Welcome to the IDriveSafely Parent/Coach Guide!

Driving is a skill that requires regulated practice and a responsible, experienced coach. Consistent practice provides the new driver with an opportunity to practice new skills incrementally, as they are learned and provides the coach with insight on the learner’s skill mastery. This coach’s guide is produced to compliment the IDriveSafely online driver education course. It is intended to provide you with a step-by-step, incremental plan for practicing the driving skills, positive attitudes and behavior presented in the online course. As a driving coach, you are not expected to be a driving instructor. The coach is there to guide and help the novice driver develop a responsible decision making process. You will demonstrate skills and conduct commentary driving to assist learning and decision making skills. This guide will help you manage the task of being a coach and give you some tips about conducting safe in-vehicle practice sessions with your novice driver. The course has eight units of instruction and is designed for you to participate in the learning process. There are activities and invehicle driving exercises designed to reinforce each unit of instruction. Each unit gets progressively more difficult. This guide will help you achieve 50 hours of meaningful supervised practice recommended by driver training experts. Print the in-vehicle activity sheets and keep them in the car on a clipboard to assist you while conducting the practice sessions. Please read this guide thoroughly and be prepared for one of the most important jobs you have ever committed to! Have a wonderful and rewarding experience as you help train your novice driver for a safe driving career! Table of Contents Coaching Tips.......................................................................................................................... 2 Commentary Driving ................................................................................................................ 4 Student Handouts .................................................................................................................... 5 The Course Map....................................................................................................................... 7 Pre-Drive 1: Risk Awareness ..................................................................................................... 9 Pre-Drive 2: The Road ............................................................................................................ 11 Pre-Drive 3: The Driver .......................................................................................................... 15 Pre-Drive 4: The Vehicle ......................................................................................................... 11 Drive 1: Basic Control............................................................................................................. 17 Drive 2: Searching ................................................................................................................. 22 Drive 3: Reversing Direction and Parking................................................................................... 24 Drive 4: Multi-Lane Roads I..................................................................................................... 28 Drive 5: Curves and Hazards ................................................................................................... 31 Drive 6: Multi-lane Roadways II ............................................................................................... 33 Drive 7: Expressway Driving.................................................................................................... 35 Drive 8: Sharing the Road....................................................................................................... 37 Drive 9: Rural Driving and Passing ........................................................................................... 38 Drive 10: Hazardous Conditions ............................................................................................... 40 Drive 11: Emergency Maneuvers.............................................................................................. 42 Drive 12: Travel Preparation.................................................................................................... 44 Drive 13: Driving Other Vehicles .............................................................................................. 45 Driving Contract .................................................................................................................... 46

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Coaching Tips
The following suggestions will improve the overall experience for the learner and the coach: #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 Be Prepared. Create a contract. Be a Good Role Model. Update Your Driving Expertise. Anticipate Common Novice Driver Mistakes. Manage and Maintain the Training Vehicle. Communicate Clearly. Take the Job Seriously.

Before beginning your coaching responsibilities, recognize a few facts that you can incorporate in your discussions about the need for quality training: • • • • According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teens 15-20 years old. Each day, approximately 8,000 teenage drivers are involved in a crash. The number of passengers is closely related to the risk of crash. When safety belts are worn, the risk of death and serious injury is reduced by about 50%.

The main contributors to the high crash rate of teen drivers include: • • • • • • Inexperience Poor visual search skills Poor risk assessment and judgment making Speeding Driving at high-risk hours (night and weekends) Inattention and distraction

Tip #1 Be Prepared. Take an active interest and follow along with the progress of your novice driver as they go through the IDriveSafely online course. The course consists of eight units broken down into 46 modules of instruction, each about 20-30 minutes in length. This course is designed to be integrated with the 50 hour parent/coach component and therefore expanded over several months. There is a great deal of information in each module concluding with a ten question quiz. Track the progress of your student online and be ready to “coach” them on the topics they have just covered. Begin your job as a coach as your teen begins the course. As valuable lessons are being learned, begin training your new driver while YOU drive with them in front passenger seat of the vehicle. Follow the progress of your teen online and become a driving mentor while leading discussions about the topics they are learning. Use this guide throughout their online experience and after they obtain a learner’s permit. Schedule at least 50 hours of guided practice in the vehicle. Use this as your guide to ensure your novice driver has 50 hours of meaningful supervised practice behind-the-wheel before receiving their license. Plan each session to last approximately 60 minutes. If you are tired, re-schedule. Be sure each of you is in a good mood before starting the sessions. Don’t move from one skill set to the next until you are confident the new driver has mastered the unit skills and is ready for a more complex set of maneuvers. Plan and drive your routes before conducting the practice sessions.

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Coaching Skills • • • • • Coach on routine trips when you drive – have your novice passenger ride in the front seat. Go over the skills and objectives with your novice driver before each session. When introducing a new maneuver, demonstrate it first while commenting on what you are seeing and what you are doing to complete the maneuver safely. When the novice is driving, sit in a position where you can easily place your left hand on the steering wheel and guide the wheel (take control) if necessary. Continuously scan for hazards and obstacles ahead and around the vehicle while observing the novice drivers behavior. Always check mirrors and the blind spots before giving directions to maneuver.

Tip #2 Establish Guidelines and Agreements. Implement parent-teen and parent-parent agreements for vehicle use and operation. Be consistent, fair, flexible and in control. Contact the parents of your teen’s friends and discuss how you will work together to monitor and enforce safe behavior, GDL passenger restrictions and other laws. A sample teen/parent contract is provided at the end of this guide. Discuss and fill in the appropriate categories. The contract can be modified to suit your own individual needs and circumstances. Tip #3 • • • • • • • • • Be a Good Role Model.

Obey the rules-of-the-road. Review the online course content and modify your driving behaviors if necessary. Stay focused on the task of driving – Do not use your cell phone, eat, read or look away from the road when driving. Always use your safety belt. Do not drive aggressively. Tap your horn. Do not yell or curse at other drivers. Always signal your intention to change lanes, turn or enter a parking space. Check your mirrors prior to maneuvers or speed adjustments. Maintain safe space, do not tailgate. Go with the flow of traffic – do not weave in and out of traffic.

Tip #4 Update Your Driving Expertise. Be sure you are a credible source of information for your novice driver. Be prepared with correct answers about rules and laws. Review the state DMV handbook to brush up on the rules-of-the road, sign meanings, GDL laws, insurance requirements and violation fines and penalties. Know how to demonstrate safe following distances and lines of sight. Be prepared to demonstrate scanning techniques and how to manage distractions. Reference the student handouts that accompany each unit of instruction before conducting the coaching duties and in-vehicle checklists. Tip #5 Anticipate Common Novice Driver Mistakes. Novice drivers make several common mistakes. Anticipate these mistakes and be prepared to correct them if they occur. Be prepared to correct common errors, which include failure to: • • • • • • • • • • Conduct a constant, thorough “search” of the roadway ahead. Continuously scan mirrors for obstacles to the sides and to the rear. Focus on obstacles and traffic on the roadway. Maintain a safe space around the vehicle (to the front, sides and in the rear). Drive a safe speed through intersections and around curves. Execute a smooth turn - cuts the corner or takes the turn too wide. Maintain control of the steering wheel when signaling. Maintain steady lane position (students often wander between traffic lanes). Conduct a complete scan before entering intersections (red-light runners and obstacles). Maintain the space gap when merging.
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Copyright, IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved

Tip #6 Manage and Maintain the Training Vehicle. Select a safe vehicle to conduct your novice driver training. Select a vehicle with crash survival features such as airbags, daytime running lights and antilock brakes. The vehicle should be well maintained and have tires with a safe amount of tread and proper inflation. All primary and secondary controls should be fully functional and in good condition. Plan to use the same vehicle to practice until the driver gains skill mastery. Tip #7 Communicate Clearly. When conducting practice sessions, restrict conversation to topics related to the practice exercises and driving task. Turn off the radio and CD player. Do not operate cell phones. • • • • • Give clear, simple directions. First state where and then what to do. For example: “At the intersection ahead, get in the left turn lane, signal and turn left when traffic is clear”. To prevent confusion when practicing, use the word RIGHT only as a direction – never use the word RIGHT to indicate “yes” or “correct.” Do not overload your teen with too much information in a single session. If you or your driver becomes tired, nervous or anxious, stop the session and resume at another time. Conduct an assessment at the conclusion of each session – have your driver critique their own performance. Create a game plan for improving problem areas that is incorporated into the goals for the next session. Keep calm and cool - Don’t allow your novice driver to become too dependant upon your instructions!

Tip #8 Take the Job Seriously. Be prepared and fully involved in your job as a coach and mentor. Rehearse the practice sessions and be enthusiastic when you see progress. • • • • Set standards and if possible, stick to your schedule. Track your teen’s progress in the IDriveSafely course. Reference the student handouts. Make sure your supervised practice sessions are consistent with what is presented in the course. When you are driving or conducting practice sessions focus on the task of being a coach.

Commentary Driving
Communication in the vehicle is critical for learning and understanding. Throughout the course, we recommend that you and your new driver implement a method to communicate potential hazards as they are “seen” ahead, to the sides and behind the vehicle. This technique is called “commentary driving” and is used by many professional driving instructors. How it works for the coach… As the driver/coach, when you are planning and performing a maneuver, comment on what you are seeing and verbalize your thoughts and decision making process. As you conduct the maneuver, comment on what you are doing as you go through the maneuver, for example: “I want to turn right at the intersection ahead. I search for hazards and signals. I see busy traffic and one bicyclist on the other side of the intersection. As we get closer, I see a road marking, a white arrow pointing to the right that designates a lane for right turns only. I scan my mirrors and blind spot to see if there is a gap for me to safely move into the right turn lane. I turn on my signal before changing lanes. When it is safe, I move into the turn lane. I keep my signal on through the turn”. When the path of travel is clear, I slow down and make the turn into the nearest (right) lane. I straighten the wheels and accelerate to the speed of traffic and re-check my mirrors.” The commentary above is a detailed description and reminder of how many complex tasks are conducted in the driving process. Plan to rehearse commentary driving as you practice driving the routes you select prior to the in-vehicle session. To conduct quality, goal oriented sessions, practice can be just as important for the coach as it is for your novice driver.
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identify them by nature and location (“kids playing near street. Have them describe the threats in as few words as possible. Print it out and go over it with your teen driver or modify one to better suit your ground rules. Test their knowledge of the rules-of-theroad as you encounter complex driving situations. The student should identify only those threats that require some action.” “blue car with the driver looking the other way. The handouts are designed to download and print during the course. if the student needs to work on left turns. just identify them. Well before your novice driver obtains their permit. There is no need for students to announce the absence of a threat.” “pavement in shadow may be icy. The Driving Contract A sample driving contract is featured on the last page of this guide. Both parties should sign the contract. This technique is called diagnostic coaching. It isn’t necessary to say what to do about threats. participating in the dialogue and discussing proper driving techniques. It helps the new driver recognize potential hazards and perform corrective action. agree to the terms. Develop a clear method of communication so you both anticipate what will happen next and how it will be performed. During student commentary driving. go through the checklists and procedures presented in the course. Essentially you are discovering how well they are processing the information they see. the coach is encouraged to make a constructive comment such as “your left turn was too wide at the last intersection. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 5 of 47 . At the conclusion of each session. comment on the adequacy of student performance by summarizing in specific terms where they need improvement. Use the handouts in conjunction with this guide to conduct discussions. The student handouts contain an overview of the critical information found in each unit. As the coach. checklists and driving activities. follow along with your student’s progress by scanning each handout to help you prepare for the activities you will conduct in the supervised practice sessions. go over your notes about what needs to be improved and also what positive progress has been made. Get in their head by having them communicate what they see and how they might respond. have them tell you what they are about to do. frequently encourage them to comment on what they see as they continuously search and scan for threats in the traffic environment.When you are driving and demonstrate how to conduct commentary driving. For example. When they see obstacles ahead and anticipate making an evasive maneuver. Student Handouts Each unit in the course is supplemented with a student handout. possibly come off the accelerator and be prepared to respond. Create a plan for when and where you will conduct the practice sessions. Whatever your situation.”). the coach is responsible for making suggestions. How it works for the novice driver… When the novice driver is practicing. even if it is to just to watch the condition closely. Copyright. Use the handouts to talk your novice through a review of the information before you demonstrate the material in the vehicle. This technique helps establish a good pattern of searching well ahead. Diagnostic Coaching While conducting supervised practice sessions. Have your teen keep each handout to review and study for the exam. have your novice practice commentary driving long before they get behind the wheel.” Providing truly diagnostic instruction requires (1) looking for specific responses at the appropriate places and (2) recording correct and incorrect responses on the checklists provided in this guide.

be prepared to discuss and demonstrate these concepts as you drive. The unit one in-vehicle exercise features the coach as the driver. Activities for this module include identifying various types of vehicles and discussing their unique features. The vehicle is used to familiarize the student with the systems and different parts of the engine. Commentary driving by the coach concludes the unit with active discussion about the rules of the road in simple. events and situations. Unit 3 The Driver Unit three is about “the driver” and the importance of being responsible and prepared to drive. The unit continues with how to manage inattention and distraction when driving. The main focus of this unit is on becoming familiar with how the vehicle works and how to keep it in good operational condition. Next. The issues of fatigue. Module topics include Intersections. signals and markings. alcohol and drug impaired driving are presented in detail for a thorough understanding about the dangers of driving when tired or impaired. unit two discusses emotional impaired driving and how to manage road rage and its triggers. This unit is also about obeying laws.A Snapshot of the IDriveSafely Course and Activities.” Activities include identifying signs. It discusses occupant protection and emphasizes how critical it is for all occupants to wear safety belts. with the tires. you will also discuss the forces of nature as they effect how you maneuver and handle the vehicle. its different characteristics and the way it communicates with us though signs. gauges and lights. The unit concludes with a trip to a service station to refuel the vehicle. or restraints. The unit launches the student into the IDriveSafely experience and concludes with the steps required to successfully obtain a driver’s license. signals and markings and demonstrating knowledge about their meanings. Unit 4 The Vehicle Unit four is about “the vehicle. intermediate and complex driving scenarios. Routine maintenance checks are demonstrated under the hood. situational awareness and the process of risk management. The novice driver is in the front passenger seat as you point out and discuss potential hazards you encounter on the roadway. introducing the student to situational awareness and how to recognize and avoid dangerous places. The unit concludes with a unique module on personal safety. The coach and student will observe and record how frequently unsafe driving behavior occurs at a busy intersection. You discuss “what-if” scenarios – emphasizing the worst that could happen. Unit one also describes how critical the laws of nature are to the driving task. vehicle controls and vehicle maintenance. responsible driving and courteous driving behavior .” The unit covers different types of vehicle and their different handling characteristics. Driving Environments and the “Rulesof-the-Road. Per Unit: Unit 1 Introduction Unit one instruction is focused on the dangers of driving. There are separate modules covering the basics of vehicle systems. Copyright. Unit 2 The Road Unit two is about “the road”. As you drive the unit one exercise. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 6 of 47 .

as the coach “commentary” driver. during wet weather. vehicle entry. Reference the student handouts to prepare for you coach activities. By the time your novice driver obtains a learner’s permit. The Course Map Print and reference the course map on the following page and use it as your guide to schedule the invehicle practice sessions and activities with your new driver. steering. curves. Driving exercises are designed to practice these skills incrementally. The course is designed for you to follow this integrated sequence of events. making sound decisions.Unit 5 Basic Driving Unit five introduces how to approach the vehicle. different driving conditions. follow this guide and the course map to conduct the in-vehicle activities and supervised practice sessions. backing. on ice and snow and in the desert. You can also use the course map to help schedule your time together in the vehicle as well as a guide for the number of hours to practice each skill set. intermediate steering and how to manage speed and space. The boxes represent the online course module titles. turning parking and securing the vehicle are taught in the first behind-the-wheel session and practiced until they are mastered. If your new driver is not ready to safely proceed to the next driving event. procedures and maneuvers. Conduct coach drives with commentary driving after each unit is complete. Practice is only encouraged for such maneuvers as skid recovery in a no-traffic. The unit concludes with driving techniques for vehicle malfunctions and evasive. emergency maneuvers. When the student obtains a permit. Because of the inherent danger practicing these maneuvers. The course map tells you what topics you need to review with your new driver before each drive. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 7 of 47 . SUVs. low risk environment. Unit 6 Intermediate Driving Unit six presents the knowledge and skills necessary to accomplish intermediate driving tasks in a low to intermediate traffic environment. in a simple to complex driving environments. the unit is primarily knowledge-based. at night. they will begin their supervised practice by demonstrating the knowledge and skills taught in this unit. you should have already talked through the entire course and discussed the topics. searching. Unit 7 Advanced Driving Unit seven is about advanced driving maneuvers. moving. Copyright. Advanced driving includes driving on expressways. The picture of the vehicle indicates the appropriate time and title for the parent/coach activities. When it is time for your teen to get behind the wheel.” The course concludes with a module on the characteristics of driving other vehicles such as rental cars. Basic control skills such as starting. reacting and performing safe driving maneuvers. in rural areas. recreational vehicles and the handling characteristics of towing a trailer and fuel economy. continue to practice with them until they have mastered the skills. Unit 8 Using Your Vehicle for Travel Unit eight prepares the young driver to prepare for a trip and the “unexpected. The driver is introduced to intersection management. on hills and mountains. moving vans. Follow along with your student’s online progress. driving preparation and simple driving skills in an empty parking lot or no-traffic environment. Focus is placed on situational awareness. This course map is only a recommended guide for you to achieve 50 hours of meaningful supervised practice.

7 3.8 3.Parent/Coach Integrated Driver Training Course Map Course Start Course Start The IDriveSafely The IDriveSafely Course Course 1.5 1.7 7.1 5.5 Pre-Drive 1 Risk & Situational Awareness 1 (1) Hr Session Inattention & Inattention & Distraction Distraction 3.2 Preparing for Preparing for a Trip a Trip 8.3 5.4 5.2 Intersections Intersections 2.1 Driver Driver Readiness Readiness 3.1 2.5 Basic Control 3 (1) Hr Session Drive 1 Your License Your License 1.4 Multi-lane Multi-lane Roadways II Roadways II Drive 6 Multilane Roadways II 5 (1) Hr Session 6.1 7.4 1.2 Multi-lane Multi-lane Roadways I Roadways I 6.6 2.5 6 (1) Hr Session Signs Signs 2.4 Curves Curves 6. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 8 of 47 .3 1.1 8.5 3.6 Communicating Communicating Emotionally Emotionally Impaired Driving Impaired Driving 5.4 6.2 Pre-Drive Pre-Drive Checklist Checklist 5.7 Basic Control III Basic Control III 5.2 Night Driving Night Driving 7.4 Driving Driving Environments Environments 2.2 Pre-Drive 3 The Driver 1 (1) Hr Session Drive 8 Travel Preparation 1 (1) Hr Session Drive 12 Parking Parking Markings Markings 5.3 Driving on Driving on Hills &Mountains Hills &Mountains 7.1 Pre-Drive 4 The Vehicle 1 (1) Hr Session Conditions & Conditions & Other Road Users Other Road Users Curves & Hazards 4 (1) Hr Session 6.4 Final Course Exam Pre-Drive 2 The Road 1 (1) Hr Session Vehicle Vehicle Maintenance Maintenance 4.3 Multi-lane Roads I 4 (1) Hr Session Drive 4 Wet Weather Wet Weather Driving Driving 7.2 2.6 2.1 Personal Safety Personal Safety 3.8 7.5 Copyright.6 3.1 1.2 Alcohol-Impaired Alcohol-Impaired Driving Driving 3.5 7.3 3.3 6.1 Rural Driving and Passing 6 (1) Hr Session Drive 9 Drive 13 Rules of the Rules of the Road Road 2.1 Drive 5 Driving on Driving on Ice and Snow Ice and Snow 7.4 Expressway Expressway Driving Driving Expressway Driving 7.1 Parking 2 (1) Hr Session Rural Driving Rural Driving 7.1 Signals Signals 2.6 Vehicle Controls Vehicle Controls 4.2 6.3 2.8 Searching 3 (1) Hr Session Drive 2 Other Other Road Users Road Users Sharing the Road 2 (1) Hr Session 7.2 1.5 2.4 7.3 Drive 3 The Vehicle The Vehicle 4.6 7.6 Why Driver Ed Why Driver Ed is Necessary is Necessary 1.7 Fatigue Fatigue 3.2 5.4 2.4 4.5 Vehicle Systems Vehicle Systems 4.6 5.9 Drive 11 Drive 7 3.1 6.3 7.8 The Laws You The Laws You Can Not Break Can Not Break 1.1 Emergency Emergency Maneuvers Maneuvers Emergency Maneuvers 4 (1) Hr Session 7.2 Occupant Occupant Protection Protection 3.1 3.9 7.5 5.3 4.4 Basic Basic Control II Control II 5.2 7.2 8.3 Basic Basic Control I Control I 5.4 3.3 Surviving Surviving Driving Driving 1.4 Desert Driving Desert Driving 7.3 Hazardous Conditions 6 (1) Hr Session Drive 10 Drug-Impaired Drug-Impaired Driving Driving 3.2 3.2 4.1 4.3 Driving Other Driving Other Vehicles/ Vehicles/ Driving Other Vehicles 1 (1) Hr Session 8.

review your state laws for: Graduated Licensing (GDL) Insurance requirements Vehicle inspection requirements Blank calendar of the current year • - Set a routine schedule for the in-vehicle practice sessions. go back online and review the module with them. gauges. restraints and tires. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 9 of 47 . For PreDrive 1. • RISK is always present. Make sure the interior is free of loose objects and debris.4. review their quiz score. When they are complete. including lights. If it is below 80%. demonstrate the forces and talk about how you can “feel” those forces when stopping. Write down the schedule and stick to it. 1. If it is 90-100%. Discuss and review them before conducting the Pre-Drive 1 in-vehicle activity (these discussions can take place at any time before getting in the vehicle – Conduct these discussions when you are not in a hurry and there is time to talk). inertia and the force of impact.” Have your teen write down each law and take notes when going through module 1. Perform any needed maintenance on the vehicle before the training begins. accelerating and driving up or downhill. Courtesy – Your social responsibility. • Space – Discuss space around the vehicle and how much you need to safely make maneuvers. Clean the vehicle interior. You will reference this handbook throughout the course. 3. kinetic energy. • Time . Discuss how you MANAGE your risk when driving. windows and mirrors. • Visibility .Gravity.Searching for obstacles and potential hazards. “The laws you can not break.Identifying hazards and deciding what to do. turning. Current DMV Handbook. 2. Discussion Topics: These topics are related to what the student is learning in Unit 1. Laws of nature . Driving is a privilege – How easily it can be taken away. friction. have them teach you what they learned about each law and its importance when driving. Take the notes with you when you do the Unit 1 in-vehicle exercise. Plan enough time for a discussion before and after the practice session. Select one vehicle that the novice driver will consistently be driving throughout the licensing process. Plan for times when you are both rested. Copyright.Pre-Drive 1: Risk Awareness Discussion Materials and Equipment: • Training vehicle. Ensure all vehicle systems and safety features are fully operational. Discuss how much time it takes to conduct maneuvers and how to judge if there is enough “time” to conduct the maneuver without increasing your risk. Surviving the drive – A game plan for avoiding collisions. 4.

congested traffic or another driver weaving in and out of traffic. predicting traffic scenarios that might occur ahead and deciding how we might react. Discuss what you might do if these scenarios actually occur. In-Vehicle ACTIVITY Copyright. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 10 of 47 . Goal: The goal of this exercise is to recognize obstacles and potential hazards in the traffic environment. 2. • Quiet residential neighborhood • Busy intersection • Highway or Expressway Time: Day. Pre-Drive 1 is a “commentary driving” activity driven by the coach. Point out all the obstacles that you see – get them thinking about how the road communicates with us. It is also an exercise in communicating what we see.Pre-Drive 1: Risk Awareness Print this page and take it with you in the vehicle. In the process of these initial drives. 1. pets running loose. speeds and hazards that you might face in a typical day behind the wheel. have your novice driver begin to do their own “commentary driving” – before getting behind the wheel. Traffic environment(s): Plan a route to demonstrate a variety of roads. Have them become comfortable with this form of communication because they will be using the same technique when it’s time for them to enter and practice driving in these assorted traffic environments. Snow or Fog (if possible. night. Create these what-if scenarios with the worst possible outcomes. Practice “what-if” scenarios when you see children. demonstrate how visibility changes and conceals hazards on the road) Conduct this activity as often as possible when you have your novice in the vehicle with you. The novice driver is in the front passenger seat as you point out and discuss potential hazards you encounter on the roadway. dusk Weather: Rain.

IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 11 of 47 . Driving environments: Neighborhood. signals. Quiz your novice on each category. 1.Road markings . procedure for searching and going through an intersection. warning and guide signs 2. Work on weaknesses. Discuss and review them before conducting the Pre-Drive Activity 2 in the vehicle. 6. flashing signals. types of traffic at intersections (pedestrians and bicyclists). urban. review DMV handbook sections on: . arrows. and the unique features and dangers of train intersections.Signals . markings. rural. lane control signals and “x” signals 3. colors.Rules-of-the-Road . (These discussions can take place at any time before getting in the vehicle – Conduct these discussions when you are not in a hurry and there is time to talk). collision responsibilities Reference signs. right-of-way.Right of way . parking lots and different road surfaces (how they affect traction).Signs . Copyright. and collision responsibilities in your state’s driving handbook. placement and integration with other road communication 4.Reckless driving Discussion Topics: These topics are related to what the student is learning in Unit 2.For Unit 2. types. speed limits. obeying traffic controls.Speed limits . rules of the road. Intersections: Controls. Road markings: Purpose. 5. Signal definition and meanings: Colors. Rules of the road: Basic laws.Pre-Drive 2: The Road Discussion Materials and Equipment: • Current DMV Handbook . Types of signs: regulatory.

when you are driving. In this situation. busy parking lot and assorted intersections (controlled. Always communicate your intention to turn or change lanes by using turn signal at least 100 feet prior to the maneuver. collision responsibilities As the coach. always demonstrate the following basic laws: • • Buckle-up. rural country road with hills and blind curves. • Rules of the road: Basic laws. obeying traffic controls. Yield to persons who are blind.” Have them make verbal driving decisions about what the road is communicating. types of traffic at intersections (pedestrians and bicyclists). Drive through these assorted environments and have the soon-to-be novice driver conduct “commentary driving. Always signal your intentions. Obey traffic controls. Drive on the right side. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 12 of 47 . markings and “who has the right-of-way" decisions. parking lots and different road surfaces (how they affect traction). Pass on the left. which makes it necessary for you to drive to the left of the centerline. Don't stop fast without a warning. passing or overtaking on the right is permitted. Review “basic laws” as you drive and discuss reckless driving as you see other drivers weaving. always yield the right-of-way to oncoming traffic on the unobstructed side of the roadway. Don't tailgate. right-of-way. • • • • • • • • Copyright. Training Environments: Neighborhood with children and pets. urban rush hour. signals and markings) • Intersections: Controls. As a role model. procedure for searching and going through an intersection. Exceptions: When overtaking or passing a vehicle going in the same direction or your lane is blocked by a parked vehicle or an obstruction. Give the appropriate Right-of-Way. speed limits. Yield to pedestrians. multiple turn lanes and shared left turn lane) Materials and Equipment: Training Vehicle Goal: The goal of this exercise is to review hazards and practice recognition of: • How the road communicates (signs. and the unique features and dangers of train intersections. signals. rural. • Driving environments: Neighborhood. uncontrolled. Travel at a safe speed. tailgating or drag racing. Continuously quiz your teen on the meanings of signs. take every possible opportunity to have your teen in the front passenger seat. urban.Pre-Drive 2: The Road In-Vehicle ACTIVITY Print this page and take it with you in the vehicle. On multi-lane or one-way streets.

) has triggered your own version of “road rage. DUI experience and how bad driving behavior (tailgating. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 13 of 47 . Save the warning labels and instructions that you have received on prescription drugs or over-the counter drugs. Dangers of combining drugs. being lost.Pre-Drive 3: The Driver Discussion Materials and Equipment: • • Training Vehicle Owners Manual Reference and review the section on occupant protection: Restraints. For Pre-Drive Activity 3.” Refresh your knowledge of the physiological effects of legal drugs and illegal drugs and note how dangerous it is to combine drugs. alternative routes and why planning is important. Issues of driver common sense and personal safety Unit 3 discussions are designed to increase awareness of being “prepared” and “fit” to drive. Together. Legal. Local collisions that have caused injury or death to an acquaintance or family member. 5. Talk about the cause of the crash and how you feel about the damage or loss. 1. Discuss collisions that have caused injury or death to people you both know. 3. 2. The dangers of driving when tired 7. Point out warnings such as “Do not operate heavy machinery” “Do not combine with alcohol” “May cause drowsiness or dizziness. Distractions you can “manage” and why it is important to stay focused on driving 8. Common destinations. review your state laws for: Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs Implied consent law Point system and consequences for violating impairment laws Definition of aggressive or reckless driving and consequences What to do if you get pulled over by the police • Discussion Topics: These topics are related to what the student is learning in Unit 3. The physiological effects of legal drugs and illegal drugs. alternative routes and prior planning. Copyright. Clip articles from the local news about collisions caused or related to fatigue or impairment. Also review the section on brakes (ABS). 6. etc. Prepare for these discussions by listing some personal experiences such as getting caught unprepared for bad weather driving. 4. Talk about the financial impact as well. count the number of people that were directly or indirectly affected by the collision. Talk about common destinations. nodding off at the wheel. Discuss and review them before conducting the Unit 3 in-vehicle exercise (these discussions can take place at any time before getting in the vehicle – Conduct these discussions when nobody is in a hurry and there is time to talk). financial and emotional consequences of receiving a DUI citation. Current DMV Handbook You will reference this handbook throughout the course. safety belts and air bags.” Ignorance is no excuse if caught driving under the influence of drugs.

4. Identify whether the vehicle has anti-lock brakes and discuss how they work. Have your driver practice scanning the mirrors and blind spots while the vehicle is not in motion.” 1. With your teen secured in the driver seat. exit the vehicle and walk outside of the vehicle in the “blind spots“. This exercise can be conducted with a parked car in a driveway. safety belts and air bags .Brake systems (ABS) Goal: The goal of this exercise is to become familiar with occupant protection and vehicle safety systems. have your teen call out when they are not able to see you in the mirrors. Copyright. It does not require starting the vehicle or putting it in motion. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 14 of 47 . Raise the hood and observe how the manufacturer has designed the hood to “fold” upon impact. mirrors and head restraint. When you are through. 2. Buckle the safety belts and check for proper position. Mark the “blind spot” locations on the pavement with chalk. Demonstrate proper seat position and how to raise and lower the head restraints. As you walk around the sides. 3. 5. Materials and Equipment: • • • Water soluble chalk Training Vehicle Owners Manual Reference the sections on: . Look at the structure of the passenger cage and point out where the airbags are located. perimeter and back of the vehicle. Have the learner get in the proper seat position to drive and adjust the seat. You will need enough empty space around the vehicle to demonstrate “blind spots. on both sides and back of the vehicle. have your teen get out and view how vast the areas are around the vehicle that can not be seen from the driver’s perspective. Discuss why it is important to be secured and in position if an airbag deploys.Pre-Drive 3: The Driver In-Vehicle ACTIVITY Print this page and take it with you in the vehicle. Demonstrate how much the driver is not able to see by just using their mirrors.Occupant protection: Restraints.

fueling. tires. AC. 3. trucks. radio. trailers.Pre-Drive 4: The Vehicle Discussion Materials and Equipment: • • Training Vehicle Owners Manual .). etc. lubricating and cooling. review vehicle emission and inspection requirements. ignition. and vans.Reference and review the sections on: . Different types of vehicles and their different handling characteristics: Emergency vehicles.Vehicle systems . Vehicle Controls: Steering wheel. • Discussion Topics: These topics are related to what the student is learning in Unit 4. 1. 2.Vehicle gauges . accelerator. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 15 of 47 . (These discussions can take place at any time before getting in the vehicle – Conduct these discussions when you are not in a hurry and there is time to talk). steering. brakes. wipers. brakes. signals. electrical. mileage-based maintenance. Vehicle systems: Engine. lights. Vehicle Maintenance: Routine checks before and during driving. Discuss and review them before conducting Pre-Drive Activity 4 in the vehicle. other secondary controls (heat. 4.For Unit 4. gauges and warning lights.Vehicle controls . selecting a mechanic Copyright.Recommended routine vehicle and tire maintenance Current DMV Handbook . fuel. exhaust.

Prepare for these discussions by becoming familiar with the location of all vehicle controls and maintenance features. Demonstrate the vehicle start procedure: • Parking brake ON. Materials and Equipment: • • Training Vehicle (with dirty windows and low on fuel) Owners Manual Goal: The goal of this activity is to become familiar with vehicle controls and routine maintenance. without putting the vehicle in motion. With the learner in the driver seat. • Lights • Signals • Wipers • HVAC • Radio and CD player 2. Raise the hood and observe the vehicle systems and maintenance features (dip stick. fluid containers. foot on brake • Turn the key in the ignition to START . fans. discuss the same topics and conduct the vehicle start procedure. battery. Have the learner conduct the refueling procedure and wash the windows.Accelerator .Steering wheel (hand-over-hand and push-pull techniques) 4.Gear shift lever (all positions) . 5. Demonstrate the operation of the: • Gear shift lever • Foot brake • Accelerator • Steering wheel • Parking brake. Locate the primary and secondary controls.Foot brake . Demonstrate how the gauges and the warning lights communicate to the driver. Discuss what to do in the event specific warning lights illuminate. Copyright.As soon as the engine starts.) With the coach as the driver and the learner in the front passenger seat: 1. on the dash board and in the trunk. etc.Pre-Drive 4: The Vehicle In-Vehicle ACTIVITY Print this page and take it with you in the vehicle. Conduct discussions at the vehicle with the owner’s manual. belts. release the key • Demonstrate the operation of the primary controls: . IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 16 of 47 . Demonstrate difference in visibility between having dirty windows and clean windows: Coach drives to a service station and demonstrates how to re-fuel the vehicle. 3. Go through the list of topics and conduct a hands-on review of vehicle features: functions and locations under the hood.

entry. entry. Training Vehicle Discussion Topics: • Pre-drive checklist: Vehicle Approach. Forward Movement and Steering. No traffic environment: Before Moving Forward. Stopping Distance Basic Control II. Blind Spots. Watch the novice driver’s eyes and practice looking ahead in the path of travel (not directly in front of the vehicle or at the controls) in a no traffic environment. The coach will demonstrate these skills and then the student will demonstrate the knowledge and practice these skills until they are mastered. Stopping. dedicate the appropriate time to master these skills. Entry and Position. This activity is recommended to be conducted during 3 (1) hour sessions. Basic control skills such as starting. DO NOT allow the novice to enter a more complex environment until they have mastered all of these skills without traffic.Drive 1: Basic Control Print the following four pages and take them with you in the vehicle. in order. Mirror Adjustment. Conduct extensive practice on “searching” and looking WHERE you want the vehicle to go. until they are mastered. Backing. Discussion Unit five introduces approach. position. Starting the Vehicle • • Basic Control I. Copyright. If it takes longer. Use the checklists to practice each procedure. steering. Annotate problem areas and conduct the procedures. No traffic environment: Basic Search. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 17 of 47 . Exiting and Securing the Vehicle In-Vehicle ACTIVITY Training Environment: No-traffic environment (empty parking lot) Materials and Equipment: Training Vehicle Goal: The goal of this exercise is to practice vehicle approach. Materials and Equipment: Student Handout Unit 5. exit and basic driving maneuvers. Turning. turning parking and securing the vehicle are taught and practiced in the vehicle. Braking. backing. moving. Accelerating. preparation and simple driving skills in an empty parking lot or no-traffic environment.

Blind Spots Checks blind spots frequently with quick glances over shoulders to the left and right every maneuver or lane change Vehicle Start Inserts the ignition key Turns the key one click Observes warning lights Turns ignition switch to start Places foot on the brake. allows the engine to idle Rechecks gauges Ensures low-beam lights (or day-time running lights) are on NOTES Copyright. potholes. Sees the edge of the back left side of the vehicle. debris. steering column and pedals (positioned at least 10”-12” from the steering wheel) Adjusts head restraint so the top of the restraint is higher than the ears Secures cargo Mirror Adjustments Rear-view mirror Adjusts so there is a complete view of the rear window Side Rear-view mirrors Maximizes view to the sides Left rear-view mirror Leans to the left and tilts head until it touches the left window.Drive 1: BASIC CONTROL Checklist (Page 1 of 4) No-traffic Environment: Empty Parking Lot Vehicle Approach Keys in hand Searches around vehicle for obstacles. fluids leaking from the vehicle Notices direction of front wheels – adjusts direction of tires before moving Checks tires for proper inflation Ensures lights and windows are clean and clear Checks for traffic. pets (any other road users sharing the area around the vehicle) Entry and Position Unlocks. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 18 of 47 . pedestrians. relocks doors Places key in the ignition Gets is proper position to operate the pedals and brake Places foot on brake so it is possible to pivot foot to the accelerator Adjusts seat. enters.

at center of traffic path Looks ahead 15 seconds Checks rear-view mirror Looks ahead in path and searches sides of the roadway for possible hazards Looks ahead Checks dashboard for speed and warnings Looks ahead Checks side view mirrors Repeats cycle Acceleration Keeps heel on the floor and uses toes to apply pressure to the accelerator NOTES Copyright.Drive 1: BASIC CONTROL Checklist (Page 2 of 4) No-traffic Environment: Empty Parking Lot Before Moving Forward Identifies operating space and checks to be sure it is clear Places foot on the brake. gradually lets up and allows the vehicle to move forward Accelerates slightly Practices smooth steering movements Looks where the vehicle is going Braking Targets the spot where you want the vehicle to stop Applies brake with a steady even pressure until the vehicle comes to a smooth stop Stopping Demonstrates “Stopping” to the point where the vehicle is not traveling forward Basic Search Pattern Demonstrates search ahead – line of sight without obstruction. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 19 of 47 . moves gear lever to DRIVE Releases parking brake With foot on the brake. checks for traffic ahead and to the sides Checks rear-view mirror and both side-view mirrors Checks right blind spot and left blind spot Grips steering wheel in the 8 O'clock and 4 O'clock steering position Signals intention to enter the left lane with left-turn signal Checks mirrors again for obstacles and hazards Forward Movement and Steering Targets a reference point at the far end of the parking lot Activates left turn signal When there is no traffic. proceeds Foot still on the brake.

IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 20 of 47 .Drive 1: BASIC CONTROL Checklist (Page 3 of 4) No-traffic Environment: Empty Parking Lot Turning Before turning. pedestrians or other obstacles in the travel path Positions vehicle in the proper lane Searches intersection for traffic in all directions Searches mirrors and blind spots Gets in proper lane position Signals intention to turn Reduces speed – slows to about 10 miles per hour before arriving at the intersection Left Turn Positions vehicle about four feet from the curb Checks right and left before turning Looks to the right. returns the steering wheel to the straight position Rechecks mirrors Steering Techniques Tracks the path of travel through the turn before maneuver Demonstrates two steering techniques in the parking lot to develop muscle memory: Hand-over-hand: 9 o’clock and 3 o’clock position Push-pull 4 o’clock and 8 o’clock position NOTES Copyright. through the turn to the furthest point Accelerates slightly Begins to turn the steering wheel when the vehicle’s front wheels are even with the corner of the intersection Right Turn Positions vehicle four feet from the curb Checks right and left Looks right through the turn to the furthest point Accelerates slightly Begins to turn the steering wheel at the corner of the intersection Checks blind spots and mirrors for obstructions Steers into the nearest lane Accelerates gently about half way into the turn When the turn is complete. searches for traffic.

depresses brake. shifts the vehicle to REVERSE Turns body to the right. sets the parking brake Shift gears to PARK Turns off lights and accessories. leaves extra space on the side for the front of the vehicle to swing out Keeps eyes to the rear. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 21 of 47 . places right hand on the top of or behind the passenger seat Looks back through the rear window Left hand at the top of the steering wheel Steers in the direction the back of the vehicle should go If turning and backing.Drive 1: BASIC CONTROL Checklist (Page 4 of 4) No-traffic Environment: Empty Parking Lot Backing Places foot on the brake. including air conditioner Closes windows Places ignition in LOCKED position Removes key Scans mirrors and blind spots for hazards Exits toward the rear of the vehicle Locks vehicle NOTES Copyright. comes to a smooth stop Turns and looks forward only after complete stop Exiting and Securing the Vehicle With foot on the brake.

signaled) intersections. If it takes longer. Training Environment: Quiet residential rural area neighborhood with very low traffic and controlled (4-way stop. DO NOT allow the novice to enter a more complex environment until they have mastered all of these skills in a low traffic environment. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 22 of 47 .Drive 2: Searching In-Vehicle ACTIVITY Print the following page and take it with you in the vehicle. Materials and Equipment: Student Handout Unit 5. Lights and Brakes. lights. dedicate the appropriate time to master these skills. Training Vehicle Discussion Topics: • Communicating: Turn Signals. Vehicle Position and Body Movement • Searching • Judging Time and Distance • Managing Space • Turning in Traffic Goal: • • • • • The goal of this exercise is to practice: Communication (signals. Copyright. Horn. brakes) Searching Judging time and distance Managing space Turning in traffic This activity is recommended to be conducted during 3 (1) hour sessions.

checks traffic NOTES Copyright. leaves more space on all sides to make adjustments Checks rear prior to slowing Adjusts speed or position if you cannot see the recommended distance ahead Anticipates safe gaps ahead and to the sides Turning in Traffic Searches ahead. to the sides and rear Signals intention to turn Looks ahead through path of travel Steers into proper lane Adjusts speed and lane position Turns steering wheel smoothly Accelerates to appropriate speed. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 23 of 47 .Drive 2: SEARCHING Checklist (Page 1 of 1) Low-traffic Environment – Rural/Residential Communication Signals far enough ahead so other drivers can make adjustments in speed and direction When seeing brake lights ahead. slightly taps on brakes Uses low-beam headlights Uses emergency flashes when in trouble Uses horn to warn other road users of hazardous situation Positions vehicle before turning Uses hand gestures as a courtesy Demonstrates courtesy by giving the right-of-way Searching Actively searches entire environment ahead 20-30 seconds Identifies escape path ahead Maintains a safe (4-8 second) following distance Able to “predict” what is happening far ahead in travel path Glances continuously at mirrors Makes good decisions based on analysis of the situation Space Management Identifies safe gaps in traffic Searches ahead 20-30 seconds Maintains a three to four second following distance between your vehicle and the vehicle ahead Identifies a 12-15 second visual control zone ahead and to the sides – plans an escape route Plans a five second stopping zone inside the visual control zone In bad weather or if poor road conditions exist.

Copyright.Drive 3: Reversing Direction and Parking In-Vehicle ACTIVITY Print the following pages and take them with you in the vehicle. Training Environments: (1) Quiet residential rural area neighborhood with very low traffic. dedicate the appropriate time to master these skills. If it takes longer. DO NOT allow the novice to reverse direction or park in a busy traffic environment until they have mastered all of these skills in a low or non-traffic environment. Training Vehicle Discussion Topics: • Two-point turn process • Space to maneuver • Vehicle turn radius • Three-point turn process • U-turns • Parking tips • Angled parking – Entering and exiting • Perpendicular parking – Entering and exiting • Parallel parking – Entering and exiting • Parking on inclines Goal: The goal of this exercise is to practice: • Maneuvers used to safely reverse direction • Parking maneuvers and skills This activity is recommended to be conducted during 2 (1) hour sessions. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 24 of 47 . wide streets or a dead-end wide enough to conduct two. Materials and Equipment: Student Handout Unit 5. (2) Empty parking lot with perpendicular parking spaces and space with a curb to practice parallel parking.and three-point turns.

turns steering wheel to right Eyes to the rear. left side mirror and blind spot Turns steering wheel hard to the left Slowly accelerates forward Stops just short of the curb As stopping. searches. to the rear. backs smoothly into lane Brakes to stop as wheels are straightened Places vehicle in DRIVE and accelerates slowly Copyright. turns and re-enters street Three-point Turn Checks traffic ahead. U-Turn at Intersection Checks for signs that prohibit a u-turn Positions vehicle in right side of left lane Signals intention to turn Identifies safe gap in traffic Turns steering wheel SHARPLY to the left and slowly executes turn into opposing right lane Straightens wheels and checks mirrors for traffic to the sides and rear Angled Parking (Entering) Signals intention to park Moves toward empty parking space until the parking space line closest to the vehicle is clearly visible Turns wheels and slowly enters space Centers vehicle and straightens wheels Stops before striking curb Sets parking brake Angled Parking (Exiting) Gives right-of-way to traffic already moving in the lane Searches for large open gap in traffic Foot on brake. and over your right shoulder and steer towards the right curb Turns on left turn signal Checks rear view mirror.Drive 3: Reversing Direction and Parking Checklist (Page 1 of 3) Low-traffic Environment (Rural/Residential) and Empty Parking Lot Two-Point Turn (use an unobstructed driveway) Drives past the driveway and stops Places vehicle in REVERSE and backs into the driveway Stops and places vehicle in DRIVE Signals. counter-steers sharply to the right Places vehicle in REVERSE Turns steering wheel sharply right while backing until vehicle is in position to go forward in right lane Stops. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 25 of 47 . places vehicle in DRIVE Checks mirrors for traffic to the rear Proceeds forward in lane. releases parking brake Slowly backs up straight When front of vehicle passes the rear bumper of the vehicle on the left.

turns off lights and accessories Carefully exits vehicle – does NOT open door into the side of another vehicle .Drive 3: Reversing Direction and Parking Checklist (Page 2 of 3) Low-traffic Environment (Rural/Residential) and Empty Parking Lot Perpendicular Parking (Entering) Signals intention as you approach the space Positions vehicle with plenty of space to turn in Drives very slowly until the stall line closest to the front of vehicle is completely visible Steers vehicle to the center of the space Checks the back and sides to be sure you are not about to hit the side of another vehicle Straightens wheels Stops when the front of vehicle is parallel with the fronts of other vehicles in the lot Sets parking brake. approximately 12" away from the curb Turns wheels sharply in the direction of the edge of the road Moves forward and stop at the edge of the road Parking Downhill With or Without a Curb Positions vehicle parallel to the curb or edge of the road. approximately 12" away from the curb Turns wheels sharply in the direction away from the curb Place vehicle gear in NEUTRAL. shifts to park. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 26 of 47 .locks vehicle Perpendicular parking (Exiting) Exits the perpendicular parking space using the same procedure as exiting angled space Parking Uphill With a Curb Positions vehicle parallel to the curb. approximately 12" away Turns wheels sharply in the direction of the edge of the road Moves forward and stops when the tires touch the curb or edge of the road NOTES Copyright. rolls back until the tires touch the curb Parking Uphill Without a Curb Positions vehicle parallel to the curb.

Drive 3: Reversing Direction and Parking Checklist (Page 3 of 3) Low-traffic Environment (Rural/Residential) and Empty Parking Lot Parallel Parking (Entering) Locates space one and a half times the length of the vehicle Checks traffic to the front and to the rear Signals intention to park by tapping on the brakes and activating right turn signal Releases accelerator and applies smooth. signals intentions. driver straightens wheels and continues moving forward slowly When the center of vehicle is in line with the rear of the vehicle in front of you. changes gears into DRIVE Slowly moves forward until your vehicle has equal space between the vehicle in front and behind Sets parking brake . firm pressure on the brake until stopped Positions right side of vehicle parallel to the parked vehicles with about three feet of space Stops beside the vehicle parked in front of the space Keeps foot on the brake and shifts into REVERSE Backs up. places vehicle into DRIVE Turns the steering wheel sharply toward the lane you are entering Slowly releases brake and moves forward into the lane When front bumper of your vehicle clears the rear of the vehicle occupying the parking space in front of you. shifts to REVERSE Checks traffic to the back and in the lane you are about to enter Checks blind spot Searches for traffic obstacles in the lane you are about to enter Backs slowly until you are within inches of the vehicle behind you Foot still on the brake. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 27 of 47 .Exits and secures vehicle Parallel Parking (Exiting) Foot on the brake. starts engine. turning the steering wheel sharply to the right Looks to the rear Backs up slowly until center door post lines up with the back left corner of the vehicle on your right Straightens wheels and backs slowly down until the right front corner of your vehicle is in line with the left rear corner of the vehicle on your right Stops. turns steering wheel to the left as far as it will go Continues looking to the rear and backing until two feet from the vehicle behind you Foot on the brake. driver turns steering wheel gradually in the direction of your path of travel Searches roadway ahead and adjusts speed to the traffic flow NOTES Copyright.

IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 28 of 47 . If it takes longer. Copyright. Training Environments: Locate a low-traffic multi-lane roadway with a left turn lane. and a speed limit of 25-35 miles per hour. a controlled intersection with multiple turn lanes. Training Vehicle Discussion Topics: • Visual search zone • Visual control zone • Following distance • Stopping zone • Entering traffic at an intersection • Turning right into an intersection from a parking lot or side street • Turning left into an intersection from a parking lot or side street • Changing lanes • Shared left turn lanes • Multiple turn lanes at an intersection • Situational awareness Goal: • • • • The goal of this exercise is to practice: Visual search Safe following distance Maneuvering through complex intersections Changing lanes on multilane roadways This activity is recommended to be conducted during 4 (1) hour sessions.Drive 4: Multi-Lane Roads I In-Vehicle ACTIVITY Print the following pages and take them with you in the vehicle. Practice these skills at a time when the road is not busy. dedicate the appropriate time to master these skills. Materials and Equipment: Student Handout Unit 6. Select an area that you are familiar with so you don’t have to worry about directions or getting lost. DO NOT allow the novice to drive on multi-lane roadways in a busy traffic environment until they have mastered all of these skills in a low or non-traffic environment.

in the rear-view mirror and side mirrors for traffic to sides and back Stops before entering the intersection Signals intention to turn right Searches intersection for a gap in traffic going in the direction you are about to travel Searches the path you are about to travel .scans well down the roadway for obstacles When traffic is clear. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 29 of 47 . pedestrians.p. rear-view mirror.h. gives right-of-way to vehicles. and side mirrors for traffic to sides and back Signals intention to turn left Searches the travel path When traffic is clear.Drive 4: Multi-lane Roadways Checklist (Page 1 of 2) Low-traffic Multiple Lane Roadway with Complex Intersection Visual Search Skills Continuously scans ahead to the sides and to the rear Demonstrates safe visual search zone (at 25-35 m.. searches intersection for a safe gap in traffic to the left and to the right Checks ahead. and through traffic Identifies travel path. keeps eyes moving Accelerates to the speed of traffic Turning Right into an Intersection from a Parking Lot or Side Street Searches ahead. accelerates and follows travel path Crosses the intersection and turns left into the lane closest to the center lane Checks rear-view mirror Positions vehicle in the center of the lane and accelerates to the speed limit Copyright. scans ahead approximately two city blocks) Identifies hazards and obstacles 12-15 seconds ahead Following Distance Demonstrates two second following distance Demonstrates three second following distance Demonstrates four second following distance Maintains safe distance from vehicle ahead Stopping Zone Demonstrates safe stopping zone of four to five seconds in front of vehicle Entering Traffic at an Intersection Begins approach to an intersection by searching ahead and looking into the intersection Searches for cross traffic and checks mirrors for traffic to sides and behind Identifies large gap in traffic with enough time to turn and accelerate to speed of traffic Enters traffic from stopped position. accelerates and turns into the right lane of the multi-lane roadway Checks rear-view mirror Establishes vehicle in the center of the lane and accelerates to the speed limit Turning Left into an Intersection from a Parking Lot or Side Street While stopped.

left side mirror and left blind spot When traffic is clear.Drive 4: Multi-lane Roadways Checklist (Page 2 of 2) Low-traffic Multiple Lane Roadway with Complex Intersection Changing Lanes Searches ahead. pedestrians. to the rear and to the sides Adjusts speed and positions vehicle in appropriate turn lane During approach to the intersection. to the sides and behind vehicle Identifies a safe gap in the traffic lane you want to enter Checks mirrors and blind spots Signals intention to change lanes Conducts another search ahead. and other hazards Identifies multiple turn lanes and road markings Searches ahead. to the sides and behind vehicle Re-checks blind spot in the direction you are about to maneuver Gradually steers in the desired direction Adjusts speed to the flow of traffic Cancels turn signal Shared Left Turn Lane Searches well ahead for vehicles already occupying the center turn lane Checks mirrors Signals intention to turn left Rechecks rear-view mirror. adjusts speed and moves into the shared left turn lane Identifies a safe gap in oncoming traffic to turn Executes the left turn and cancels signal Multiple Turn Lanes at an Intersection Searches intersection and the roadway for traffic controls. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 30 of 47 . continues to search for pedestrians and conflicts – watches for oncoming vehicles that are turning in the same direction NOTES Copyright.

Do not select a road with a steep incline or small shoulder. If it takes longer. Training Environments: Locate a low-traffic multi-lane roadway with several curves. Copyright. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 31 of 47 . Training Vehicle Discussion Topics: • • • • • • • • Forward Motion Traction Speed and Weight Transfer Approaching a Curve Driving Through a Curve Posted Speeds Highway Conditions Predicting the Actions of Other Road Users (other drivers. animals and bicyclists) Goal: The goal of this exercise is to practice: • • • Approaching a curve Driving through a curve Predicting the actions of other road users This activity is recommended to be conducted during 4 (1) hour sessions. DO NOT allow the novice to drive in areas with curved roads in inclement weather or with opposing traffic until they have mastered the skills in this activity. Practice these skills at a time when the road is not busy. Materials and Equipment: Student Handout Unit 6.Drive 5: Curves and Hazards In-Vehicle ACTIVITY Print the following page and take it with you in the vehicle. pedestrians. dedicate the appropriate time to master these skills.

IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 32 of 47 .If traction conditions are poor.Drive 5: Curves and Hazards Checklist (Page 1 of 1) Low-traffic Multiple Lane Roadway with Curves and Other Road Users Approaching a Curve Continuously scans ahead for approaching curves Identifies the posted speed limit and advance warning signs Adjusts speed prior to entering the curve Identifies travel path and searches through the curve for obstacles Driving Through a Curve Enters the curve at the posted speed . straightens steering wheel Accelerates to a safe or posted speed of traffic Predicting the Actions of Other Road Users Predicts potential conflicts with other vehicles such as large trucks or motorcycles Avoids driving in “packs” of other vehicles Travels at a safe following distance behind the vehicle ahead Scans for pedestrians.adjusts speed and space to avoid potential conflicts Identifies mature drivers .through the curve as far as possible Creates a cushion of safe space behind the vehicle ahead Steers smoothly through the curve Maintains lane position When line of sight extends down the straight roadway ahead. joggers and bicyclists sharing the roadway Gives the right-of-way to pedestrians and bicyclists Obeys speed limit in school zones Identifies distracted drivers . reduces speed further Releases the brake and maintains speed with the accelerator Looks where the vehicle is traveling .adjusts speed and space to avoid potential conflicts Identifies speeding and aggressive drivers .adjusts speed and space to avoid potential conflicts NOTES Copyright.

Do not practice these skills during rush hour. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 33 of 47 . Copyright.Drive 6: Multi-lane Roadways II In-Vehicle ACTIVITY Print the following page and take it with you in the vehicle. Materials and Equipment: Student Handout Unit 6. Training Vehicle Discussion Topics: • • • • • • • Traffic Controls Adjusting speed and space Advanced searching at uncontrolled intersections Advanced searching at controlled intersections Searching in poor visibility and when sharing the road with large vehicles Safe following distance when hazards are present Managing space to the sides and behind the vehicle Goal: The goal of this exercise is to practice the following skills in a complex driving environment: • • • • Advanced searching Time and speed management Space management Communication This activity is recommended to be conducted during 5 (1) hour sessions. dedicate the appropriate time to master these skills. Training Environments: Locate a medium traffic multi-lane roadway with complex intersections. If it takes longer. DO NOT allow the novice to drive in complex driving environments with traffic until they have mastered the skills in this activity.

IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 34 of 47 . checks blind spot in the direction you are about to maneuver Signals intentions When there is a safe gap. right and left again Observes others to determine if they are following traffic control messages Visibility Blocked by Large Vehicle Adjusts speed (drops back) or re-positions vehicle to obtain clear. to the rear and to the sides Checks the signal and estimates when it will change Adjusts speed and vehicle position to minimize conflicts Following Distance Creates a following distance greater than two seconds when: Traction and visibility are reduced A driver behind you is trying to pass Following a large truck or vehicle with limited rear vision Following a large vehicle that is blocking your view of the road ahead Following motorcycles Stopped on a hill or incline Dealing with a uncontrolled distraction Managing Space to the Sides Searches mirrors for side conflicts Creates space for merging vehicles Managing Space Behind Maintains a smooth. steady speed Communicates intention to stop or slow by tapping the brake NOTES Drive 6: Multi-lane Roadways II Checklist (Page 1 of 1) Copyright. changes lanes Identifies multiple turn lanes and watches for road markings Searches ahead. Multiple Lane Roadway with Complex Intersections and Other Road Users Traffic Controls Successfully searches and recognizes signs. pedestrians.Medium Traffic. signals and road markings well ahead of an intersection Adjusts speed as speed limits change Scans through and to the sides of intersections well in advance Before entering an intersection. unobstructed view Avoids traveling in truck and other vehicle blind spots “no-zones” Controlled Intersection with Multiple Turn Lanes Searches the intersection and the roadway for traffic controls. and other users If you need to change lanes. looks left.

Select a familiar area. DO NOT allow the novice to drive on a medium or high traffic expressway until they have mastered the skills in this activity. Copyright. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 35 of 47 . Materials and Equipment: Student Handout Unit 7. dedicate the appropriate time to master these skills. Training Vehicle Discussion Topics: • • • • • • Expressway characteristics Safety at High Speeds Entering Expressways Driving on Expressways Passing and Being Passed Exiting Expressways Goal: The goal of this exercise is to practice the following skills while driving on an expressway: • • • • • • Advanced searching Time and speed management Space management Merging Exiting Communication This activity is recommended to be conducted during 6 (1) hour sessions. Training Environments: Locate an expressway with an interchange during a low traffic time. Do not practice these skills during rush hour.Drive 7: Expressway Driving In-Vehicle ACTIVITY Print the following page and take it with you in the vehicle. If it takes longer.

Multiple Lane Expressway with Interchanges Entering Expressways Successfully searches and identifies signs well ahead of interchange Adjusts speed Enters entrance ramp acceleration lane scanning ahead. to the back and to the side Locates safe gap to merge Accelerates to speed of traffic Signals Checks gap.Drive 7: Expressway Driving Checklist (Page 1 of 1) Low Traffic. changes lanes and positions vehicle in exit lane Signals intention to exit ½ mile prior to exit Checks mirrors Exits smoothly Adjusts speed in de-acceleration lane Maintains safe cushion of space ahead and behind Searches for conflicts NOTES Copyright. checks mirrors and blind spot Maintains speed Merges smoothly Cancels signal Rechecks mirrors Adjusts speed to the speed of traffic Expressway Driving Stays focused Conducts continuous advance search Doesn’t cross solid yellow or white lines Drives at appropriate speed Scans mirrors for drivers speeding and weaving Avoids being in the middle of a “pack” of traffic Goes with the flow of traffic without exceeding the speed limit Signals intention to change lanes Checks mirrors and blind spot before changing lanes Changes lanes smoothly Selects appropriate travel lane Maintains at least a two to four second following distance Avoids traveling in truck “no-zones” Adjusts speed and position when encountering limited visibility Passes with adequate space Maintains steady speed Changes lanes well in advance of exit ramp Exiting Expressways Plans exit in advance Signals. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 36 of 47 .

Training Environments: Locate an assortment of driving environments that have pedestrian traffic. bicyclists. buses and large trucks. Training Vehicle Discussion Topics – Characteristics of: • • • • • • • Pedestrians – children. If it takes longer. motorcyclists.Drive 8: Sharing the Road In-Vehicle ACTIVITY Print the following page and take it with you in the vehicle.Congested Traffic. turn signals) Prepares to stop in advance when school buses are present Changes lanes in advance to avoid being trapped behind commercial buses Avoids traveling in truck or service vehicle “no-zones” Drive 8: Sharing the Road Checklist (Page 1 of 1) Copyright. DO NOT allow the novice to drive in congested areas that require advance searching. Multiple Road Users Sharing the Road Gives the right-of-way to pedestrians Scans around and behind other vehicles for the unexpected Checks mirrors and blind spots before backing Demonstrates patience and courtesy Communicates to other road users (hand signals. Select familiar areas such as a busy grocery store parking lot or neighborhood shopping plaza. Busy Shopping Area . Materials and Equipment: Student Handout Unit 7. handicapped Bicyclists – children and adult Motorcyclists Buses – School and Inner-city Large trucks Service vehicles “No-Zones” Goal: The goal of this exercise is to practice the following skills while sharing the road with other road users: • • • • • • Advanced searching Time and speed management Space management Focused coordination Distraction management Communication This activity is recommended to be conducted during 2 (1) hour sessions. elderly. time and space management skills until they have mastered the skills in this activity. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 37 of 47 . dedicate the appropriate time to master these skills.

Materials and Equipment: Student Handout Unit 7. straight road with signs. time and space management skills until they have mastered the skills in this activity. Select a familiar. occasional roadside business (countryside village) and limited traffic. clear lane markings. horse and buggy) Roadside business traffic Speed limits – speed traps The benefits of passing another vehicle Passing procedure Being passed Goal: The goal of this exercise is to practice the following skills while driving on rural two-lane roadways: • • • • • Advanced searching Time and speed management Space management Decision making Communication This activity is recommended to be conducted during 6 (1) hour sessions. Copyright. high visibility. dedicate the appropriate time to master these skills.Drive 9: Rural Driving and Passing In-Vehicle ACTIVITY Print the following page and take it with you in the vehicle. If it takes longer. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 38 of 47 . Training Vehicle Discussion Topics: • • • • • • • • • Rural road conditions High speeds related to long stopping distance Warning signs Slow moving vehicles (farm equipment. Training Environment: Rural two lane highway. DO NOT allow the novice to drive in rural areas that require advance searching.

Familiar Rural Two Lane Highway with Occasional Roadside Business . slows to increase gap ahead if appropriate NOTES Drive 9: Rural Driving Checklist (Page 1 of 1) Copyright.Limited Traffic Searching Searches well ahead for traffic conflicts. behind and blind spot Signals lane change Accelerates. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 39 of 47 . no-passing lane markings and signs Determines safe passing zone Searches for oncoming vehicles and other conflicts Checks mirrors to the side. hidden intersections and other road users Recognizes and obeys signs and road markings Passing Identifies passing. changes lane and cancels signal Smoothly overtakes the vehicle Checks rear-view mirror for both headlights of the vehicle just passed Signals lane change to right Checks right-side mirror and right blind spot Maneuvers to right lane when it is clear Maintains speed Cancels signal Being Passed Positions vehicle in right side of lane Maintains speed After being passed.

DO NOT allow the novice to drive in hazardous conditions until they have mastered the skills in this activity. night. ice. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 40 of 47 .Drive 10: Hazardous Conditions In-Vehicle ACTIVITY Print these pages and take it with you in the vehicle. If it takes longer. dedicate the appropriate time to master these skills. desert Materials and Equipment: Student Handout Unit 7. assorted elevation and terrain: Wet roads. sunset. Training Vehicle Discussion Topics: • • • • • • • • • • Reduced traction Hydroplaning Reduced visibility Low.and high-beam headlights Night vision Glare Managing speed uphill Managing speed downhill Winter driving Desert driving Goal: The goal of this exercise is to practice the following skills while driving in hazardous conditions: • • • • • • Skid detection and recovery Glare management Proper use of low. hills or mountains. snow.and high-beam headlights Managing speed with reduced visibility Managing speed uphill and downhill Managing speed around sharp curves This activity is recommended to be conducted during 6 (1) hour sessions. Copyright. reduced visibility. Training Environments: Reduced traction.

Drive 10: Hazardous Conditions Checklist (Page 1 of 1) Assorted reduced traction and low visibility environments Wet Weather Driving Performs routine maintenance – checks tire tread.and high-beam headlights Adjusts rear-view mirror to manage glare Searches for oncoming vehicles and other conflicts Increases following distance Adjusts speed as visibility changes Driving Uphill Maintains speed Checks gauges Slows at crest of hill Driving Downhill Downshifts into lower gear Does not “ride” brakes Increases following distance Avoids driving in front of large trucks Blind Curves Stays to right side of lane Slows to marked speed limit (goes slower in less than ideal conditions) Signals to other drivers around blind curve by tapping horn Turns off stereo and listens for other drivers signaling Winter Driving Warms up engine before driving Applies “gentle” pressure to accelerator Demonstrates smooth steering NOTES Copyright. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 41 of 47 . windshield wipers and washer fluid Manages speed to maintain traction Uses headlights Uses wipers as soon as it starts raining Searches well ahead for vehicles without headlights on Reduces speed with poor visibility Night Driving Demonstrates proper use of low.

dry. DO NOT allow them to conduct these maneuvers unless you are confident they are experienced enough to perform these maneuvers safely. At this juncture. over 45 hours of progressive. with good shoulder – shoulder level at same height as roadway. Dedicate the appropriate time to master these skills. UNTRAVELED two-lane road. Copyright. Training Environments: (1) Straight. hard surfaced. with no obstacles (to practice off-road recovery). do not conduct this session. If further practice is required to master advanced control skills. Training Vehicle Discussion Topics: • • • • Being secured and in position for a crash Off-road recovery Steering and braking to avoid a crash Skid Recovery Goal: The goal of this exercise is to practice the following skills to practice emergency maneuvers: • • • Off-road recovery Steering and braking to avoid a crash Skid recovery These activities should only be performed in safe conditions. locate a slick EMPTY parking lot (to practice skid recovery) Materials and Equipment: Student Handout Unit 7. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 42 of 47 . DO NOT allow the novice to perform practice on these maneuvers in an environment with traffic. These activities are designed to IMPROVE handling skills of an experienced novice driver.Drive 11: Emergency Maneuvers In-Vehicle ACTIVITY Print these pages and take it with you in the vehicle. (2) EMPTY parking lot with at least 500 feet of clear space (to practice steering and braking to avoid a crash). DEMONSTRATE THESE SKILLS BEFORE ALLOWING the novice to practice. structured supervised practice has occurred. (3) If you are in a winter climate.

steers quickly but not forcefully. hard surfaced. concise control in the direction you want the vehicle to go – being cautious not to steer into another hazard Does not cross lanes into oncoming traffic Stabilizes the vehicle and returns to lane 3. UNTRAVELED two-lane road. Both hands in low-hand steering position With no traffic. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 43 of 47 . Depresses brake to reduce speed Checks mirrors for a clear path Eases off of the brake Grasps the steering wheel firmly. Off-Road Recovery – Slow practice 10 m. locate a slick EMPTY parking lot (to practice skid recovery) 1.h.Environments: (1) Straight.h.p. Skid Recovery Takes foot off of the brake or eases off the accelerator until the vehicle regains traction Looks and steers (using push-pull) in the direction you want to go NOTES Drive 11: Emergency Maneuvers Checklist (Page 1 of 1) Copyright. slows to 10 mph and takes foot off accelerator Signals Steers off the roadway until the center of the vehicle is in line with the edge of the roadway Maintains speed Signals intention to return to roadway Checks for oncoming traffic and for traffic to the rear Locates a safe gap to re-enter the roadway Turns the steering wheel no more than an eighth of a turn towards the roadway – does not over-correct or “jerk” the wheel towards the center of the roadway As soon as the front right tire returns to the roadway. dry. Steering and Braking to Avoid an (Imaginary) Obstacle Ahead – Slow practice 10 m. turns the wheel sharply to the right to enter the lane without crossing over Returns wheel to center position 2. with good shoulder – shoulder level at same height as roadway. with no obstacles (to practice off-road recovery) (2) EMPTY parking lot with at least 500 feet of clear space (to practice steering and braking to avoid a crash) (3) If you are in a winter climate. Looks and steers with precise.p.

Training Environments: Home Driveway or garage Materials and Equipment: Student Handout Unit 8. Maps.Drive 12: Travel Preparation In-Vehicle ACTIVITY Print this page and take it with you in the vehicle. This is an exercise in being prepared for a journey away from home. Owner’s Manual (reference load and tire pressure recommendations) Discussion Topics: • • • • • • • • Route planning Planning travel time Packing – weight distribution. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 44 of 47 fuel oil tire inflation windshield washer fluid . Directions. lodging and other expenses Vehicle Preparation Checks Checks Checks Checks Packing Packs emergency equipment References weight and load limitations in Owner’s Manual Does not obstruct rear window Distributes weight at bottom of vehicle Secures cargo Copyright. These activities do not require traveling or driving. load limits Driver preparation Fatigue Supplies Emergencies and emergency assistance Personal safety away from home Goal: The goal of this exercise is to recognize the importance of pre-planning and practice vehicle preparation for long trip. Select a destination and create a travel scenario – Have your driver make the travel preparations for your review and critique! Drive 12: Travel Preparation Checklist (Page 1 of 1) Pre-planning Checks long range weather forecast Obtains maps and plans safe route Estimates travel time – plans safe stopping locations Budgets for fuel.

Drive 12: Driving Other Vehicles Checklist (Page 1 of 1) Vehicle Familiarization Conducts walk around and pre-drive inspection Checks tire inflation and condition of tires Adjusts mirrors. Assorted vehicle types (SUV. turning radius. braking system. fuel gauge and speedometer Checks blind spots Conducts test drive on acceleration. These activities are recommended but not required if there is no unfamiliar vehicle available. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 45 of 47 . visibility and blind spots How center of gravity affects performance (SUVs. windshield wiper switch and HVAC unit Checks warning lights. An indepth discussion should still take place between the coach and novice driver.Drive 13: Driving Other Vehicles In-Vehicle ACTIVITY Print this page and take it with you in the vehicle. Trucks) Towing a trailer – skills and equipment Goal: The goal of this exercise is to recognize the handling characteristics of different vehicles. light traffic Materials and Equipment: Student Handout Unit 8. vehicle similar to one that is familiar (different make or model to recognize similarities and differences) Discussion Topics: • • • • • Vehicle control familiarization Primary and secondary controls Test drive – turning radius. Training Environments: Local neighborhood. light truck. Vans. head restraint and seat position Locates emergency brake Becomes familiar with light controls. brakes and visibility NOTES Copyright.

Personal Safety I will plan my route in advance. I won’t exceed the speed limit or drive aggressively. Safety Belts I will always use my safety belt and never put the vehicle in motion unless all passengers are buckledup. park only in safe locations and always secure the vehicle. Children under 12 will always travel and be secured in the back seat. Passengers and Distractions I will never drive with more than one friend with me in the vehicle and I will never eat or use my cell phone while the vehicle is in motion. IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 46 of 47 . I will be responsible for the consequences.Driving Contract Financial Responsibility I will be responsible for the following costs associated with the vehicle: ___Purchase/loan cost ___Registration ___Insurance ___Maintenance ___Fuel ___Damage Other: _____________________________________________________ Maintenance Responsibility I will be responsible for the following routine vehicle maintenance: ___Wash and wax ___Check tire pressure ___Check fluids ___Clean interior ___Clean windows ___Inspect exterior Other: _____________________________________________________ Curfew I agree to be home at designated times and communicate my purpose for each driving trip. Rules of the Road I will obey the rules of the road. If I violate the rules of the road and receive a citation. This agreement is made by: Novice Driver Signature Parent / Coach Signature Month Day Year Copyright. I will call before the curfew expires and request help. I accept full legal responsibility for my actions as a driver. If I am delayed or encounter a problem. I will drive in safe environments. Alcohol and Drugs I will never drive after using alcohol or drugs and never ride with an impaired driver.

IDriveSafely 2006 All Rights Reserved Parent/Coach Guide Page 47 of 47 .NOTES Copyright.

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