi¢e "ere filmed by FBI In
Agents. Duquesne,who was vehemently anti-British, submitted in
I information dealing with national defense in America, the sailing
ct ships
to British ports and technology. He also regularly
received money from Germany in payment for his services. ,
* On one occasion, Euquesne provided Sebold with
photographs_and specifications a
of new type of bombbeing
Frodnoed in the Hnited States: He claimed that he secured that
material by seoretly;en¬eFi§§ the uPoat plant in Wilmington;
-92 Delaware. paquesne also explained howfires could be started in
industrial&#39;$§ants.
-Muchof the information Duquesne
obtained was
the result of his correspondence with industrial concerns. v
Representing himself as a stndent, he requested dataIconcerning"
their products and manufacturing conditions.
1 .Duquesne was brought to trial he
and was convicted.
&#39;was
sentenced to serveI18 years in prison on espionage charges,
= as well as»a 2-year concurrent sentence and paymentof a $2,009
fine for violation of the Registration Act. -
PAUL BANTE &#39;"

" A native of Germany, Paul Bante served in the German_


army during World Har I. He cameto the United States in 1930
and became a naturalized United States citizen y
in 1938. A
Bante, formerly a member of the German-American Bund,
that
claimed Germany put him in contact with one of their-
operatives, Paul Fehse, because of Bante&#39;s previous association
vi.-.
with a Dr. Ignatz T. Griebl.. Before fleeing to
to Germany escape
i I~"prosecution, Dr. Griebl had been implicated ins: aziaspy ring~~
with Guenther Gustave Rumrich, who was tried on"espionage charges
in 1938. -I "- ,n

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H .@,"Bante assisted Rahl Fehse in obtaining information ;%
aabout ships bound for Britain with gar materials and supplies.~»"
E Bante elaimed that asia member of the Gestapo his function was;ao
create disoontentwamong~nnion workers, stating that every stride
would assist Germany; 1 - .;§
Sebold met Bante at the Little Casino Restaurant, which
was frequented by several members this
of spy ring. During one
such meeting, Bante advised that he was preparing afuse bomb,
and he subsequently delivered dynamite and detonation caps to L
Sebold.. 1 &#39;

-&#39; Entering aguilty plea to violation of the Registration


Act, Bante was sentenced to months
18 imprisonment and was fined
$1,000. 1

MAX BERNK

Max Blank came to the United States from Germany in


1928, Although he never became aUnited 8tates citizen, Blank
had been employed in New York City at aGerman library and atra
-Q boon store whioh oateree to German trade,

. Paul Fehse, amajor figure in this case, informed


Germany that Blank, who was acquainted with several members of
the spy could
ring, secure some valuable information but lacked
the funds to do so. Later Fehse and Blank met with Sebold in his
office., They told Sebold that Blank could obtain details about,
rubberized self-sealing airplane gasoline tanks, as well as anew
Braking device for airplanes, from afriend who worked in a
-shipyard. However, he needed to
money get the infonmation. _

Blank
&#39; pleaded guilty to violation the
of Registration
Act. He received asentence of months
18 imprisonment and a
$1,000 fine. &#39; ~e

. ALFRED E. BROKOFF

Alfred E. Brokhoff, anative Germany,


of came to the
United States in 1923 and became anaturalized citizen in 1929.
He was amechanic for the United States Lines in New York City
for years
17 prior to his arrest. Because of his employment on
-the docks, he knew
almost the
all of other agents in this group
who were working as seamen on various ships. __
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§ " &#39;" Brokhoff helped Fehse secure information about the
sailing dates and cargoes vessels
of destined for England; He
also assisted Fehse in transmitting this information to Germany.
Also, another German agent, George V. Leo Waalen, reported that
he had received information from Brokhoff for transmittal to
% Germany. L-

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U» tQ Upon
conviction,Brekhcff
wassentenced
tc&#39;serve
a 7%
fiveeyear prises term for violation cf the espionageatatutes_am@M
to serve a~twc4yearteencurrent sentence for violation sf the Qt
.Registration,Act-:_ " 1 tr» p
HEINRICH CLAUSING R 1

< 1 In September, 1934, German-born Heinrich Clausing came


to the United States, where a
he became naturalized citizen in 1
1938. Having served on various ships sailing from New York y
arrival
Harbor since his in the country, he was employed as a
_
cook on the SS Argentine at the_time of his arrest.
Closely associated withFranz Stigler, one of the
principal contact men for this spy ring, Clausing operated as a
courier. .He&#39;transportedmicrophotographs and other material from
the United States to South American ports, from which the J
information was sent to Germany via Italian airlines. He also 2
established a mail in
drop South America for expeditious ~ t _
transmittal of information to by
Germany mail.

0 iausing was consisted and was sentenced to serve eight


years for violation of espionage statutes. He also received a »
two-year concurrent sentence for violation of the Registration

" V I CONRADIN OTTO DOLD

9 Conradin
Otto Doldcameto the UnitedStatesfrom
I Germany in 1926. in
He became a United States citizen 193M under
the Seaman&#39;s
Act.&#39;
Prior to his arrest, he was Chief Steward 1_
aboard the S§&#39;Siboney
of the American Export.Lines.
Dold was related to people holding high positions in
Germany and was closely associated with other members of the
espionage group who worked on ships sailing from New York Harbor.
a
As courier, Dold carried information from Nazi agents in the
United States in
to contacts neutral ports abroad for transmittal
to Germany. _

Dold was sentenced to serve ten in


years prison on
espionage charges and received a two-year concurrent sentence and
-
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&#39;
$1,000
fine of for violation.-&#39;
of the Registration_ Act.
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After leaving Germany for the United States in 1925,


Rudolf Ebeling in
became an American citizen 1933. He was
% employed as-a foreman in the Shipping Department of Harper and
in
Brothers New York City when he was arrested.

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&#39;4>w Vupon conviction; Eheling was sentenced to five years in
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coneurrent sentence and a $1,000 fine for violating the 1
Registration &#39;_
Aet. D- V. l.~ {A g -0
- azcannp sicasuuua. &#39; i 4
»&#39; ., >
g. Richard Eichenlaub, who came to the United States in
1930 and became a citizen the
in 1936, operated Little Casino
Restaurant in the Yonkville Section of New York City. This
restaurantVwas members
a rendezvous sea many of this spy ring,
and Eichenlaut introduced several new members into the group.
r Eichenlaub reported to the German Gestapo and often -
obtained information from customers
his who were engaged in
3» national deiense production, Through Eichenlaub, dynamite was
delivered &#39;
te»Sebold £:dm<Bante. C

&#39;
pf; Q>QBa?§§g
entered_aplea of guilty to violation of the
gegistratioq see, Eichenlaub was sentencedato pay a fine of
$1,000 and to serve 18 months in prison. ; V
. &#39; ~ V
&#39;1&#39; -
HEINRICH cm. swans V
j A native of Germany, Heinrich Carl EiLers came to the
I United States in 1923 and became a citizen in 1932¢ From 1933
until his arnest,Vhe ships
served as a steward on sailing from
New York City.
1;
Eilers made a.trip from New York to Washington, D.C.,
to obtain information for Germany from the Civil Aeronautics
Authority. His mission, however, was unsuccessful.
_ At the time of his arrest in New York City by Customs
authorities in June, 1930, he had in his possession 20 letters
addressed to people throughout Europe. He also had books_
to magnesium andVa1uminum alloys which had been sent to
v relating

i
him by Edmund Carl Heine, one of the principal espionage agents
in this group.,eq£M¬
$Q £HV,§,,, , _§g, V.,m%g§&é§gé$%¬§ ,£?,
&#39; Upon conviction, Eilers received a five~year prison
on
sentence espionage charges and a concurrent sentence of two
years&#39;
imprisonment and a $1,000 tine under the Registration Act.
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;
? , In~193H, Paul Fehseleft Germany
where he became a citizen
for the United States,
in 1938. Since his arrival in this ,
,1
1..
country, he had been employedas a cook aboard ships sailing from
New York Harbor. . ,

P,
1G
,.
" Fehsewasone of the directing forces in this espionage
group. He arranged meetings, directed members activities,
correlated information that had been developed, and arranged for
1.
its transmittal to Germany,chiefly throughSebold. Fehse, who
was trained for espionage work in Hamburg, Germany, claimed he
headed the Marine Division of the Germanespionage system in the
United States. 1 1

1 Having becomequite apprehensive and nervous, Fehse


madeplans to leave the country. He obtained a position on the
SSSiboney,whichwasscheduledto sail fromHoboken,
NewJersey,
for Lisbon, Portugal, on March 29, 1941. He planned to desert
ship in Lisbon and return to Germany. .
-
mnevsr, before he could leare the United States, Fehse
wasarrested by FBI Agents. Uponarrest, he admitted sending
letters to Italy for transmittal to dermany,as well as reporting
the movementsof British ships; 1
,&#39; On April 1, 19H1, Fehsewas sentencedon a plea of"
guilty to serve one year and one day in prison for violation of
the RegistrationAot.. He subsequently
pleadedguilty to
espionage and received a prison sentence-of 15 years.
. nexus
&#39;
EDHUND.CARL &#39;

A native of Germany, Edmund Carl Heine came to the-


United States in 1910 and becamea naturalized citizen in 1920.
Until 1938, he held various positions in the foreign sales and
service departments of Ford Motor Company and Chrysler Motor
Corporation. His employment _
took him to the WestIndies,
South America,
Spain, and Berlin, Germany.-Heine was closely
associated with Dr. Hans Luther, former GermanAmbassadorin 1
&#39;
Washington, D.C., and Prince Louis Ferdinand of Berlin.
1
a9<,?* Heine sent letters from.Detroit,.Michigan,§$o;Lilly .
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¢$@ @> ;;@%it.,itnr yeaa@Eneei@§
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To ensuresafe deliiery of e yg einejgggt,thermateri
the eaeea~te=aersaee .Eiler§ga;
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ihf$hs@~they¥di;t
. not reach Eilers, Heine in icated&#39;thereturn address on the,
package as the address of Lilly Stein.
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Upon conviction of violating the Registration Act,.


Heine received a$5,000 fine and a two~year prison sentence.
FELIX JAHNKE &#39; "
.92 5
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¢. , In 192M, Felix Jahnke left Germany for the V _
United States, where he became a naturalized citizen in 1930.
Jahnke had attended military school in Germany and had served in
the German army as a radio operator.
_ - *

i Jahnke and Axel Wheeler-Hill secured the services of


Josef Klein, a radio technician, in building
a portable radio set
h for Jahnke&#39;sapartment in the Bronx. Jahnke used this radio to
transmit messages, which were intercepted by the FBI, to Germany.
He also_visited_the docks ing gw York harbor to obtain
iaieemation about any vessels genie for England. V *
i
1; - After pleading guilty to violation of the Registration
C Act, Jahnke was sentenced to serve
20 months in prison and to pay
? a $1,000
fine. e ;, - V. A ;
.v
Vv
I.r" GUSTAV WILHELNVKAERCHER , »

- Gustav Wilhelm Kaercher came to the United Stateswin _


1923, becoming a citizen in 1931. He served in the German army
during World War
I and was a former leader of the German Band in
New York. During visits to Germany, he was seen to have worn a"
German
army officer&#39;s uniform. At the time of his arrest ghe was
engaged
in designingpowerplants for the American
Gasané
- Electric Company in New York City.

Kaercher was arrested with Paul Scholtz,-who had Just


handed Kaercher a table of call letters and frequencies for
transmitting information to Germany by radio. V
a result of his guilty pleato charges
As of violating
the Registration Act, Kaercher received a$2,000 fine and a&#39;
. _-
i prison sentenceof 22 months; ~
....V,; ~&#39;.-: ~ e »,~»= ~%§gg§§§e$:zpa@@$a+
&#39; JOSEFKLEIN V V_
A native of Germany, Josef Klein came to the
1 _
i United States in 1925; he did not become a citizen. e lein,-a »+
photographer and lithographer, had been interested in the
&#39;1 building and operation of shortwave radio transmitters..
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set for Feat; gahnne.an[ hie}: p ,5
£5 U Uheeler?_ i km W hnhe built he-radi§¢$§$t Klein; new it wouldgnf
be used for transmitting messages to ermany. *i » i?n mm
&#39;
Upon conviction, Klein received a sentence
of five 92
years! imprisonment on espionage.charges and a concurrent x
sentence
of .
two years imprisonment
1 ~ under the92 Registration Act.v..>~
1 "" &#39;
+aAaIu1e&#39;a1caAap
xtezss ti
~ , ,Born in Germany, Hartwig Richard Kleiss came to this
country in*I925 and became
a naturalized citizen six years later.
Following his arrival in the United States, he was employed asa
cook on various ships. ~, it

Kleiss obtained information for Germany, including *


blueprints
of the SS America which showed the locations
of newly
installed gun emplacements. he included information about how
guns would be brought into position
for firing. Kleiss a1so~
obtained details on the construction and Performance
of new ~ A
gpged ggtsi6ein§*§eVel0pEd by the United States
Navy, which he
3
submitte3
&#39;/&#39;
to SEBo1d*?§F» ..transmitta1itp~
>,
ermany:S
.
_
;y§,n niyhleiss hadoriginally chosenso stand trial. However;
after,eress¢examinatien, he ehangedhhis plea to guilty onroharge
of espionage and received an eight~year~prison sentence. ~¢
,
-1-~ Sf I
Htanau
w. LAKG " ȤY,
92 - ;_ i Q
< Barman W. Lang came
to the United States from Getmany
in 1927 and became a citizen in 1939. he was one
of four people
Sebold had Been told to contact in the United States. <

Until his arrest, Lang had been employed


by a company
manufacturing highly confidential materials essential to the
national defense
of the United States. During a visit to Germany
in 1938, Lang conferred with German military authorities and
reconstructed of
plans the confidential materials from memory. &#39;

Upon conviction, Lang received a_sentence


of 18 years
in prison on espionage charges and a 2-year concurrent sentence
under the Registration Act.
- &#39; -

* - " ~ * it tvstyuctnrrouLEWIS
* %5~ ?*§w#
- A native
of Arkansas,
Evelyn Clayton Lewis had been
-
_ living with Frederick Joubert Duquesne in New York City. Miss 4
g Lewis had expressed heraanti-British-and.anti-Semitic feelings
WW "fr &#39;
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material for ré smittal thread. 7&#39;
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&#39; Upon a guilty plea, Miss Lewis wassentencedto serveii
one year and one day in prison for violation of the Registration
&#39;
Act.

< &#39;
~ &#39;,
RENE EMANUELMEZENEN L
r
a
Rene Emanuel Mezenen, "
Frenchman, claimed
United States citizenship through the naturalization -
of his
father. Prior to his arrest he was employed a
as in
steward the
transatlantic clipper service. "
k

The German Intelligence Service in Lisbon, Portugal,


asked a
Mezenen to act as courier, transmitting information
on
between the United States and Portugal on his regular trips
the clipper. He accepted this offer for financial gain, In the
course of flights across the Atlantic, Mezenen also reported his
observance of convoys sailing for England. He also became a
inuclxed in smuggling platinum from the United States to &#39;
P6¥§H§él; ~, p L1 &#39;

&#39;V Following a plea of guilty, Mezenen received an eight-


year prison term for espionage and two concurrent years for
registration violations. e
92
U ~ CARL REUPER -

~ _ Having come to the United States from Germany in 1929,


Carl a
Reuper became citizen in 1936. Prior to his arrest he
served as an inspector for the Westinghouse Electric Company in
Newark, New Jersey.

Reuper obtained photographs for Germany relating to


national defense materials and construction, which he obtained
from his_employment. He arranged radio contact with Germany ~
through the station established by Felix Jahnke. On one
occasion, he conferred with Sebold regarding Sebold&#39;s
facilities
for communicating with German authorities.
.4
g ,+m
Upon conviction, Reuper was sentenced to 16 years
imprisonment on espionage charges and 2 years concurrent
sentencennderatheRegistrationAct. s» -» =*-~§g§;g§§§§g,¢a
I
- svznswr MINSTER no£n£n~ .¢a..

Born in the Bronx, a


New York, Roeder was draftsman and
of
designer confidential materials for the United States Army and
&#39;
Navy.
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ihié getichs
hdtcgrhph
tohe
=Roeder,-ascrdcredsby Germanauthorities. _Rhed%fg§§dYSebold
met}
.in public places and~p oceeded to spots where theytdould talk Q
*
privately. 9 it V,
In 1936, Roeder had visited Germanyand was requested,
by German authorities to act as an espionage agent. Primarily 9
due to monetaryrewardshe wouldreceive, Roederagreed. r
a
Roeder entered guilty plea to the charge of espionage
and was sentenced to 16 years in prison. p v G

PAUL ALFREDH. SCUOLZ ~


A Germannative, Paul Scholz cameto the United States
in 1926 but never attained citizenship. He had been employed in
German book stores in New York City, where he disseminated Nazi
&#39;
propaganda. 9
. Schola had arranged for Josef Klein to construct the
radio set used by Felix Jahnke and Axel Hheelcr-Hill. At the
time of his arrest, $chcia~had just given Gustay Hilhelm Kaerchgj
a list call
of radio letters and frequencies. He also encouraged -
membersof this spy ring to secure data for Germany and arranged
contacts between various German asents.i 1

Upon conviction, Scholz was sentenced to &#39;


16 years
imprisonment for espionage with 2 years concurrent sentence
under the Registration Act. s&#39; . " 1

é= 1 GEORGEGOTTLOB
SCHUH
a
&#39; George Schuh, native of Germany, came to the ,W
United States in 1923. He became a citizen 1939
in and was
employed as a carpenter.

As a German agent, he sent information directly to the


¢ Gestapo in Hamburg, Germany, from this country._ Schuh had
provided Alfred Brokhoff information that Winston Churchill had
»arrived in the United States on the HMS George V. He also.
furnished information to Germany concerning the movement_of ships
carrying materials and supplies to Britain. ~ *

k iH Act,
& Schuh
% §§¬¬ &#39;
Guilty to.1.1.=...<¢f¢iié%§ZEI;t
avin8?51eaded i
received a sentence of 18 months in prison and a

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tier uni e;ed3 ii f*§t,ai
from erean
é$¥ inv
1929¢and attained eititenship in j936.ol e nae served»as*chief QQJ
butcher on the SS Emerita until it was taken over by the In
United States Navy. *~ 0 A

g- f Acourier, Siegler brought microphotographic &#39;


instructions to $ebold from German authorities on one occasion.
He
also had brought $2,900 from German contacts abroad to pay r
Lilly Stein, Duquesne and Roeder for their services and to buy a
pomb sight. He served the espionage group as an organizer_and
contact man, and he also obtained information about the movement
of ships
and.mi1itary defense preparations at the Panama
Canal.
Subsequent to his conviction, Siegler was sentenced to
10 years imprisonment on espionage charges and aconcurrent
2-year term for violation of the Registration Act.
»OSCAR RICHARD STABLER

l e<;§ Born in Germany; OscarStabier came to this country in


1923 and beeamere oitizen ihJ1933a e had been employed
primarily as a barherganoarditransoceanic ships.
at B0 In Decemhen@r1§$B,
gyatish authorities
in Bermuda
found
amap of Gibnalter in his possession. a elwas detained for a .
short period
.&#39; . hetero being released
1 » . ]
- »p Aclose associate of Conradin Qtto Dold, Stabler served
as agourier, transmitting information between German
agents in
the United States and contacts ebroadb
eStab1er was convicted and sentenced to serve fiveayears
in prison for espionage and atwo-year concurrent term under the
Registration Act.
HEINRICH STADE .
.- 0
_Heinrich Stade came to the United States from Germany
in 1922 and became in
a citizen 1929. Stade had arranged.for
Paul
Bante&#39;s contact with Sebold and had transmitted data to
Germany regarding points of rendezvous for convoys carrying
supplies to England. a, ~: a~ ,,%§§§§§%§@#,n;
Following aguilty plea to violation of the
Registration Act, Stade was fined $1,000 and received a15-month
prison sentence. . _

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Bornin vienna,&#39;Aus%ri%,
the espionage instructor uheVhadtrained William Sebold the two
mentwerenot related! in Hamburg,Germany. She enrolled in this.
school and was sent to the United States in 1939.
-&#39;4 Lilly Stein was one of the people to whomSebold had
been instructed to deliver microphotographinstructions upon his
arrival in this country. v$hefrequently met with Seboldto give
him information tor transmittal to Germany,and her address was
used as a return addressby other agents in mailing data for
Germany. an
_ Miss Stein pleaded guilty and received sentences of 10
years 2
and concurrent years imprisonment for violations of
espionage and registration _
statutes, respectively.
FRANZ JOSEPH STIGLER .

Eran:
in 1931, Stigler left Germanyfor the
United States, where he became_a.citizen in 1939. He had been
employedas a crew memberaboardUnited States ships until his
discharge from the SS Americawhenthe United States Navy
converted that ship into v
the U85 West Point.

His constant companionwas Erwin Siegler, and they


operated as couriers in transmitting information between the
United States and Germanagents abroad. Stigler sought to
recruit amateur radio operators in the United States as channels
of communicationto Germanradio stations. He had also observed
and reported defense preparations in the Canal Zone and had met
with other German T
agentsto advisethemin their espionage
pursuits.

Upon conviction, Stigler was-sentenced to serve 16


years in prison on espionagechargeswith 2 concurrentyears for
registration violations.

ERICH -
STRUNCK -
5
&#39; A seaman aboard ships of the United States Lines since
his arrival in this country, Erich Strunck cameto the ,- V .
F "iUnited States Tromi ermany
citizen in
1n W927."~He&#39;became
1935."
a@maturali2ed&#39; *
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. As a courier, Strunck carried messagesbetween German


§
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agents in the United States and Europe. Herequestedauthority
3 to steal the diplomaticbagof a British officer traveling aboard
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teat. weyears
{1, =~inpniscngen,espianage
charges.
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naesentc aed
te
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two-year
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the Regist »L%tie Aet;
Q
; . LEO waALEn&#39;i- a my e
K
Y Haalenwasborn in Danzigwhile that city wasunder,
German domination.Heenteredthe UnitedStatesby "jumping
9.
> ship" about1935. Hewasa painter~forgasmallboatcompany
whichwasconstructingsmallcraft for the UnitedStatesNavy.
¥92 , Waalengatheredinformation about
ships sailing for
England.Healso obtaineda confidentialbooklet
issued by the
I
FBI whichcontainedprecautionstc be taken
by industrial plants
¢ to safeguardnational defensematerials from sabotage. Waalen
also securedGcvernment contracts listing specifications for in
materials andequipment,as well as detailed seacharts of_the&#39;
United States Atlantic coastline.
F, Following his conviction, Uaalenwassentenced
to 12
é years in prison icr espionagegnd a concurrent 2-year term for
vieelaticn thazjtegiatraucn
.P
act. 1
13%..
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Y4 -_ anoir nanny aucusr wiisstasnsxi &#39;
»&#39;~
K. Aj ermannative, Nalischewskihadbeena seaman
since 1
t maturity. He becamea naturalized citizen in 1935.
&#39;
Walischeuski
became
connected"with
theGerman
espipnage
_system
throughPaulFehse.Hisdutieswereconfined
t§n§gase~cfj
courier, carrying
contacts abroad.
&#39;
datafromagentsin the Unitedstates
1?
can V2
Uponconviction, Walischewski
receiveda five~year e
prison sentence
on espionagecharges,as well as a two-year
concurrent sentence under the Registration Act.
ELSE WEUSTENFELD
"

Else Weustenfeldarrived in the United States from


Germany
in 1927andbecame
a citizen 10yearslater. From1935
,. until her arrest,&#39;she
was
a secretary
for a lawfirmrepresenting
"theGerman Consulate
in NewYorkCity. Y ;p
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Else
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two
2V7 : years
concurrent on
_. charge
of registrationviolations.
V; -
AXELWHEELER-HILL V
y VJ AxelWheeler-Hill
came totheUnited
States
in 1923
V fromhis native land of Russia. Vhewasnaturalized as a citizen
V
V";
a
in 1929 and was employedas truck driver. V
Wheelerkhillobtainedinformation for Germany regarding2
, ships sailing to Britain from NewYork harbor. &#39;
with Felix
Jahnke,he enlistedthe aid of Paul Sohalzin building
a radio ,
set for sending
x coded
V. messagesto Germany.
92 "~ Hheeler~Hill-V85ee fé cedto V
aa11essng»ees»seesas,
serve 15 years i%e§fiS©Bfor espionageand 2 concurrent years »
under the Registration Act. V
.V &#39;
asarnnn HOLFGANG_
zaszzucea "
. V V»

V Born in Germany,ZenzingereameVtothe United States in


19HO citizen of the Unionof SouthAfrgca. His
as aVnaturalized
reportedreasonfor coming
to this countrywasto stud$f
-mechanicaldentistry in LosAngeles,California. F%_*
receiveda pencil for preparing
In July 1900,Zenzinger
invisible messages
for Germany
in the mail fromSiegler. Hesent
several letters to Germanythrough a mail drop in Sweden
outlining details of national defense materials.

by
Zenzingerwasarrested FBI Agentson April T6, 19H1.
18
Pleading guilty, he received monthsin prison for violation of
8
the RegistrationAct and years imprisonment &#39;
for espionage.

e " " ~ V VV

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