YUReview

T H E M A G A Z I N E O F Y E S H I V A U N I V E R S I T Y W I N T E R 2 0 0 6 / H O R E F 5 7 6 6

WE ARE FAMILY

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY
Bring Wisdom to Life.
U N D E R G R A D U AT E S C H O O L S

Yeshiva College Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program Robert M. Beren Department of Jewish Studies Isaac Breuer College of Hebraic Studies James Striar School of General Jewish Studies Yeshiva Program / Mazer School of Talmudic Studies Irving I. Stone Beit Midrash Program Stern College for Women S. Daniel Abraham Honors Program Rebecca Ivry Department of Jewish Studies Sy Syms School of Business Rennert Entrepreneurial Institute
G R A D U AT E A N D P R O F E S S I O N A L S C H O O L S

Albert Einstein College of Medicine Sue Golding Division of Medical Sciences Belfer Institute for Advanced Biomedical Studies Michael F. Price Center for Genetic and Translational Medicine Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law Jacob Burns Institute for Advanced Legal Studies The Floersheimer Center for Constitutional Democracy Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology Wurzweiler School of Social Work
A F F I L I AT E S

Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik Center of Rabbinic Studies Rabbi Norman Lamm Kollel L’Horaah Yadin Yadin Semikhah Program Marcos and Adina Katz Kollel (Institute for Advanced Research in Rabbinics) Ludwig Jesselson Kollel Chaverim Bella and Harry Wexner Kollel Elyon and Semikhah Honors Program Israel Henry Beren Institute for Higher Talmudic Studies (HaMachon HaGavohah Le’Talmud) Max Stern Division of Communal Services Philip and Sarah Belz School of Jewish Music Yeshiva University High Schools The Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy / Yeshiva University High School for Boys Milton and Pearl Unger Department of Jewish Studies Samuel H. Wang Yeshiva University High School for Girls Yeshiva University Museum
IN ISRAEL

Caroline and Joseph S. Gruss Institute in Jerusalem S. Daniel Abraham Israel Program

YUReview
WINTER 2006 / HOREF 5766

4

26

14

3 4 14

FROM THE PRESIDENT

YU DIGEST

W E A R E FA M I LY
At Yeshiva University, we often refer to our collective selves as a family. In this section, we highlight our interconnectedness by glimpsing what some of our “relatives” are up to.
THIS THING CALLED LOVE MINDING HIS OWN BUSINESS B A L A N C I N G P U L P I T A N D FA M I LY J E W S A N D A M E R I C A’ S G A R M E N T I N D U S T R Y Y U TA K E S L E A D I N H E L P I N G I S R A E L S T U D E N T S W I T H M E N TA L H E A LT H I S S U E S A FA M I LY C E L E B R AT I O N FA C U LT Y E S S AY: INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION: WHO ARE THE GOOD GUYS?

29

A LOOK BACK
YU and the struggle for Soviet Jewry.

C O V E R : FA M I LY T R E E — I M A G E B Y © I M A G E S . C O M / C O R B I S

YUReview
30 35

34

36

30 34 35 36

CENTERED IN THE JEWISH FUTURE
Rabbi Kenneth Brander, dean of the new Center for the Jewish Future, tackles substance in this penetrating Q and A.

D AV I D S R O L O V I T Z : A NEW DEAN FOR A NEW ERA
“ College is not just about vocation training,” said the Princeton University professor, who will become the 10th dean of Yeshiva College in June. “It’s also about preparing for life, for how to think.”

E X P L O R AT I O N S : EXCERPTS FROM STUDENT RESEARCH
“ Negotiating Urban Spaces: Central Park and Ground Zero,” by Aaron Roller

E I N S T E I N E X H I B I T AT G O T T E S M A N L I B R A R Y
The history of Yeshiva College is, in part, the story of a friendship between the school and Albert Einstein.

D E PA R T M E N T S
ALUMNI NEWS 38 BOOKSHELF 42 CLASSNOTES 45

from the president n

YUReview
YESHIVA UNIVERSITY
Morry J. Weiss
CHAIRMAN, BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Richard M. Joel
PRESIDENT

In Genesis, after Adam is created, the Lord
states a master principle for humanity: “It is not
good for Man to be alone.” The gift of union, of bridging
the existential loneliness of life by forging family, has been our defining blessing. Civilization as it has developed can be viewed as concentric circles of family, and we struggle through the ages to remind ourselves that we indeed are kindred. This issue of YU Review celebrates family, the central institution of our lives. In this fine work, different members of the Yeshiva University family are featured, and you will enjoy various facets of how we at Yeshiva University advance that master idea. I sense that YU is growing closer as family—faculty, students, trustees, alumni, parents and communities, we are bonded together in a search for wisdom and a commitment to advancing noble ideas informed by our timeless tradition. Four months ago, Esther and I became grandparents. What many of you told us is true—there is a special magic in seeing one’s third generation begin life. In a few years, Eitan Joel will mark the fourth generation of Esther’s family to attend Yeshiva. For me, this is the first time in over a hundred years that there are three generations of Joels alive at the same time. I imagine our grandchild at study, and I am encouraged and inspired. It reminds us how much we have, and how much we must do.

Daniel T. Forman
VICE PRESIDENT FOR I N S T I T U T I O N A L A D VA N C E M E N T

Georgia B. Pollak
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF U N I V E R S I T Y C O M M U N I C AT I O N S

YU REVIEW
June Glazer
EDITOR

Judy Tashji
C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

CONTRIBUTING TO THIS ISSUE:

Gila Berkowitz Elsa Brenner Philippe Cassamajor Esther D. Kustanowitz Melissa Payton Daniel Pollack Aaron Roller
PHOTOGRAPHY

Jeremy Bales Enrique Cubillo Michael Datikash Norman Goldberg Jane Hoffer Aaron Pergament Peter Robertson Susan Wagner V. Jane Windsor

Richard Bieler
SENIOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR O F C O M M U N I T Y R E L AT I O N S

Yeshiva University Review is published three times each year by Yeshiva University’s Department of Communications and Public Affairs. It is distributed by mail to alumni and friends of the university and on campus to faculty and administrators. Paid subscriptions are available at $15 per year. Editorial contributions and submissions to “Classnotes” are welcome, but the publication cannot accept responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. All submissions are subject to editing. Opinions expressed in the Review are not “official” university policy. Send mail to: Yeshiva University Review 500 West 185th Street New York, NY 10033-3201 Phone: 212-960-5285 Email: glazerjb@yu.edu
© Y E S H I VA U N I V E R S I T Y 2 0 0 6 3

For all of our Eitans.

RICHARD M. JOEL

YUdigest
Life Bone Marrow Foundation, a Florida-based organization that educates and encourages people to be tested for bone marrow registries around the world. • Linda Altman is member of the Board of Overseers and president of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine National Women’s Division. She and her husband, Earle, are Benefactors and members of Einstein’s Society of Founders. • Kathryn O. Greenberg is chair, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law Board of Directors, the first of its alumni to hold the position. She is the founder of the New York Legal Assistance Group (NYLAG), which provides free civil legal services for low-income New Yorkers. She and her husband, Alan, are Benefactors. • Jack M. Nagel is a Benefactor, Holocaust survivor, chairman of the West Coast Friends of Bar-Ilan University and a member of its board of trustees. He and his wife, Gitta, are founders of the US Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC. • Rose Yavarkovsky is member of the Executive Council and a founding board member of the Atlantic Beach chapter of Yeshiva University Women’s Organization. She established the Rose Yavarkovsky Scholarship at Stern College for Women. She and son Ira are Benefactors and Sy Syms School of Business founders. They also established four scholarships at Wurzweiler School of Social Work and are Cardozo Fellows.
To see an expanded version of many of these stories, visit www.yu.edu/news/

Hillary Clinton keynotes annual Hanukkah Dinner and Convocation
Senator and Five Communal Leaders Honored
Kathryn O. Greenberg ’82C, Jack M. Nagel, and Rose Yavarkovsky. Senator Clinton is the only former First Lady ever elected to the United States Senate. She serves on the Senate Committees for Environment and Public Works; and Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. She is also the first New York senator to serve on the Senate Armed Services Committee. In her address, Senator Clinton expressed unequivocal support for Israel and described the United States and Israel as partners against terrorism. “People in the Middle East who are not sure what democracy means should look to Israel,” she told the audience of some 700. “The bonds between the United States and Israel are forged on the common struggle for human rights, democracy, and the right to live without fear and oppression.” Opening the proceedings, President Joel said: “Tonight we celebrate Yeshiva University and look to the future with hope and challenge. The recipients of honorary degrees exemplify the life lessons and models of leadership that we seek to teach our students.” • Jay Feinberg is a former foreignexchange analyst and leukemia survivor who founded the Gift of

S
4

enator Hillary Rodham Clinton (NY) was among six recipients of honorary degrees at Yeshiva University’s 81st Annual Hanukkah Dinner and Convocation, held Dec. 11 at the WaldorfAstoria in NYC. President Richard M. Joel conferred honorary degrees on the senator, who delivered the principal convocation address, as well as on Linda Altman, Jay Feinberg,

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

B E R E N C A M P U S D E D I C AT I O N
Yeshiva University Chairman Emeritus Robert M. Beren and his family visited Yeshiva University on Nov. 15, for the official dedication of the Israel Henry Beren Campus. The mid-Manhattan campus was renamed in gratitude for Mr. Beren’s leadership gift as trustee of the Israel Henry Beren Charitable Trust. Mr. Beren, his sister, Leila Jacoby, and his children, Adam, Nancy, Amy, and Julie, along with spouses and friends, were warmly welcomed and thanked for their generous support by President Richard M. Joel at a breakfast on the Wilf Campus. The family then joined President Joel on a tour of programs and From left: Robert Beren, friend Malka Fingold, and YU Board of Trustees chairman Morry J. Weiss. facilities previously underwritten by Mr. Beren and his late uncles, Israel Henry and Harry H. Beren, on the Resnick Campus and at Brookdale Center. “Beren Day” concluded with a dinner in the family’s honor hosted by members of the Board of Trustees and their spouses. See page 26 for more photos of the day.

At the Graduate Schools…
F E R K A U F G R A D U AT E SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY (FGS) overview of the mourning process, as well as new theoretical and clinical developments in the area of bereavement counseling. sistant director, NYU Child Study Center’s Institute of Trauma and Stress, where she headed a free treatment program for adults and adolescents affected by the events of 9/11. Dr. Gordon, who completed his postdoctoral training at Adelphi University, is with NYU’s Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine. al Association of Social Work. A recognized expert in both field education and in developing curriculum on cultural competence and multicultural practice, Dean Hendricks was recently appointed to a three-year term on the Commission on Accreditation, Council on Social Work Education. • Adrienne Asch, PhD, a bioethics expert and authority on the rights of the disabled, is the Edward Millstein Professor of Bioethics. Previously on the faculty at Wellesley College, her research and policy work have focused on issues such as reproductive rights, disability, genetics, and surrogacy.

New counseling master’s offered
Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology has inaugurated NYC’s first licensure-qualifying master’s program in mental health counseling. The initiative is in response to recent changes in NYS law allowing master’s level graduates in psychology to become licensed counselors.

New school-clinical psychology program Web site
A new Web site developed by the school-clinical psychology program offers updates of the current program manual, in addition to information on activities and scholarly and professional developments of faculty, current students, and alumni. To access the site, visit www.yu/ferkauf/academic/school_ clinical.htm.

WURZWEILER SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK (WSSW)

Bereavement conference for helping professionals
A one-day practical conference, “Grief Counseling: What Therapists Need to Know,” is planned for May 2006 at Brookdale Center. The conference, designed for practitioners and students in mental health and other helping professions, will provide an integrative

Faculty/administrative appointments
• Carmen Ortiz Hendricks, DSW, ’93W, professor at Hunter College School of Social Work, is new associate dean. She has held numerous social work leadership positions, including president, NYC chapter, Nation-

New board members
Lori Davis, PsyD, ’02F, Robert M. Gordon PsyD, ’86F, and Bobby Dor Ferkauf recently joined the Ferkauf Board of Governors. Dr. Davis began her postdoctoral training at Weill Cornell Medical College and was later promoted to as-

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

5

n

digest

Wurzweiler suffered a great loss with the passing in June of Margaret Gibelman, DSW, doctoral program director, after a battle with lung cancer. Dr. Gibelman made a substantial contribution to the field of social work as a scholar, author, researcher, mentor, and practitioner. “She was the consummate academic, with a commitment to scholarship, her profession, and her students,” said Sheldon R. Gelman, PhD, Dorothy and David I. Schachne Dean at Wurzweiler, where Dr. Gibelman taught classes in management /administration, child welfare, and social policy.

tions (Haworth Press), an overview of the economic status of aging families in the US. Joan Beder, DSW, ’93W and David Strug, PhD, were promoted to full professors, and Jonathan Fast, DSW, ’99W was promoted to associate professor. Drs. Fast and Strug also were granted tenure. • Assistant Prof. Rozetta WilmoreSchaeffer, PhD, volunteered with the Red Cross in New Jersey to coordinate the delivery of mental health services to victims of Hurricane Katrina. She prepared staff to be deployed to Texas and Louisiana, maintained contact with them in the field, and debriefed them upon return.

Scott Goldberg

A Z R I E L I G R A D U AT E S C H O O L O F J E W I S H E D U C AT I O N A N D A D M I N I S T R AT I O N ( A G S )

Scott Goldberg, PhD, assistant professor of education and psychology; and teaching Tanakh, facilitated by Moshe Sokolow, PhD, YH,’69Y,B, Fanya GottesfeldHeller Professor of Jewish Education, at CHATS in Toronto. In addition, Dr. Chaim Feuerman, EdD, Golda Koschitzky Professor of Jewish Education, facilitated workshops this fall for schools outside the New York area where Azrieli student teachers are currently placed.

Activities in Israel Faculty wrap-up
• On a recent group trip sponsored by the Chinese government, Martin Birnbaum, PhD, Beate and Henry Voremberg Professor of Social Group Work, spoke to local high school students about his work and the role of the social worker in the United States. • During his sabbatical in spring 2005, Norman Linzer, PhD, YH, ’55Y,R,W, Samuel J. and Jean Sable Professor of Jewish Family Social Work, together with assistant professors Heidi Heft LaPorte, DSW, ’87,’00W, and Jay Sweifach, DSW, ’88,’02W researched issues such as the impact of 9/11, hurricanes, the SARS epidemic, and terrorism on social work practice and ethics in various agencies in New York, New Jersey, Florida, Boston, Toronto, South Dakota, and Israel. • Assistant Prof. Joanna Mellor is the 2005 recipient of Walter M. Beattie Jr. Award from the State Society for Aging of New York for outstanding contributions to the organization and commitment to its goals. She was also recently appointed a fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine and of the Gerontological Society of America. • An article in the spring 2004 issue of The Social Work Forum, coedited by Prof. Daniel Pollack and Eric Levine, DSW, ’94W and published by Wurzweiler, was awarded one of five 2005 Pro Humanitate Literary Awards from the Center for Child Welfare Policy of the North American Resource Center for Child Welfare. • Prof. Richard K. Caputo, PhD, is the new director of the doctoral program. Professor Caputo recently published his second book, Challenges of Aging on US Families: Policy and Practice ImplicaAzrieli announces graduate courses open to both Azrieli students and other interested individuals at the Caroline and Joseph S. Gruss Institute in Jerusalem. This is in addition to supervised student teaching and administrative internship opportunities currently available to Azrieli students at Israeli educational institutions… Azrieli also joined with the Van Leer Institute and Tel Aviv University this January to sponsor a conference marking the 100th anniversary of the birth of Nehama Leibowitz, instructor of three generations of teachers who acquired an extensive and profound influence on Torah pedagogy worldwide.

B E R N A R D R E V E L G R A D U AT E SCHOOL OF JEWISH STUDIES (BRGS) Last summer, the Harry Fischel Summer Program hosted Yeshayahu Maori, PhD, of Haifa University; as well as professors Rachel Elior, PhD, Menachem Ben Sasson, PhD, and Emanual Etkes, PhD, of Hebrew University… Moshe Bar-Asher, PhD, of Hebrew University and the Hebrew Academy of the Hebrew Language in Jerusalem taught a course on

Faculty members offer seminars, workshops
Azrieli summer seminar offerings this year included differentiated learning taught at the Wilf Campus by

6

Mishnaic Hebrew… Mordechai Cohen, PhD, ’87Y,R,B, associate professor of Bible, delivered a paper, “ ‘Reproducing’ the Text: Traditional Biblical Exegesis in Light of Ludwig Strauss’ Literary Theory,” at a conference marking the 100th anniversary of the birth of Nehama Leibowitz… Dean Arthur Hyman will deliver a paper in February at the Conference on Jewish Philosophy at University of Amsterdam on “Maimonides as Biblical Exegete”… Yaakov Elman, associate professor of Jewish studies, spoke on “Theological Dialogue in Amoraic Babylonia” at the Eighth International Conference of the Institute for the Study of Rabbinic Thought at Robert M. Beren College, Beit Morasha of Jerusalem, in December… Enrollment this year continues to increase, with an anticipated increase in doctoral students, as well, within the next two year.

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE (AECOM)

B E N J A M I N N . C A R D O Z O S C H O O L O F L AW ( C S L )

Center receives funding
The Hispanic Center of Excellence at Einstein received $562,902 in federal funding from the US Department of Health and Human Services. The center is a multidisciplinary program that helps new physicians target specific needs of Latinos and recruits Latinos for careers in medicine.

Recent Conferences/Lectures
• The New York Lawyer Chapter of the American Constitution Society and Cardozo recently hosted “On Double-Super-Secret Background: Managing Confidential Sources in the Post-Miller/ Cooper Era.” Three experienced investigative reporters and an attorney discussed dealing with and protecting confidential sources in the post Miller/ Cooper era. • Senator Frank Lautenberg (NJ) was keynote speaker when the Floersheimer Center for Constitutional Democracy and the Jacob Burns Center for Ethics in the Practice of Law presented a two-day conference, “Secret Evidence and the Courts in the Age of National Security.” The conference described and evaluated the use of secret evidence throughout the legal process. The Floersheimer Center also presented Bhikhu Parekh, a member of the British House of Lords, who addressed “Is There a Case for Limiting Hate Speech?” during a two-day conference on the comparative law of hate speech regulation. • The Samuel and Ronnie Heyman Center on Corporate Governance brought together prominent members of the corporate restructuring field for a one-day conference, “Perspectives on Corporate Restructuring.” James H.M. Sprayregen of Kirkland & Ellis LLP delivered the keynote address on the purpose, role, and importance of restructurings in corporate America. A panel discussion featured leaders from the fields of law, business, finance, government, and academia.

Community fairs aid health literacy
Medical students recently participated in a weeklong program, “Breaking Down Barriers to Health Literacy,” to promote health literacy in the Bronx and provide first and second-year medical students with an opportunity to practice effective communication with future patients. As part of the program, students attended workshops led by Einstein faculty members and certified health educators from Montefiore Medical Center, and conducted health education programs at local schools and a local community center.

Yaakov Elman

Biochemistry chair lauded
Dr. Vern Schramm, Ruth Merns Professor of Biochemistry, is recipient of the 2006 Repligen Award from the Biological Chemistry Division of the American Chemical Society. The award recognizes Dr. Schramm’s contributions to the field of mechanistic enzymology. He is renowned for his research into the “transition-state structure” of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, which has led to the design of powerful inhibitors that can be used in the prevention of such diseases as cancer. Two inhibitors designed by Dr. Schramm’s lab are in clinical trials for the treatment of leukemia and autoimmune diseases.

Last summer, Revel faculty members comprised part of the contingent of YU’ers to attend the Fourteenth World Congress of Jewish Studies, held in Jerusalem July 31–Aug. 4. Revel faculty members who delivered papers at the conference were • Yaakov Elman (see above. He was unable to attend, but his paper was read) • Arthur Hyman (see above) • Richard Steiner, PhD, ’66Y, professor of Semitic languages and literature • Haym Soloveitchik, PhD, ’63R, Merkin Family Professor of Jewish History and Literature.

Panelists Mark Bowden and Mark Feldstein discuss dealing with and protecting confidential sources in the post-Miller /Cooper era.

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

7

n

digest

At the Undergraduate Schools…
Y E S H I VA C O L L E G E ( Y C )

Also at Stern:
• In November, Aliza Ricklis ’98S offered a career information session on genetic counseling; Rachel Bronson, author of Thicker Than Oil: The U.S. and Saudi Arabia, addressed students; Stern cosponsored, along with the Rabbi Arthur Schneier Center for International Affairs, an address at the Beren Campus by Michael Oren, author of Six Days of War: June 1967 and the Making of Modern Israel; and the Dunner Political Science Society presented Malvina Halberstam, professor of law at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, who spoke on “The Evolution of the UN’s Definition of Terrorism.” • In December, the English department hosted Gil Schwartz, executive vice president of communications for CBS. Mr. Schwartz addressed students in the Levy Lounge on “What to Do When Everything Goes Wrong”… the Stern English department hosted David Elstein, longtime British

At Yeshiva University High Schools ( Y U H S )

Richard Holbrooke

DeGrasse Tyson is Writer-in-Residence
Neil deGrasse Tyson, PhD, the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium in NYC, was Yeshiva College Writer-in-Residence for the fall term. Dr. Tyson gave a public reading on “Explorations in Science Writing: A Personal Journey” and focused on various nonfiction forms of writing, including letters to the editor, magazine features, news articles, and encyclopedia entries, in his course in the Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program. Previous writers-in-residence had been fiction writers, and English department chair Joanne Jacobson, PhD, viewed Dr. Tyson’s class as “the kind of interdisciplinary course that will build bridges between the sciences and humanities.” The author and coauthor of seven books, Dr. Tyson also served as on-camera host, narrator, and executive editor of the PBS-NOVA four part mini-series “Origins.”

• Students Jaimie Stettin and Lauren Sipzner were named regional finalists in the Siemen’s Westinghouse Science Competition. They are among only three yeshiva students, out of a total of 90 finalists nationwide, to receive the distinction. • Two representatives from the Micronesian Republic of Palau, in town for the UN General Assembly opening session last September, visited the boys’ high school to thank students for their visit to Palau last winter. The students made the trip as an expression of gratitude for Micronesia’s consistent support of Israel—second only to that of the United States—in the General Assembly.

broadcasting executive responsible for the documentary “The World at War” and the comedy shows “Mr. Bean” and “Benny Hill.” Mr. Elstein spoke on “Media Bias: Who Decides?”; the Middle East Forum presented the roundtable discussion, “Academic Freedom and Accountability,” in the Levy Lobby. Ellen Schrecker, PhD, professor of history, and Alexander Joffe, director of Campus Watch, hosted the event.

Physics faculty receive grant
Gabriel Cwilich, PhD, Sergey Buldyrev, PhD, and Fredy Zypman, PhD, department of physics, were awarded a $100,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to organize a Pan-American Scientific Institute. The conference, “From Disordered Systems to Complex Systems,” will take place in late summer 2006 in Mar del Plata, Argentina. The professors were asked to lead the program along with two colleagues from Mar del Plata. A team of more than 20 world authorities on physics will attend, including researchers from France, Spain, and Israel, as well as North American and Latin American experts. In addition, Dr. Cwilich has arranged for five advanced undergraduate physics students to attend the conference, which is traditionally open only to graduate students, post-docs, and researchers.

STERN COLLEGE FOR WOMEN (SCW)

Ambassador Holbrooke at Stern
Ambassador Richard C. Holbrooke, former US Ambassador to the United Nations, spoke at the Schottenstein Cultural Center on the Beren Campus on “Morality, Foreign Policy, and the New Idealism of the Bush Administration.” The program was sponsored by the Dr. Marcia Robbins-Wilf Scholarin-Residence Program and Yeshiva University’s Rabbi Arthur Schneier Center for International Affairs.

8

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

Sy Syms School of Business Looks Ahead
Dr. Morton Lowengrub, vice president for academic affairs, has been working closely with Interim Dean Ira Jaskoll and other university administrators to map out the road ahead for Sy Syms School of Business.
Q: The search for a new dean is a process that takes time. Where are we now in that process and how is it advancing?

The second area will benefit gifted students enrolled at Sy Syms School. We’ve already begun developing an honors program by offering one honors course this past fall and two this spring. We plan a very rigorous program that will be guided by the input of our new dean.
Q: In YU’s strategic plan for the future, increased enrollment at the undergraduate schools has been identified as a priority. What are the immediate enrollment projections for Sy Syms School?

A: The search committee has met a few times, has begun the interview process, and expects, by the beginning of March, to have identified a group of excellent candidates to present to President Joel. The new dean should be on board by July 1, 2006.
Q: Sy Syms School of Business is moving forward at full steam. What major milestones are ahead for the school?

A: YU expects to increase its undergraduate enrollment by 1,000 students over the next five years. That translates into another 300 or so men and women at the business school. We expect Sy Syms to be a thriving institution, and we encourage students to take a careful look at what we have to offer.
Q: Looking ahead, where will Sy Syms School of Business be academically in, say, five years?

A: The interim dean and faculty members are working in two important areas this year: accreditation from the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) and building an honors program. The first is important because every well-organized business school is accredited by the AACSB. Accreditation will help raise the level of education at Sy Syms through a process of self-study that allows us to take a fresh look at our entire curriculum. We’ve already met with a consultant from the organization who has deemed that we are eligible for accreditation and who will guide us through the process. It will take two years and will be spearheaded by our new dean.

A: Along with all our undergraduate schools, we want to bring the business school to another level of excellence. We want to make sure that our students get the very best business education that can be offered.
Ed. note: On April 25, Robert J. Aumann, the 2005 cowinner of the Nobel Prize in Economics, will spend a day at YU, a visit initiated and sponsored by Sy Syms School of Business. A full day of events is planned, culminating with a public lecture in the evening.

Music professor honored
Stern College for Women presented a concert in honor of recipients of awards granted in 2005 by the American Academy of Arts and Letters, including Stern faculty member David Glaser, visiting assistant professor of music. The concert took place in December at the Leonard Nimoy Theater at Peter Norton Symphony Space in Manhattan. The Momenta Quartet played the world premier of his String Quartet No. 2. Professor Glaser received the Academy’s Academy Award.

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

9

n

digest
Beren Campus Film Festival

SY SYMS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS (SSSB)

Money isn’t everything
• While Bill Gates and Steve Jobs represent the opportunistic and the creative sides of business entrepreneurship respectively, the message behind their success is to “find something you care about and study it carefully,” said Paul E. Steiger, managing editor, The Wall Street Journal and vice president, Dow Jones & Company, during his talk, “Society’s Intensified Demand for Business Professionals,” at Sy Syms this fall. Mr. Steiger told students that while a solid background in economics and finance will be key to weathering any forecasted economic downturns, “you need to think about what kind of person you want to be.” • George Ross, executive vice president and senior counsel for the Trump Organization and business and legal adviser to Mr. Trump, is also Mr. Trump’s right-hand man on the TV program “The Apprentice.” In November he spoke Paul Steiger with students at the Wilf Campus to Syms students on strategies his boss employs for buying real estate. His lecture, “Trump Strategies for Real Estate: Billionaire Lessons for the Small Investor,” was based on a book by the same name that Mr. Ross recently authored. His message to students: “You can and will lose if you don’t know what you are doing.” George Ross

The Beren Campus’ Geraldine Schottenstein Cultural Center was the setting of a new initiative to bring outstanding films to the YU community during fall 2005. Films focused on the theme “Combating Crisis: Confronting Jewish Identity in a Changing World,” and included “Eicha,” “The Chosen,” “Hiding and Seeking,” “Ushpizin,” and “The Pianist.” After each showing, there was a brief discussion by professors, historians, film critics, and / or the director and/or writer of the featured film.

M E N ’ S U N D E R G R A D U AT E JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAMS The Stone Beit Midrash Program (SBMP) now offers all nine program shiurim (lectures) on Sundays for credit. Rabbi Ezra Schwartz ’96Y,R, formerly on President Richard Joel’s staff, is a new rebbe in the program… Among new courses at Isaac Breuer College of Hebraic Studies (IBC) and James Striar School of General Jewish Studies (JSS) is “Sephardic Intellectual History,” taught by Rabbi Yamin Levy ’87Y,R, academic director of Sephardic studies at the Jacob E. Safra Institute of Sephardic Studies; and one on the Holocaust taught by Jeffrey Gurock, PhD, Libby M. Klaperman Professor of Jewish History. IBC currently has more than 300 students, its highest enrollment ever… Rabbi Joshua Flug ’98Y,R, IBC instructor, is also teaching at Stern College for Women… Chief Rabbi Sir Jonathan Sacks, of United Hebrew Congregations of the British Commonwealth, spoke at the Wilf Campus in December. The event was sponsored by the men’s undergraduate Jewish studies programs and student councils. President Joel offered introductory remarks.

Middle East Forum hosts Daniel Pipes
The university’s chapter of the Middle East Forum presented Daniel Pipes, Middle East scholar and Middle East Forum founder and director, who discussed “Radical Islam and the War on Terror” at the group’s inaugural event on the Wilf Campus. Dr. Pipes is the author of 12 books and numerous articles, and is a columnist for both the New York Sun and The Jerusalem Post. He is a former member of the US Institute of Peace, to which he was nominated by President George W. Bush, and was the keynote speaker at the university’s 2003 Commencement.

At RIETS…
Annual Kinus Teshuva lectures at Rabbinic Seminary
Rabbi Eliahu Baruch Shulman, rosh yeshiva (professor of Talmud) at RIETS, and Rabbi Aharon Lichtenstein ’53Y,R, Rabbi Henoch and Sarah D. Berman Professor of Talmud and rosh kollel (head) and director of the Caroline and Joseph S. Gruss Institute in Jerusalem,

1 0

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

were featured speakers at the 21st Annual Hausman /Stern Kinus Teshuva lectures given between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur in NYC and Jerusalem. Rabbi Shulman gave his address on “The Quality of Mercy,” while Rabbi Lichtenstein spoke on “Teshuva: Norm and Crisis.” Rabbi Shulman was named a maggid shuir at Yeshiva Program/Mazer School of Talmudic Studies (MYP). His new responsibilities are in addition to the position of bochen (examiner) he has held since 1992.

Rabbi Koenigsberg joins faculty
Rabbi Eliakim Koenigsberg ’88Y,R has been appointed a rosh yeshiva in MYP. Rabbi Koenigsberg was a fellow of RIETS’ former Gruss Kollel Elyon and previously served as instructor in the Stone Beit Midrash Program. At MYP, he teaches a class in Talmud for entering students.
“Jewpardy,” a take-off on the TV game show “Jeopardy,” was a hit at this year’s General Assembly.

At the Center for the Jewish Future…
University delegation attends conclave
Yeshiva University’s Center for the Jewish Future (CJF) sent a delegation of alumni and students to the United Jewish Communities General Assembly in Toronto in November. Considered UJC’s premier event, the General Assembly attracts thousands of participants from Jewish organizations in North America and around the world. The university ran an exhibition booth where representatives talked with attendees about YU’s academic and social programs. It also featured “Jewpardy,” a Jewish version of the “Jeopardy” game show. David Schnall, PhD, YH,’69Y,R, dean of Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, offered a session on conflict management. Also leading sessions were Rabbi Kenneth Brander ’84Y,R, CJF dean, on synagogue/federation relationships; Rabbi Ronald Schwarzberg ’80Y, F,R, director at CJF of Jewish career development and placement, who taught Bible; and Rabbi Jacob J. Schacter, CJF senior scholar and director of rabbinic and community education. According to Julian Sandler, vice chairman of Hillel International who attended the GA, “The presence of YU students, together with those from Hillel International [the two main student groups at the conclave], enriched the GA experience for all those who attended.” lay and professional leadership and strengthening communities throughout North America and Israel. (Ed. note: see “Centered in the Jewish Future,” p. 30.)

Rabbis to celebrate ordination
On March 26, some 130 newly ordained rabbis will participate in the RIETS quadrennial Chag HaSemikhah celebration, a personal and professional milestone for each of the individuals who have finished their requirements for semikhah (ordination) since 2002. The event, to take place in NYC at the Wilf Campus, also will recognize musmakhim (alumni) from the classes of 1953–56 and 1963–66. Watch for details and for a link to the Chag HaSemikhah Web cast at www.yu.edu.

Challenging high school students to engage social issues
Eimatai, an initiative of the Association of Modern Orthodox Day Schools through CJF, in November sponsored a conference for high school students from across North America that challenged them to look at their responsibility of tikkun olam (repairing the world), learn about Jewish and non-Jewish causes, and acquire tools to start projects in their own schools. Titled “Exploring the World of Tikkun Olam,” the conference utilized university mentors who will support students when they return to their schools to implement their projects.

That’s the ticket
Almost 1,000 students on the Wilf and Beren campuses came out for CJF’s three-day launch of “You Are the Ticket to Our Future” this fall. Tents set up on both campuses featured food, giveaways, shiurim (lectures), and student opportunities to meet CJF department heads and learn how to become involved in this new initiative. CJF works together with the university’s colleges, schools, and affiliates to build programming that includes training and developing Jewish

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

1 1

n

digest

Rabbis helping rabbis
Nearly 50 pulpit rabbis from the US and Canada convened at Cong. Keter Torah in Teaneck, NJ, for a Yarchei Kallah (rabbinic conclave) to grow in study, discuss professional challenges, and receive instruction on contemporary issues in Jewish law. Rabbi Jacob J. Schachter served as facilitator and led study sessions in history and materials that could be used for sermons and classes. Other speakers included Rabbi Kenneth Brander, who spoke about cutting-edge issues and shared creative programming ideas. Rabbi Moshe Bellows ’90Y, CJF director of social and organizational leadership training and a professional

coach, discussed ways to run a board meeting; and psychoanalyst Shana Yocheved Schachter focused on creating balance between personal and professional time. President Richard M. Joel and Chancellor Norman Lamm ’49Y,B,R offered remarks. (Ed. note: see “Balancing Pulpit and Family,” p. 19.)

Come learn on Sunday mornings
An initiative by Yeshiva University offers men and women of all ages, Jewish backgrounds, and educational levels the opportunity to participate in traditional yeshiva learning with RIETS’ most celebrated roshei yeshiva (professors of Talmud) on Sunday mornings. Kollel Yom Rishon for men and Midreshet Yom Rishon for women are designed to accommodate working people. Located at the Wilf Campus in Washington Heights, the initiative utilizes the batei midrash (study halls), where participants receive and review material to prepare for the two shiurim (lectures) that follow. Each week the shiurim for men and for women are given by one of RIETS’ roshei yeshiva and one prominent speaker, and are attended by hundreds of participants. The schedules are posted at www.kollelyomrishon.org and www.midreshetyomrishon.org. Audio recordings of past shiurim are also available on line. Participants are encouraged to attend all or part of the scheduled programs. Complimentary breakfast and parking are available.

Jacob J. Schacter

Alumni, students comfort Katrina victims

I

n response to a request from Lee Wunch of the Houston Jewish Federation, Rabbi Moshe Bellows assembled a response team of three trained YU alumni who headed to Houston to spearhead relief efforts for Hurricane Katrina victims on behalf of the Houston and New Orleans Jewish Federations. Aliza Abrams ’05S, a CJF presidential fellow; Rabbi Aryeh Lightstone ’02SB,R, assistant rabbi in West Orange, NJ; and Phil Moskowitz ‘04Y, a third year semikhah (ordination) student at RIETS, created several initiatives in support of both the Jewish and greater communities in Houston. One was to organize Operation Compassion, an interfaith initiative that coordinated relief efforts at George R. Brown Convention Center in downtown Houston. Another enabled schools and communities around the country to sponsor the purchase and furnishing of apartments for displaced people. The group also assessed the needs of the New Orleans Jewish community in anticipation of the approaching High Holy Days. In a related story, CJF and the Department of Synagogue Services of the Orthodox Union sent Rabbi Robert Shur ’01Y,R, and undergraduates Elyasaf Schwarts and Menachem Butler, Student Organization of Yeshiva (University) president, to New Orleans to deliver a Torah to

members of Beth Israel Congregation, the city’s only Orthodox synagogue, in time for Yom Kippur. Since the synagogue was unusable after being submerged in 10 feet of water for three weeks, services were held at a local hotel and run by Yeshiva University students. In addition, President Bush recognized Rabbi Barry Gelman ’96Y,A,R, of United Synagogues in Houston at the National Dinner Celebrating Jewish Life in America, held at the National Building Museum. Rabbi Gelman was praised for his work in assisting those in Houston displaced by Hurricane Katrina. Rabbi Gelman was among many YU’ers attending the dinner, which was the culminating event celebrating 350 years of Jewish life in America. Representing the university were Chancellor Norman Lamm; Rabbi David Israel ’96R, director of the Association of Modern Orthodox Day Schools and Yeshiva High Schools, CJF; and Dr. Jeffrey Gurock. Yeshiva College senior and SOY president Menachem Butler also attended.

Aliza Abrams was part of a team that traveled to Houston to spearhead relief efforts for Hurricane Katrina victims.

1 2

In Israel...
Week in Israel
During the week of March 17–23, Yeshiva University will sponsor a series of events—billed as an “inaugural colloquium”—in Israel, under the title “Torah Umadda in the 21st Century: Engaging Israel, Engaging the World,” for its 3,000 alumni living there. The week will feature an alumni family Shabbaton and Chag The week will culminate with an academic convocation to award honorary doctorates to Rabbanit Malke Bina ’72B, founder and educational director of Matan, a pioneer institution in women’s Torah education in Jerusalem; Victor B. Geller YH,’48Y,W, a retired Jewish communal administrator, author, and lecturer who played a leading

Malke Bina

Victor Geller

Moshe Kaveh

Shlomo Riskin

I L L U M I N AT E D B I B L E O N D I S P L AY
A rare 15th-century Hebrew Bible, held by Mendel Gottesman Library, was on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC, Sept.-Jan. 3, 2006, as part of its “Prague, The Crown of Bohemia, 1347–1437” exhibition. Valued at $3 million, the 1489 Bible is a Hebrew manuscript written and dated in the city of Prague. The late Ludwig Jesselson, former chairman of the Yeshiva University Board of Trustees, together with his wife, Erica, arranged for the Bible to be presented to the university. Mrs. Jesselson is chair of the Yeshiva University Museum Board of Directors.

HaSemikhah celebration with President Joel and Chancellor Norman Lamm that will include students in Israel for their year abroad. It will also include sessions Sunday through Wednesday at locations throughout Israel—and sponsored by alumni groups from Yeshiva University—that will focus on the contribution of Torah Umadda to Religious Zionism, education, community, medicine, and the law.

role in YU’s Max Stern Division of Communal Services; Prof. Moshe Kaveh, an internationally renowned physicist who served as president of Bar-Ilan University; and Rabbi Shlomo Riskin YH, ’60Y,R,B, chief rabbi of Efrat and founder of the Ohr Torah Stone educational institutions. For more information about convocation week events call 02 531-3010 in Israel or email yuievents@yu.edu.

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

1 3

We Are Family
No matter what our current life situation, we are all members of a family— whether traditional, permutated, or group-based. At Yeshiva University, we often refer to our collective selves as a family, inclusive of all schools, students, faculty, alumni, administrators, and staff. And that characterization runs deeper: many of us can trace our association with the university back through three and four generations, so that even our families are family. In this issue, we focus on several facets of the theme of family as explored by segments of the university. Each facet is a story—whether it’s Sy Syms School alumnus Daniel Gryfe, who tells us what it’s like to run a family business; RIETS alumnus Rabbi Reuven Spolter, who describes the boundaries he and his wife, Rena, have created to protect family time; or Einstein professor Dr. Lucy Brown, who is researching the biological components of romantic love. These stories make it clear that our family is healthy and thriving. When you allow family members to experiment and grow, they bring honor to their name and homage to their home. Here are some of their stories.

[

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE

]

This thing called
B Y M E L I S S A PAY T O N

love
—SONG OF SONGS

T

“ Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth, for your love is better than wine.”

he Bible’s “Song of Songs” is considered by many to be the ultimate love poem. Composed by King Solomon in the 10th century BCE, it may not be the first description of burning, romantic love, but it certainly isn’t the last: popular culture is awash in paeans to love and its loss. Passionate love, whether love at first sight or the gradual dawning of romance between friends, is often the first step to marriage and then family. But can it be studied scientifically? And if it can, why would you want to? Lucy L. Brown, PhD, a professor of neurology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, is among the researchers who are zeroing in on the physiology of love. And, she says, far from taking the magic and poetry out of love, science can deepen our understanding of the glorious emotions it spawns—as well as the dangerous urges that can lead to violence when love goes sour. Earlier this year, Dr. Brown and her two principal coresearchers, anthropologist Helen Fisher of Rutgers University and social psychologist Arthur Aron of the State University of New YorkStony Brook, published their study on “earlystage intense romantic love” in the Journal of Neurophysiology. Now they are broadening their efforts to look at long-term loving attachments and the opposite: love affairs that end unhappily. By analyzing functional MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) results of 17 college-age men and women who were in the throes of new love, the researchers have determined that intense romantic love may have more to do with the motivation, reward, and “drive” aspects of human behavior than with the emotions or sexual attraction. That’s why researchers like Brown are more sympathetic to the couch-jumping antics of someone like Tom Cruise than is the cynical Hollywood press. “I think it helps to understand why people do these crazy things if you know that the regions of the brain that are active are at the unconscious level, reasons developed early in mammalian evolution,” Brown said. For the published study, the researchers devised a way to analyze reactions to feelings of intense love. As their brains were being scanned, the love-struck subjects alternately viewed a full-face photograph of their beloved and a photograph of a friend, interspersed with a “distraction-attention task”—counting backwards from a large number. That way, researchers could watch and contrast changes in brain activity.

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

1 5

LEGACY STUDENT

tion worldwide, is the first to look at how the brain changes in early-stage romantic love. It was Fisher’s interest in human reproductive (Unlike a standard MRI, which shows the strategy that brought the three principal details of anatomy, a functional MRI measures researchers together. “Humans have evolved three distinct but blood flow and corresponding changes in neural interrelated brain systems for mating and reproactivity.) What Brown and her colleagues found was duction: the sex drive, romantic love, and atthat the brain activity spurred by the loved-one’s tachment to a long-term partner,” Fisher said. photo was centered in dopamine-rich areas “Our results support what people have always linked to mammalian reward and motivation— assumed—that romantic love is one of the most forces behind the basic drives for food and powerful of all human experiences. It is defiwater, for example—and not in areas tied to sex- nitely more powerful than the sex drive.” Fisher recruited Brown for her neuroscience ual arousal. Extreme emotions, such as elation or anxiety, expertise along with Stony Brook’s Arthur Aron, are the result of romantic love, the researchers who has been studying romantic love for about say. “I like to think of this as a natural euphoric,” 20 years despite encountering popular and academic resistance. “It’s hard enough to study an emotion, let alone romantic love,” Brown said. “It’s shrouded in mystery—why do you need to know anything about it? But I was convinced, and Helen, too, that when this goes wrong, you’ve got stalking, incidents of depression and suicide, and even murder.” With greater understanding of intense romantic love, scientists might someday develop behavioral or drug therapies to treat patients suffering from depression in Dr. Lucy L. Brown is part of a the wake of thwarted team researching the early stages passion, she said. And of intense romantic love. Brown is grateful that Yeshiva University, with Brown said. “Romantic love can have such a pro- its mission to help individuals and society, “supfound impact on our lives—look at Edward VIII, ports research into this incredibly important who abandoned the throne to marry Wallis stage of our lives.” Romantic love is not, of course, simply a Simpson.” There may be an evolutionary reason for this, matter of neural activity, said Brown, who keeps Rutgers’ Fisher said. “This brain system probably pictures of her husband of 33 years in her office. evolved for an important reason—to drive our Personality, free will, and other elements come forebears to focus their courtship energy on spe- into play. “It can’t be completely explained,” she said, cific individuals, thereby conserving precious mating time and energy,” she said. In other “but we can know more. You can bake the best words, romantic love lets us concentrate on cre- chocolate cake ever, and you can even know ating a stable family instead of pursuing an end- about the chemistry behind it if you’re a chemist. It does not change the taste of the cake; it’s less mating game. The study, which has received press atten- still magical.” n
WE ARE

family

Miriam Ausubel
STERN COLLEGE SOPHOMORE, PRE-MED MAJOR
Grandfather: Isaac Suna ’54Y,R, YUHS rebbe for 42 years Grandmother: Odette Suna ’84F Father: Kalman Ausubel ’77Y Mother: Rochelle (Suna) ’80S, YU Beren Campus Counseling Center psychologist; YUHS psychologist Siblings: Yoni YH,’05Y, semikhah (ordination) program; Elli YH’02, YC student; Yael, YUHS student

“ After surviving the Holocaust, my grandfather, Rabbi Isaac Suna, was nurtured at Yeshiva College, thanks to Dr. [Samuel] Belkin [Yeshiva University’s second president.] He felt he was winning his fight against the Nazis by continuing his own Jewish education and by passing that education on to the next generation, during his career as rebbe at MTA [YUHS Boys] for over 40 years.”

“ The common theme in the three generations of my family is that, as a Jew in the modern world, you can fulfill your potential and still remain observant. It is a message we’ve been taught at home and that has been reinforced throughout our education.”

1 6

[

SY SYMS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

]

Minding his own
BY ESTHER D. KUSTANOWITZ

business

Every Sunday during his childhood in Toronto, Daniel Gryfe woke up at 3:30 am, yawned, got dressed, and accompanied his father in early morning’s darkness to Gryfe’s, the family bakery Daniel’s grandfather founded in 1930.

S
Y E S H I VA

even-year-old Daniel helped where he could, assisting his father in preparing the bakery ovens and turning on the lights. Side-by-side, father and son spent those Sundays together creating fond memories and implicit expectations. Although his father never pressured him directly, Daniel always knew that the unspoken assumption was there: Someday, the family business would be his to run, whether he wanted to or not. Now the younger Gryfe, a 2005 Sy Syms School of Business graduate, helms the family company as chief operating officer—a tall order for someone so young. But, Gryfe explains, “Growing up, the business was all I knew. And now at 23, I have 23 years of experience being around the family business.” Gryfe’s father built the company’s distribution to 100 stores, but the son faces the challenge of teaching an old business new tricks, and quickly discovered a technology gap

between the generations. “I would suggest, ‘Let’s spend some money on technology,’ and my father would say, ‘Prove to me that this works and I’ll invest the money.’” But the younger Gryfe doesn’t mind. “Experience gives wisdom. My father’s been in business 40 years, I’m in it one year. So that’s why, starting out, it’s all Klingon to me.” At Sy Syms, Gryfe embarked on a journey— to explore the world outside the family business and investigate alternate professional destinies. While interning at a venture capital firm, he found he had a real affinity for the field, and began to seriously consider his options. To their credit, his parents left Gryfe to make his own decision, and their son eventually realized that “venture capital would not allow me to grow the family legacy I knew I had back in Toronto.” “People think that going into the family business is taking the easy way out. But I’m here to dispute that,” Gryfe told students at a recent meeting of the Sy Syms School entrepreneurship class taught by his mentor, Prof. Lawrence

Bellman. “Going into the family business is not simple. You’re supposed to respect your mother and father, but in business, you’re likely to disagree. And when it’s you against two parents, it’s complicated: They’re your business partners, but they’re also your parents.” In New York for Kosherfest, an annual kosher foods fair where Gryfe’s Kosher (the company division headed by the junior Gryfe) was rolling out its new whole-grain frozen pizza line, he made time to address the students who, not long ago, were his academic peers. It was a threshold moment for the young businessman. “To come back to my alma mater and speak to this class, as someone who can give an intelligent opinion on a very complicated matter—it’s a new stage of who I am,” Gryfe said. Initially, his parents had suggested that he work his way up to management, but Gryfe disagreed. “My father and grandfather were bakers —great with formulas, with the capability to throw this and that together and come up with a great product. I’m a suit-and-tie person, and I enjoy building a brand.” The pizza line launch is an example of Gryfe’s favorite kind of work—innovative, entrepreneurial thinking, researching new markets, and understanding the potential of a new business opportunity within the $3 billion frozen pizza industry. Although Gryfe doesn’t feel that he was

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

1 7

LEGACY STUDENT

WE ARE

family
Someday, the family business would be his to run, whether he wanted to or not.

Jonathan Koslowe
YESHIVA COLLEGE SENIOR, POLITICAL SCIENCE AND HISTORY MAJORS
Grandfathers: Rabbi Herman J. Zwillenberg ’ 43Y,R and Rabbi Irving Koslowe YH,’40Y,B,R Father: Mark Koslowe YH,’73Y Brother: Jason Koslowe ’05Y

pushed into the business, he remembers the parental pressure of expectation; the prospect of his kids following in his footsteps immediately out of college is “out of the question,” said Gryfe, who hopes someday to write the book he wishes he had read when he was trying to focus professionally. “Not that many books are out there on the subject. Plus, many people who lecture on family business are professors who discuss theories,”

he said, adding that to speak from his own experience is an opportunity to share what he knows about a side of the business world that hasn’t been explored. “The family business has my name on it. It’s something that I build and other people enjoy. It’s a privilege to pass something like this on. My kids will have to work for someone else before they work for me—I want them to make decisions for themselves.” n

“ There are still some people at YU who remember my grandparents, so when I speak to them I feel a special connection.”

“ My dad’s father used to take me to Mac

When Business and Family Mix
According to Lawrence Bellman, PhD, assistant professor of management and marketing at Sy Syms School • Reluctance on the part of the family of Business and patriarch / matriarch to “give up the reins.” head of its Rennert Many times, the founder does not give Entrepreneurial his / her children freedom to operate and Institute, there grow the business on their own. are several problems encountered by entrepreneurs involved in family businesses: • Sibling rivalry. Not all members of a family have the skill set to operate a successful business, yet insist on being part of the management team. • Reluctance on the part of the family to bring in talented outsiders in key management positions. When the business expands beyond the capabilities of the • The role of in-laws. Are they accepted into the business and given positions of responsibility? • The role of husband-wife teams. Who’s the outside person (spokesperson and corporate leader) and who’s the insider (operations and back office management)? • Naming family successors. Which sibling is selected to continue the business? How will this affect the other siblings? family members to operate, they must be willing to import senior managers, trust them, and motivate them to perform.

[Maccabees] basketball games when I was young. My dad used to tell me about pranks he played. For instance, in the days when Morgenstern Residence Hall had phones only in each hallway, he’d answer it, ‘City Morg, you kill ’em we chill ’em.’ I did that once when the payphone in the lobby started ringing. My dad was so proud of me.”

1 8

Balancing pulpit family

and

S

BY JUNE GLAZER

Jacob J. Schacter, pulpit rabbi, scholar, and now University Professor of Jewish History and Jewish Thought at Yeshiva Univesity, knows first-hand what it’s like to grow up the son of a rabbi. His father, Rabbi Herschel Schacter ’38Y,R, retired from the rabbinate in 1999 after 60 years as a spiritual leader, the last 52 at Mosholu Jewish Center in the Bronx.

o, when the younger Schacter decided to enter the rabbinate, he says he “made it a huge priority to spend time with my children. I was the rabbi of a large synagogue in Manhattan [The Jewish Center], but I made sure I was home in the afternoons to give them juice and cookies, to buy them ice cream, to give them a hug. In the winter I sometimes missed mincha and maariv [the afternoon and evening prayer services] at shul so I could be with them.” In addition to his academic appointment, Rabbi Schacter is senior scholar and also director of rabbinic and community education at YU’s new Center for the Jewish Future (CJF). He says it is his experiences both as the son of a rabbi and as a rabbi with a young family that animate his conception of a professional enhancement program he runs through CJF called Yarchei Kallah. The program, which he began five years ago, offers continuing education to young rabbis—mostly RIETS musmakhim (graduates)—to their wives, and to educators. “For me, a fundamental component of professional rabbinic education is understanding oneself and one’s relationship to one’s family, and appreciating the centrality of those relationships within the context of rabbis’ professional work,” he said.

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

1 9

LEGACY STUDENT

The Impact of Rabbinic Life on Family
• The rabbinic family is not only more visible than the average family, but also psychologically more vulnerable. • Driven by anxiety and insecurity, many rabbis become over-involved with their congregations and under-involved with their families. • Despite the stresses of rabbinic life, most rabbinic families appear successful in raising highly functional children.

70%

of rabbinic

30%
Joshua Berman
YESHIVA COLLEGE SOPHOMORE, ENGINEERING PROGRAM
Great grandfather: Rabbi Mordechai Zimmerman studied at Yeshiva Eitz Chaim (precursor to RIETS) Grandfathers: Julius Berman ’56Y,R, RIETS Board chair and member, YU and AGS boards; Rabbi Michael Hecht YH,’61Y,B,R, YUHS rebbe, former YC associate dean and YUHS interim dean Grandmother: Dorothy (Gewirtz) Berman ’59S,F, SCW Board vice chairman Father: Zev Berman ’82Y, YC Board founding member and YCAA past president Mother: Judy (Hecht) Berman ’84S, YUHS Parents Council chair noblesse oblige.

children perceived their fathers this way.

of rabbinic wives

• The greatest resentment expressed by divorced wives of congregational rabbis was that they felt they always had to defer to

wish their husbands were not rabbis.

• Viewed as extensions of their father’s profession, children of rabbis often feel both special and isolated during their childhood and adolescence. It is the price paid for

the insatiable needs of others, while not feeling sufficiently supported or understood by their rabbinic husbands.

• The most critical factor affecting the strength of the rabbinic family is the

• Known as the “rabbi’s kid,” children of rabbis often feel stripped of their personal identity. As they grow older they tend to prefer socializing outside of their community.

marital relationship. If it is strong, then the family tends to be resilient to the stresses of rabbinic life.

—YISRAEL (IRVING) N. LEVITZ, PHD, AUTHOR OF “THE RABBI AND HIS FAMILY,” A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO RABBINIC COUNSELING (LEVITZ AND TWERSKI, EDS.)

“ YU is where I always thought I’d go to college. You can’t learn at any other college like you can here. You can’t expand your Jewish horizons anywhere else like you can here.”

“ I grew up in a family in which YU was part of its fundamental fabric. YU has had such an effect on forming my family that I feel I’m just as much a product of the institution as I am of my parents.”

In fact, the impact of rabbinic life on rabbis and their families has been of growing concern in recent years, and is analyzed in an article by Yisrael (Irving) N. Levitz, PhD, Wurzweiler associate professor emeritus and former Bennett Professor of Pastoral Counseling who teaches rabbinic counseling to semikhah (ordination) students at YU’s Caroline and Joseph S. Gruss Institute in Israel. Dr. Levitz is coeditor with Abraham J. Twerski of A Practical Guide to Rabbinic Counseling, in which his article appeared. He writes: “…the rabbinate is more than just a profession. It is an all-encompassing lifestyle that can absorb a rabbi to the point where he has neither time for himself nor his family.” He adds that, “Given the complex nature of the rabbinate and its weighty demands, rabbis face unusual challenges in successfully fulfilling

their roles as husbands and fathers. In order to succeed in the family arena, as well as the community sphere, rabbis need to develop a special sensitivity to the impact of rabbinic life on the members of their families, negotiate the many demands of the rabbinate, and be mindful of their priorities.” To that end, Rabbi Schacter utilizes the services of his wife, Yocheved, a psychotherapist in private practice who consults through the Rabbi Soloveitchik Institute in Boston and CJF. As both wife and daughter of a rabbi, she often speaks at the Yarchei Kallahs about how a rabbi’s professional life can spill over into his family’s personal lives, and about taking care of oneself and one’s family by setting necessary boundaries. “It’s important for rabbis to learn how to carve out time for themselves and their families. It doesn’t help the rabbi, his family, or his con-

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

LEGACY STUDENT

gregation when he overextends himself,” she said. “The strain commonly experienced in rabbinic families can potentially affect their stability,” Dr. Levitz writes, citing an overwhelming complaint of most divorced clergy wives that their husbands “devoted excessive time and energy tending to the needs of their congregation at the expense of their own families.” Dr. Schacter (she uses the name Shana Schacter professionally) advises rabbis that conversations with spouses and children about drawbacks and disappointments as well as privi-

leges and benefits of rabbinic life are critical and should be ongoing. This February, she will tell rebbetzins (wives of rabbis) at a Yarchei Kallah her husband will run in Teaneck, NJ that they should let their spouses know how their work impacts on them and their children “in an effort to create boundaries between the family and the job. “The more aggressive and assertive a rabbi is in creating space for his marriage and family, the more likely he is to be successful in his career. It’s only a myth that the selfless rabbi is doing a better job,” she said. n

Jonah Raskas
YESHIVA COLLEGE JUNIOR, HISTORY MAJOR
Grandfather: Rabbi Murray Grauer ’41Y,R Father: Stanley Raskas ’65Y,AE,R, YC Board secretary Mother: Sheri (Grauer) ’70S Siblings: Michael Raskas ’90Y,C (and wife Karen ’91S), Aliza Major ’92S (and husband Steven ’90Y), Tamar Benovitz ’95S (and husband Ethan ’90Y),

[

RABBI ISAAC ELCHANAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

]

Ari Raskas ’01Y (and wife Robin attended SCW)

Making Family Time Sacred
Reuven Spolter ’94Y,AG,R became a rabbi because he liked teaching adults. And, while he felt adequately trained and prepared to enter the rabbinate, he admits now that he had no real understanding of just how allencompassing his career choice would be. “I thought that being a rabbi would be a job, that I would have congregants. I didn’t consider its impact on family life because I wasn’t married then. I wouldn’t have been able to relate to the issue,” he said. Today, as spiritual leader at Young Israel of Oak Park, MI, a position he has held for five years, the impact of his profession on his family is very much on his mind. He and his wife, Rena (Rosen) ’97S,AG, feel fortunate to serve in a community where the ba’alabatim (householders) view themselves as partners in what he does. Nevertheless, the couple works hard to safeguard time with their four children, ages 8 years to 6 months, and with each other. Rena, who teaches high school girls at Yeshivat Akiva and takes an active role in her husband’s work by offering evening classes and private tutoring, and by welcoming guests to their home, makes sure she is close by when the children return from school and do homework. She limits her communal activities and, when she must go out at night, employs a steady babysitter with whom the children are familiar. But she or her husband always tries to put them to bed. Rabbi Spolter keeps Sundays clear of appointments except in the event of an emergency and tries never to speak of his children from the pulpit. “They are not props in my rabbinate. We want people to treat them normally, not as ‘ the rabbi’s children,’” he said. He often comes home for dinner, or sees his kids for an hour in the afternoon, and he and Rena ensure that the family eats together alone at least one meal each Shabbat. Rabbi Spolter acknowledges that he could not manage without the support of his wife. But beyond their marriage, he often turns for encouragement to relationships he has cultivated in the rabbinate, at conventions, and through programs, including the Yarchei Kallahs run by Rabbi Schacter. Rena says she turns to friends both within the synagogue and beyond it. “I’ve never regretted marrying a pulpit rabbi, even with all the difficulties,” she said. “We’re partners in this,” her husband added. “For us, the rabbinate is not so much a job, but a calling.”

“My grandfather always used to tell me about the time he took his semikhah [ordination] exam with the Rav and about being in his shiur [class]. My father often used to tell me about the many different types of people he met, his run for president of Student Council, and overall campus life. YU is more significant for me because they, my siblings, and their spouses all attended the same institution I do.”

“When Yeshiva University opens in Israel, I will send my kids to YU there.”

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

[

Y E S H I VA U N I V E R S I T Y M U S E U M

]

FROM RAGS TO RICHES:

Jews and America’s industry
In 1942, the United States War Production Board, which regulated every aspect of clothing production during the war years, issued regulation #L-85. With rationing impacting everything from food to fuel to fabric, the new directive required clothing designers and manufacturers to shorten hemlines and slim silhouettes in an effort to support American troops abroad.
1

garment

C
2 2

ole of California, for example, complied by producing its popular “Swoon” swimsuit, made without elastic, and even turned over the majority of its manufacturing to the production of parachutes. Pennsylvania-based Milco did likewise, abandoning its civilian lingerie line until after the war, though it continued to make “bloomers” for the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps. Regulation #L-85 not only marked a poignant moment in the intersection between manufacturing, patriotism, and American-made apparel, it transformed American style through creative use of available materials and a revamping of clothing production and industry stan-

dards. Its story is one of many that weave through a new exhibition at Yeshiva University Museum, A Perfect Fit: The Garment Industry and American Jewry 1860–1960, and that in part highlight the contribution of Jewish families to American fashion and the industry it spawned. MAKING THEIR MARK Jews in America have played an integral role in the development of the American garment industry. “Whether as tailors, peddlers, pressers, cutters, designers, models, moguls, or union leaders, it is impossible to understand the ‘rag trade’— one of America’s greatest industries—without focusing on the contribution of American Jews,” said Sylvia A. Herskowitz, museum director. Names like Levi Strauss, Hickey-Freeman,

Hart, Schaffner and Marx, Nettie Rosenstein, Adrian, Hattie Carnegie, Neiman Marcus, Anne Klein, and Fred Cole have become synonymous with the world of fashion, in large part because of the importance, throughout generations of family operation, placed on remaining true to the company’s founding vision. “My great-great-granduncle, Levi Strauss, developed a product and a way of doing business that would earn the trust of generations,” said Bob Haas, Levi Strauss & Co. chairman, in a written statement. “The company values—empathy, originality, integrity and courage—became the foundation of more than 150 years of responsible commercial success. Over the years, a succession of family members has led the company, and Levi Strauss’ descendants continue to

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

hold the majority of our stock. We have worked hard to sustain Levi’s principled approach to business through prosperous and tough financial times. Our ‘Profits with Principles’ philosophy is one of the reasons consumers trust our brand and our company.” Less famous Jews who toiled far from the limelight made contributions to the industry, as well, and A Perfect Fit also tells their story. They include • Union leaders David Dubinsky of the International Ladies’ Garment Workers Union and Sidney Hillman of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. They were among the many immigrants whose thinking had been shaped by a turn to Socialism and other radical ideological movements in Europe in response to deteriorat1. A dress by Mollie Parnis, c. 1950 2. Fashion sketch of Grubére Original, c. 1945

ing conditions faced by Jews in Czarist Russia. Newcomers to the United States brought these concepts of social activism with them and became active in garment workers’ unions. • A cutter named Mortimer Ritter who, in 1926, founded a New York City high school to help immigrants without a high school education learn more about the business. It became the Central Needle Trades High School in 1940. Ritter also worked with Max Meyer to establish the Fashion Institute of Technology in 1944 to offer career training in the industry. Meyer mobilized both industry and labor, as well as city and state politicians, to support the new college. A L L I N T H E FA M I LY Families also have played an important role in the industry’s expansion. Having a family connection to “get something wholesale” wasn’t simply a convenience, but a building block of the American garment industry. Family connections

2

World War I Uniform Factory, ca. 1917, YIVO Institute

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

2 3

WE ARE

family

figured prominently from its early days. Extended networks—siblings, cousins, children, spouses—facilitated entry into and contributed to success in manufacturing and retailing across the US. Common family bonds and shared entrepreneurial interests enhanced business continuity and growth.

“Fashion and clothing are universal topics; we all wear clothes, and so everyone can relate to this exhibition,” said Gabriel Goldstein, the museum’s associate director for exhibitions and programs and exhibition curator. “So many people have personal family backgrounds and traditions in the garment industry, so this history is particularly resonant.”

Among the families to whom the exhibition pays homage are several who are associated with Yeshiva University. One is the Schottensteins: Jay, who is YC Board of Trustees honorary chairman, is chairman of the board and CEO of Schottenstein Stores Corporation, Value City Department Stores, Inc., Value City Furniture, Englander Sleep Products, and American Eagle Outfitters. Another family is the Bienenfelds. Marvin ’53Y,R, Board of Trustees and RIETS Board of Trustees member, and Yeshiva College Board founding chairman, sold his family’s business, Bestform, 13 years ago. Started by his father, Morris, it had been in the family for more than 70 years. “Harmony,” he said, “is the secret to a successful family business. A family has to get along well. If you have harmony, it not only benefits the business, but it helps the family to stay together.” A Perfect Fit: The Garment Industry and American Jewry 1860—1960 opened in December and runs through April 2, 2006. To view its Web site, visit www.yumuseum.org . Yeshiva University Museum is located at the Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street in Manhattan’s Chelsea district. For more information, call the museum at 212-294-8330, email at info@yum.cjh.org, or visit www.yu museum.org. n
Home Industry, advertising flyer, c. 1900, Courtesy of Levi Strauss & Co.

The museum held its Gala Dinner celebrating A Perfect Fit on Jan. 10 at the Mandarin Oriental in Manhattan. The event featured a “Who’s Who” of the fashion industry: David Sable, chairman and CEO of Wunderman EMEA, served as dinner emcee; George Feldenkreis, chairman and CEO of Perry Ellis International and a dinner speaker, was an honorary chair; Robert Haas, Levi Strauss & Co. chairman, earned kudos for maintaining the company’s high standards of social responsibility; as did Andrew Rosen, founder and president of Theory, who told the 300 guests: “The fashion industry is truly a family business. This is not just about making clothes to fill up racks in stores. It’s about relationships, about community, about threading one generation to the next.”

From left: Museum Board vice chair Michael Jesselson; Dr. Phillip Frost ’61A, chairman and CEO of IVAX Corporation; Sy Syms School of Business Board member Sy Syms and his wife, Lynn; and George Feldenkreis, who served as the evening’s honorary chair. Above: Mr. Feldenkreis, Mr. Rosen, and Mr. Haas were honorees at the dinner.

S

tudents who study at schools far from home may be susceptible to problems that include anxiety, depression, and substance abuse, according to

Dr. Victor Schwartz ’77Y, a psychiatrist and the director of counseling for Yeshiva University’s Manhattan campuses. He and Dr. Efrem Nulman YH,’81W, senior university dean of students, have been helping students for many years to deal with the pressures associated with living away from family.

YU Takes Lead in Helping Israel Students with Mental Health Issues

In January 2005, their work became even more necessary when, while working with Dr. Hillel Davis ’72Y,B,R, vice president for university life, on ways to approach mental health issues for students in YU’s S. Daniel Abraham Israel Program (SDAIP), tragedy struck. Unrelated to SDAIP, a young man spending the year in an Israeli yeshiva died of a drug overdose. The same week, four Americans in Israel were arrested for dealing drugs. “We wanted to have YU take the lead in educating those who are responsible for the wellbeing of our Israel students,” said Dr. Schwartz about the reaction to the incidents in Israel. Annually, some 700 students spend their posthigh school year learning in Israel under the auspices of SDAIP. YU officials collaborated with the Orthodox Union to run a program in March about recognizing at-risk teens. Dr. Schwartz and renowned psychiatrist Dr. Abraham Twerski addressed the participants via videoconference; on site speakers were Dr. Josh Lamm YH,’79Y,A, medical director of the Yatzkan Center in Mt. Vernon, NY, the only kosher residential treatment center in the US for Jewish adolescents suffering from substance abuse problems; and Caryn Green ’97W. She is director of the Israel-based Crossroads, which features a drop-in center for youth in distress and also sends teams into downtown Jerusalem at night to offer services to

teens who may be using drugs or engaging in other dangerous behavior. “After the success of the first program, we decided to work on a yearlong mini-series,” said Mark Lehrman ’86Y,B, SDAIP director. “We needed to be proactive in confronting drug and alcohol problems with students in yeshivot.” Three seminars have been held so far, the last, this past January, featuring Dr. David Pelcovitz, Gwendolyn and Joseph Straus Professor of Jewish Education at Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration. Dr. Pelcovitz is a clinical psychologist who is known for his work with at-risk children and teens. Dr. Pelcovitz offered two programs. The first, “Dealing with Loss,” helped yeshiva administrators find ways to help students with illness, death, and divorce in their families back home. While these are issues that college students in the US face, “to be 6,000 miles away adds another layer of worry on it,” Dr. Pelcovitz said. The second session explored “adolescents having difficulties regulating their mood, selfconcept, depression, cutting, and obsessivecompulsive disorder,” said Dr. Pelcovitz, who also teaches courses in pastoral psychology at RIETS and serves as special assistant to President Richard M. Joel. During a session for rabbis and yeshiva administrators at YU’s Israel campus this past fall, Dr. Schwartz focused on how schools can prepare

for various emergencies, as well as recognize and respond to such problems as depression. More than 50 rabbis and administrators from 25 schools attended the session, where Dr. Schwartz explained that “risk is increased by any agent of change, and coming to Israel for the year immediately following high school can have an impact.” In an interview, Dr. Schwartz said that students in Israel experience the same problems as the general college student population. “Separation and homesickness in many cases add to the anxiety and depression that students may feel,” he said. He noted that students in Israel programs have the advantage of being in smaller schools and are part of a cohesive community. Studies have indicated that volunteerism, often found to a high degree in the religious programs, helps lower the rate of substance abuse. But Dr. Schwartz cautioned that schools must use their advantage to identify the problems, and he explained that they need to have a “well thought-out and communicated set of policies” to determine when outside experts and parents should be consulted. Participants have expressed enthusiasm for the sessions. “The interest is definitely there for programs such as these,” Mr. Lehrman said. “The gatherings serve as a catalyst for discussions and programs in the individual yeshivot.” n

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

2 5

I M A G E B Y © B E N W E L S H / Z E FA / C O R B I S

WE ARE

family

celebration
On an event-filled day that began with breakfast in Washington Heights and concluded with a dinner in midtown, Chairman Emeritus of the Board of Trustees Robert Beren and members of his family visited each of YU’s four New York City campuses. During their day-long tour with President Richard M. Joel, the family was briefed by deans, administrators, and faculty members about the varied programs and facilities made possible by their philanthropy over the years.

A Family

Robert Beren and his sister, Leila Jacoby, with a plaque commemorating Israel Henry Beren.

Mr. Beren and his family concluded their tour of the Israel Henry Beren Campus at the 36th Street Residence Hall. Attractive new banners and signs are displayed on all buildings on the campus.
2 6

LEGACY STUDENT

Mr. Beren and his son, Adam Beren (left), with President Joel at the breakfast reception for the family in the Presidential Suite.

Shoshana Adler
STERN COLLEGE JUNIOR, PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR
Grandfather: Jacob Adler YH,’46Y,R Father: Emanuel Adler YH,’76Y, YC Board vice chairman Mother: Helen (Monderer) YH,’77TIW Siblings: Avraham Simche YH,’03Y;

Mr. Beren spoke warmly to students, faculty, and administrators at the formal dedication of the Israel Henry Beren Campus in the lobby of the 215 Lexington Avenue academic and administrative building.

Mirel ’04S

“ Both my father and grandfather were in Rav Soloveitchik’s shiur.”

“ Everyone in my family had a positive experience at YU and they encouraged me to come. But I came mostly because of the Jewish atmosphere I knew I’d find At Brookdale Center, where the Israel Henry Beren Floor was dedicated at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law: Mr. Beren with Kathy Greenberg, chair of the school’s board, and third-year law students Melissa Roth (left) and Philip Wellner (right). here—shiurim, hessed [acts of kindness] opportunities, Jewish-based activities.”

Mr. Beren with his grandchildren at the Board of Trustees’ dinner in his honor: Standing from left: Michael Strapp, William Bressman, Robert Beren, Ellie Bressman, Samantha Platt, and Danielle Metson. Seated from left: Vered Strapp, Irene Jefferson, Elizabeth Jefferson, and Jonah Platt.

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

[

FA C U LT Y E S S AY

]

Intercountry Adoption: Who Are the Good Guys?
B Y D A N I E L P O L L A C K , M S W, J D PROFESSOR, WSSW*

T

he Jan. 5, 2005 CNN headline read, “Trafficking a threat to tsunami orphans.” Within days after the tsunami hit, Indonesia had begun putting into place policies that prohibited any child under age 16 from leaving the country. Why? The Indonesian Embassy’s press secretary in Washington explained, “The government would like to protect the children from potential traffickers.” It had cause for concern—estimates of children trafficked each year range from a half a million to four million. Is this concern sufficient to interfere with legitimate intercountry adoption? Indeed, is intercountry adoption an act of unparalleled altruism, or is it a sly way of kidnapping a poor country’s children? International child advocates are engaged in finger-pointing at each other. One side confidently asserts that, but for intercountry adoptions, the few children who are saved would be destined to be untouchables in the back rooms of institutions in their native countries. The other side claims that cultural genocide and unofficial baby buying is what is really going on. So, who are the good guys? According to the National Adoption Clearinghouse, Americans adopted 21,600 children from abroad in the year 2003. Many of them had confirmed health problems, among them HIV / AIDS, developmental disabilities, malnutrition, congenital defects, tuberculosis, and hepatitis. Intercountry adoption raises many general questions: Are such adoptions really in the best interest of the child? Are birth parents relinquishing their babies under economic or cultural duress? Do we know, from valid studies, if the adopted child will adjust satisfactorily to a new culture? Is there an element of classism and imperialism when Americans and Western Europeans secure babies from developing countries? Modern-day adoption statutes and international conventions balance the interests of children, birth parents, adoptive parents, states, cultures, and countries. Indeed, intercountry adoption is not a topic that can be easily divorced from the swirl of geo-politics. Intercountry adoption implicates the international reciprocal rights and duties that people claim for and from each other. But to limit human interactions to those based solely on duties and rights is to overlook the most essential aspect of being human—genuine concern for one another. Focusing on this communal aspect enhances our most human virtues. Complicating the resolution of these general issues is the need

for answers to three specific questions: Which data is really valuable in determining the best place for a child? What risks are there to a child in terms of abuse and exploitation in the care of an institution in the child’s home country versus those same risks if the child were adopted, whether it is within or outside of their home country? Is there more we can do to help the poorest countries become more efficient in finding homes within their own countries? Given the large numbers of children who are in the care of orphanages around the world, and an intercountry total worldwide annual adoption rate that numbers only approximately 30,000, much rancor has ensued. Perhaps both sides of this debate should acknowledge elements of truth in the other’s position. When an unwanted child with or without medical or emotional problems is spared a devastating, lonely, neglected life, clearly the adoptive parents, no matter where they reside, are doing an act of great love and kindness. On the other hand, when a child is adopted by parents many thousands of miles away without the host country having made rigorous attempts to secure a permanent family for that child in its own country, there may be grounds to question whether the adoption is really in the best interests of the child or primarily in the best interests of the parents. In order to achieve real-time positive results, the international adoption community needs to have all the relevant facts and figures about the child in actual time. The ability to make decisions quickly based on reliable information is the key factor to success in the face of difficult situations faced by at-risk children. We need intelligent solutions that will provide us with relevant information and allow us to plainly see the risks and chances for success by either leaving the child in its country of birth or removing it and allowing it to be swiftly adopted. An elementary school teacher told me the following story: She was watching the children in her classroom while they were drawing pictures. When she approached one girl who she knew had been recently adopted, she asked, “What are you drawing?” “I’m drawing a picture of love,” the girl replied. The teacher remarked, “But nobody knows what love looks like.” The girl shyly replied, “They will when I finish my picture.” n * Daniel Pollack is also Senior Fellow, Center for Adoption Research, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA. Correspondence may be addressed to dpollack@yu.edu.

A Look Back
The fight to free Soviet Jewry, which culminated in 1991 with mass Jewish emigration from Russia and its satellite states, dominated student life at Yeshiva University beginning in late April 1964. That was when the first organized meeting of the Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry (SSSJ) took place, at Columbia University. The group was comprised mostly of Yeshiva University students from the main and midtown campuses who often took to the streets and lobbied in Washington to protest the Soviet regime’s oppressive treatment of its Jews. Some SSSJ activists in the early and mid 1960s came from the ranks of Torah Leadership Seminar, a YU program that cultivated leaders from among the student body. In 1965, Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik, RIETS rosh hayeshiva and spiritual leader of the Modern Orthodox movement, gave his consent for YU students to act publicly on behalf of Soviet Jews. According to SSSJ leader Glenn Richter (who met his future wife, Lenore Wolfson ’67S,F at a demonstration in May 1964), the Rav’s “haskama” was a watershed moment within the Orthodox community: Other than during the Holocaust, Orthodox Jews in America generally avoided participating in public protest. In this undated photo, students march along Fifth Avenue on behalf of Soviet Jewry.

2 9

Centered in the Jewish Future
BY JUNE GLAZER

The Center for the Jewish Future (CJF), the brainchild of President Richard M. Joel, was launched this fall against a backdrop of devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina. Even before the public understood what the Center is about, a response team of young alumni trained by CJF, headed to Houston to spearhead relief efforts on behalf of the Houston and New Orleans Jewish Federations [see p. 12]. Since its inception, CJF has undertaken a gamut of initiatives—both within Yeshiva University and beyond—that aims to place the institution at the epicenter of a movement to address contemporary issues facing society and the Jewish community. At the helm of CJF is Rabbi Kenneth Brander ’84Y,R who, as dean, brings to Yeshiva University his considerable experience as spiritual leader of the Boca Raton Synagogue and as a community builder. During his 14 years in Florida, he founded and headed an array of Torah institutions, including the Boca Raton Community Kollel, and the Weinbaum Yeshiva High School of Broward and Palm Beach Counties. Under his leadership, the Orthodox Jewish community in Boca grew from 60 to more than 600 families. Rabbi Brander recently sat down with YU Review to articulate his vision of the Center and the impact he anticipates it will have on today’s generation as well as generations to come.
Read more about the Center for the Jewish Future on its Web site, www.yu.edu/cjf/

Q: They say that timing is everything. So, why is this the right time to establish the Center for the Jewish Future in light of what is happening now in Jewish life, around the world, and right here at Yeshiva University?

University to help it serve the Jewish community. The university has always promoted scholarship and activism. Now, with the launch of CJF, it is combining its multifaceted efforts to shape and impact the Jewish future.
Q: Would you give me an example of how CJF may utilize the university’s schools?

psychology, social work, education, or medicine allows us to build a new, dynamic paradigm. CJF serves as an overlay for the cross-pollination and interaction between the schools.
Q: What are some of the challenges and opportunities confronting the Jewish community that CJF is tackling?

A: The timing is right because we are blessed with a university president of great vision who feels we can make a difference in society. His passion for the Jewish community, his love for Torat Yisrael and Medinat Yisrael [Torah and Israel], make it the right time. Building on the accomplishments of Rabbi Norman Lamm [former Yeshiva University president and now chancellor], the president enables the university to embark on this important initiative. The Jewish community is looking for direction and leadership in dealing with contemporary concerns. Yeshiva University, as the seminal Jewish educational institution, is positioned to address Jewish communal needs by interacting with all segments of the Jewish community to offer the expertise of its faculty, the energy and activism of its student body, provide halakhic [Jewish legal] and philosophical direction, and make available research on contemporary issues.
Q: How does CJF fit into the mandate and vision of Yeshiva University? Does it reflect a new direction for our institution?

A: CJF is the nexus of all the energies of Yeshiva

A: As we train our students to be the future leaders of the Jewish community, CJF will develop that training in cooperation with Yeshiva University’s graduate schools, like RIETS, Wurzweiler School of Social Work, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, and Azrieli Graduate School of Education and Administration. As we train our [future] rabbis, we have Albert Einstein College of Medicine to teach them about cutting-edge scientific issues that will affect their future constituents. An example is the training program—the first of its type in North America—for young rabbis in the area of fertility and Halakhah [Jewish law]. It is being taught by rabbis and a doctor from Einstein, and is geared to create poskim [rabbinic authorities] who understand the physiology, medical procedures, ethical and psychological challenges [of infertility], and how Jewish law deals with related cutting-edge scientific developments. Creating opportunities for our future leaders to gain mastery and earn advanced degrees in

A: A major issue is a need for additional talented rabbis, educators, and lay leaders. CJF is helping address this need through its Yarchei Kallah program for pulpit rabbis, educators, and rabbis’ wives [see p. 19], by encouraging students to become educators, and by hosting ongoing leadership conferences in communities around the country. We create and support activist opportunities for our students, allowing them to realize that they can help change the world around them. We create a Jewish living laboratory with the hope that as Yeshiva University students plan their future, becoming Jewish communal professionals—klei kodesh— or as lay leaders—lei kodesh—will be uppermost in their minds. Additional challenges include the high cost of yeshiva tuition. CJF is partnering with the OU [Orthodox Union] and the RCA [Rabbinic Council of America] to confront this issue. We’re “incubating” student groups—mentoring them and helping them with funding. Among

Divisions roundup
RABBI JACOB J. SCHACTER Senior Scholar and Director, Professional Enhancement Program for Rabbis and Laity, Center for the Jewish Future “Contemporary Orthodox Jews are educated, sophisticated, and rooted personally and professionally in the secular world while living traditional Jewish lives. My interest is in helping develop pulpit rabbis, educators, and lay leaders who can articulate and implement a vision for Orthodox life in 21st-century North America, Israel, and beyond. I am presently working with close to a hundred young rabbis, and the numbers will grow in the years ahead as our CJF-sponsored programs continue to expand and flourish.” RABBI MOSHE BELLOWS ’90Y Director, Social and Organizational Leadership Training, Center for the Jewish Future “Strong, effective leadership is the cornerstone of any healthy organization, be it school, camp or university. Building healthy leadership begins with cultivating healthy individuals. The dual focus of this division is to educate and train our communities’ members in social issues facilitation, as well as organizational/business skills. By emphasizing these two areas, we can address our communities’ immediate needs and provide an expanded leadership base for the future.” SUSAN B. HORNSTEIN, PhD Director of Beren Campus Programs, Center for the Jewish Future

“Stern College for Women students are involved in many of CJF’s exciting and valuable programs. Women have unique challenges to meet as they plan lives of Jewish leadership; the best way to nurture their development is to connect our students with Jewish women who have been successful in meeting these challenges. I am developing programs that will maximize the impact of Stern College students in the greater Jewish community, both during their time on campus and beyond.”

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

3 1

them are ORA [Organization for the Resolution of Agunot], a grass-roots organization that works on behalf of wives whose husbands refuse them a divorce, and Tzelem, which taps into the expertise of faculty at RIETS, our other graduate schools, and the broader university community to create a formal curriculum for those who teach chattanim and kallot [brides- and bridegrooms-to be]. CJF has also created a partnership with Jewish communal leaders in Jewish law and science who are helping us tackle contemporary issues and identify imminent scientific breakthroughs. This partnership allows us to use the talent within Yeshiva University and also in the Jewish community at large to develop a way to evaluate the gifts of science through the prism of Jewish law and Jewish ethics.
Q: YU is an institution that has long taken the leadership role in the Modern Orthodox movement as well as in engaging with the broader Jewish community through outreach. How does CJF fit into that mission, expand on it, and, perhaps, help transform it?

A: It does all of that. The initiatives of CJF celebrate the idea of reaching out through Yeshiva University’s network. They include the Blanche Schreiber Torah Tours, a program that this fall brought 400 students to 77 communities around

the United States, representing the largest contingent of students YU has ever sent out. They were received with great warmth by their communities, and many of the students have continued relationships with those communities. Additionally, we were involved in three winter-break initiatives. One was training 15 YU students who went to Honduras on a humanitarian mission; a second was bringing 20 students to Germany as part of the Bridge of Understanding program (we had 140 applicants!); and in another, students went to Israel to work with families affected by the disengagement from Gush Katif. These initiatives celebrate the ideal of tikkun olam [repairing the world] and reaching out. At the same time, they are the living laboratory I spoke about, providing our students with opportunities to learn about their lifetime responsibilities to help the people—Jews and non-Jews—around them. Another way we celebrate outreach is by building yeshivot without walls—by helping communities develop their intellectual infrastructure through the creation of community kollelim [advanced learning programs], night kollelim, and weekend kollelim that enhance and enrich the adult education programs in communities around the country. A fourth way is through the work we’re doing via our Association of Modern Orthodox Day

Schools, which focuses on creating and sustaining relationships with school professionals, offering tools that only a university can provide to help them grow professionally, and creating national initiatives allowing students in each school to participate in leadership and advanced learning programs. Individually, each school cannot effectively offer such programs. Only when we pool faculty and student energies— while continuing an independent relationship with each school—can we make sure that students in our high schools are honing their leadership responsibilities. The final way is through the community cabinet we’ve created. The community cabinet enables us to respond to different issues communities face by looking at them in a holistic way and tapping into the energies of the extended Yeshiva University community—both the talents on campus and among our alumni—to help those that are facing the inherent challenges of development.
Q: There have been important and longstanding efforts to address some of these issues, challenges, and opportunities through the Max Stern Division of Communal Services and RIETS. How can CJF complement the important work of these established institutions?

A: I should first note that the Max Stern Divi-

RABBI DAVID ISRAEL ’96R Director, Association of Modern Orthodox Day Schools and Yeshiva High Schools (AMODS), Center for the Jewish Future “Among the greatest challenges facing our community’s schools are the rising cost of tuition, the need to raise teachers’ salaries, and the need to draw larger numbers of talented individuals into the field of Jewish education. AMODS and the combined forces of CJF are tackling these issues while at the same time AMODS is addressing other critical needs in our schools. These include providing our educational professionals with opportunities for ongoing pedagogic training, the need for appropriate curriculum and standards, and for programming that raises the level of passion about Torah, Jewish identity, and the State of Israel.”

RABBI JOSH JOSEPH ’00B,R Director, Special Projects, Center for the Jewish Future

RABBI MARC PENNER ’91Y,R Director, Professional Rabbinic Education and Advisement, Max Stern Division of Communal Services, RIETS

“My vision for this division is for it to be a small non-profit incubator that provides support, mentorship, and guidance while utilizing the strength and energy of the specific groups to achieve our goals. At this early stage, projects are related to family life, science and Halakhah, key issues of the day, and ways to enhance public visibility and involvement of Yeshiva University in these areas.” Special Projects is the research and development arm of the Center for the Jewish Future.

“Our community will only be as strong as its future leaders. The Professional Rabbinic Education and Advisement division identifies potential leaders, encourages them to consider Avodat Kodesh [rabbinic work], and, through RIETS, provides them with an unmatched program of professional rabbinic training. Throughout college and semikhah [ordination] studies, students receive caring, informed career guidance to successfully lead them to their first rabbinic placement. We work with RIETS to create the finest program in professional education.” Housed at the Center for the Jewish Future

3 2

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

sion of Communal Services is now an agency of CJF. In that way, the important work done by MSDCS will continue, and grow, under CJF auspices. But, in general, we are not out to duplicate anyone’s efforts. Our goal is to make sure everyone’s energies are properly channeled, and where there is a vacuum, to fill it. To that end, President Joel asked me to chair a deans’ council for continuing discussion between CJF and each school regarding our respective agendas, and I meet regularly with Rabbi [Zevulun] Charlop [Max and Marion Grill Dean of RIETS] to advance our partnership in areas such as professional training of rabbinical students.
Q: Many CJF staff members are young YU alumni who were student activists during their undergraduate years. What attracts them to CJF? How is CJF nurturing them to become leaders in the Jewish community?

to be dealt with immediately. We need to pace ourselves and evaluate the most effective ways to help our students develop leadership.
Q: You took the pulpit position in Boca when that Jewish community was still small and developing. Under your leadership it has experienced remarkable growth and today is a dynamic center of Jewish life and learning. How do you impart the lessons you learned there to our semikhah [ordination] students and young musmakhim [rabbinic graduates] who look to your successes as a guide to their own careers?

communicate paradigms on how to build “buyin” to create these Torah institutions and on being tolerant and embracing of all Jews. But even more important is the need for rabbis to realize that their primary responsibility is not to build these community institutions, but to be involved in people’s lives. A rabbi can only be successful as a pulpit rabbi and community leader if he realizes that his foremost priority is to be there for people during their times of greatest joy and challenge.
Q: Is there a role for YU alumni in ensuring that the mandate and agenda for CJF is realized?

A: I think what brings them is the knowledge that President Joel is serious about this initiative. Yeshiva University not only is a great place to gain wisdom, it’s a great place to help bring that wisdom to life. People are excited, they see that in a short time we’ve accomplished a lot and this is due to the president’s vision and an unbelievable and dedicated staff. The challenge to CJF is for all to realize that this is not a sprint but a marathon. Not every creative project needs

A: There are a couple of lessons I would like to impart. First is the need to recognize that we can remain committed to our Torah value system and still embrace Jews who celebrate their Judaism differently. The Orthodox community should not be an isolated community, but should play an active role in all aspects of Jewish communal life. In Boca I helped to create—and, I must say, with the support of a strong group of community lay leaders—a vaad hakashrut [kashrut supervising agency], an elementary and high school, a mikvah [ritual pool], Boca Tov Café & Spirit drop-in center, an expanded eruv [a Sabbath boundary marker], and I sat on the Federation executive board. I think I have the ability to

A: We need YU alumni to give us direction on how we can be effective in communities around the country. CJF sends out a monthly e-newsletter. I ask people to read it, and please tell us what we’re doing right. But more important, tell us when we’re not “getting it,” when we have simply missed the mark. Because the input of alumni is so important, we have appointed Rabbi Richard Bieler to be our community liaison and to help garner input and support from the community at large, including alumni and parents who are committed to our efforts. Our alumni represent the Jewish future, and are the best conduits through which we can achieve our goals. n

RABBI ARI ROCKOFF ’00S,R Director, Department of Community Initiatives, Center for the Jewish Future

JORDANA SCHOOR Executive Director, Orthodox Caucus

RABBI RONALD SCHWARZBERG ’80Y,F,R Director, Jewish Career Development and Placement, Max Stern Division of Communal Services, RIETS

“We operate on the front lines to identify and assess a community’s challenges and needs and to utilize the resources of YU. Our greatest challenge is to see opportunities for existing and emerging communities in the next 20 years. To do that, we initiate contact with communities to identify and assess their challenges and needs, engage communities with a unique brand of educational programming and community-building initiatives, build meaningful and long-term relationships with Jewish communities, and strengthen Jewish communal infrastructure to cultivate a vibrancy of Torah life and learning around the globe.”

“The Orthodox Caucus encourages and implements solutions to unmet needs through existing institutions and organizations and, if necessary, creates new programs. Two past projects are the halakhic prenuptial agreement, to prevent future agunot (women whose husbands refuse them a divorce), and the ‘Guide to Israel Programs,’ to help students and parents choose an appropriate post-high school program. Currently, the Caucus is addressing the high cost of yeshiva tuition and promoting women within Orthodox leadership.” Hosted by the Center for the Jewish Future

“Every Jewish organization and institution at some point faces engaging new employees. The process of selecting a highly qualified and matched professional is both challenging and arduous. The search and selection process offers the institution the opportunity for assessment; consensus building; and establishing priorities, objectives, and short-range goals. Our goal is to build a placement center that the Jewish communal world, our students, and alumni will look to for all their placement needs.”

Housed at the Center for the Jewish Future

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

3 3

[

Y E S H I VA C O L L E G E

]

David Srolovitz: A New Dean for a New Era

BY ELSA BRENNER

I

n his dining room, one recent winter morning, a cup of hot tea warming his hands, David J. Srolovitz talked about his deep passion for learning—and how higher education must focus not only on producing another doctor or lawyer, but also “a total person.” “College is not just about vocational training,” said the Princeton University professor, who will become the 10th dean of Yeshiva College in June. “It’s also about preparing for life, for how to think.” Professor Srolovitz, who earned his PhD in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania, is leaving his position as chair of Princeton’s Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Busy shuttling between research projects at Princeton and in Singapore, he has had little time to speak publicly about his new role at Yeshiva College. He refers to it as “a rare opportunity, an awesome responsibility and exciting challenge”— and one that he almost turned down. “When YU first broached the idea of my becoming dean, my initial reaction was ‘no,’ ” he recalled. “Then they said, ‘why don’t you come in and talk to us?’” They indeed talked, and Dr. Srolovitz agreed there is a trove of experience that a professor at an Ivy League university could bring to a small, liberal arts college like Yeshiva College. In addition to his passion for learning and his high standards for scholarship, Dr. Srolovitz has served as chair of one of the largest departments at Princeton and as director of a major interdepartmental institute there. He was also president of a major professional organization, trustee of another, and a frequent consultant to large government research organizations. But, he explained, it is more than just a matter of being well-versed in the workings of educational institutions. At Yeshiva College, he will have the opportunity to merge distinct facets of his identity—scientist, researcher and scholar, and Modern Orthodox Jew and father of three Yeshiva University students—Aron ’05Y, a second-year RIETS student; Miriam, a former Stern College student; and Noam, in YU’s S. Daniel Abraham Israel Program and future student at Sy Syms School of Business. “When Vice President [for Academic Affairs] Morton Lowen-

grub called, I agreed to give Yeshiva College some serious thought, and ultimately I decided to sign on,” he recalled. “My reasons are very simple. I believe in Torah Umadda*. I believe in Yeshiva University. And I am an ardent supporter of President Joel’s vision for where this institution is heading. I believe that the future of this university is the future of Am Yisrael [the Jewish people] in chutz l’aretz [outside of Israel].” His first order of business, he says, is to grow the number of tenured-track scholars at the college. “I want professors in front of students who live and breathe their subject, who are involved with research and scholarship.” The second order of business is to involve students in the scholarly activities of their majors. “I want to see our students excited about their studies. I want them to lose sleep over the ideas they’ve been exposed to each day,” he said. “Learning is not supposed to be easy, it should be all-encompassing—whether it is the learning that is going on within the yeshiva or in the academic disciplines. This is what Yeshiva College is about!” He added that, “YU students are unique. They are comfortable with primary sources. They have a refined sense of logic and analysis. They know how to sit and concentrate on unraveling complex problems. These are the skills our students need to succeed in the liberal arts, in sciences, and all areas of academics. Our challenge is to help our students build on these yeshiva skills in their secular studies. This will build the type of academic rigor that will distinguish Yeshiva College.” And, by extension, distinguish the university. In Dr. Lowengrub’s estimation, “His vision for the college will certainly lead all of Yeshiva University to another level of excellence. We are very fortunate to have attracted him,” he said. When Dr. Srolovitz arrives, he will bring with him his research on the structure and properties of materials. His research uses theory and computer simulation to grow better semiconductor crystals for optoelectronics, understand the interplay of structure and stress in thin films, predict the conditions under which corrosion will occur in nuclear fusion reactors, reveal the microscopic mechanisms of deformation of materials, and identify how defects move in crystals. But will he have time in his new role to continue his scientific research? “The best way to lead is by example,” he said. n * Torah Umadda is the name of the philosophy that, within the spectrum of Orthodox Judaism, perceives the relationship between Jewish and general studies as symbiotic. It is the foundation upon which Yeshiva University was established.

In this issue, YU Review inaugurates

n

explorations: excerpts from student research

“Explorations,” a column that periodically features selected passages from students’ research. We begin with an excerpt from the senior honors thesis of Aaron Roller, an English major who next year expects to pursue a master’s

FROM

degree in urban planning. Aaron is enrolled in the Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program at Yeshiva College, where Will Lee, PhD, honors program director, is his mentor. The honors thesis is the crowning achievement within the program and represents

“Negotiating Urban Spaces: Central Park and Ground Zero”
BY AARON ROLLER

the most in-depth intellectual experience within Yeshiva College: a full year of research and writing under the guidance of one or more

T

he planning of urban space takes place in a set of intersections between politics and populism, commerce and culture, idealism and economy. Anyone who attempts to shape urban space must answer a number of questions: Who will use this space? What contribution will this space make to the larger city? How will it look? Who will pay for it? What constituency supports this plan? Who opposes it? All these questions and more were addressed during the conception, design, and construction of Central Park. In visiting the New York of the mid-19th century, I became acquainted with a city made up of wealthy gentlemen caught between a sense of noblesse oblige and a desire to increase profit margins, crooked politicians, a hungry working class, and artists struggling with notions of how to fulfill a creative vision without becoming compromised. In many ways, this description also applies to 21st-century New York. Although the events on Sept. 11, 2001 were unprecedented in the history of the city and the country, in the aftermath of the tragedy, the scarred crater at the base of Manhattan required that those same questions about urban space be answered. Indeed, both Central Park and the site of the World Trade Center exemplify the ways in which planning and architecture are used to tell stories and to promote agendas.… …In December 2002, the question of what shape Ground Zero would take seemed to have arrived at a resolution. In a competition run by the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, a plan called Memory Foundation, designed by Daniel Libeskind, beat out six other finalists as the master plan for the former World

Trade Center site. Libeskind, whose major architectural achievement up to that point had been the design for the Jewish Museum in Berlin, became an overnight celebrity. The architect, easily identifiable with his heavy, black rimmed glasses, black wardrobe, and head of white hair, seemed to be the toast of New York City, speaking to large audiences and appearing with his wife, Nina, in the society pages.… Everyone involved in the Ground Zero decision-making process seemed impressed by the plan, and there seemed to be a desire—on the part of Governor George Pataki, and on the part of the Port Authority—to latch on to Libeskind’s rising star. Yet the tower slated for construction in Lower Manhattan beginning in early 2006 looks very little like the model Libeskind presented at the Winter Garden on Dec. 16, 2002 to so much acclaim. The architect’s name does not even appear as the designer of the current building. Like Fredrick Law Olmstead and Calvert Vaux, Daniel Libeskind emerged victorious from a competition to shape an important and contentious space in New York City. But while the partnership of Olmstead and Vaux saw their plan take shape in the heart of the city, Libeskind’s has been rendered nearly unrecognizable through the changes it has undergone since it was originally introduced three years ago. What elements caused this divergence in the ability of the creators of these two great spaces to carry through with their plans? Is the difference due mainly to Libeskind’s and Olmstead’s contrasting personalities, or do the two cases diverge because of the players and forces shaping urban spaces in early twenty-first century New York City? n

faculty mentors. Aaron’s research deals with the political and cultural environment that led to the creation of Manhattan’s Central Park and that today surrounds the rebuilding effort at Ground Zero.

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

Aaron Roller

Einstein Exhibit at Gottesman Library
ALBERT EINSTEIN most likely first learned of Yeshiva College in November

1933 when Mendel Gottesman, then treasurer of its board, sent him a Yeshiva Endowment Foundation yearbook just one month after the world-renowned scientist fled Germany and moved to Princeton, and just five months after Yeshiva College graduated its first full class. In a letter dated Nov. 21, 1933, Dr. Einstein thanked Mr. Gottesman and expressed his conviction that “the Yeshiva College is of great importance for the preservation of the Jewish tradition and for the deeper spiritualization of the Jewish youth in general.” His reply, as they say, was the start of a beautiful friendship between Dr. Einstein and Yeshiva College, the forerunner of Yeshiva University. In 1934, the school awarded him an honorary degree, and over the years the relationship grew to span decades and deepened with the founding of Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 1955. In honor of Yeshiva College’s 75th anniversary—and as part of celebrations commemorating the Einstein College of Medicine founding 50 years ago—the Mendel Gottesman Library is hosting an exhibit on the multifaceted connection between Time magazine’s “Person of the [Twentieth Century]” and “the house of God on the Hill,” as Dr. Bernard Revel, Yeshiva College’s founder and first president, called his revolutionary initiative. “Einstein and Yeshiva University: ‘Love for the Spiritual and the Moral,’” which opened Nov. 15 in conjunction with Science Week at Yeshiva College, features rare and original documents, letters, photographs, and footage demonstrating their special kinship, including some previously overlooked and unknown sources. Usually sympathetic and always respectful, the interchanges between Dr. Einstein and Dr. Revel were based on shared values, including Zionism, the importance of education for Jews, and the need to help refugees from fascism and the War.

On behalf of Yeshiva College, Dr. Einstein wrote to donors, sent supportive messages to fundraising events, and occasionally talked with potential contributors. In the early 1950s, second president Dr. Samuel Belkin, who presided over the expansion of the college into Yeshiva University, renewed the relationship. In 1953, Dr. Einstein agreed for the first and only time in his life to lend his name to an institution of higher education—Albert Einstein College of Medicine, the medical school of Yeshiva University. Among the correspondence on display is a letter to Dr. Belkin, dated March 23, 1951, in which Dr. Einstein expresses his awareness of plans to build the school. “I have learned to my great satisfaction that Yeshiva University is planning to establish a medical school. To my mind, this undertaking is of the greatest importance to American Jewry; it is an act of self-help to make it possible for many of our young people in this country to study medicine,” he wrote. Albert Einstein died in 1955, but his fame lives on and transcends his achievements. In popular culture, his name has even entered the English language as a symbol of visionary genius. Now, “through documentary treasures held by the library and studied and interpreted by university faculty, the exhibit at Mendel Gottesman Library examines a little-explored area of Dr. Einstein’s life and of his relationship with Yeshiva University,” said Pearl Berger, Yeshiva University Libraries dean. The exhibit runs through March 31 on the fourth floor of the library, 2520 Amsterdam Ave. (at 185th Street in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan). Admission is free with a photo ID. Exhibit hours are Sunday–Thursday, 10 am–8 pm. For more information, visit the exhibition Web site at http://www.yu.edu/libraries/digital_library/einstein.

From left: Samuel Belkin, Yeshiva University’s second president; Albert Einstein; and Nathaniel Goldstein, NY State Attorney General and national chairman of the campaign to build Albert Einstein College of Medicine. The photograph was taken in Princeton the day after Einstein’s 74th birthday.

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

alumninews
ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE

‘Lost’ alumni
During the past summer, the Office of Alumni Affairs posted its “lost alumni” lists from the three undergraduate schools online and made them interactive. Now, both alumni and non alums can access these lists and forward information about individuals to staffers. Visit www.yu.edu/alumni/ and click on “Help us find our missing alumni.” Look for online lists from all other schools in the near future.

EINSTEIN’S 50TH ANNIVERSARY MARKS MILESTONE

Watch for information on these spring reunions:
• Stern College for Women Student Leaders, May 7 • Yeshiva College Class of 1981, Sunday, May 21 • Yeshiva College Class of 1956, Thursday, May 25 • Yeshiva College Class of 1966, TBA • Stern College for Women Classes of 1966 and 1981, TBA • All Torah Leadership Seminar (TLS), Yeshiva Seminar (YS), and Counterpoint alumni, Shabbat Nachamu, Aug. 4–5 at the Sheraton Parsippany, NJ. For information, contact Hindy Poupko at 212-960-5263 or seminar@yu.edu. From left: President Richard M. Joel; Ira M. Millstein; Burton P. Resnick, board chairman emeritus; Senator Clinton; Dominick P. Purpora, MD, the Marilyn and Stanley M. Katz Dean; and Elliot Wolk.

New Online Community Launched
The Alumni Office announces a new version of its Online Community. On this site you can: • Find former roommates and classmates (via our Alumni Directory). • Update friends and classmates about important milestones (in our Classnotes section). • Post or find that perfect new job (in our Career Center). • Advertise or look for businesses in your area (in our Classified Section). To visit the new community, go to www.yu.edu /alumni and click on the “Online Alumni Community” link.

U

nited States Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton delivered the keynote address at the Gala Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Albert Einstein College of Medicine, held Sept. 18 at the Waldorf-Astoria. Praising Einstein as an “extraordinary College of Medicine,” Senator Clinton told the more than 700 guests that the medical school embodies the American dream of tolerance and providing a better world for our children. The event, chaired by Elliot K. Wolk, a member of the Einstein Board of Overseers, also featured a performance by comedian and actor Robert Klein and a video

presentation produced by Rita Rosen, who also serves on the college’s board. “Our 50th anniversary marks an important transition in the life of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine,” said Ira M. Millstein, board chair. “As we set out on our second half-century, we look forward with confidence and enthusiasm to a future that will be even greater than our illustrious first 50 years.” To learn about the relationship between Yeshiva University and the renowned late scientist for whom the School of Medicine is named, see “Einstein Exhibit at Gottesman Library,” p. 36. n

3 8

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

Y E S H I VA C O L L E G E

Saluting Yeshiva College at 75

BASKETBALL REUNION

T
From left: Joshua L. Muss YH,’62Y, YC board chairman, with Harry Steinberg ’32Y, Yeshiva College’s oldest living graduate. From left: Samuel Solomon ’75Y,B,R, YC board member, and Stanley Raskas YH,’65Y,A, YC board member and dinner chairman.

he first-ever reunion of men’s basketball alumni, held Dec. 14 at Max Stern Athletic Center, attracted more than 30 former players and honored the memory of beloved former basketball coach Bernard “Red” Sarachek, who passed away in November at age 93. The gathering, conceived by current and longtime YU basketball coach Jonathan Halpert YH,’66Y,F, reunited cagers from the 1940s to 2001. In addition to the former players, other alumni, spouses, and children attended. Among them were Donald Geller ’49Y, Ayal Hod ’89SB and Lior Hod ’88Y, Elihu Levine ’54Y, Mitchell Orlian ’54Y, Moshe Orlian ’86Y, and Nachum Palefski ’01Y.

More than 650 guests attended a lavish gala on the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum to celebrate the 75th anniversary of Yeshiva College. Alumni, students, faculty, friends, and roshei yeshiva joined the festivities to celebrate this august milestone and the convivial atmosphere of the historic museum was a grand class reunion. More than 9,000 YC alumni have gone on to professional careers and positions of leadership in the Jewish

and general communities in America, Israel, and around the world. Also honored were 25 faculty members who rendered 20 or more years of distinguished academic service to the university. Some 180 graduates from classes ranging from 1945 to 2005, who live in cities throughout North America, volunteered to serve as class marshals and are participating in anniversary events throughout the 2005–2006 anniversary year. n

Invest in Yeshiva College’s Future

Meet Heidi (Wellen) Kuperman ’94W
Heidi comes to her new position as director of institutional advancement for Yeshiva College after three and a half years as director of institutional advancement for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine Men’s Division. Born and raised in Montreal, she attended McGill University and spent her junior year at Stern College for Women. After graduating from Wurzweiler School of Social Work, she went to work for UJA-Federation of New York, and UJC (United Jewish Communities, formerly National UJA) and National Conference of Synagogue Youth (NCSY) before coming to Einstein. “Helping to support Yeshiva College and its students is a wonderful way to involve alumni, parents, and friends. I encourage everyone to help the school to grow and to meet future needs through participation in events as well as the fundraising campaign,” she said. n

A

lumni and friends can now “invest” in Yeshiva College through a new program, conceived by Shai Barnea ’03Y and Joshua Goldman ’04SB, that will pay big dividends to the school by the time it celebrates its 100th anniversary. The YC100 Fund will allow investors to buy up to 200 “shares.” Monies raised will be invested in the university’s endowment fund and any capital earned over time will be reinvested and compounded. At maturation, the YC100 Fund will underwrite an array of Yeshiva College capital projects. All investors will be kept periodically apprised of the fund’s activity. Barnea and Goldman are readying an initial public seeding. They plan to contact all YC and SSSB alumni about the offering. Others who would like to participate can email Heidi Kuperman, director of institutional advancement for Yeshiva College, at kuperman@yu.edu.

Alumni can make gifts to help support their alma mater by visiting www.yu.edu /onlinegiving or by calling 212-960-5373.

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

3 9

n

alumni

ISRAEL

NEW ISRAEL ALUMNI A S S O C I AT I O N P R E S I D E N T

T

he election of Jay Kalish as president of the Israel Alumni Association marks a change in the focus of alumni activities in Israel. There has been a noticeable increase in aliyah (emigration) from North America in recent years, and a high proportion of these olim (immigrants) are graduates of one or more of Yeshiva University’s educational establishments. Many are young professionals and they are choosing to live in the newer Anglo-Israeli towns rather than Jerusalem. “We hope to decentralize our entire organization, empowering the various regional chapters to tailor activities to specific alumni age and interest groups,” said Mr. Kalish, who has already enlisted fellow alumni in Modi'in and Beit Shemesh to organize local chapters. Mr. Kalish envisions alumni activities that will tap into the broad spectrum of alumni who are experts in so many facets of Israeli life. “We are working closely with staff at YU’s Israel campus to help make the organization more relevant to life in Israel, to develop career networks for YU graduates in Israel, and also help YU students and alumni who are looking to make aliyah,” he said. Mr. Kalish graduated from Yeshiva College in 1979 with a BA in economics, and in 1982 earned a law degree from Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. A father of four who made aliyah in 1987, he is vicepresident of investor relations at ECI Telecom Ltd.

Blue Fringe members (from left): Avi Hoffman, Dov Rosenblatt, Danny Zwillenberg, and Hayyim Danzig.

Y E S H I VA C O L L E G E

On the Fringe of a Blue Horizon
BY GILA BERKOWITZ

E

Israel reunion
Members of the Stern College for Women Class of 1970 who live in Israel gathered to celebrate the 35th anniversary of their graduation. The get-together was held at YU’s Israel campus in Jerusalem Dec. 19. Esther Zuroff, director of student services at Stern from 1957 to 1987, was guest of honor, and was thanked by Sophomore Class president Chaya (Spatz) Passow. In addition to catching up with old friends, the alumnae heard divrei Torah from Rabbi Aaron Adler ’74Y,R,B and an update on activities for alumni in Israel by Howard Weisband, senior adviser to the president on Israel affairs.

ven in the haze and glare of a Manhattan club, they look pretty much like what they are: four recent graduates of Yeshiva College, full of youth’s wild hopes and art’s magical dreams, but true to their faith, true to their heritage, and true to their music. The thrumming of the bass begins. Hayyim Danzig ’05Y, a big sensitive bear of a guy, fingers the instrument deftly, clearly under the influence of his jazz heroes. Danny Zwillenberg ’03Y comes in on the drums, his relaxed playing belying years of training and musical discipline. Avi Hoffman ’05Y, lead guitarist, introduces the melody. His piercing blue eyes are closed in ecstasy, his wiry body sways like a Hasid at prayer. Finally, Dov Rosenblatt ’05Y, with guitar and keyboard ready at hand, begins to sing in a gentle tenor. The song is in Hebrew, the

lyrics from the Book of Psalms, but the crowd in the club won’t get it for a while. They’re responding to the rhythm, moving with the sensual beat. It’s a mostly Jewish audience, but for now they are floating in universal waves of sound. Once they get it though, they realize that what they’re hearing isn’t ordinary rock. Blue Fringe, one of the most eclectic Jewish rock bands, touches on everything from a satirical song of Orthodox teens on their post-high school year in Israel, “Flippin Out,” to a dark exploration of contemporary meaning in the “Binding of Isaac,” in a song from their forthcoming album, Seventy Faces. Blue Fringe devotees are just as eclectic, from young yeshiva students to a growing number of secular, and even non-Jewish fans. The band’s origins are in the halls of Yeshiva University’s undergraduate music department. The

4 0

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

four students met in a course taught by John “Shap” Shapiro, “History of Jazz and Blues.” Another unforgettable professor was Noyes (“Dr. Bart”) Bartholomew. But apart from formal courses, all four cite the encouragement and freedom they were given as students. Their undergraduate years were a time of experimentation and growth. Each had had extensive musical training before college, but it was only in the music department that they began to think creatively as independent artists. It was there, too, that they formed the cohesive bonds that make Blue Fringe a musical whole that is so much more than just four guys jamming. It would be hard to find bigger school boosters. Hayyim even volunteers at student recruitment events. Of course, their roots at YU run deep; Dov’s parents, Judy (Turk) ’68S and Gary ’68Y, are both graduates; as are Hayyim’s parents, Rivka (Ausubel) ’81,’85W and Neil YH,’72Y,R,B. Dov cites his earliest introduction to music at the Shabbat table, and the sweet melodies of the zmirot (Shabbat songs) resonate in their contemporary songs. Once they formed their band, they quickly gained popularity, playing at summer camps, Chabad houses,

THEY KNEW THEY W E R E FA M O U S W H E N …
“The first inkling we had that we had ‘made it’ was when we played at Camp Moshava in 2002, right after our first CD, My Awakening, came out. Back then, our music was maybe 50 percent traditional songs, 50 percent original. At the camp concert, the kids were all singing along to our original stuff. The four of us just kind of looked at each other. How did they know all the words?”
— D O V R O S E N B L AT T

and Bnei Akiva-sponsored events. With the release of their first album, My Awakening (2003), which stunned the band with its sale of 14,000 copies, the demand increased further. Today they travel all over North America, as well as to England, Australia, and South Africa, for appearances. Most gratifying of all have been concerts they’ve given in Israel, at the Great Synagogue of Jerusalem, and at the Rock n’ Soul Festival in Beit Shemesh, which drew 10,000 fans. In spring 2005, the band released Seventy Faces, whose title alludes to the many interpretations of the Torah. “We feel this record shows how much we’ve matured together as a band,” says Dov. While he and Avi write most of Blue Fringe’s music and lyrics, the album was completely a band collaboration, from songwriting to arrangement and production. All four members are technically versatile, playing several instruments, but concentrating on the whole sound. The world has taken note of their growth, too. A record label in California is interested in signing the band for their third album, and Blue Fringe played at the Times Square mecca, B.B. King’s, on Dec. 25. The sky’s the limit as the band discovers and adapts (“explore but not cannibalize,” says Hayyim) a great rainbow of sound. Blues, jazz, funk, reggae, ska, rock, pop, Latin—no music is alien to Blue Fringe. Yet they adamantly insist that their musical goals can and will coincide with their religious identity and practices. “Everything is a tightrope,” says Avi, “but we won’t compromise religion any more than the music.” Says Dov, “in music, your mindset can be anywhere.” On the upward trajectory, Blue Fringe’s Fab Four are determined not to neglect their mission: to bring a unique Jewish spirit into the universal language of music. n

B E N J A M I N N . C A R D O Z O S C H O O L O F L AW

The Cardozo Alumni Association and the Office of Career Services cosponsored an alumni-student networking reception in October, offering students an opportunity to connect with graduates in all areas of law and business. The Cardozo alumni network is strong and growing; more than 50 graduates attended the event to share their experience with students.

In November, the Cardozo Alumni Association held its Third Annual Awards Ceremony. Speakers praised Alumna of the Year Bonnie Steingart ’79C for her many contributions to the school. From left: Dean David Rudenstine, board chair Kathryn O. Greenberg ’82C, Leon Silverman, Hon. Jack B. Weinstein, Marilyn Bodner ’92C, Leonard Benowich ’79C, and Rosemary Byrne ’80C, 2003 Alumna of the Year.

Alumni who have been federal and state judicial clerks were recognized for their achievements at the awards ceremony.

4 1

bookshelf
The Binding of Isaac, Religious Murders and Kabbalah: Seeds of Jewish Extremism and Alienation?
by Lippman Bodoff YH’46 Devora Publishing

Overcoming Thyroid Problems
by Jeffrey R. Garber YH’67 with Sandra Sardella White Harvard Medical School Guides

The author has compiled a collection of articles he has published in various journals of Jewish thought.

An up-to-date authoritative source of practical information for thyroid patients and those who think they may have a thyroid problem, the guide is written by Harvard Vanguard’s chief of endocrinology, an internationally respected authority on thyroid disease.
The Cambridge Companion to American Judaism
edited by Dana Evan Kaplan ’85Y Cambridge University Press

and optimistic life, transforming tragic circumstances into a force for healing. Drawing upon years as a clinical therapist and spiritual chaplain, the author takes a fresh approach to the Bible and evokes relevancy and sage advice from an ancient text.
Beit Yitzchak
coedited by Ephraim Meth, YC student, and Avi Robinson, RIETS student Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary and Student Organization of Yeshiva

(advanced study programs). Many articles deal with topics related to the Talmudic tractate “Shabbat.” Others focus on an array of diverse issues. For copies, contact BY5766@gmail.com.
Murderer in the Mikdash
by Gidon Rothstein ’85Y,B,R Booksurge Publishing

Exclusion and Hierarchy
by Adam S. Ferziger ’90Y,B,R University of Pennsylvania Press

A new light reveals a new understanding of Orthodoxy as a specific movement within modern Jewish society.
Spiritual Survival for Law Enforcement
by Cary A. Friedman ’95R Compass Books

A survey of Judaism in the United States, important themes and concepts emerge that include insights into religious culture and institutional practice, identity and community, Jewish living in America, and American Jewish culture. The book offers insights into how Judaism has changed during the last 20 years, and offers ideas about where it is headed.
City of Salt
coauthored by Erez Lieberman ’03B, Nicholas Kahn, Richard Selesnick, Sarah Falkner Aperture Press, 2005

Dedicated to the late RIETS rosh yeshiva Rabbi Michael Katz ’45Y,B, the volume contains articles by RIETS faculty members, students in the MYP program, and fellows in several of the RIETS kollelim

In a novel set in the future, an ABC News anchorwoman temporarily living in Israel has just had a baby and also lost her best friend to sudden respiratory distress. Her attempts to find the real cause of that friend’s death force her to confront uncomfortable truths about the Messianic-era society that Israel has become, about herself, and about how she can or cannot find her place in that world.

YU PRESS
Essays of Jewish Music and Prayer
edited by Macy Nulman YH,’45Y Philip and Sarah Belz School of Jewish Music Compiled by the former BSJM director, the book includes subjects from the broad spectrum of Jewish music and is dedicated to the memory of the school’s namesakes and in tribute to Marilyn and Jack Belz. To purchase, call BSJM at 212-960-5353 or email belzschool@aol.com.

The book provides spiritual fortification for law enforcement officers and is distilled from the author’s experiences as a consultant to the FBI’s Behavioral Science Unit.

A new work of experimental fiction and photography, the book explores, through a series of stories and images, the world of a fictional city built entirely of salt.
Second Chances: Transforming Bitterness to Hope and the Story of Ruth
by Levi Meier ’71B,R Urim Publications

The book examines strategies that serve as models for a more positive

4 2

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

Dictionary of Jewish Usage: A Guide to the Use of Jewish Terms
by Sol Steinmetz ’53Y,R Roman & Littlefield Publishers

A guide to the way many Hebrew, Yiddish, and Aramaic words and meanings are used by English speakers, the book clarifies the meanings of Jewish terms that have been absorbed into English, as well as the transliterated Hebrew terms from sacred texts that reflect differing pronunciations. It explains terms that are often misused, sheds light on the meaning of clusters of terminology, and delineates the etymology and pronunciation of many words.
Preaching in the New Millennium: Celebrating the Tercentennial of Yale University
edited by Frederick Streets ’81,’97W Yale University Press

Jewish life. He explores the conflicts that have ensued among Jewish Americans who want to be involved in both religious and sporting life.
Learning to Teach, Teaching to Learn
coauthored by Carmen Ortiz Hendricks, WSSW associate dean and professor, with Jeanne Bertrand Finch and Cheryl Franks CSWE Press

Couples of Mixed HIV Status: Clinical Issues and Interventions
by Nancy Beckerman, associate professor, WSSW Haworth Press

The editor, university chaplain at Yale, has compiled a selection of sermons delivered during the school’s 2001 tercentennial celebration chronicling its rich religious history.

The author addresses the unique emotional challenges facing today’s couples of mixed HIV status and provides a conceptual framework for assessment and intervention. She provides therapists with a range of theoretical approaches to help mixed HIV status couples deal with their issues and concerns.
Contemporary Halakhic Problem Vol. V
by J. David Bleich Herbert and Florence Tenzer Professor of Jewish Law and Ethics, CSL Targum Press

provides original research on the demands elderly family members make on caregivers and the parenting resources they make available to needy grandchildren.
Judaism’s Encounter with American Sports
by Jeffrey S. Gurock Libby M. Klaperman Professor of Jewish History Indiana University Press

A “how-to” in social work field instruction, the book is intended for field instructors or those who teach them. Step by step, it demonstrates how to achieve a quality field education experience.
A Practical Guide to Rabbinic Counseling
coedited by Yisrael (Irving) N. Levitz, WSSW professor emeritus and instructor at the Caroline and Joseph S. Gruss Institute in Jerusalem

FROM THE FA C U LT Y
A Tree in the Garden
coauthored by Peninnah Schram, associate professor of speech and drama, and Miriam Oren Nora House

The author considers the defensive strategies American Jewish leaders have employed in response to sports’ challenges to identity, such as using temple and synagogue centers—complete with gymnasiums and swimming pools—to attract the athletically inclined to

Here the rabbi will find the requisite knowledge and practical guidelines for some of the most common counseling situations he is likely to face, including premarital counseling, serious illness, addiction, trauma, and suicide. Con-

In this new vision of Genesis 1–3 that celebrates the wisdom, courage and foresight of the first woman, the encounter between her and the snake becomes a choice for knowledge and gives a positive spin to both the snake and the woman.

The author outlines issues that include rabbinic confidentiality, the use of surveillance systems, the use of fax machines and telephones on Shabbat, and observance of mitzvot in polar regions. He brings the opinions of various halakhic decisors and explains the basis of disagreements between them.
Challenges of Aging on U.S. Families: Policy and Practice Implications
edited by Richard K. Caputo WSSW professor of social policy and research; director, doctoral program Haworth Press

By Paul R. Verkuil, CSL professor of law
Regulation and Deregulation, second edition
(West Group, coauthored with Jeffrey L. Harrison and Thomas D. Morgan)

Administrative Law and Process, fourth edition
(West Group, coauthored with Richard J. Pierce and Sidney A. Shapiro

An overview of the economic status of aging families in the US, it

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

4 3

n

bookshelf

confront today’s challenges and give parents perspective and downto-earth advice on good parenting.
Flames of Faith: An Introduction to Chassidic Thought
by Zev Reichman ’00Y,R,AG, Mechinah Program director Judaica Press

Jews in Italy under Fascist and Nazi Rule, 1922–1945
edited by Joshua Zimmerman Eli and Diana Zborowski Professor of Interdisciplinary Holocaust Studies Cambridge University Press

tributors include alumni Daniel H. Jackson ’05R, Dodi Lee Lamm ’95W, and Rabbi Maurice Lamm ’51Y,B,R, the Rabbi Maurice Lamm Professor in Professional Rabbinics at RIETS; and faculty members Dr. David Pelcovitz, the Gwendolyn and Joseph Straus Professor of Jewish Education, and Dr. Sylvan Schaffer, assistant professor of clinical psychiatry at AECOM.
Journey Through Grief: A Sephardic Manual for the Bereaved and Their Community
by Yamin Levy ’87Y,R, academic director, Sephardic Studies, Jacob E. Safra Institute of Sephardic Studies KTAV Publishers

The author opens up the world of Chassidic literature and reveals the depth and soulful vitality that pervade Chassidic thought. Adapted from the Torah classes of Rav Moshe Wolfson.
The Triumph of Venus: The Erotics of the Market
by Jeanne Schroeder, CSL professor of law University of California Press

This book brings to light the Italian-Jewish experience from the start of Mussolini’s Prime Ministership through the end of the

Second World War. Challenging the myth of Italian benevolence during the fascist period, authors investigate the treatment of Jews by Italians during the Holocaust, and the native versus foreign roots of Italian fascist anti-Semitism. Essays collected in this volume each illustrate a different aspect of Italian Jewry under fascist and Nazi rule.

Baby Boomers: Can My Eighties Be Like My Fifties
by Joanna Mellor, WSSW assistant professor, and Helen Rehr Springer Publishing Co.

A detailed look at the laws and rituals associated with grief, mourning, and comforting the mourner in the Sephardic tradition, the book affords readers a philosophical and psychological context for mourning and grief.
Dispute Resolution: Beyond the Adversarial Model
by Lela Porter Love, CSL professor of law and director, Kukin Program for Conflict Resolution and the Cardozo Mediation Clinic; Carrie J. Menkel-Meadow, Andrea Kupfer Schneider, and Jean R. Sternlight Aspen Publishers

The author looks at contemporary debates in legal theory through the lens of psychoanalysis and continental philosophy.
Foundations of Evidence Law
by Alex Stein, CSL professor Oxford University Press

The book is a systematic examination of the underlying theory of evidence in Anglo-American legal systems and identifies the defining characteristics of adjudicative factfinding. The author develops a detailed innovative theory that sets aside the traditional vision of evidence law as facilitating the discovery of the truth.
The Person of the Millennium: The Unique Impact of Galileo on World History
by Manfred Weidhorn, Abraham S. and Irene Guterman Professor of English Literature Iuniverse Inc.

Resulting from meetings convened by the Social Work Fellows of the New York Academy of Medicine, the book addresses the needs of aging Baby Boomers, including income security, health care, longterm care, living arrangements, retirement, end-of-life care. It makes recommendations for action and change in the education of health and social service providers.

The textbook immerses students in the dispute resolution experience through a comprehensive, sophisticated examination of key areas of arbitration and mediation.
Balanced Parenting
by David Pelcovitz, Gwendolyn and Joseph Straus Professor of Jewish Education, AGS and SCW, and Raphael Pelcovitz The Shaar Press

Leading with Meaning: Using Covenantal Leadership to Build a Better Organization
by Moses Pava, Alvin H. Einbender Professor of Business Ethics Palgrave MacMillan

A father and son—a rabbi and a psychologist—examine love and limits in raising children. They

Galileo’s fame rests largely on his pioneering use of the telescope, which showed that the earth is not at the center of the universe. However, the author posits, an even greater contribution is how Galileo established the procedure of modern science, which ultimately created the modern world.

How does good leadership impact an organization? In Leading with Meaning, the author argues that meaningful and useful answers to these questions are available in traditional religious and spiritual resources.

4 4

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

classnotes
Yeshiva University Review welcomes Classnotes submissions that are typewritten or neatly printed. Relevant information (name, maiden name, school, year of graduation, and a contact phone number) must be included. The magazine is not responsible for incomplete or incorrect information. Graduates of CSL, WSSW, FGS, and AECOM may also direct notes to those schools’ alumni publications. In addition to professional achievements, YUR Classnotes may contain alumni family news, including information on births, marriages, condolences, and bar/bat mitzvahs. Engagement announcements are not accepted. We reserve the right to edit submitted items. We cannot be responsible for time-sensitive submissions that expire before publication. Items sent for the next edition of Yeshiva University Review will be included as received and as space permits. Photographs are encouraged.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine Stern College for Women Wurzweiler School

’40s
Carl M. Einhorn, PhD, ’44Y was awarded board certification and the designation of Diplomate-Fellow in Advanced Geriatric Psychology by the International College of Professional Psychology and Prescribing Psychologists’ Register. Mazal tov to Rabbi Jacob Hack YH,’43Y,R on the bat mitzvah of granddaughter Jessica, daughter of Shira and Philip Meissner.

Mazal tov to Pesach (Paul) Rogoway ’57Y and wife Debbie on the birth of great-grandsons Ben Tzion Shlomo to parents Shmuel and Esti Baruchi and to Tuvya and Tehillah Lewkowicz. Idelle (Menkes) YH’56 and Prof. Reuben Rudman YH,’57Y,R announce the birth of their first great grandchild, Devorah Nechama to Temimah and Dovid Marcus of Jerusalem. Mazal tov also to grandparents Rachel (Fishman) Rudman YH’81 and Rabbi Zave, and Rabbi and Rebbetzin Raphael Marcus of Toronto; and to great grandmother Sarah (Berlin) Fishman YH’55. Dovid is the grandson of the late Rebbetzin Ella and the late RIETS rosh yeshiva Rav Aharon Soloveichik and Lillian and the late Rabbi Joseph Marcus. Dr. Hirsch Lazaar Silverman ’51F was included in Who’s Who in American Education, 7th edition, 2006–2007. He is a psychologist, educator, and poet. Joseph Sungolowsky ’55Y,R, professor of French literature and Jewish studies at Queens College–CUNY, read a paper, “André Neher (1914–1988) and the Significance of Eretz Israel,” at the International Conference on Contemporary Jewish Thought at the Université Charles De Gaulle-Lille 3 in Lille (France). Also, he is the author of “The Jewishness of Primo Levi” that appeared in the volume The Legacy of Primo Levi, Palgrave Macmillian 2004.

’50s
Yona (Beeber) ’56TIW and Rabbi Avraham Basch YH,’52Y,R celebrated the birth of a great-granddaughter to Elchanan and Yaffa Bar-netzan of Har Beracha; the birth of a grandson, Netanel Aharon, to Rivka and Shlomo Pejo of Petach Tikva; and the marriage of granddaughter Hedva Landsberg of Psagot to Yitzchak Gabbai of Jerusalem, all in Israel. Phyllis (Dvora Katz) ’61S and Yehuda Rosenberg Ben-Meir YH,’59Y,R celebrated the birth of a granddaughter, Inbar, to Tamar and Aryeh Sivan. Mazal tov to Rabbi Moshe Gorelik ’53Y,R, former JSS and IBC faculty member, and wife Sarah on their 50th wedding anniversary. Gita (Jochnowitz) ’63S and Arnold Hoffman ’56YR celebrated the birth of grandson Yehuda Chaim to Shmaryahu and Chaya Hoffman of Mitzpe Ramon; and the bat mitzvah of granddaughter Rivki, daughter of Yaakov and Susan Hoffman of Beit Shemesh, all in Israel. Paul S. Laderman ’57Y,R and wife Dr. Shulamit celebrated the marriage of son Rafi to Chani Mannheim Schumer of Kibbutz Merav, Israel.

A new Web resource, “Challenges and Issues in Modern Orthodox Education,” is a downloadable online library of the essays of Rabbi Shalom Carmy ’70Y,B,R, YU assistant professor of Bible and editor of Tradition. Rabbi Carmy has edited several volumes on topics in Jewish studies and authored scores of essays and articles, many of them featured on the new Web site under the auspices of ATID: Academy for Torah Initiatives and Directions. Click on www.atid.org/resources/carmy.asp to read about some of the more complex and subtle challenges facing Orthodox Jewish life, learning, and teaching.

’60s
Pnina (Pam Forman) Aronson ’68S and husband Yaakov, YUHS faculty member, 1964–68, celebrated the birth of their 21st grandchild, Benaya Netzir, to Aviva and Rabbi Ari Katz. Toni (Feltscher) ’70S and Phil Chernofsky YH,’69Y, of Jerusalem, announce the birth of their granddaughter, Roni Rnana Schler.

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

4 5

n

classnotes

Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology Yeshiva University High Schools Yeshiva College Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law

Pushing destiny
Suzanne Alexandra Black ’80F has relocated to France after a postdoctoral fellowship at UCLA Medical Center in Emergency Room psychiatry and neuropsychiatry and private practices in Los Angeles and San Francisco. A specialist in bipolar disorder and a clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at UCSF Medical School, she is in private practice in Paris; is a consultant there with La Clinique du Chateau a Garches, a private psychiatric hospital, and with International SOS; is founder and president of the Paris Society for Psychology and Medicine; and is working on several books. Also, she co-teaches a course in medical English at Université de Paris–Hôpital Bichat et Hôpital Nekker, and helped establish L’Institut de Recherce sur L’Olfaction (Institute of Research on Olfaction) in that city, dedicated to researching the association of smell, memory evocation, and its use in psychiatric interventions and its context in psychoanalysis. Suzanne relocated to France “as a journey to reclaim my mother’s roots.” One of her goals is to “reunite the many members of my large family in France and Israel.” She is working on a documentary on North African Jews who have relocated to France and Israel, and plans to work with victims of terrorism in Israel. “Albert Camus said one must push one’s destiny. This is how I see my role as a psychologist and in life,” she said.

Mazal tov to Harvey Douglen ’63Y and wife Renee on the birth of a grandson to their children Avi and Maya Douglen. Lea Dror-Batalion ’69S celebrated the marriage of son Udi Dror to Miri Vaknin. Lea is the executive manager at the Bucerius Center for Research of Contemporary German History and Society, University of Haifa, Israel. Sarah (Singer) Eiferman YH’62 and husband Zecharia celebrated the birth of a grandson. Howard R. Feldman YH’62, professor of biology at Touro College, presented a paper at the Geological Society of America annual meeting in Denver, CO on Callovian-Oxfordian biostratigraphy and paleoenvironments of northern Sinai and Israel; and a paper at the Geological Society of America Northeastern Section meeting in Saratoga Springs, NY on a marine faunal assemblage from the Jurassic (Callovian) Ethiopian Province of southern Israel. He is continuing his research on the fossils and paleocommunities of the Negev and Sinai and is writing a geological field guidebook of the hiking trails on the Shawangunk Mountains at Mohonk Mountain House in New Paltz, New York. In addition, at Touro College he developed two new field courses in zoology and ecology for biology majors. Fieldwork for these courses was conducted in the Hudson Valley and Westchester County. Yaakov Fogelman ’61Y and wife Ruth celebrated the marriage of daughter Avigayil Aviva to Ian Wiseglass and son Ariel Tzvi to Limor Kogan. Dov Gilor ’67F and wife Barbara celebrated the bar mitzvah of grandson Dvir, son of David and Shira Gilor of Hashmonaim, Israel. Dvir was born deaf, but thanks to a Cochlear implant, he read the entire parsha and delivered a dvar Halakhah.

Mazal tov to Dr. Daniel Hain ’68Y and wife Lea on the marriage of son Gavriel to Rebecca Feld. Shimshon (Larry) Halpern YH,’60Y and wife Miriam, of Karnei Shomron, celebrated the birth of granddaughter Taeer Rachel to Chani and Yoni Gur and grandson Ivri Avraham to Eli and Efrat Halpern, all of Bruchin, Israel. Rabbi Lowell S. Kronick YH,’67Y,R,B is the new associate director for education at the Department of Veterans Affairs National Chaplain Center, Hampton, VA. He is responsible for continuing professional education for Veterans Affairs chaplains serving at 172 medical centers nationwide. Also, he spent a week last Sept. at the Veterans Affairs medical centers in Little Rock, AR, providing spiritual care to veterans evacuated from Gulf Coast communities during hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Mazal tov to Pitzie (Elissa Friedman) ’63S and Dr. Judah Lando ’60Y on the birth of grandson Dor Zvi to Rachel and Sagi Baruch. Debby (Cohen) Leibenstein ’62S and husband Rabbi Dov were honored by the Associated Talmud Torahs of Chicago as Educators of the Year. Dr. Joel Luber ’68Y and wife Sarah, of Beit El, Israel, celebrated the marriage of Joel’s daughter Chaya to Boaz Nahari. Prof. Edith (Slomowitz) Lubetski ’68B, head librarian at the SCW Hedi Steinberg Library, authored “Day School Libraries, Educating the Educator” in Judaica Librarianship, a publication of the Association of Jewish Libraries, vol. 11, Winter 2002–Spring 2003.

Last May, Ariel Shiloh ’00Y graduated from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Medical School for International Health (MSIH), the only medical school in the world specifically created to train future doctors to provide healthcare to individuals and communities in troubled spots around the globe. Graduates have so far gone on to offer disaster relief, refugee health, and preventive nutrition to people in the Sudan, Haiti, Zambia, and Swaziland. Ariel spent two months in India to satisfy an international health clerkship requirement. In July he entered a residency program in internal medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine-affiliated Montefiore Medical Center.

4 6

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bernard Revel Wurzweiler School of Social Work Stern College for Women Yeshiva University High Schools

Morton Merowitz ’60Y participated in a panel discussion on Jewish bibliographers of the 20th century at the annual meeting of the Association of Jewish Libraries. He spoke on contributions made by Isaac Rivkind (1895–1968). Rifka (Richman) YH,’75TIW and David Monderer YH’68, and Asher Scharf ’76Y,R and wife Lisa, celebrated the birth of granddaughter Efrat to their children Yonatan and Elisheva Edel of Petach Tikva, Israel. Mazal tov to Monty (Noam) Penkower YH,’63Y and wife Yael, of Jerusalem, on the birth of granddaughter Yardena Ahuva to Yonina and Mark Simon of Hashmonaim, Israel. Mazal tov also on the birth of Ilan Moshe Bezalel to Shifra Chana (Rothstein) ’01S and Ariel Penkower ’00Y, of Elizabeth, NJ. Phyllis (Butler) Posy ’69S and husband Dr. Carl announce the birth of a grandson to their children Drs. Aaron and Tmima Allen of Brighton, MA. Charlene (Weinstein) YH’68 and Rabbi Bernhard Rosenberg ’69Y,F,R,AG were honored by the state of New Jersey Israel Bonds in Dec.

Stanley Goldschmidt ’75Y joined the Washington, DC office of the law firm of Roetzel & Andress. He is a partner in the Real Estate and Litigation Practice Groups. Mazal tov to Wendy (Turk) YH’74 and Allan Gomberg ’77Y on the marriage of son Judah, a YC student, to Kara Goldstein, a SCW student and daughter of Stan and Brenda Goldstein. Jacki (Mann) ’80S and Rabbi David Gorelik YH,’79Y,B,R celebrated the bat mitzvah of daughter Chana. Mazal tov also to grandparents Rabbi Moshe Gorelik ’53Y,R, and wife Sarah. Lois (Schwartzfarb) ’71S and Irving Grabin ’70Y, of Efrat, Israel, celebrated the marriage of daughter Peri to Yonaton Leong in Jerusalem; and the marriage of son Rafi to Ilana Steinberger of Efrat. Gay (Sicklick) Hoffman ’73S and husband Shelly announce the birth of their first grandchild, Daniella Amy, born to children Sharona and Jason Hoffman. Mazal tov to Chaim (Harold) Horowitz ’71Y,R on the birth of granddaughters Chana Raizel to Devoiry and Boruch Munk, Tzivia to Sholom Yosef and Shira Horowitz, and Rachelli to Leah and Moshe Tzvi Sonnenschein; and on the marriage of son Moshe Dovid to Devorah Goldstein. Prof. Ira Jaskoll ’71Y,R, SSSB associate dean and interim dean, was honored by Yeshivat Ohr Yerushalayim. He received the school’s Educator’s Award at its annual dinner in Feb. 2005. Nava Rephun YH,’76W presented a lecture series, “Enhancing Your Marriage: Making a Good Marriage a Phenomenal One,” at the Friar Tuck

Inn in Catskill, NY. Nava is a psychotherapist and Imago Relationship therapist who works with couples and individuals in her NYC private practice. She lectures and presents workshops in the US and Israel. Milton J. Schachter ’75Y is president and CEO of Jewish Family Service Association in Cleveland, OH. He has worked in the fields of managed care, medical management, business development, and organizational growth. Asher Scharf ’76Y,R and wife Lisa celebrated the birth of grandson Dvir Shalom to Tzvi and Tamar Scharf of Givat Shmuel, Israel. Roy Schreiber ’76Y and wife Lisa announce the marriage of son Judd to Jordana Levitsky, both third-year students at CSL. Caroline Stern ’77S is a loan officer for Wells Fargo in Highland Park, NJ. She specializes in construction and renovation loans for residential homes. She has three children: Shoshana, a veterinarian, Tzvi, who graduated from Cooper Union and is planning to attend law school, and Shlomo, who is in 11th grade at Mays High School in South River, NJ. Mazal tov to Karan (Press) Tanenbaum ’75S and husband Paul on the marriage of daughter Mindy to Matthew Cooper of Worcester, MA.

grandparents Rabbi Harry Cohen ’51Y,R and Danielle Levinsohn. Dr. Joseph Coppolo ’89F was appointed director of clinical services for On Your Mark, Inc., a non profit agency that provides services for persons with developmental disabilities. Dr. Coppolo is current president of the Richmond County Psychological Association. Dr. Irene Deitch ’81F is a psychotherapist in private practice. Professor emerita of psychology at College of Staten Island–CUNY, she specializes in couple and family counseling, bereavement and grief therapy, and aging-related issues. Recently, she was honored by Richmond County Psychological Association. She serves as media ambassador for the NY State Psychological Association and does media training for the American Psychological Association. Judy (Goldberg) Goldrich ’87C and husband Dr. Michael celebrated the bnot (in 2004) and bar mitzvah (in 2005) of Eliana, Gavriella, and David. Judy just completed a two-year term as president of the Young Israel of East Brunswick (NJ), one of the first woman presidents in the Young Israel movement in the US. Joel Kaplan YH,’80C is the president of the Cantorial Council of America. He was installed at the organization’s 45th annual convention, held in Jerusalem in July. Joel is son of the late Irving Kaplan, a YC alumnus, and grandson of the late Rabbi Julius (Yechiel) Kaplan, former YU professor of Talmud. Adam Klein YH,’87Y,R and wife Hadassa, of Ramat Gan, Israel, announce the birth of son Shmuel Chaim.

’70s
Mazal tov to Rabbi Aaron Adler ’74Y,B,R and wife Miriam on the births of granddaughters Na’omi Ruchama to Ahuva and Tamir Gaziel, and Moriya to Chaim and Avigail Adler, all of Jerusalem. Jay Bernstein ’79Y, former bond claim managing director at St. Paul Travelers in Baltimore, joined Ober / Kaler, one of the largest construction practices in the mid-Atlantic area, as a principal. Stephen Blumert ’79C was recently installed as president of the board of directors of the Jewish Community Center of Staten Island.

’80s
Esther (Levy) Bar-Shai ’88W celebrated the birth of grandson Oz Aryeh. Rachel (Tambor) ’84S and Rabbi Kenneth Brander ’84Y,R, dean of YU’s new Center for the Jewish Future, announce the birth of fifth child Chaim Yitzchak Amichai. Nicole Cohen ’89S and husband Michael celebrated the birth of son Alexander Joshua. Mazal tov also to

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

4 7

n

classnotes

Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law Sy Syms School of Business Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education

Laura (Soskin) Kornblum ’87S and husband David announce the birth of third child Rachel Daniella. Mazal tov also to grandparents Philip and Joan Soskin and Rabbi Yigal and Marilyn Kornblum; and to great-grandmother Bella Kornblum. Mazal tov to Phil Serlin ’82Y and wife Wendy, of Beit Shemesh, Israel, on the bar mitzvah of son Noam. Rabbi Nahum Spirn ’87Y,B,R made a Siyum Hashas on completing the Talmud. It was celebrated with a breakfast and davening by faculty members and his 200 students in the Yeshivah of Flatbush, where he teaches limudei kodesh (Jewish studies). He is the son of Rabbi Charles ’47Y,R and Regina Spirn. Douglas S. Stanger ’81C was appointed chair of the Bankruptcy Law Practice Group at Flaster/Greenberg, a law firm in Cherry Hill, NJ. His practice concentrates in bankruptcy, general business, and real estate law. He serves on the US Department of Justice Panel of Trustees and is an approved mediator for the Bankruptcy Court. Claudine (Sokol) Unterman ’88S is a senior account executive with Nielsen Media Research in Los Angeles, where she lives with husband Ira and their three children.

Manhattan last July for a NORPACsponsored fundraiser to assist the senator’s re-election in 2006. Sen. Kennedy said he had “high expectations” that Mayor Wildes would soon join him in Washington as a member of Congress. “Michael has expertise on immigration issues that would be invaluable,” said Sen. Kennedy. Mayor Wildes is a partner in the law firm of Wildes, Weinberg, Grunblatt and Wildes. Dr. Orit (Schwartz) ’95A and Jan S. Wimpfheimer YH,’89Y, of Beit Shemesh, Israel, celebrated the bar mitzvah of bekhor Yair. Mazal tov also to grandparents Michael Wimpfheimer YH,’61 and wife Susanne, and Malka and Dr. Moshe Schwartz. Gil Yoshor ’88Y and wife Hdar announce the birth of daughter Adira.

and Dr. Edward and Marjorie Hurwitz. Deborah Podell ’97S and Rabbi Ari Rockoff ’00SB,R, director of community initiatives at the Center for the Jewish Future, celebrated the birth of daughter Sheera Abigail in Aug. 2005. Adina Sacknovitz ’94S celebrated her marriage to Baruch Hain. Mazal tov also to parents Dr. Daniel Hain ’68Y and wife Leah, and Esther (Pernikoff) ’66S and Rabbi Chaim Sacknovitz ’64Y,F,R. David Z. Solomon ’97C and wife Miriam celebrated the birth of their bekhor, Menachem Mendel. David is a managing director in the Equities Division at Goldman Sachs & Co. Rabbi Mayer Waxman ’94Y,W,R is the Orthodox Union director of synagogue services, part of the OU’s department of community and synagogue services. He has been associated with the department for almost a decade, most recently as director of community affairs. Daniella Wiessen ’98S celebrated her marriage to Jacob Feder, in June 2005. Dr. Rhonda Yoss-Kaplan ’90F is a psychologist in a private practice in Port Washington, NY. She specializes in children and adults. She is a former adjunct professor at FGS, where she taught Cognitive Assessment I and II. She and husband Dr. Arthur have three children. Avi Zimmerman YH’95 and wife Dana announce the birth of their first child, a daughter. Mazal tov also to grandparents Sherry (Scheinberg) Zimmerman ’74S and Saul, of Beit Shemesh, Israel.

’00s
Rachel (Horn) ’04S and Jason Cyrulnik YH,’01Y announce the birth of their bekhor, Micah Ivy. Mazal tov to David Stephen Glass ’05SB on his marriage to SCW student Estee J. Slansky. Mazal tov to parents Michael and Sharon Glass and Lisa Slansky; and to grandparents Claire ’56BG and Dr. Leon Green YH,’55Y,R. Hillel Glazer YH,’01Y and wife Ellie Schainker announce the birth of their first child, daughter Mollie Yonit. Mazal tov also to grandparents June Glazer, CPA senior writer and editor, and husband Jeffrey; and Dr. Bruce and Sheryl Schainker. Raizy Gorfinkel ’03S celebrated her marriage to Aryeh Yanofsky. Mazal tov also to Raizy’s parents Phyllis (Zimilover) ’78TIW and Paul Gorfinkel ’75Y. Mazal tov to Tamar (Fox) ’02S and Philip Gross YH,’02Y on the birth of son Zev Simcha. Mazal tov also to grandparents Debbie (Breidenbach) ’78W and Ed Fox ’75Y,BJSM; and Michael Gross ’73Y and wife Shaindy. Kirsten Hyman ’03S celebrated her marriage to Joshua Freedman in Sydney, Australia. Mazal tov also to her brother, Ryan Hyman ’98Y; and to parents Mark and Beulah Hyman of Johannesburg, South Africa, and Rabbi David and Ruth Freedman of Sydney. Lauren (Pick) ’03S and Joel Jerozolim ’01Y announce the birth of son Nechemia Boruch, in May 2005. Mazal tov to Aliza (Schwartz) ’98S,AG and Rabbi Avery Joel ’00Y,R on the birth of a son, Eytan. Mazal tov also to

’90s
Shoshana (Lerner) ’91SB and Steven Arnold ’91Y, of Beit Shemesh, Israel, announce the birth of son Netanel Shimon. Mazal tov also to grandparents Shirley Roy Arnold Lerner ’64S,F and husband Martin, also of Beit Shemesh. Stacy (Abroms) ’99W and Ari Bandler ’99Y,W announce the birth of third child Rami Asher, in July 2005. Elana (Vogel) Dressler ’99S and husband Rich live in Baltimore and are the parents of two-year-old Avigayil (Gali) and one-year-old Amitai. Stephanie Freeman ’93C is panel attorney to the Bankruptcy Appellate Panel for the Tenth Circuit in Denver, CO. She is married to James McKeon and has twin daughters, Jolie and Perri.

DONNA BRENNAN

Mayor Michael Wildes ’89C, mayor of Englewood, NJ, welcomed US Sen. Ted Kennedy to his law offices in

Mazal tov to Shulamit Braun YH,’98S and Paul Hurwitz ’98SB on their marriage. Mazal tov also to parents Zelda (Badner) ’68S,W, SCW dean of students, and Dr. Martin Braun YH,’63Y;

4 8

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

Yeshiva University High Schools Albert Einstein Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies Theological Seminary & Administration Stern College for Women

grandparents Esther (Ribner) ’83F and YU President Richard Joel and Dr. Ira and Arlene Schwartz. Simon B. Landsberg YH,’02Y and wife Hillary celebrated the birth of a daughter, Ashley, in May 2005. Simon received a Juris Doctor degree from New York Law School. Mazal tov to Anne (Mogilevich) ’01C and Alexander Lumelsky ’01C on the birth of son Samuel Michael. Mazal tov to David Rabin ’04Y and Rachel Turk ’03S on their marriage. Jason M. Rudolph ’03F, PsyD candidate at FGS, is a psychology intern at Jacobi Medical Center, Bronx. Rebecca (Glass) ’03S and Yehuda Shmidman ’03Y celebrated the birth of their bekhor, Samuel Leib. Mazal tov also to grandparents Linda (Stern) ’70S and Dr. Michael Shmidman YH,’70Y. Carla (Shron) Sprung ’01S and husband Elie, of Modi’in, Israel, announce the birth of their bekhor, Akiva Moshe, in June 2005. Jonathan J. Walzman ’01SB has joined the firm of Greenbaum, Rowe, Smith & Davis LLP as an associate in the corporate department.

Malki Cymbalista YH’69, Zev YH,’69Y and Aryeh YH’71 Furst on the loss of their mother, Batya, wife of Rabbi Moshe Furst YH,’43Y,R. Lenny Ben-David (Davis) ’71Y, Rabbi Melvin (Menachem) Davis ’68Y,R, and Marcia Frank ’66S on the loss of their mother, Adele. Allan Friedman YH,’68Y on the loss of his mother, Sylvia. David S. Gottesman, YU Board of Trustees chairman emeritus, on the loss of his brother, Milton. He was a supporter of the Mendel Gottesman Library, named for his grandfather, who was a pioneer leader of YU. Judith Gottesman ’95W on the loss of her father, Rabbi Aaron. He attended YU for his freshman year of college. He was a photographer, chaplain, and resident in later years of San Diego. That city’s mayor proclaimed Aug. 4, 2003 Rabbi Aaron Gottesman Day, and Rabbi Gottesman was 2004 Man of the Year in Southern California’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Vera (Apt) Gruber ’70S,W on the loss of her mother. Arnold ’56Y,R, Seymour ’56Y,F, and Herbert (Chaim) ’57Y,R Hoffman on the loss of their mother, Gussie, widow of the late Rabbi Yitzchak Hoffman, a founding teacher at YUHS-Girls. Rabbi Nathan Kahan ’74Y,B,R on the loss of his mother, Betty. Condolences also to Jacob Glueck, a YU Benefactor with his daughter, Vivian Glueck Rosenberg, on the loss of his sister. Dr. Monique (Censor) Katz ’63A, vice chairman of the SCW Board of Directors and Benefactor with her husband, YU trustee and BRGS Board chair Mordecai D., on the loss of her father, Jacques.

Your news is our news!
If you’ve got a new job, promotion, hobby that’s become a “second career,” new book, award, community service honor, addition to the family, etc., we’d like to hear about it. Please include complete information and, if possible, a head shot or good quality photo.

SCHOOL / CLASS ____________________ NAME (FIRST) __________________________ (LAST) ____________________________

(MAIDEN) ______________________________________________________________ ADDRESS ____________________________________________________________________ CITY, STATE, ZIP ____________________________________________________________ PHONE (HOME) ________________________ (OFFICE) __________________________ FAX (HOME) ____________________________ (OFFICE) __________________________ EMAIL (HOME) __________________________ (OFFICE) __________________________ MY NEWS: __________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

CONDOLENCES TO
Ellen YH’73 and Nachum Amsel YH,’74Y,R,F,AG on the loss of their father, Stanley. Sharon YH’69 and Rabbi Richard Auman ’68Y,B,R on the loss of their son, Shmuel, husband of Chedva Herskovics Auman, a WSSW student. Rabbi Ezra YH,’70Y,R, Rabbi Yosef YH,’66Y, and Rabbi Hillel ’63Y,B,R Bick on the loss of their mother, Sonia.

____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

S E N D O R FA X T O :

Office of University Alumni Affairs,

500 West 185th Street, New York, NY 10033-3201. Phone 212-960-5373 • FAX: 212-960-5336 • Email: alumni@yu.edu

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

4 9

Wurzweiler School of Social Work
n

classnotes

Yeshiva College

Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law Sy Syms School of Business

Martin Kaufman, a YU Guardian with wife Shelley, on the loss of his mother, Hilda. They are supporters of RIETS and BRGS, on which Board of Directors Martin serves. Lawrence ’65Y,R and Joseph Kaplan YH,’68Y and Rena Spinowitz on the loss of their father, Simon Kaplan. Sandy Kilstein ’72S,W on the loss of her mother, Ida. She was a Holocaust survivor born in Oswiciem (Auschwitz) Poland and who came to Memphis, TN after the war. She is survived by her husband, Jacob, two other children, and four grandchildren. Marcia YH’70 and Dr. Bernard Klein ’72Y on the loss of their father, Louis. He passed away in Jerusalem. Ambassador Daniel ’71Y and Benjamin Kurtzer ’79Y, Debra Forman, and Gale Bienstock on the loss of their mother, Sylvia. Mark Licht YH,’78Y on the loss of his mother, Rosalyn. Jay ’70Y,A and Neal ’73Y Rosenblum, Nina Cohen ’67S,W, Estee Shor ’76S, and Aviva Ramras ’84S on the loss of their mother, Sylvia. Sheldon Rudoff YH,’54Y,R, YC board member, and Evelyn Rochlin YH’54, YUHS-Girls faculty member, on the loss of their mother, Goldie, who, with her husband, Raphael, endowed the Goldie and Raphel Rudoff Scholarship fund at YUHS-Girls. Debra Brickner ’71F, Gary YH,’71Y,

and Dr. Larry YH’70 Schulman on the loss of their father, Eliezer, chazzan (cantor) at the Great Neck Synagogue in Great Neck, NY. Rebbetzin Sabina (Muller) Shmidman ’61S on the loss of her husband, Rabbi Joshua Shmidman, former Shabbat rabbi at SCW. Condolences also to Rabbi Avraham Shmidman ’93Y and Rabbi Michael Shmidman, YU dean of undergraduate Jewish studies, on the loss of their father and brother, respectively. David Weinberg ’05Y on the loss of his father, Jerry. Sara Leah (Saffir) Weisenberg ’60S and Isser Saffir ’74Y on the loss of their mother, Ruth. Dr. Herman Wouk, a YU Guardian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author who taught English Rhetoric at YC, on the loss of his brother, Dr. Victor.

AECOM Society of Founders, he served as Society chairman in 1961, and remained a dedicated supporter of the College’s medical research and education programs through the years. He also was a YU Guardian. Condolences to his wife, Gladys, children, and grandchildren. Albert T. Brod, in Sept. 2005. He and his wife, Lois, are YU Guardians who established the Albert T. and Lois Brod Scholarship and the Albert T. and Ruth Hagy Brod Scholarship at YU. Condolences to Lois and the entire family. Rabbi Eli Gamliel YH,’53Y,TI,R, in Aug. 2005. Condolences to his wife, Ann, and children Nardi and Sharona. Max Grill, in Dec. 2005. A Benefactor with his late wife, Marion, he named the Max and Marion Grill Deanship at RIETS and a host of scholarships at the university’s undergraduate and graduate schools, and at YUHS. Dr. Marshall S. Horwitz, chair of microbiology and immunology at AECOM, in May 2005. The Leo and Julia Forchheimer Professor of Microbiology and Immunology as well as professor of pediatrics and of cell biology at AECOM, he was a world-renowned virologist known for his study of the biology of adenoviruses. At the time of his death, he was studying novel adenovirus genes that regulate the human immune system. Condolences to his wife, Dr. Susan Band Horwitz, cochair of molecular pharmacology and the

Rose C. Falkenstein Professor of Cancer Research at AECOM, and to his sons, Joshua and Bruce. Lola Kramer, a Benefactor with her husband, Saul, in July 2005. She dedicated a classroom at FGS in honor of their daughter, Dr. Kathie Kramer Rudy, a member of the FGS Board of Governors. At AECOM, they endowed a professorial chair in molecular genetics and a laboratory for multiple sclerosis research as well as ongoing support for student loans. Norman F. Levy, in Sept. 2005. A leader in the building of NYC and its economy, he was instrumental in securing the real estate industry’s support in the early days of Albert Einstein College of Medicine and, with his late wife, Betty, became an Einstein Founder and Cancer Research Donor. On the occasion of YU’s Centennial in 1987, they established the Betty and Norman F. Levy Foundation Fellowship at BRGS and, more recently, the Norman F. Levy Lobby at the Beren Campus. Harold Lowell YH,’43Y, in Aug. 2005. He was a retired CPA. Condolences to his family. Michael Massa ’99W, in Sept. 2005 after a long illness. He is survived by his immediate family and longtime partner, Sheila Rourke ’00W. Ruth (Goldman) Miller ’65W, in Aug. 2005. She was the wife of the late Rabbi Israel Miller ’38Y,R, YU senior vice president emeritus. Condolences

WE MOURN
Dr. Moshe (Marvin) Bayewitz YH’64, in May 2005. He worked at Bethlehem Steel for many years, where he was issued a US patent, and in 1990 formed Bayewitz Asset Management in Teaneck, NJ. Condolences to his wife, Passi, and to children Divsha Tollinsky ’98S, Bina Faber ’99S, Ariel ’04Y, Ashrei YH’02, and Ora. Edward H. Benenson, former member of the AECOM Board of Overseers for more than four decades, in July 2005. Among the early members of the

A, AECOM Albert Einstein College of Medicine • AG Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration • BG, BGSS Belfer Institute for Advanced Biomedical Sciences • B, BRGS Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies • BSJM Philip and Sarah Belz School of Jewish Music • CTI Cantorial Training Institute • C, CSL Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law • F, FGS Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology • I, IBC Isaac Breuer College of Hebraic Studies • J, JSS James Striar School of General Jewish Studies • MSDCS Max Stern Division of Communal Services • Y, MYP Yeshiva Program/Mazer School of Talmudic Studies • SBMP Irving I. Stone Beit Midrash Program • R, RIETS Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary • S, SCW Stern College for Women • SG Sue Golding Graduate Division of Medical Sciences • SB, SSSB Sy Syms School of Business • T, TI Teachers Institute • T, TIW Teachers Institute for Women • W, WSSW Wurzweiler School of Social Work • Y, YC Yeshiva College • YH, YUHS Yeshiva University High Schools (MSTA The Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy) (SWHSG Samuel H. Wang Yeshiva University High School for Girls)

5 0

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

Albert Einstein College of Medicine Stern College Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology Bernard Revel Graduate School Yeshiva University High Schools

to children Rabbi Dovid Miller ’68Y,R,B, director of YU’s Gruss Kollel in Jerusalem; Rabbi Michael Miller YH,’71Y,R,B; Judy Kalish ’80S; and Debbie Kram. Dr. Harold Nierenberg, former SSSB dean, in Oct. 2005. Also the Joseph Kerzner Professor of Management, he was a longtime educator who served with distinction as the school’s second dean. During his tenure at SSSB, he also served for a time as the university’s acting vice president for academic affairs. Condolences to his wife, Laura; children Bart YH’72 and Jonathan ’88SB Nierenberg and SCW student Andrea Winkler; his grandchildren and great grandchildren; and brother, Michael. Rabbi Joseph Nissel YH,’45Y,R, of Petach Tikvah, Israel. Condolences to his wife, Annette, daughter Laurie Koslow, son Yitzchak, and sister Anna Bruckenstein. Rabbi Manfred Pick ’48R. He was a Jewish educator at Hillel Academy in Passaic, NJ. Condolences to his wife, Barbara, and their children. Dr. Abraham A. Polachek YH’32. Condolences to his children, Rabbi Shlomo (Solomon) Polachek ’71B,BG,R and Jean Niedober ’71S. Rabbi Judah S. Rackovsky ’48Y,R, in Aug. 2005. He was a librarian at Bronx Community College. Condolences to his wife, Judy, and children Fruma, Chedva, Shalom, and Rachel. Rabbi Evan Radler ’90R, in May 2005. He was spiritual leader of the Hillcrest Jewish Center, Queens, NY. He began his rabbinical career at the Roosevelt Island Jewish Cong. He also led the First Hebrew Cong. Of Peekskill, NY, and Cong. B’nai Torah in Atlanta. Condolences to his wife, Mindy, his mother, Norma Solzberg, stepdaughter Ilana Zaken, and stepson Tal Zaken.

Cantor Abraham A. Salkov ’43Y, in Feb. 2005. Dr. Noam Shudofsky ’77F, in March 2005. An educator and retired administrator at the Ramaz School, he taught at AGS for 17 years. Condolences to his wife, Nehama (Deutsch) YH,’54TIW, and children, Binyamin (Shudofsky) Shalev ’79Y, Rachel, and Leora. Jack Straus ’78Y, in May 2005. He lived in Jerusalem. Rabbi Abraham Wahrhaftig YH,’66Y, B,R, in June 2005. Condolences to his wife, Joyce (Wolf) YH,’69S, and to his children, Lisa Lesnick ’94S, Yael Miller ’00S,F, Michal Schechter, and Yaacov Wahrhaftig. Joseph H. Warburg, YU Guardian with his wife, Ilse, in May 2005. Condolences to her; to their children Rabbi Ronald YH,’69Y,F,R and David YH,’75Y Warburg, and Joan Rothman; and to his brother, Ralph. Rabbi Yitzchak (Irwin) Witty YH,’53Y,R, of Toronto, in July 2005. After a distinguished career as executive director of the Toronto Board of Jewish Education, he was executive director of the Albert and Temmy Latner Jewish Public Library. Prior to relocating to Toronto, he was principal of the Winnipeg Hebrew School and a pulpit rabbi in Winnipeg for several years. Condolences to his wife, Shulamith, children Rabbi Noah ’78Y,R; Judith Lustig ’82S,W; Leah Stromer ’82S, assistant to the SSSB dean, Office of Career Services; and Rabbi Avraham Aryaih ’87Y,R; grandchildren; and brother Rabbi Abraham A. Witty. Rabbi Wilfred Wolfson, who taught at Manhattan Talmudical Academy for many years. Louis Young YH’25, the oldest YH alumnus in Israel, in Oct. 2005. Condolences to his sister, Cynthia Tisser.

BERNARD “RED” SARACHEK, FORMER LONGTIME YU COACH, D I E S AT 9 3

B

ernard “Red” Sarachek, longtime coach of the Yeshiva University men’s basketball team and a member of both the New York City Hall of Fame and the New York City Basketball Hall of Fame, died Nov. 14 in Deerfield Beach, FL, after a long illness. He was 93. Renowned internationally as a coach of coaches as well as players, Red counted among his disciples some of the best-known coaches in the US. Among them are Lou Carnesecca, Jack Donohue, and Red Holzman. “He has taught more high school and college coaches in [the New York City area] than anybody,” former St. Johns Coach Carnesecca once said of Sarachek. “Red is the guru.” A tireless roundball strategist and innovator, Sarachek was featured in the above photo, which appeared in The New York Times in 1956. It accompanied a story by Gay Talese called “Yeshiva Quintet Holds ‘Skull Sessions’ in Subway.” Sarachek coached the YU team from 1942 to 1943 and from 1945 to 1969. Current YU basketball coach Jon Halpert YH,’66Y,F, in his 34th

season as coach, played for Sarachek from 1962 to 1966. Halpert said the key thing to know about Sarachek was that he believed in the truth. “He did what he thought was right and he said what he thought was right,” Coach Halpert said. Yeshiva University named its annual high school basketball invitational after Sarachek in 1992. The Red Sarachek Basketball Tournament, which takes place each spring, attracts Jewish high school basketball teams from as far away as Los Angeles and Toronto. Coach Carnesecca, who called YU’s Department of Communications and Public Affairs after Sarachek’s death, wanted people to know that the old YU coach was “most of all a true friend. I’m gonna miss him so much,” Carnesecca said.

Y E S H I VA

U N I V E R S I T Y

R E V I E W

W I N T E R

2 0 0 6

5 1

Increase Your Income… and Your Commitment to Jewish Life
Some charitable gifts transform dream to deed. Others balance one’s need for financial security with the desire to keep Jewish higher learning strong and vibrant. A Yeshiva University gift annuity helps you achieve both. It makes your money really matter. Whether you give cash, stocks, certificates of deposits, or bonds, your YU annuity can provide annual income for life…and ultimately help continue a track record of superb academic study and research. Be part of a success story whose best chapters lie ahead. Your YU annuity could: • Increase annual income for life • Provide a significant charitable income tax deduction • Reduce your capital gains tax • Offer partially tax-free quarterly annuity payments
BENEFITS
IF YOU ARE 60 70 80 90 YOU CAN EARN 5.7% 6.5% 8.0% 11.3%

The Gift That Matters
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT HENRY T. RUBIN, ESQ., SENIOR DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT FOR GIFT PLANNING YESHIVA UNIVERSITY, 500 WEST 185TH STREET, BELFER HALL ROOM 719, NEW YORK, NY 10033 TOLL FREE 877-983-3857 OR 212-960-0870 FAX 212-960-0869 E-MAIL: HRUBIN@YU.EDU

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful