January 8, 2011 - January 8, 2011, The Afro-American A1

By Shernay Williams
AFRO Staf Writer
The city’s new top prosecutor Gregg Bernstein,
who proposed tougher legal treatment of violent
offenders while on the campaign trail, was sworn in
Jan. 3 during a private offcial event.
Bernstein, who is White, won the city’s state’s
attorney position after unseating longtime Black
incumbent Patricia Jessemy in the heated Democratic
primary. He went unopposed in the General Election.
At a public, ceremonial swearing-in Jan. 4, the
former federal prosecutor pledged to build a better
relationship with police and restructure the State’s
Attorney’s Offce to “aggressively” prosecute violent
offenders. “Despite great strides in the last few
years,” Bernstein said, “we must change the way
we do business so that we can successfully target,
prosecute, and convict the violent offenders who
continue to harm our neighbors and neighborhoods.
The season for promises… is over, and the time for
performance and action is about to begin.”
The great strides he mentions include a steady
decline in violent crime for at least the last three
years. City offcials reported 223 homicides in 2010,
the lowest count since 1985. Juvenile homicides and
shootings are down 35 percent and overall gun crime
down 16 percent over last year. Yet Bernstein and
other city leaders understand more must be done
for Baltimore residents to feel safe.
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who
attended Bernstein’s swearing-in, said at a
separate event that the reduced numbers are
“not a cause for a celebration, but a call for
further action.”
“I believe with the help of the Maryland
General Assembly, we can...continue reducing
gun violence to historic lows,” she said.
She plans to lobby two bills that would create
tougher penalties for gun offenders. The frst
would require all defendants arrested with an illegal,
loaded frearm to serve a minimum of 18 months
in jail. The second
would allow judges
to sentence repeat
gun offenders to
fve to15 years.
Police
Commissioner
Bealefeld
supports the
legislation and
notes that almost
half of homicide
suspects in 2010
had prior gun
arrests, but on
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JANUARY 8, 2011 - JANUARY 14, 2011
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Copyright © 2011 by the Afro-American Company
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75 CENTS
Scott Sisters’ Sentence
Suspended
Continued on A3
B1 A2
Continued on A4
Baltimore County Residents
Celebrate Kwanzaa
Adventure Theatre’s
‘Mirandy and Brother Wind’
B3
By Zenitha Prince
Washington Bureau Chief
For many people, it’s
a way of giving thanks, of
acknowledging a sacred
season by means of giving
back to the community. But
philanthropy should not be
confned to just the end of
the year, advocates say.
“It’s a day to day for
us, not just Thanksgiving
and Christmas, and it’s a
lifestyle,” said Gwen Pope,
manager of the SHABACH!
Emergency Resources and
Empowerment Center at
the First Baptist Church
of Glenarden in Landover,
Md.
And it’s needed more
than ever before, Pope and
others say. The tentacles of
the two-year recession—
high unemployment and
underemployment, leading
foreclosure rates and
depleting wealth— continue
to have a stranglehold on
many Black communities
in the area, creating a new
class of indigent people.
“We and our partner
agencies have defnitely
seen an increase in the
demand for our services (25
percent) and not only have
we seen an increase but a
change in who is coming
to us for food assistance,”
said Shamia Holloway,
communications manager,
Capital Area Food Bank.
The Food Bank serves
as a hub, from which food
is distributed to hunger-
fghting organizations in
the Maryland-Washington,
D.C.-Virginia area.
According to Holloway,
the Food Bank serves more
than 478,000 persons a
year in Prince George’s
County, Montgomery
County, Washington, D.C.
and Northern Virginia.
Traditionally, the vast
majority of those clients
had been “working poor”—
people who may have been
working multiple jobs or
been underemployed but
struggling to meet the
monthly fnancial demands
of transportation, housing,
medical expenses, etc.
“But like our partner
agencies we’re seeing frst-
time visitors, people who
have never been to the food
Continued on A4
Economic Times
Demand Giving
Beyond the Holidays
By Sean Yoes
Special to the AFRO
Baltimore Police say they are “enormously concerned” about a
16-year-old girl from North Carolina visiting family in Baltimore, who
has not been seen or heard from since Dec. 28. And they have requested
the FBI aid in the search for the missing teen.
“We have serious concerns about this case,” said Police
Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld, III during a press conference
earlier this month. Baltimore homicide is investigating Barnes’
disappearance.
According to police, Phylicia Barnes, an honor student from Monroe,
N.C., was visiting her older sister at the Reisterstown Square Apartments
on the 6500 block of Eberle Drive in Northwest Baltimore.
On Jan. 4, investigators greatly expanded their search for Barnes
based on a post on The Baltimore Sun website. “Humor me, somebody
pop over to the 4000 block of Franklintown Road and look at the
Southwest shoulder,” read the post in the comment section at the bottom
of a story about Barnes’ disappearance.
Police confrmed the comment sparked the mobilization of at least
By Shernay Williams
AFRO Staf Writer
Members of a local Black
grassroots organization say
Marylanders need a new
type of political party that
advocates for the working
class.
The “community-
controlled” Ujima People’s
Progressive Party supports a
living wage, the reregulation
of electricity and other laws
that support poor, working
residents, says director
Nnamdi Lumumba.
Lumumba, 40, and a solid
core of about 15 volunteers—
mostly community activists—
set up tables at various
community and cultural
events around the state,
hoping to spread the Ujima
mission.
They need signatures from
at least 10,000 residents to
qualify as an independent
party and have their
candidate’s names listed on
statewide ballots.
If their ambitious plan is
successful, the organization
would be Maryland’s “frst
state-wide electoral party
created and led by Africans,”
their website reads. The
Maryland Department of
Legislative Services did not
confrm Ujima’s claims by
AFRO deadline.
Lumumba formed the
Ujima party in the fall of
2009. The Morgan State
graduate, a full-time
computer technician, said he
realized many candidates,
who chose to be “political
outsiders” and challenge
established laws and public
policy, failed to build the
strong base needed to win
races. He referred to the
failed mayoral runs of
progressive democrat Andrey
Bundley.
President Barack Obama’s
election, he said, gave him
the fnal push to create the
party. Although he was not
an Obama supporter per se,
he was intrigued that a virtual
unknown could captivate the
nation, especially generally
apathetic young voters.
He says his tight knit
team wants to capitalize on
what remains of President
Barack Obama’s energy to
attack the “misleadership in
the state,” which they say is
fueled by Democrats.
Black politicians like
Sheila Dixon and Jack
Johnson “have clearly failed
the citizens,” he says.
But Lumumba wants
to debunk perceptions that
Maryland and the Black
community don’t have strong
leaders.
AP Photo/Courtesy of Baltimore Police Department
This undated photo provided by the Baltimore
Police Department shows Phylicia Barnes.
Barnes, 16, is missing after visiting relatives in
Baltimore and police say she may have been
abducted.
FBI Joins Search
for N.C. Teen
Black-Led Workers Party Pushes
for Statewide Recognition
Courtesy Photo
Obasi Camara, Outreach Coordinator for the grassroots
political organization Ujima People’s Progressive Party,
promotes the group in West Baltimore. Ujima needs
10,000 signatures to qualify as an ofcial political party.
Bernstein Sworn-in, City Leaders Call for Tougher Gun Laws
Photo by Webster Phillips III
Gregg Bernstein was sworn in as
Baltimore City’s State’s Attorney on
Jan. 3.
Continued on A3
A2 The Afro-American, January 8, 2011 - January 14, 2011
AFRO National Briefs
Emory Professor Honored with Literary Medal
Frances Smith Foster, a professor at Emory University, has
earned a lifetime achievement award for her contributions to
American literature. She is the frst Black woman to receive the
Jay B. Hubbell Medal from the Modern Language Association.
Foster is an English and women’s studies professor at the
private Atlanta school. She has written and edited more than 12
books specializing in Black literature and family traditions.
Miss. Gov. Suspends Life Sentences of Sisters Jailed
for $11 Robbery
Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour on Dec. 29 suspended the
life sentences of two sisters jailed for an armed robbery that
netted just $11—but the release of one
sister will require her to donate a kidney
to the other.
“To date, the sisters have served 16
years of their sentences and are eligible
for parole in 2014. Jamie Scott requires
regular dialysis, and her sister has
offered to donate one of her kidneys
to her,” Barbour said in a prepared
statement posted on his website. “The
Mississippi Department of Corrections
believes the sisters no longer pose a
threat to society. Their incarceration is
no longer necessary for public safety
or rehabilitation, and Jamie Scott’s
medical condition creates a substantial
cost to the State of Mississippi.”
In 1993, the sisters lured two men
down a road where they were robbed
by three teens, according to reports.
The Scott sisters were convicted of
robbery with a deadly weapon in the
incident and each received reportedly
unusual double life prison sentences.
The teenagers, who allegedly carried out
the robbery, only served two years in
prison.
Barbour’s statement said that he
asked the Mississippi Parole Board to
review the Scott’s case, and that they
supported his decision to suspend their
sentences. The sisters have received
support from national groups including
the NAACP. A march for them last
year drew hundreds of people.
A release date for the sisters has not
been decided, and will be set by the
Mississippi Department of Corrections,
according to Jackson, Miss. NBC
affliate WLBT.
NAACP Fact-Finding Delegation
Investigates Abuse Claims at Georgia Prisons
The Georgia State Conference of the NAACP is
spearheading an investigation into abuse allegations at two
Georgia prisons. Last month, a fact-fnding committee visited
the Macon State Prison in Oglethorpe, Ga., where inmates
complained of poor conditions during a statewide prisoner
strike. The Georgia State Department of Corrections (DOC)
agreed to allow the visit after meeting with the NAACP
Georgia State Conference, an NAACP national delegation and
a number of other organizations to discuss allegations of guard
violence and the poor conditions that led to the peaceful strike.
According to reports, prison guards allegedly turned off
heat and hot water in hopes of forcing
prisoners back to work. However,
inmates’ advocates say they’ve
remained peaceful while petitioning
for better educational opportunities,
improved health care, nutritional meals
and fair parole standards.
Benjamin Todd Jealous, president
and CEO of the NAACP, said
the prisoners’ demands should be
considered. “The requests being made
by the inmates – better access to their
families, pay for their work, access
to education opportunities – are not
unreasonable, and could in fact lead
to helping them successfully reenter
society and become responsible citizens
once they have served their time.”
Meanwhile, the national NAACP
has called upon the United States
Department of Justice, through its
civil rights division, to urge federal
intervention under the authority granted
the department by the Civil Rights of
Institutionalized Persons Act to ensure
that the civil rights of Georgia State
inmates are protected.
New Charles R. Drew Nursing
School Utilizes State-of-the-Art
Technology
Charles R. Drew University of
Medicine and Science’s new Life
Sciences Research Nursing Education
building, a $43 million addition to the
school, is garnering nationwide attention
for its state-of-the-art facility. According
to school offcials, the Mervyn M.
Dymally School of Nursing in South
Los Angeles, Calif., has one of the
most advanced
simulation labs in
the United States.
One of the
most unique
features in the
facility is the
top-of-the-line
human patient
mannequins
in the 12-bed
simulation
lab. These
mannequins are
all anatomically
correct and
represent adults, children, elderly and newborn patients with
the ability to cough, talk, urinate and have audible heart and
lung sounds. Students can insert intravenous lines into them to
ease their “distress” and to make diagnoses.
“Typically, when students graduate from nursing school,
they have cared for two patients, and while they may know a
lot about the care of those two types of affictions, they have
not been in a dynamic environment,” said Dr. Gloria McNeal,
founding dean, in a press statement. “What we are trying to do
here at CDU is to offer students hands-on experience in every
environment, so that by the time they graduate, they know what
to do when a patient requires care.”
Courtesy Photo
Frances Smith Foster
Courtesy Photos
Jamie (left) and Gladys Scott were
convicted of robbery in 1993 and given
double life sentences.
AP Photo
The Georgia State Conference of the NAACP is
spearheading an investigation into abuse allegations at
two Georgia prisons.
Courtesy Photo
The Mervyn M. Dymally School of
Nursing has one of the most advanced
simulation labs in the United States.
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A2 The Afro-American, January 8, 2011 - January 8, 2011
By Hazel Trice Edney
Special to the AFRO
PART I of a periodic
series: The Terrorism of
Racism
WASHINGTON (TEWire)
- Reginald Bailey seemed
to have done everything
right. The 1995 business
administration graduate of
North Carolina A&T, an
HBCU, has never been in
trouble with the law; he is a
member of the prestigious
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity;
he is a married father of
two children and a business
owner.
In fact, just fve years
ago, the now 40-year-old
Bailey and his business
partner, Walter Gray, were
awarded multiple contracts
that totaled more than $140
million over a course of
four years. The contracts
were for management of
telecommunications in Iraq
and Afghanistan. Bailey’s
frm, Worldwide Network
Services, LLC (WWNS)
served as a subcontractor
and teaming partner under
DynCorp International, LLC,
a nearly $3 billion-worth U.S.
defense contractor.
Fast forward fve years
later, Bailey, of Southeastern
Maryland, has nowhere near
his former livelihood. Like
many other Americans, he has
even been through periods of
concern about his mortgage,
his credit rating, and the
education of his children, a
boy and girl, ages 8 and 4.
How did Reginald Bailey
lose so much in so little time?
It was not the economy; it
was not corruption on his
part; it was not due to bad
business decisions; nor was
it due to excessive spending
and greed, all reasons for
which people typically lose
thriving businesses.
So, how did Worldwide
Network Services, LLC go
down so quickly? According
to a May 14, 2008 ruling
from an all-White jury of
eight people in the U. S.
District Court for the Eastern
District of Virginia, Reginald
Bailey lost his multi-million
dollar company simply
because he is Black.
In the 4-year-old court
case that appears to be once
again coming to a head even
after the verdict, Bailey and
his partners stood helpless
as WWNS went belly up
because of pure racism
from an unlikely source.
That source, according
to court documents, was
DynCorp - the same billion
dollar company that teamed
with WWNS seven years
ago, resulting in the major
contract.
Conversely, DynCorp,
which was acquired
by Cerberus Capital
Management, L.P., a multi-
billion dollar corporation
that merged with DynCorp in
June this year, continues to
grow from lucrative federal
government contracts. It also
thrives from investments
from public pension funds,
which include billions in
contribution dollars from
at least 30 percent African
Americans.
Now emerging into the
court of public opinion, the
WWNS v. DynCorp-Cerberus
case is viewed by some as
a quintessential David and
Goliath fght that has civil
rights leaders seething.
The Rev. Jesse Jackson
Sr. describes the case as
“egregious” and “the most
signifcant conviction of
racial discrimination by a
government contractor to an
African-American business
in U.S. history.” Among the
leading activists seeking
justice for WWNS, Jackson
wrote his descriptions in
an Oct. 26, 2010 letter to
Secretary of State Hillary
Clinton. The letter continued,
“DynCorp has been the
benefactor of multiple State
Department awards, which
comprise of a signifcant
portion of their business and
Cerberus’ current strategy
to increase the depth and
value of DynCorp through
acquisitions of companies
that also maintain a
signifcant amount of State
Department contracts.”
Marc Morial, president
and CEO of the National
Urban League, has also long
advocated for justice in the
case. “It’s a case of unfair
treatment. It’s also a case of
the government standing on
the side at the time and not
doing anything while one
of its contractors treated an
African-American business
patently unfairly,” said
Morial in a recent interview.
“Light needs to be shed
on it to show some of the
trials and tribulations that
African-American business
owners face when doing
business sometimes in the
government.”
The National Urban
League was among
organizations which fled
an amicus or “friend of the
court” brief to side with
WWNS in the case.
Morial said he had never
met Bailey when he heard
about the case and decided
to support him. He says the
injustice has grown steadily
worse, even after the jury’s
verdict, largely because
it appears that DynCorp-
Cerberus is not clearly and
openly disclosing the race
discrimination fndings
while continuing to reap
public funds. “If this is not
a violation of the civil rights
laws, I don’t know what is,”
Morial said.
According to federal
acquisition regulations an
“agency debarring offcial
may debar a contractor on
the basis of a conviction of
or a civil judgment for an
offense indicating a lack of
business integrity or for any
other ‘serious or compelling’
cause.”
DynCorp, through a
spokeswoman, Ashley Burke,
sent an e-mailed statement
to Trice Edney Wire denying
any further responsibility
in the case. “DynCorp
International takes allegations
of racial discrimination
very seriously,” she wrote.
“And our strict code of
ethics and business conduct
specifcally addresses our
zero tolerance for any kind
of discrimination. Although
we strongly disagreed with
the verdict in this case, the
judgment was paid in full.”
Bailey is determined
that his company, in ruins
- partially because of the
millions of dollars it took to
fght DynCorp in court - must
be made fnancially whole as
DynCorp-Cerberus continues
to prosper.
In May 2008, the jury
found DynCorp guilty of
race discrimination and
awarded WWNS $10 million
in punitive damages. On
DynCorp’s appeal, a three-
judge panel in the U. S.
Fourth Circuit Court of
Appeals - widely considered
the most conservative in
the nation - upheld the race
discrimination fnding on
Feb. 12, 2010. But, it set
aside the $10 million in
punitive damages due to a
technicality involving clarity
of jury instructions.
The U. S. Supreme Court
on Oct. 4, 2010, denied the
petition to hear the case.
Despite the loss of the
$10 million in punitive
damages, the fndings upheld
by both lower courts are
irrefutable. According to
court documents, while
WWNS employees worked
the war zones of Iraq and
Afghanistan, DynCorp, now
Cerberus:
* Regularly referred to
Black WWNS employees and
management as “kaffrs,” a
racially offensive word used
as a disparaging term for
South African Blacks and
equivalent to the N-Word in
some defnitions.
* Stopped making
payments to WWNS, causing
the company to suffer
fnancially and rendering
it unable to pay its 147
employees.
* Stopped providing the
badges and security that
WWNS employees needed to
go out into the feld and war
zones to do the work they
needed to do.
* While deliberately
withholding payments to
WWNS invoices; DynCorp
even began recruiting
WWNS’ employees to
work for DynCorp while
denigrating WWNS
management. One manager
was forced at gun point to
his room by a DynCorp
employee.
* Ultimately DynCorp
breached the contract,
according to court
documents.
Bailey recalls how Gray
and their employees endured
the same risks as DynCorp
employees in Iraq and
Afghanistan. “We risked our
lives for our company,” he
said, “and now we’ve lost a
$50 million a year business.”
By Alan King
AFRO Staff Writer
Jennifer Hudson and other
relatives positively identified
the body of her 7-year-old
nephew Monday, just hours
after his body was found in a
sport-utility vehicle sought in
connection with the murder of
Hudson’s mother and brother.
The white, 1994 Chevrolet
Suburban with Illinois license
plate X584859 was found on
Chicago’s West Side after
police received a 7 a.m. call
from a neighbor about a suspi-
cious vehicle. The man noticed
the vehicle while walking his
dog. According to the Chicago
Tribune, the boy had been shot
multiple times in the back seat
of the vehicle. The SUV, regis-
tered to Hudson’s murdered
brother, was towed with the
boy’s body inside and is being
processed by evidence techni-
cians and workers. The body
was later removed and taken to
the Cook County Medical
Examiner’s office.
Hudson and other family
members arrived at the Medical
Examiner’s office mid-after-
noon to identify the body.
Given the choice between look-
ing directly at the body or
viewing it on a wall-mounted
video screen, the family chose
the latter. According to the
Tribune, Hudson said, “Yes,
that’s him.”
A spokesman for the office
told the newspaper that Hudson
“remained strong for her fami-
ly” and was clearly its leader.
“She held hands with her fami-
ly,” the spokesman said. “It
was obviously a very emotional
moment.”
The boy – the son of Julia
Hudson, Jennifer’s sister – had
been missing since Friday,
when a relative found Julian’s
grandmother, Darnell
Donerson, 57, and his uncle,
Jason Hudson, 29, shot to death
in his grandmother’s home in
the 7000 block of South Yale
Avenue.
An Amber Alert – a desig-
nation for high-risk missing
children – was issued Friday
after Julian was discovered
missing after the murders.
Police arrested William
Balfour, the missing boy’s step-
father and estranged husband
of Julia, at his girlfriend’s
Southside apartment several
hours after the murders.
Balfour’s mother, Michele, has
told reporters that her son had
nothing to do with the slayings.
Balfour remains a suspect in
the murders but is being held in
jail for parole violation after
being convicted of attempted
murder and vehicular hijack-
ing. Cook County records show
that he pleaded guilty to both
charges in 1999. He was also
convicted in 1998 for posses-
sion of a stolen motor vehicle.
He was released from prison in
2006 after serving seven years
for the attempted murder and
car hijacking charges.
The boy remained missing
through a long weekend in
which police and volunteers
posted fliers bearing his photo-
graph around the city. On
Sunday, Jennifer Hudson asked
for the public’s help in finding
her nephew. In her MySpace
blog, she thanked fans and sup-
porters for their prayers and
offered a $100,000 reward to
anyone who returned the boy
alive.
Since the investigation,
Hudson – who gained stardom
after appearing on “American
Idol,” and then won an
Academy Award for her role in
the movie Dreamgirls – has
stayed out of the public eye.
The Chicago Tribune report-
ed that a parade of cars moved
slowly past her family’s home
Monday morning, past the
news vans, reporters and curi-
ous onlookers.
Neighbors stood
quietly and
reflected on the
violence.
In front of the Hudson’s
home, men in heavy jackets
and hooded sweatshirts came to
kiss the twin white crosses bar-
ing the names of Donerson and
Jason.
“Everybody is sick of going
through stuff like this,” Artisha
West, a former resident of the
area told the Tribune. “We all
have to stick together. All these
young children are dying, and
for what?”
By Alan King
AFRO Staff Writer
Presidential candidate John
McCain’s attack on ACORN –
Associated Community
Organization for Reform Now –
confirms the success of the
organization, the head of the
group says.
“This is testimony to the work
we’ve done and success we’ve
had,” Maude Hurd, president of
ACORN, said in an interview
with the AFRO.
“When this attack started, we
had just announced that we had
registered 1.3 million new vot-
ers,” she said. “That’s just to say
that someone’s running scared
because of ACORN’s success.”
McCain, who is running for
president on the Republican tick-
et, lashed out at ACORN in the
final debate against Barack
Obama, contending the group “is
on the verge of maybe perpetrat-
ing one of the greatest frauds in
voter history in this country,
maybe destroying the fabric of
democracy.”
Factcheck.org, a non-partisan
Web site, found those claims to
be “exaggerated,” with “no evi-
dence of any such democracy-
destroying fraud.”
Hurd believes the McCain
charges were politically motivat-
ed.
She said, “Because it’s low-
and moderate-income people,
and people of color, I believe the
McCain campaign thinks those
voters are going to vote
Democratic, which is not neces-
sarily true.”
ACORN is no stranger to
controversy.
For 38 years, the non-partisan
organization has fought for social
and economic justice for low-
and moderate-income
Americans. With 400,000 mem-
ber families organized into more
than 1,200 neighborhood chap-
ters in 110 cities nationwide,
ACORN has over the years seen
its share of criticism while advo-
cating for affordable housing,
living wages, healthcare for the
underserved— and while organ-
izing voter registration drives.
But none has been as withering
and baseless as this one.
With the presidential election
less than two weeks away,
ACORN’s detractors allege the
organization has engaged in mas-
sive voter registration fraud after
the reported discovery of bogus
names, such as Mickey Mouse
and Dallas Cowboys players
Tony Romo and Terrell Owens,
among the names submitted to
election officials.
Hurd said those workers, who
were doing those things without
ACORN’s knowledge or permis-
sion, were fired.
“The evidence that has sur-
faced so far shows they faked
forms to get paid for work they
didn’t do, not to stuff ballot
boxes.” ACORN, she said, is the
victim of fraud, not the perpetra-
tor of it.
Hurd said the only things
bogus are the charges them-
selves. And factcheck. org
agrees.
It concluded, “Neither
ACORN nor its employees have
been found guilty of, or even
charged with, casting fraudulent
votes.”
The problem came about pri-
marily because of the way
ACORN operates. Rather than
rely on volunteers, it pays peo-
ple, many of them poor or unem-
ployed, to sign up new voters.
The idea was to help both those
being registered and those doing
the registration.
Maud explained, “We have a
zero tolerance policy for deliber-
ate falsification of registration.”
Most news account neglect to
point out that ACORN is
required by law to turn in all reg-
istration forms. And they also fail
to note that it was the organiza-
tion, in many instances, that first
brought the phony registrations
to the attention of authorities.
The McCain camp apparently
isn’t interested in those fine
points, preferring to air mislead-
ing ads that seek to link Obama
to ACORN, thereby undercutting
his political support.
McCain: I’m John McCain
and I approve this message.
Announcer: Who is Barack
Obama? A man with “a political
baptism performed at warp
speed.” Vast ambition. After col-
lege, he moved to Chicago.
Became a community organizer.
There, Obama met Madeleine
Talbot, part of the Chicago
branch of ACORN. He was so
impressive that he was asked to
train the ACORN staff.
What did ACORN in Chicago
engage in? Bullying banks.
Intimidation tactics. Disruption
of business. ACORN forced
banks to issue risky home loans.
The same types of loans that
caused the financial crisis we’re
in today.
No wonder Obama’s campaign is
trying to distance him from the
group, saying, “Barack Obama
Never Organized with ACORN.”
But Obama’s ties to ACORN run
long and deep. He taught classes
for ACORN. They even endorsed
him for President.
But now ACORN is in trouble.
Reporter: There are at least
11 investigations across the
country involving thousands of
potentially fraudulent ACORN
forms.
Announcer: Massive voter
fraud. And the Obama campaign
paid more than $800,000 to an
ACORN front for get out the vote
efforts.
Pressuring banks to issue risky
loans. Nationwide voter fraud.
Barack Obama. Bad judgment.
Blind ambition. Too risky for
America.
Since McCain’s comments,
ACORN’s 87 offices have been
bombarded with threats and
racist mail.
The day after the presidential
debate, vandals broke into the
organization’s Boston and Seattle
offices and stole computers.
After a Cleveland representative
appeared on TV, an e-mail was
sent to the local office saying she
“is going to have her life ended.”
Aworker in Providence, R.I.,
received a threatening call say-
ing, “We know you get off work
at 9” and uttered racial epithets.
Acaller to one office left a
message on the answering
machine, saying: “Hi, I was just
calling to let you know that
Barack Obama needs to get
hung. He’s a (expletive deleted)
nigger, and he’s a piece of
(expletive deleted). You guys are
fraudulent, and you need to go to
hell. All the niggers on oak trees.
They’re gonna get all hung hon-
eys, they’re going to get assassi-
nated, they’re gonna get killed.”
Another message said, “You
liberal idiots. Dumb (expletive
deleted). Welfare bums. You
guys just (expletive deleted)
come to our country, consume
every natural resource there is,
and make a lot of babies. That’s
all you guys do. And then suck
up the welfare and expect every-
one else to pay for your hospital
bills for your kids. I jus’ say let
your kids die. That’s the best
move. Just let your children die.
Forget about paying for hospital
bills for them. I’m not gonna do
it. You guys are lowlifes. And I
hope you all die.”
Hurd thinks the hate calls will
cease soon.
“In two weeks, I think these
attacks will be over. But I think it
will be harder for us to get our
name back on good graces
because they really trashed us in
the last few weeks.”
But ACORN will not be
deterred.
“We’ve been fighting for a
long time, for over 30 years, for
the rights of low- and moderate-
income people all across the
country,” Hurd said. “We’re
going to continue to fight for
economic justice in our commu-
nities.”
November 1, 2008 - November 7, 2008, The Washington Afro-American A3
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con Éxito, a 10-year,
$
100 million program to help prepare young
children for school and life. Pick up a free bilingual Sesame Street™
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with all kinds of simple, everyday things you can do to help a child
learn. Together, we can work with our communities so an entire
generation won’t just grow up... but grow up great.
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Jennifer Hudson and Relatives Identify Body of Her Slain Nephew
“She held hands with her family. It was obviously a very emotional moment.”
Courtesy Photos
Jennifer Hudson and her mom, Darnell Donerson who
was killed, as well as her brother, Jason.
Jason Hudson
Julian King, Jennnifer Hudson’s nephew.
ACORN Fights Back
Leader Calls Voter Registration Fraud Charges ‘Bogus’

January 8, 2011 - January 14, 2011, The Afro-American A3
100 police offcers who
scoured a section of Leakin
Park in Southwest Baltimore
for eight hours. The search
included use of a dive team
and police helicopter.
It was later revealed the
comment was not a tip based
on tangible information about
Barnes’ vanishing, but more
on the heinous, decades-long
history of the park being a
dumping ground for dead
bodies. The search yielded
no new leads in the case,
according to police.
“Detectives have been
working around the clock,
literally around the clock
on this case,” said Anthony
Guglielmi, Baltimore Police
spokesman during a Jan. 4
press conference. “We have
20 detectives in shifts. This is
extremely high priority for us.
Every hour that passes we get
more and more concerned.”
Barnes allegedly left her
sister’s apartment, which
is nestled between the
Reisterstown Road Metro
stop and Reisterstown Road
Plaza, around 1:30 p.m.
Dec. 28 to get something to
eat. Reportedly wearing a
navy pea coat with a hood,
blue jeans, a turquoise shirt
and white slipper boots,
Barnes was also carrying
her cell phone and wallet,
but repeated calls to that cell
phone have gone unanswered.
She was scheduled to fy back
to North Carolina Jan. 3, but
she didn’t make that fight.
Police say they fear she has
been abducted and possibly
taken out of Maryland.
Barnes, who has no history
of criminal activity or of
running away, is not familiar
with Baltimore and allegedly
has no friends in the area. “I
know she’s traumatized right
now,” said Barnes’ mother
Janice Stallings during an
interview with WBAL-TV,
Baltimore’s NBC affliate.
“She’s scared out of her
mind right now. She’s a little
innocent girl who does not do
any harm to anyone.”
The neighborhood from
which Barnes vanished is
awash with fiers bearing her
photo. At her hometown the
teen’s family members and
friends held a vigil for her
on New Year’s Day. At the
charter school she attends
classmates of the standout
student have also held vigils
praying for her safe return.
“I have a strong faith that
we will fnd her, and we will
fnd her well,” said Reginald
Barnes, the missing girl’s
father, who said he grew up in
Baltimore. According to him
his younger daughter, who
was on pace to graduate from
high school early, planned
to live in Baltimore with her
27-year-old sister while she
attended Towson University.
As of Jan. 4, 2,088 people
have joined a Facebook page
called, “Pray for Phylicia
Barnes.”
Yesha Callahan, a blogger
and social commentator who
joined the page, wrote about
the lack of national media for
the Barnes case. “Phylicia
Barnes has been missing
from the Baltimore area
since Dec. 28
th
, but her case
has not received the national
attention that other cases have
received,” wrote Callahan on
Jan. 3. “Is it because she’s
black?”
Anyone with information
on the disappearance of
Phylicia Barnes is asked to
call the Baltimore City Police
Department.
“We have leaders…and
what we want to do is take
those leaders who are active
and have been doing things
without the spotlight, and
build up an (energy) around
them.”
“It’s up to the working
class people to create a new
party that supports them,” he
added.
The reaction from the
public, he said, has been
strong.
“People are excited.”
That includes Ujima
supporter the Rev. Annie
Chambers of the D.C.-based
African Spiritual Love
Ministry. “We need a party
that will represent us and
speak for working people—
both Black and White,” she
told the AFRO. The 69-year-
old Baltimore resident says
she knows the grim realities
of the poor, working class.
“Maryland is a state that
has turned its back on the
working poor,” she said. “We
are a rich state, but we have
whole families that go place
to place and live on the street.
(Ujima) would give those
same people power.”
The growing political
party is especially targeting
young people, who Ujima
leaders say are looking
for “bold and consistent”
leadership. Lumumba says
politicians often fail to
address the ballooning young
Black unemployment rate.
“It’s at 50 percent,” he said.
But when the AFRO
surveyed 20 to 30 year olds
primarily from the Baltimore-
Washington D.C. area, many
felt it would be diffcult to
stir up young interest in
Ujima or politics in general.
At least two said they
would patronize Ujima, but
were skeptical the group
could ever succeed past
the “local level” because
of divisions created by a
“Black” party.
It’s “the ‘United’ States of
America…,” one Baltimore
City college student posted,
emphasizing the “United.”
Lumumba says one of
his biggest struggles will be
“breaking the myths” about
Black-led organizations.
“Our core leadership is
Black but we open our party
to all workers,” he said.
“Working people have the
same problems and needs…
regardless of their ethnicity.”
The next and perhaps
largest hurdle is fundraising.
The group refuses to
accept money from large
corporations and functions
exclusively on funds from
individual supporters.
Win or lose, members
of the group will continue
to be activists within the
community, even during non-
election years, Lumumba
said.
“In the long run, it’s not
about producing politicians,
it’s about producing leaders.”
The party has 3,500
signatures, so far, and needs
the rest by spring. But Ujima
leaders say they are already
grooming candidates to
run city races in Baltimore,
Annapolis and Prince
George’s County this year,
though they would not reveal
in which districts.
Lumumba said if the
group can have an impact
similar to the tea party’s reign
on Republicans, he would be
satisfed.
“If we can have that
effect, get candidates
and pressure the standing
candidates” to address our
issues, “then all around we
win,” he said.
Workers Party Pushes for Recognition
Continued from A1
U.S. Discrimination Case Still Sizzling after Conviction
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton; former V.P. Dan Quayle among those under fre
“It’s up to the working class people to
create a new party that supports them.”
Photo from TEWire
WWNS team leader Derrick Culbreath, shown here after
a car bomb exploded in Iraq, was one of WWNS prized
telecommunications employees who lost his job due
to racism when the business went under, says Reginald
Bailey.
N.C. Teen
Continued from A1
January 8, 2011 - January 8, 2011, The Afro-American A3 A4 The Afro-American, January 8, 2011 - January 14, 2011
featuring
Booklovers’ B RE AKFAS T
Saturday, January 29
8:30 am - noon
Rowell
VICTORIA
Advanced registration required. For more information,
visit: www.prattlibrary.org/booklovers or
call 410-396-5494. www.prattlibrary.org
Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel
700 Aliceanna Street • $40 per person
average, served only four months in jail. The criminal
courts suspend 82 percent of gun cases, he added.
Bernstein, with Bealefeld’s endorsement, has promised
to tighten the grip on these offenders through prosecution.
But he denies his method will prompt a “no-tolerance”
attitude leading to excessive jailing for minor offenses.
“We will not treat all crimes, and those who are
accused, alike,” he said at the swearing-in. “We will
continue to take advantage of existing programs and
alternatives to incarceration, and look for new methods
to partner with the public, private and faith-based
organizations that treat and rehabilitate individuals whose
behavior may be the result of severe drug addiction or
poverty. I will work with organizations that help to put
people back on the path to healthier lives, more stable
families, and good-paying jobs and achieve the best
possible outcomes for all involved.”
Bernstein hired a brand new leadership team to begin
an internal audit of the State’s Attorney’s Offce, which
he said had a “small lack of leadership and direction.”
His staff includes former assistant U.S. attorney George
J. Hazel, former assistant state’s attorney Elizabeth
Embry and former secretary for the state’s Budget and
Management Cecilia Januszkiewicz. Mark Cheshire,
former AFRO reporter and speechwriter for Mayor Sheila
Dixon, will reportedly serve as communications director.
In a statement, Bernstein said his team “share(s) my
vision to restructure the State’s Attorney’s Offce to focus
on the prosecution and conviction of violent offenders and
improve training, technology and cooperation with law
enforcement.
“I look forward to beginning our work together to make
Baltimore a safer city and get violent criminals off our
streets.”
bank coming now,” Holloway
said. “We’ve actually seen
former donors who are
now coming to us for food
assistance. So the face of
hunger has changed and the
recession has played a big
role.”
SHABACH!, which acts
as a liaison to social services
and donates food, clothing
and household items to
persons in the Washington,
D.C. metro area—though it
has seen clients from as far
away as West Virginia—is
also getting an infux of
“professionals,” Pope chimed
in. These are educators,
government workers and
corporate types who were
laid off from their jobs, or
saw their businesses closed;
have exhausted their savings
and retirement accounts
and are now depending
on the community and the
government for help.
“These are very
conscientious people that
want to work but there are
no jobs out there for them…,
who are not looking for a
handout—and really don’t
want it—but this is what
they have to do in order to
maintain,” Pope said. “And
they are new to the system,
meaning social services, and
they’re trying to fnd out
how it works, what they can
get, or what is available to
them and a lot of them have
become very frustrated.
“… [So] even though they
(the clients) drive up in a big
car, everyone is reminded that
they may be sleeping in that
same car.”
Alleviating—and
ultimately changing—the
dire situation begins at a
personal level, said A. Adar
Ayira, project manager, More
in the Middle Initiative, an
Associated Black Charities
(ABC) program designed to
strengthen and expand the
Black middle class.
“For themselves, what
people can do is to really
become more educated on
fnancial management,”
Ayira told the AFRO. “This
economic climate is giving
all of us an opportunity to
clean up our fnancial houses,
to fgure out what we can
tighten and to make us more
conscious about working
ourselves out of whatever
holes we’re in.”
For others, the traditional
ways of “giving back”
continue to be important,
Holloway said.
“It’s very easy. You can
donate—with $1 we can
provide three meals; you
can host a food drive at your
school or church—they are a
critical way by which we get
food.”
Also, with individual and
corporate donors giving less
to nonprofts such as theirs,
volunteers who offer their
time and energy to sort food
and pack boxes are just as
important to the Food Bank’s
work, Holloway added.
Last year, 14,000 volunteers
saved the organization $1.7
million in administrative
costs. “Without community
support, without donations
and volunteers we would not
be able to feed the thousands
who are suffering from
hunger,” she said. “The need
is there, the problem is real
and it’s up to the community
to take action and make a
difference.”
Diane Bell McKoy,
president/CEO of ABC,
which is based in Baltimore,
said too many people are
dissuaded from giving back
because they think they must
do something “big.”
“I want to change
people’s defnition of
help… everything makes a
difference,” she said.
For example, in churches
with social services
ministries, simply supporting
the church fnancially may
be an indirect way of giving
back to the community.
And there are other ways
parishioners can give.
“There are churches
that are beginning to
recognize that within
their congregations there
are people of expertise…
So when people think
of volunteering…lots of
people can do soup kitchens
and shelters and that’s
critical. But, because often
our community is also
disconnected from knowing
what they don’t know, in
order to change up economic
outcomes volunteering
knowledge and resources and
relationships and access is
critical. You don’t have to go
far to make a difference.”
Economic Times Demand Giving
Continued from A1
“I want to change people’s defnition of
help… everything makes a diference.”
By Shernay Williams
AFRO Staf Writer
People lined up outside
Ashley Johnson’s West
Baltimore home the evening
of Dec. 29, all bearing at least
one gift. To her surprise and
delight, the “secret Santas”—
many of them strangers—
placed the gifts under her
Christmas tree. The heart-
warming spectacle brought
the 11-year-old her frst
Christmas presents this year.
Ashley’s mom, Pam
Johnson, was diagnosed
with two forms of breast
cancer last summer. Boggled
down with medical bills for
chemotherapy treatments
and medication, she and her
husband Joe Johnson could
not afford presents.
When Tenyo Pearl, Mrs.
Johnson’s close friend and
former professor, heard
the news, she made it her
mission to make Christmas
special for the girl. She sent
text messages and e-mails
detailing the situation to
several friends. Word spread
like wildfre, even landing
on Facebook. In just three
days of planning, the group
decided to surprise the girl
with gifts.
Over 20 people showed
up, including Councilwoman
Sharon Green Middleton
and Bea Gaddy’s daughter,
Cynthia Brooks. At least 10
others contributed gifts but
couldn’t make the surprise
event.
“I couldn’t sleep
knowing…a girl didn’t have
presents under her Christmas
tree,” Pearl said at the
gathering. “Pam didn’t ask
for help but it’s our duty.”
Mrs. Johnson told the
crowd she was speechless. “I
would have never expected
this type of outreach,” she
said. “I’m thankful to God
that each of you was touched
in some way to make a
difference for my daughter.”
This was the frst year she
couldn’t afford gifts for her
child, she said.
“Cancer …it drains
everything, all your resources
for treatments,” the 49-year-
old said. She looked strong
and alert, despite the intense
treatments. She expects her
fnal two bouts of chemo this
month.
Mrs. Johnson frst felt a
lump in her breast last spring.
She initially wrote it off as
a hormonal imbalance, but
after two months, she decided
to get checked out. Her
doctors discovered cancer
in two sections of her breast
and ordered a lumpectomy
in September. Now she
is undergoing chemo as a
precaution to ensure the
cancer does not spread, she
said.
Her insurance didn’t
cover the surgery. She
had to stop working as
director of the local Boys
and Girls Club, but remains
ineligible for unemployment
benefts because of a fling
technicality.
“I’m basically without
income right now,” she said.
Her husband increased his
work hours at BWI Thurgood
Marshall Airport, but the
family struggles without the
additional income.
Mr. Johnson estimates
they owe around $10,000.
“One of her medications
is $125, and we have
to get that every three
weeks,” he explained. After
reconstructive surgery and
the 10 years worth of pills
his wife will need to recover,
he expects it will cost about
$25,000.
It makes his “heart warm”
to know the community is so
giving, he says, especially for
a woman so giving.
“That’s my heart,” he said
of his wife of nine years. “I
can’t lose her. It took me too
long to fnd her.”
Ashley started middle
school at Windsor Hill
Elementary/ Middle in the
midst of her mom’s surgery
and still managed to make
honor roll.
The pre-teen told the
AFRO it’s “sad and hard” to
watch her mother go through
chemotherapy but “it feels
good” to have a special
Christmas this year.
She received clothes,
games, cards and even food.
“This is what the
holiday season is all about,”
Middleton said. Along with
a gift, she brought Mrs.
Johnson a list of government
aid options. She said her
younger sister is a cancer
survivor.
Pearl, who was one of
Mrs. Johnson’s instructors
at Coppin State University,
said, “You want to make sure
they not only have a degree
but they have support. I
didn’t have money to buy all
this but I had this,” she said
raising her cell phone, “and it
multiplied 100 times.”
Mrs. Johnson said her
family received more than
material items that night.
“It’s not even about
the gifts,” she said. “It’s
the outpouring of love and
concern from people.”
All cancer patients should
experience this love, she
added. She wants to create
a breast cancer support
group that especially targets
African-American women.
“Black women don’t talk
about it,” she noted. “We
aren’t as open…Even this 11
year old,” she said, pointing
to her daughter, “I have to
start teaching her to take care
of herself.”
“I know I can’t save
the world but if I can help
another woman, even if it’s
an 11-year-old going through
this process…it will be worth
it.”
Bernstein
Continued from A1
Community Giving Warms Struggling Family’s Holiday Spirit
Courtesy Photo/ Cynthia Brooks
A group of Baltimore residents surprised 11-year-old Ashley Johnson (bottom, center
right) with Christmas gifts last week. Her mother, Pam Johnson, (bottom, center left) is
battling breast cancer and was unable to aford gifts this year.
January 8, 2011 - January 14, 2011, The Afro-American A5
A6 The Afro-American, January 8, 2011 - January 14, 2011
ONE DAY SALE PRICES INEFFECT 1/7 &1/8/11. For store locations &hours, log on to macys.com
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Community Calendar
Jan. 8
Book Talk: ‘The Integration
of Debate: Competing
Futures for American Cities’
Reginald F. Lewis
Museum, 830 E. Pratt St.,
Baltimore. 2 p.m. Discuss
the book The Integration
Debate with its contributing
authors. Museum admission
is required. For more
information: 443-263-1800.
Maxine Bigby Cunningham
Enoch Pratt Free Library,
Edmondson Avenue Branch,
4330 Edmondson Ave.,
Baltimore. 2 p.m. Author
Maxine Bigby Cunningham
will discuss her book
describing how walking can
help attain physical, mental,
emotional and spiritual well-
being. For more information:
410-396-0946.
Maysa
Rams Head Tavern, 33
West St., Annapolis, Md. 6:30
p.m. Baltimore native Maysa
Leak brings her soulful vocals
back home. $35. For more
information: 410-268-4545.
Jan. 9
‘Fundi: The Story of Ella
Baker’
Reginald F. Lewis
Museum, 830 E. Pratt
St., Baltimore. 2 p.m.
Examine the 1960s from the
perspective of civil rights
activist Ella Baker. Museum
admission is required. For
more information: 443-263-
1800.
Jan. 11
Remembering Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr.
Enoch Pratt Free Library,
Cherry Hill Branch, 606
Cherry Hill Road, Baltimore.
3:30-4 p.m. Listen to a story
about the life of Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. and his
contributions to the Civil
Rights Movement. For more
information: 410-396-1168.
Devon A. Blackwood
Enoch Pratt Free Library,
Central Branch, 400
Cathedral St., Baltimore.
6:30 p.m. Devon Blackwood
is a licensed professional
in the feld of addiction. At
this event, he will discuss
his book, Beyond the
Lingo: Working Through
Recovery Concepts, in
which he provides practical
and realistic solutions to
overcome the barriers and
traps of dependency. For more
information: 410-396-5430.
Jan. 12
Warm Wednesdays Open
Mic
5 Seasons, 830 Guilford
Ave., Baltimore. 9 p.m.-12
a.m. Witness the largest
open-mic poetry venue in
the area. $5-$10. For more
information: 410-207-9832.
Isabel Wilkerson
Enoch Pratt Free Library,
Central Branch, 400 Cathedral
St., Baltimore. 7 p.m. Pulitzer
Prize winning author Isabel
Wilkerson will discuss her
new book The Warmth of
Other Suns: The Epic Story of
America’s Great Migration,
which chronicles the decades-
long migration of African
Americans from the South to
the North and West. For more
information: 410-396-5430.
Jan. 13
A Conversation With Dr.
Johnetta Cole
The Reginald F. Lewis
Museum, 830 E. Pratt
St., Baltimore. 7 p.m.
In conjunction with the
museum’s special exhibition
Freedom’s Sisters, Dr.
Johnetta Cole, executive
director of the National
Museum of African Art at
the Smithsonian, will speak
about her life work, education
and historic Black colleges
in the museum world. $5.
For more information: www.
AfricanAmericanCulture.Org.
Jan. 14
Annual MLK Dinner
La Fontaine Bleu, 7514
S. Ritchie Highway, Glen
Burnie, Md. 5 p.m. The
Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr. Committee of Anne
Arundel County will honor
seven individuals and one
organization who have carried
on Dr. King’s legacy of
service through professional
and volunteer work at the
23rd Annual Martin Luther
King Dinner. $50-$55. For
more information: www.
mlkmd.org.
Jan. 17
The Walters Art Martin
Luther King Jr. Family
Festival
The Walters Art Museum,
600 N. Charles St., Baltimore.
10 a.m.-4 p.m. Don’t miss
one of the most popular
festivals of the season
which celebrates the life and
legacy of Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. through theatrical
performances and stories. For
more information: 410-547-
9000.
January 8, 2011 - January 14, 2011, The Afro-American A7
Charter Improvement Needed for City Council Individual
Vacancy Replacement
It is time Baltimore City improved upon the Charter of the
City of Baltimore in Article III, Section 6, City Council Individual
vacancies. The current process is antiquated, prejudicial,
contradictory and undemocratic.
In Section 2 Members, subsection c Districts, it states: “The
election of members shall be held by council districts, and no
person is entitled to vote for any member of the City Council
other than member for the district in which the voter is registered.
However, 100 percent of those replacing a member of the City
Council do not live in the district as indicated by Section 6
Individual vacancies. This section states: After public notice, the
City Council, by a majority vote of its remaining members, shall
elect a person possessing the qualifcations prescribed in Section 1
of this article to serve the remainder of the unexpired term of the
form incumbent. One district-connected group elects and another
non-district group replaces. Let’s agree to improve this process
before this happens again—and it will.
On the Maryland state level elected county/city representatives
are replaced by elected Central Committee members where 100
percent of them live in the district.
I am writing this before the City Council makes a selection that
they have promised will be, as Council President Young stated:
a decision based on each candidate’s merits. Years ago there was
a slightly better process when we had three representatives for
each district. District Council courtesy was expected, though
not mandated, when the remaining two council people would
suggest to the council who would replace their district fellow
councilperson. Now that we only have one council person for each
district we need to adjust the Charter to this fact.
This process gives the incumbent appointed council person
an advantage for the next election—an advantage given to her or
him by persons that do not live in the district. If anything, why not
appoint someone that would not have the right to run?
In the time it took to post a vacancy notice a similar notice
could be posted to allow the district to vote on the replacement
utilizing the same requirements for electing that person.
Let’s have residents of the district replace their council person.
Dr. Marvin L. Cheatham Sr.
Baltimore, Md.
Investigation of Egregious Court Delay in Arey’s Wrongful
Conviction
Michael Austin was wrongfully convicted of a 1974 murder,
a corrupt prosecution based on the work of Baltimore City Police
“detective” James Russell. After 27 years incarceration, the courts
fnally cleared Austin. (Austin had Centurion Ministries support
his claim for relief; my problem is that I am indigent and I don’t
have any nationally recognized Innocence Project support. I made
all these Brady-Bagley discoveries on my own, without a lawyer!)
I was also wrongfully convicted in 1974, also due to corrupt
prosecution based on the “work” of the same Baltimore City Police
“lead detective” James Russell.
After 37 years incarceration, why can’t I also get a hearing, a
fnal court decision clearing me?
At my original trial, prosecutors lied, telling Baltimore City
Circuit Court Judge Harris on the record there was a two-page
missing person’s police report, and a four-page arrest report in my
case.
Thirty-two years later, on Oct. 18, 2006, the only honest
prosecutor to handle my case, Deputy State’s Attorney Haven
Kodeck, released 200+ pages of Brady-Bagley police reports.
Some 75 pages were exculpatory Brady documents supporting my
veracity; 75 pages were inculpatory Bagley documents proving
state’s witnesses’ perjury; and 50 pages were doubly damning,
simultaneously both exculpatory Brady documents, supporting
what I said at trial; and inculpatory Bagley documents, proving
state witnesses lied!
These 200+ pages of police reports have subsequently been
combined with affdavits and motions for a new trial based on the
newly discovered Brady-Bagley evidence, yet Chief Judge Prevas
sat on these motions for four years until just before his death, when
he reassigned my case outside of his domain.
Yet the same delay, procrastination, and refusal to grant a
hearing persists and I ask, what does it take for a wrongfully
convicted person to get a hearing and disposition on Brady-Bagley
police reports?
Prosecutors can give a criminal defendant 200+ pages of police
reports at trial, and claim they overlooked six pages of Brady-
Bagley reports, but there is no constitutional way prosecutors can
claim there are only six pages of police reports at trial, and then
“fnd” 200+ pages of Brady-Bagley reports 32 years later!
Accordingly I ask, can prosecutors delay and procrastinate
for so many years that I will die or become incapacitated so they
needn’t make another Austin ruling? I’ve spent a decade more in
prison than Austin, and said on record in the 1974 trial transcript
that prosecution witnesses lied and I was illegally convicted.
So my case is not new news! Vindicated by the release of 200+
pages of Brady-Bagley police reports, why is it impossible to get a
hearing? Why do today’s prosecutors defend corrupt predecessor
prosecutors from the 1970s?
For constitutional due process in Maryland’s courts, I ask for
an investigation into the prosecutor’s corruption and egregious
refusal to grant a court hearing on valid Brady-Bagley exculpatory
discoveries.
Douglas Scott Arey
Jessup, Md.
January is a month when
Maryland families pause to
refect on the year just past
– and make our plans for the
months ahead.
2010 was a year that
evoked in me gratitude, a
sense of accomplishment, and
a renewed determination to
carry on.
I am both grateful and
humbled by the faith that
my neighbors once again
invested in me on Election
Day. Despite our opponents’
attacks and their dirty tricks,
our community once again
rose to the challenge.
As a result, Maryland Sen. Barbara Mikulski, Gov. Martin
O’Malley, our other Democratic colleagues in Annapolis
and all but one of our Democratic congressional delegation
received a renewed mandate to fght for the more prosperous
and equitable America symbolized by the pledge, “liberty and
justice for all.”
It is in this spirit that we must regroup and move forward,
notwithstanding the electoral gains that the forces of wealth,
reaction and power achieved in 2010.
With Republican control of the House of Representatives
and a weakened Democratic majority in the Senate, President
Obama’s already daunting task of rebuilding America has
become far more diffcult.
To acknowledge this reality, however, is not to accept
defeat. One victory does not a mandate make – nor one defeat
a movement break.
It is critical that we hold on to this shared vision of a better
country because we are in for a series of tough battles during
the next two years.
The Republican leadership in Washington has made it clear
that their top objective is to deny President Obama a second
term in 2012.
They have pledged to cut $100 billion each year from
the social programs that are keeping millions of American
above water during this long economic storm – and they are
determined to harass the administration through unending
subpoenas and political spin.
These assertions amount to a battle cry against all that is
progressive, not a pledge of bipartisan debate and action for
the beneft of our country.
We are in a fght. Yet, we stand on frm ground.
The Democratically-led 110th Congress just concluded has
been called the “most productive Congress in 50 years.”
We provided a path to more affordable health insurance
for more than 30 million Americans and invested in a stronger
national system of community health care. We strengthened
federal regulation of Wall Street and the credit card industry
for the frst time in decades.
We took actions – including the Recovery Act – that
protected our nation from a second Great Depression. We
helped to ensure that women will be paid as much as their
male counterparts.
We helped to protect state governments from bankruptcy –
and teachers from unemployment.
We stood against the tobacco lobby, fought for child
nutrition and demanded greater food safety.
We reduced the threat of life-ending nuclear attack, made
a down payment on our debt to our veterans and ended the
discrimination inherent in “Don’t ask, don’t tell.”
All of these advances (and more) are what our opponents
hope to destroy when they scream that they are going to
“take their country back” and deny a second term to the most
successful president of our time.
Well, this is our country as well – and I, for one, will fght
to make it better for everyone.
I do not minimize the power that we face.
Billionaires like the Koch brothers are dumping millions
into a concerted effort to defeat our president and the
progressive movement he leads. A slim majority of the
Supreme Court has decreed that corporations can use their
profts to buy elections and protect their privileges.
Against these forces, we have only our vision,
determination and organization.
Still, history informs us that, sometimes, this can be
enough.
We know that ours is the same dream that uplifted the
working women of New England cotton mills, the coal miners
and factory workers in their struggles against the company
store, and the civil rights workers of the 1960s.
Ours is the same challenge as those heroes and heroines of
our past who risked everything for “liberty and justice for all.”
We are a movement, and not just another political
campaign. We fght not just for ourselves, but for our children
and for the generations yet to be born.
Once more, into the breach . . . .
Congressman Elijah E. Cummings represents Maryland’s
Seventh Congressional District in the United States House of
Representatives.
Opinion
Letters to the Editor
Once More, into the Breach....
Elijah Cummings
In recent days some have heaped accolades on Mississippi
Gov. Haley Barbour for indefnitely suspending the double life
sentences unjustly leveled against Gladys and Jamie Scott for
their alleged role in a 1993 robbery.
What seems to have been lost in the celebration is that
Barbour’s action does not grant a full pardon, a clemency or
a commutation of their sentences that sets them free forever.
Barbour’s action also does not guarantee their suspended
sentences will never be reversed resulting in their return to
prison. To add insult to injury, as a condition of Barbour’s
release, Gladys Scott must give up a kidney to her older sister
Jamie, not to save her life, but to save the state money in
dialysis treatments.
The women have already served 16 years of two
consecutive life sentences each after being convicted of luring
two men to a deserted spot in Scott County where three teens
ambushed them, hit them with the butt of a shotgun and
robbed them of wallets containing anywhere from $11 to $200,
depending on the source.
The sisters, now 38 and 36, have always maintained their
innocence. They, however, were not eligible for parole until
2014.
Willie Simmons, a Mississippi state senator, reportedly
characterized Barbour’s actions as a “bold step” and “a
courageous move.”
Really? These “props” are woefully premature. Barbour
does not deserve our gratitude for being courageous. His
actions bespeak not of honor or humanity but instead reek of
self-serving political cover with respect to his aspirations for a
higher offce.
Don’t forget: Barbour has been governor since 2004 and
has not deemed it necessary to do anything about the well-
publicized Scott sister case until now. Also be aware that
Gladys’ request to willingly participate in the transplant was
previously denied apparently by a parole board several years
ago.
Some assume Barbour may be able to save face with
Black voters with this long overdue gesture while at the same
time appease Whites by maintaining a law and order image
along with an economically conservative stance. It is Barbour
who makes the point that the Scott Sisters were not released
because it was the humanitarian thing to do, but instead
because they “no longer pose a threat” and one of them, Jamie,
is costing the state too much money for her dialysis treatments.
In the course of completing this absurd picture of Southern
justice, Mississippi now has established a precedent that one
may achieve freedom in return for giving up a body part.
Barbour shouldn’t be praised for his two-faced attempt
which does nothing but adds insult to the injury the Scott
sisters have already suffered from the application of so called
Mississippi justice.
Their mother, Evelyn Rasco of Florida, where the sisters
may end up, contends their case was in retaliation for family
members testifying against a corrupt local sheriff. Even if the
Scott Sisters were guilty, their life sentences were inconsistent
with the crime and unduly harsh.
They were sentenced by a judge the NAACP claimed had a
history of racially biased rulings and who gave a surprisingly
lenient sentence to the convicted killer of Schwerner, Chaney
and Goodman, the CORE civil rights workers murdered in
Philadelphia, Miss., in 1964.
The Scott sisters were represented by an attorney who was
later disbarred in another case for providing lack of diligence
and failure to communicate with his client. In the Scotts case,
he called no witnesses at the trial, not even the sisters in their
own defense. The actual teen perpetrators said their damning
statements were coerced for plea deals.
We are not condoning criminal behavior here. Robbery
(no matter how big or small the sum illegally gained) with its
potentially fatal outcome deserves harsh punishment. However,
the convicted teen perpetrators of this robbery received eight-
year sentences of which they served only two.
Given this background of the Scott case, we fnd it
surprising the prosecutor, Ken Turner, now tells The Clarion-
Ledger, “it was not a particularly egregious case.”
So why has Barbour kept the Scott Sisters incarcerated
during his six-year tenure as governor? Why has he continued
their incarceration while reportedly pardoning no less than
four undisputed murderers and suspending the life sentence of
another? Would Barbour, a son of the Mississippi South, have
grabbed on to the Scott Sisters’ kidneys after all these years
and countless protests and pleas for their release, had he not
committed political suicide himself only days earlier? We think
not.
Barbour’s’ action is a paper-thin disguise for his retreat
from the insensitive and historically revisionist statements
he made in a recent interview with the conservative Weekly
Standard. In the article, laying the groundwork for his
presidential bid, Barbour marginalized the turmoil of the 1960s
Civil Rights Movement in his hometown of Yazoo City, Miss.,
and complimented the role of the conservative White Citizens
Councils in maintaining order although they were instrumental
in upholding segregation.
Days later, after round criticism, he issued a retraction
saying Blacks did indeed suffer during “the diffcult and
painful era for Mississippi,” and the councils were “totally
indefensible, as is segregation.”
Which is it? This is the same man who earlier this year
defended Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell’s decision to reinstate
Confederate History Month, saying critics were “trying to
make a big deal out of something that doesn’t matter for
diddly.”
Some will argue that it matters not the insincere motivation
of Barbour’s action, but rather that the Scott Sisters will be
released, albeit with strings attached, within 45 days.
However, until Barbour really does “the right thing” by
granting full clemency or pardon for the Scott sisters, without
conditions, he gets no accolades or “props” here.
We Owe Mississippi Gov. Barbour NOTHING!
No Props, No Gratitude
Our View
A8 The Afro-American, January 8, 2011 - January 14, 2011
Wachovia Bank and Wachovia Bank of Delaware are divisions of
Wells Fargo Bank, N. A. Member FDIC.
© 2010 Wells Fargo Bank, N. A. All rights reserved. ECG-406901
wachovia.com
Wachovia proudly celebrates the new milestones being reached by African
Americans every day. In the home, in the community, and in the world,
African Americans are taking the lead, achieving unity, and reaching new
heights. And from these heights, our children not only have a clear view of
today’s possibilities, but also tomorrow’s promise.
Our strength supports
generations
Business
Restaurants Uploading Menus on iPads for Diners
By Caryn Rousseau
Associated Press
CHICAGO (AP) — The
bar is buzzing on a busy night
at Chicago Cut steakhouse as
regulars Keith and Peg Bragg
sit at a high table scanning the
wine list.
Within seconds, they
have all bottles under $40 at
their fngertips using an iPad
supplied by their server.
“You can very quickly look
through to see the price per
bottle,” said Keith, a fnance
executive, as he scrolled
through rows of selections.
“You can read the wine tasting
note, how long it has been
aged.”
The upscale eatery on the
northern bank of the Chicago
River has invested in 40 iPads
at about $700 each for wine
selection. Since April, when
Apple debuted the tablet, the
device is now in use as a full
menu at upscale restaurants,
hamburger eateries and quick-
service chains like Au Bon
Pain. Restaurateurs said that’s
just the beginning.
Chicago Cut partnered
with a technology frm to
create a custom app that looks
like a virtual wine cellar. It
lists the restaurant’s more than
750 wines, includes photos
of bottles on wooden shelves
and allows for searches based
on variety, price or region of
origin. Diners can also access
information about a wine’s
taste, composition and a
Google map of the vineyard.
“Eventually the bottle is
going to spin around and you
can read the back label,” said
Chicago Cut managing partner
Matt Moore. In the future,
programmers could add
video or let customers e-mail
themselves the name of a new
favorite wine.
Moore’s partner, David
Flom, said the iPads were a
large investment, but they’re
already showing returns.
“I’ve already seen an
increase of wine per customer
of 20 percent,” Flom said.
“I can’t say that the iPad
commanded 100 percent, but
I can say it commanded a
signifcant portion of that.”
Technology is becoming
increasingly important to
restaurants and tabletop
ordering devices only stand to
multiply, said Darren Tristano,
executive vice president at
the Chicago-based restaurant
consulting frm Technomic.
“It’s cool and trendy and
kids love it,” he said. “It paves
the way for other opportunities
with applications.”
Au Bon Pain uses iPads at
six of its 220 locations, with
plans to expand. Ed Frechette,
the company’s vice president
of marketing in Boston, said
diners usually fll out pieces
of paper with their orders
at the cafes, but iPads have
simplifed the process.
“One of our employees has
an iPad with a menu loaded
in it and they’ll take your
order,” Frechette said. “You
still see a menu board with all
the information on it. We have
handheld laminated menus for
a reference, but all the paper
pads are gone.”
At 4Food in New York,
where diners can build and
name their own burgers,
iPads are at eight kiosks
with plans for as many as 30
devices, including Android
and Blackberry platforms.
Customers order and enter
credit card information into
the iPad to pay. Managing
partner Adam Kidron said
ordering food electronically
will eventually be the norm.
“You’ve just got to
imagine that this is something
that won’t just be considered
to be a discretionary
behavior,” Kidron said. “It
will be a necessary behavior.”
Chief executive Patrick
Eldon, whose orderTALK
Inc. helps set up online
ordering for restaurants,
said the real value of using
iPads is to develop customer
relationships. Digital surveys,
collecting customer e-mails
and offering frequent diner
programs are all possible with
the tablets, he said.
“It’s about getting to know
your customer in a way that
you can’t get to know them
from the waiter or waitress,”
Eldon said. “You now have
incredibly valuable data about
customers, how often they eat,
what a particular customer
likes to order.”
The tablets are arriving on
the travel circuit, too. OTG
Management has installed
more than 200 iPads loaded
with menus at gates in New
York’s John F. Kennedy
International Airport,
allowing travelers to order
salads and sandwiches while
they wait for fights. A waiter
brings the food and diners can
pay via the iPad or in cash to
the server.
“I think eventually
a signifcant number of
restaurants will just use iPads
for their menus,” said OTG
chief executive offcer Rick
Blatstein. “We’re starting out
using hundreds of them and
I expect it to be thousands in
the future.”
“Technology is becoming increasingly important to restaurants
and tabletop ordering devices only stand to multiply.”
Prince George’s Business and National Science Foundation Form Alliance
By George Barnette
AFRO Staf Writer
With a paucity of minority women in science, technology
and math (STEM) careers, a Prince George’s-based business
has partnered with the National Science Foundation (NSF)
and HBCUs to retain minority women in those careers. GPRA
Strategic Management and the NSF held a conclave in June to
build community awareness about the issue and are committed
to broadening minority representation STEM careers.
The movement was a long time coming, according to Kelly
Mack, Ph.D., program offcer with the NSF’s ADVANCE
program. She said the NSF wants to create more diversity in
science-related felds.
“We had the goal of bringing together women of color to
look at the issues that were germane to them,” Mack said. “We
also wanted to expand the professional network of women of
color, particularly those from historically Black institutions.”
The program has a number of unique features and like other
initiatives focusing on minority women in STEM careers, has
little to no federal funding. ADVANCE implements feedback
from the community it serves and the women directing the
program have lived the HBCU experience, making them more
attuned to the societal pressures minority women face, Mack
said.
Those pressures underscore the program’s importance. The
percentage of African Americans and Latinos wanting to major
in STEM careers at the onset of their college careers is greater
than that of Whites, but that number isn’t refected in graduation
rates or workforce statistics.
“Something happens between the freshman year and
graduating with a baccalaureate degree,” said Mack. “We
know that something happens again in the transition from the
baccalaureate degree to graduate school and other transition
points that the NSF is interested in.”
The discrepancy develops because too few mentors are
available for women of color, according to Claudia Rankins,
Ph.D., program offcer of NSF’s HBCU UP Program. She hopes
female faculty members at HBCUs will help address the issue.
“The few women faculty members we have now will of
course serve as role models for students,” Rankins said. “In that
way, we are hoping that they have an infuence on undergraduate
and graduate students.”
The program, in its initial stages, is focused on retention and
not attraction, although its leaders acknowledge that’s a step
they’re interested in taking very soon.
“We do recognize that we will, at some point, want to expand
our scope to include strategies that would attract undergraduate
women and graduate women into the academy,” Mack said.
For GPRA, however, the program is not just going to
stop here. Carmen Rivera, president of GPRA, said that the
organization’s large minority population allows them a unique
opportunity to engage public school children.
“My personal passion in this is the fact that I have three
daughters that are pursuing STEM disciplines or are in the
STEM academy in college,” Rivera said. “The youngest one
actually gave us some ideas on reaching back-going back to the
primary levels and secondary levels.”
Courtesy Photo/GPRA
Dr. Kelly Mack, center, poses with Roland S. Martin at
June’s conclave.
January 8, 2011 - January 14, 2011, The Afro-American B1
Members of the Griots’ Circle of Maryland: Deborah Pierce-Fakunle,
left, Christopher Green, Janet Alford, Jocelyn Green, Diarra Mitchell,
Bunjo Butler, Waylan Mitchell, Whitney Johnson and Shania Alford
Jocelyn and
Christopher Green
Kinara
candles
representing
the seven principles of Kwanzaa: unity,
self-determination, collective work and
responsibility; cooperative economics,
purpose, creativity and faith
The Jack and Jill Mothers
Bob Smith
Replica of a 16th
century cabin
Whitney Johnson
Judy Miller
Stephen Lee speaks to the audience
about Kwanzaa and its principles
Shania Alford
Tim McAlily (far left) leads a
tour of the museum
Artifacts on display at
the Benjamin Banneker
Historical Park and Museum
Artifacts on display at
the Benjamin Banneker
Historical Park and
Museum
Kennedy and Kenith Riley
Cynthia T. DeJesus, program chairwoman,
and Bill Lambert, president, Friends of the
Benjamin Banneker Museum
Alvin and Deborah Mullan, Dora Mitchell
and Dorlisa Mullan Mitchell
Jason Murphy lights a Kwanzaa
candle as Bill Lambert looks on
Griot Bunjo
Butler,
director of
Growing
Griots
Justin Marrow, James Marrow, Jordan Ross, Kaiyla
Ross, Trey Burrell, Linsey Hamilton, Kaili Beverly
and Jason Murphy
Kaiyla Ross
Photos by Bill Tabron
In celebration of Kwanzaa, a seven-day ceremony observing Black nationalism and culture,
Baltimore-area residents gathered at the Benjamin Banneker Historical Park and Museum in Oella to
learn more about the holiday and celebrate their culture.
Children of all ages participated in the educational event, along with several established griots
(storytellers) and members of community organization Jack and Jill. Also in attendance was Bill
Lambert, who heads Friends of the Benjamin Banneker Park and Museum and Cynthia T. De Jesus, the
organization’s program chairwoman.
Founded in 1966 by Maulana Karenga, Kwanzaa takes place annually Dec. 26-Jan.1.
B2 The Afro-American, January 8, 2011 - January 14, 2011
By Rev. Dorothy S.
Boulware
Special to the AFRO
One would think integrity
would be central to those
who purport to carry on
the work of a leader who
espoused truth as a virtue
that would ensure freedom
and the willingness to serve
as the only true indicator
of greatness. With more
than 30 years of ministry
on his resume, the Rev. Dr.
Reginald Kennedy, bishop
and pastor of Gospel Tabernacle
Baptist Church in Baltimore,
has learned to take nothing for
granted. Making sure the bottom line is clear, he’s written,
“What Really Works in Ministry: Being a Refection of God.”
It’s really needed because we live “in a day where image is more important than integrity,”
according to the Rev. Dr. Karen S. Bethea, senior pastor, Set the Captives Free Outreach
Center in Baltimore. “The reality of our ministry stems out of who we are and not what we can
do.”
The bishop’s concern is that the “weight of our message is suffering because of the lack of
integrity of the vessels. We’re being tested and many are failing,” he said. “We have to be of
good report if we’re going to lead.”
His contention is that the message of the church is always the same, but different methods
can be used to suit the times and culture. “Spiritual leaders who are not truly attached to the
foundation from the beginning then end up being infuenced by the world, rather than being
infuencers of the world,” Bishop Kennedy said.
“If you serve a healthy meal, but serve it out of a trashcan top, it taints the meal.”
So he uses this book and others he’s written internally to train his ministerial staff of 35.
He not only teaches formally, he “works hard to make sure my behavior and actions are not a
hindrance to the body of Christ.”
This work on incarnational ministry, in addition to detailing the basis of the Christian faith,
gives step-by-step instruction on what the bishop sees as the most important things.
Each chapter answers the question of what really works in ministry – salvation, followed by
total surrender, followed by leadership that is tailor-made by the Holy Spirit. His next assertion
is, “Godly love always works.”
“Godly love is exhibited in, not just shown towards. It’s more than just saying a word; it
should be seen in a number of areas,” the author said. A few of those he lists are:
Ministering to the wants of others
Ministering love to each other
Believing strangers
Sympathizing
Supporting the weak
Covering the faults of others
A preacher since age 11, Bishop Kennedy is sure that what works in the corporate arena is
not workable in the church. “We can’t be motivated by the fear of losing our jobs. I want my
staff to work for me because they love me and I love them and we all want to give the Lord our
very best.”
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Faith Pulse
In a day and time when the
country is in educational crisis,
William E. Peterson decided to
reverse this trend, returning to
school after 40 years and earning
his associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s,
and doctorate degrees within a six-
year period.
“I never thought I was smart
enough to earn a degree,” Peterson
said in a prepared statement. “My
sister, who returned to school at
56, inspired me, and I wanted to
challenge myself.”
Although he did graduate from
high school in 1958 and attended
other training institutions in his
earlier years, he had serious doubts
about having what it took to succeed
in the world of academia, especially
at the seasoned age of 63.
After retiring from a successful
32-year career in the insurance
industry and becoming the founder
and pastor of Deliverance Free Will Baptist Church in Temple
Hills, Md., over the past 22 years, Peterson had some fear
about entering an environment where he’d likely be the oldest
class member.
“Initially, I felt a little nervous,
but then my fellow students — and
the professors — started to look to
me for guidance and wisdom. I was
really surprised, but honored at the
same time.”
Peterson’s educational odyssey
began in 2004 at Maple Springs
Baptist Church’s Bible College and
Seminary in Capitol Heights, Md.
He then matriculated to the United
American Free Will Baptist Bible
College, Kinston, N.C., where he
earned his associate’s and bachelor’s
degrees in biblical studies. But
he didn’t stop there. A master’s
in theology soon followed and he
graduated summa cum laude.
Peterson culminated his
academic aspirations by completing
a two-year doctoral program in
eight months and writing his
thesis, “Where Faith Begins:
Autobiography of a Sharecropper’s Son.” He received his
doctorate, graduating summa cum laude, on Dec. 11 at
Deliverance Free Will Baptist Church in Temple Hills.
Local Pastor Shows Age is No Obstacle
Elder William E. Peterson, 69, earns four degrees in six years
Courtesy Photo
William E. Peterson
What Really Works in Ministry?
Refecting the One
We Serve
Courtesy Photo
Rev. Dr. Reginald Kennedy
Publishing Company Seeks ‘Angel
Stories’ for New Digest
Angelnook Publishing announced it is
seeking submissions for true angel stories
for its planned Angel Digest publication,
according to a press release issued by the
company.
People all over the world have
experienced miraculous encounters with
angels. These heartwarming and often
inspiring stories will be the crux of Angel
Digest’s content. The belief in angels
crosses nearly all faiths, making this a
subject of universal interest to millions of
people.
Those who have a true angel story are
asked to submit their story at www.AngelNook.com, a website that features divinely-inspired artists
and their works. The form is easily accessed via a banner on the to of the website’s home page.
Those who submit stories can remain anonymous, but publishers do reserve the right to reject
a submission they feel would not be appropriate for Angel Digest. People with angel stories can
also upload images, which may be included in the Angel Digest. Publishers do ask that people who
submit their stories state whether the story has been published in another publication.
Submissions will be reviewed by an editorial team, and people will be informed via e-mail if
their story has been accepted for publication. Those who submit stories will not be compensated.
For more information, go to: www.angeldigest.com.
New Publication for Christian Men
Launches January 2011
CORE12 Ministries recently launched a new e-zine or “men-zine” on Jan. 4 at www.
livebold.org. The publication, called Live Bold, is male focused and designed to introduce men
to God.
Delivered primarily via website, Live Bold features a condensed e-mail delivery along
with auto publishing on to the mainline social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and more.
Greg Arnold, founder of CORE12 Ministries said, “Men deserve to be served with meaningful
information. We tore apart the idea of publishing for the male audience and discovered a
powerful, useful way to attract, inform, and keep men connected to their faith and teach them
to Live Bold with their faith.”
Live Bold will offer articles from a core team of writers that have avast amount of
experience serving the male audience in life and ministry with monthly contributions from
Greg Arnold, Steve Fandel, Robert Noland, Larry Malone, Glenn Sasscer, and Paul Coughlin.
This accomplished team of men will deliver powerful, compact style of writings on various
topics of interest from food, football, and work to technology, teaching, ministry, and more.
The Live Bold e-zine is free without subscriptions or memberships and targets men of all
ages. Arnold further explained the Live Bold format: “Each article is written about things guys
care about. What we’re doing is merging faith into those areas that exist outside of traditional
religion, pushing the boundaries and extending faith into those places where men live
everyday.”
The e-zine, located at
www.livebold.org, will also
provide an online store call
“The Pro Shop” where self-
produced items will be sold
along with other relevant
books and materials. From
long form books to short
small group guides, the Pro
Shop is offering online mail
ordering for printed books
along with quick access to
electronic downloads. The
publication also promises
to offer T-shirts and other
merchandise to help support
this ministry effort.
About CORE12
Ministries: Founded by Greg
Arnold as a clearinghouse
initiative for Men’s Ministry,
CORE12 Ministries has
produced the e-zine, Live
Bold, along with a men’s
ministry framework called:
M3: Men. Ministry. Mission.
You can read more about
Greg Arnold on the Live
Bold website.
January 8, 2011 - January 14, 2011, The Afro-American B3
www.afro.com
The Recording Academy
recently named Washington,
D.C. native Carolyn Malachi,
R&B crooner Raheem
DeVaughn and go-go music
founder Chuck Brown as
2011 Grammy nominees for
their hit 2010 singles.
Malachi has been
nominated for Best Urban/
Alternative Performance for
her single “Orion” from the
Lions, Tigers & Squares EP.
Similarly, DeVaughn’s
2010 smash “Customer”
garnered him a Grammy nod
for Best R&B song.
The Recording Academy
also recognized the godfather
of go-go, Chuck Brown, for
his single “Love,” which
features singers Jill Scott,
Ledisi and jazz musician
Marcus Miller, for Best R&B
Performance by a Duo or
Group with Vocals. This is
the frst Grammy nod for the
District’s 74-year-old musical
ambassador.
All three stars enjoyed
stellar success in 2010
– particularly Brown –
who made a nationwide
appearance with the Roots
on “Late Night with Jimmy
Fallon,” released a three-
disc album We Got This and
had his breakout hit “Bustin
Loose” featured in a TV
commercial.
Meanwhile, this is
DeVaughn’s second Grammy
stint. In 2008, the Recording
Academy recognized the
Newark, N.J.-born, Prince
George’s County, Md.-
raised singer for his popular
hit “Woman.”
Also sending a powerful
message through music
is Malachi, whose genre-
blending songs frequently
serve as a rally call for women
in the arts. She is founder of
Smart Chicks, a philanthropic
organization
which seeks
to develop
visibility and
leadership
opportunities
for women
in the arts
community.
The
53rd Annual
Grammy
Awards will be
held on Feb. 13
in Los Angeles
at the Staples Center and will
air live on CBS. For more
information and a full listing
of the 2011 nominees, visit
grammy.com.
Local Stars Among 2011 Grammy Nominees
Chuck Brown welcomes frst nod at 74
Carolyn Malachi, Chuck Brown and Raheem DeVaughn
have been nominated for Grammys.
By Kam Williams
Special to the AFRO
Dulé Hill stars as Burton ‘Gus’ Guster on the USA Network
series “Psych,” which airs on Wednesdays at 10 p.m. EST.
Best known for his work as Charlie Young on “The West
Wing,” Hill frst came to prominence as The Kid opposite
Savion Glover and Jeffrey Wright in the Broadway production
of Bring in ‘Da Noise, Bring in ‘Da Funk.
Born to Jennifer Garner and Bertholomu Hillshire in
Orange, N.J., on May 3, 1975, and raised with his elder
brother, Bert, in nearby Sayreville, Dulé began attending
dance school when he was 3 and received his frst break in
1983 as the understudy to Savion Glover in The Tap Dance
Kid on Broadway. He went on to perform the lead role in the
musical’s national tour alongside Harold Nicholas.
In 1999, he joined the cast of the acclaimed NBC series
“The West Wing,” playing the personal aide to the president
(Martin Sheen) and, subsequently, deputy special assistant to
the chief of staff (Allison Janney). During his seven seasons on
the series, Hill garnered an Emmy Award nomination and four
NAACP Image Award nominations for his work.
On the big screen, Hill appeared opposite William H. Macy
in an adaptation of David Mamet’s Edmond, and Andrew
Davis’ The Guardian.
Here, he talks about “Psych,” a lighthearted, crime-solving
series where he plays a private eye whose partner (James
Roday) pretends to be clairvoyant.
KW: Attorney Bernadette Beekman asks: Do you believe
people have psychic powers? Have you ever experienced
anything psychic in real life?
DH: I do believe that there are a few of those rare folks out
there with a sixth sense who really do have psychic powers.
But I think the majority of people who claim to be psychics
are frauds. As for myself, I’ve
never experienced anything
personally, except on one
occasion when I was a kid with
a friend of mine who has passed
away since. He was spending
the night over at my house and
I tried to wake him up because
he was mumbling to himself in
his sleep. I asked him what he
was talking about and he said,
“Oh, man, I had this dream
that your little cousin was here
and bothering me by climbing
on my back.” It turned out that
later that day one of my cousins
did come over and start messing
with him. That was defnitely
strange. But besides that, I
haven’t had any psychic experiences.
KW: I guess Miss Cleo of Psychic Friends Network
infomercial fame ruined it for real psychics once she was
exposed as a fraud.
DH: Yeah, any Jamaican could’ve told you from the frst
time they saw the commercial that she was a fake, because her
accent was terrible. [Laughs]
KW: Children’s book author Irene Smalls asks: Has your
role on “Psych” evolved, and how do you see it evolving
further?
DH: The role has defnitely evolved since the pilot season.
Steve Franks had always promised that it was going to expand.
If you compare the frst few episodes from the frst season
to recent ones, you’ll see that the quality of Shawn and Gus’
interaction is richer, and that Gus stands up for himself a little
more. It’s a fuller friendship at this point. As for where the
development of my character is headed, I can’t say. But I’d
really like to see Gus date more. He doesn’t necessarily have
to succeed at dating, but just step out there, especially now that
Shawn and Juliet’s relationship is really kicking off. Gus has
to start asking, ‘What am I going to do with my life?’
KW: Nick also asks: How much would you say you’re like
your character, Gus?
DH: I don’t think I’m like Gus at all, really. I don’t
store lots of trivia in my brain. He knows something about
everything, like all these random facts about the Eighties.
I think I’m not as hyped as Gus is. I’m smoother and more
laidback. I do like to have fun and to play games; otherwise, I
don’t think I’m too much like him.
KW: Editor/legist Patricia Turnier says: Tap dance was
very popular in the past with people like Fred Astaire, Gene
Kelly and the Nicholas Brothers…As an expert in tap dance,
what would you say needs to be done to put this genre of art
back on the map?
DH: That’s an excellent question, although I wouldn’t
call myself an expert tap dancer. [Laughs] Something I’m
constantly turning over in my head is a way of getting tap back
into the public eye. I tried to take some baby steps by doing a
tap episode on “Psych” this year. But I don’t think it’s going
to be an overnight revival. It’s probably going to be something
that starts small and builds into a multi-faceted groundswell.
It might have to begin on the theater side, on the stage, before
working its way to television more widely. The Internet can
play a big role, too, in educating the masses as a whole about
what really good tap dancing is.
‘Psych-ing’ Out Dulé
Courtesy Photo
Dulé Hill
Reader’s Corner on afro.com
Visit afro.com for more on Dulé Hill.
WELCOME TO DR.
MARTIN LUTHER KING
JR. DAY
Hello, hello everyone. I
just arrived home from my
vacation. It was truly out of
sight. New Year’s Eve was
awesome in Las Vegas. I wish
you could have been there. I
will show pictures in my next
column. I will be going into
St. Agnes Hospital for major
surgery on Jan. 12, at 6:45
a.m. Please keep me in your
prayers.
The Kings Landing
Women’s Service Club is
hosting its “36th Annual
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Memorial Breakfast” to be
held on Jan. 17, at Martin’s
West in Woodlawn from 8 to
10 a.m. The event is the oldest
of its kind on the East Coast
and was founded over three
decades ago to celebrate the
life and teachings of Dr. King.
For more information, tickets
and contributions, please call
410-663-3199.

Speaking of
Martin Luther King Jr.
celebrations, Baltimore City
commemorates the legacy
of King on Jan. 17 at noon
with a parade. On the national
holiday, local bands, civic
and community
organizations
and schools pay
homage to the
civil rights leader
at the 11th annual
Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. Parade.
The parade will
step off at Martin
Luther King Jr.
Boulevard and
Eutaw Street
and travels
south on Martin
Luther King Jr.
Boulevard.
Because
my column is
bi-weekly, I
don’t want to
miss telling you about the
holiday and the birthday of
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.,
which is a federal holiday.
It is observed on the third
Monday in January each
year and reminds us to stop
the violence. It is a time
to remember his fght for
freedom, equality and dignity
of all races and people.

Get your shouting shoes
on and check out the 2011
Gospel Celebration on Jan. 16
at the New Life Fellowship
Church of Christ at 559
Robert St., in Baltimore at 4
p.m. The featured performers
are: “The Wings of Praise”,
The New Might Wonders”,
“The Ebony Gospel Singers”,
“The Shepards Voices”,
“Christioneers”, “Gospel
Jewels”, “Devine” and “Eddie
& The Family Connection”.
The emcee is Robert Wilson.
For more information and
tickets, call 443-545-8536.

Iota Phi Lambda Sorority
honored Maryland educators
last year. For several years,
the ladies of the Iota Phi
Lambda Sorority, Kappa
chapter, have honored
outstanding educators who
change the lives of their
students through courage,
compassion and commitment.
The ultimate priority of
Iota Phi Lambda Sorority
is a quality education for
all students. The sorority
embodies the philosophy
that education is a self-
enlightening process which
is an important component of
life. Through the years, the
members of Iota Phi Lambda
Sorority have supported and
sponsored quality educational
initiatives that promote
education as a key factor for
a student’s overall quality of
life. The sorority members
understand that a quality
education is paramount to the
nurturing and development of
a student’s value and virtues.

Enjoy the rest of the week.
If you need me, call me at
410-833-9474 or send your
press releases, fyers, letters,
photos etc. to rosapryor@
aol.com or fax it to 410-517-
0447. UNTIL THE NEXT
TIME, I’M MUSICALLY
YOURS.
Courtesy
Photos
By Rosa
Pryor
Maryland Congressman Elijah E.
Cummings, Dist.-7, was the keynote
speaker at the “Apple for the Teacher”
luncheon given by the Iota Phi Lambda
Sorority. Also pictured is national
Iota Phi Lambda Sorority President
Dr. Doris Browning Austin (right) and
Kappa chapter President Nona Diggs.
Dr. Martin Luther King and Coretta Scott King visited
Baltimore in the early 1960s. They were hosted by the
Rev. Logan Kearse.
B4 The Afro-American, January 8, 2011 - January 14, 2011
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GNO BW (5.68x5).indd 1 12/20/10 5:34 PM
Community
By Bobby Marvin
Special to the AFRO
From the pages of Patricia J. McKissack’s brilliantly
animated children’s book Mirandy and Brother Wind to Glen
Echo, Md.’s storied Adventure Theatre, Mirandy – the bright-
eyed, cocoa-hued protagonist – has found a place in young
school children’s heart nationwide.
McKissack’s 1997 work imbues fantasy and rich African-
American cultural references amid the backdrop of a small
southern town’s cakewalk jubilee, a celebratory dance
competition. Mirandy needs a dance partner, but her fellow
townspeople encourage her to “capture the wind,” a concept
that puzzles the spry girl.
But Grandmother Beasley’s sage words help Mirandy
understand Brother Wind’s power. “Can’t nobody put shackles
on Brother Wind, chile. He be special. He be free.”
It was the rich Black vernacular and other cultural elements
that frst attracted Michael J. Bobbitt, artistic director of
Adventure Theatre and the production’s playwright, to the book
and encouraged him to craft a musical based on Mirandy’s
plight. Together with music and lyrical director John L.
Cornelius and director Jennifer Nelson, Bobbitt has developed
an engaging stage production he hopes will encourage more
African-Americans to become theatergoers.
AFRO: What was it about this story that caught your
attention?
Michael J. Bobbitt: I actually was just sort of roaming
around the Barnes & Noble in Bethesda with my son, and I just
sort of walked over to the children’s book section …started
thumbing through it. Then I saw the title Mirandy and Brother
Wind and I thought, well it must be an African-American book
and I pulled the book off the shelf and saw a beautiful picture
of this young, sassy looking girl and up in the sky behind her
was a picture of the wind, who was dressed in a top hat. And
I thought, ‘Wow, this must have some good fantasy or fction
about it.’ I looked on the back and it’s about the story of a little
girl who wants to win the annual cakewalk, so it immediately
had culture, music, dance and a fantasy element. And I think all
of those things make for great musicals.
AFRO: What is the process of creating a stage play out of a
children’s book?
MJB: My [fellow] writer and I worked for about two years
on the script and actually a lot in the last year. [We were] just
looking at the story, thinking how can we make this come to
life on stage. I mean luckily, most of the characters are human
like characters. There’s dancing and music in the story. It
wasn’t hard to fnd where the songs and such were.
AFRO: What resonated with you the most about this story?
MJB: I think it’s more that these experiences they
(characters in the book) had were stooped in the culture and
they weren’t about race. They weren’t about Black versus
White or the White man keeping us down. It was just part of
their everyday [lives].
AFRO: This production appeals to an African-American
audience, but what do you think can be done to engage more
African Americans to become theatergoers?
MJB: Well I think there needs to be more African-American
work produced and I think there’s lots of different kinds of
African-American plays. And one of my goals with “Mirandy”
is to do something that is more traditional musical theatre that
stretches the audience’s ear. But I think what we have to do is
encourage each other to go to the theater.
“Mirandy and Brother Wind” runs Jan. 21-Feb. 13
at Adventure Theater and Feb. 25-March 13 at The Atlas
Performing Arts Center. For tickets and more information, log
onto http://adventuretheatre.tix.com and call (301) 634-2270
for Glen Echo, Md. showing; and www.atlasarts.org/tickets,
(202) 399-7993 for Washington, D.C. showing.
Kristin Gray contributed to this article.
Children’s Musical Teaches Important Life Lessons
‘Mirandy and Brother Wind’ comes to Adventure Theatre
Courtesy Image
Four Hollywood stars, LeVar Burton, Tyne Daly, David
Alan Grier and Pam Grier, will join headliner Sharon Stone
for “Hollywood on the Shore,” the 2011 University of
Maryland Eastern Shore Gala. “We are elated to be able to
bring such a wonderful, well-known group of celebrities to
be among our guests,” said Veronique Diriker, director of
development and event coordinator, in a prepared statement.
Burton, 53, is an actor, director, producer and author
whose career has spanned some 30 years. He portrayed
Kunta Kinte in the 1977 award-winning television miniseries
“Roots,” based on the novel by Alex Haley. Burton is also
known for his role as Geordi La Forge on the television
series “Star Trek: The Next Generation.” He won 13
Emmy Awards and fve NAACP awards as host of “Reading
Rainbow,” one of PBS’ longest running children’s series.
David
Alan Grier,
54, began his
career in drama.
He worked
alongside Denzel
Washington in
the Academy
Award
nominated
dramatic flm,
A Soldier’s
Story. He is best
known for his
many characters
in the Emmy
Award-winning
TV comedy
series “In
Living Color.”
In comedic
roles, he also
appeared on flm
in Boomerang,
Blankman, In the
Army Now and
Jumanji. He is
also a successful
stand-up comedian and hosted the Comedy Central series
“Premium Blend.” On stage, Grier was nominated for a Tony
Award for Best Featured Actor in a Musical and won the
Theatre World Award for ‘The First.”
Daly, an outspoken feminist on and off the screen, is
best known for portraying the gutsy detective, Mary Beth
Lacey, in the TV series “Cagney and Lacey.” She and
her co-star Sharon Gless won the Emmy Award for Best
Lead Actress in a Drama for six straight years—a record
unmatched in any major category by a television show.
She also won an Emmy for the American drama TV series
“Christy,” which was based on the novel by Catherine
Marshall. From 1999-2005, Daly, 64, played the character
Maxine Gray, the social-worker mother of the show’s title
character, on “Judging Amy.”
Pam Grier, 61, is celebrating her 40th year as an entertainer
on the big and small screens. She is one of the few African-
American actresses to receive a Golden Globe nomination for
Best Actress for the crime flm Jackie Brown. On flm, she
played character roles in “Fort Apache the Bronx,” “Something
Wicked this Way Comes,” and “Above the Law.”

For more information or to purchase a ticket, contact
Diriker at 410-651-8142 or by e-mailing vdiriker@umes.
edu. Tickets are also on sale for the March 5 fundraising
event, which takes place at 6 p.m. in the university’s Student
Services Center.
UMES Gala Celebrity Line-
up Adds Four More Stars
Courtesy Photo
Actor and producer LeVar Burton
is among the attendees slated to
appear at the University of Maryland
Eastern Shore’s upcoming gala.
Gov. Martin O’Malley
and Baltimore Mayor
Stephanie Rawlings-Blake
joined the Maryland state fre
marshal, the president of the
Professional Fire Fighters
of Maryland, members
of the Maryland State
Firemen’s Association, and
frefghters from throughout
the state to urge safety for all
Marylanders during the winter
months.
Cold seasons often carry
with them fre hazards in
the home, including holiday
decorations and unsafe home
heating. Generators and other
appliances can also cause
carbon monoxide poisoning if
unmonitored. O’Malley and
Rawlings-Blake touted state
and city programs that can
help Maryland families get
the detectors they need, and
assistance with energy bills
during the cold weather.
“Protecting the public’s
safety is the most solemn
obligation we have as public
servants,” said O’Malley.
“That includes protecting
families from the fre hazards
that typically come with the
holidays, and ensuring that
homes and businesses are
equipped with the proper
detection equipment to keep
every Marylander safe. There
is no such thing as a spare
Marylander, and protecting
our most vulnerable citizens is
among our highest priorities.”
Statewide, there have
been 69 fre deaths in 2010,
a slight decline from the
comparable period last year.
Gov. O’Malley put particular
emphasis on energy assistance
programs the state provides,
encouraging citizens to take
advantage of these programs
rather than attempting unsafe
home heating techniques.
Home energy assistance
information can be found at
problemsolver.maryland.gov.
“I want to thank Governor
O’Malley and the State
Fire Marshall’s offce
for their efforts to keep
Baltimore City residents
safe this winter,” said Mayor
Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.
“In Baltimore, fre safety is
a priority. That is why we
reduced rotating closures, and
increased funding for smoke
alarms with longer-lasting
lithium batteries that are
available to any resident who
needs one.”
Baltimore City residents
can apply for free smoke
detectors from the Baltimore
City Fire Department.
Firefghters from throughout
Maryland joined the governor
and Mayor at today’s event to
urge safety for all Maryland
families. The event took place
at the Herman Williams, Jr.
Fire Station in Baltimore City.
“Make sure to test all of
the smoke alarms in your
home! Smoke alarms are
one of the most effective
life saving safety tools in
preventing injury or death
from fre,” stated State Fire
Marshal William E. Barnard.
“Every Marylander needs to
take personal responsibility
to ensure their smoke alarms
operate properly in the event a
fre occurs in their home.”
Heating Safety
• Keep anything that can
burn at least 3 feet away from
heating equipment.
• Have a 3-foot “kid-free
zone” around open fres and
space heaters.
• Never use your oven to
heat your home.
• Have a qualifed
professional install stationary
space heating equipment,
water heaters or central
heating equipment according
to the local codes and
manufacture’s instructions.
• Have heating equipment
and chimneys cleaned and
inspected every year by a
qualifed professional.
• Turn portable heaters
off when leaving the room or
going to bed.
• Always use the right
kind of fuel, specifed by the
manufacturer, for fuel burning
space heaters.
• Make sure the freplace
has a sturdy screen to stop
sparks from fying into the
room. Ashes should be cool
before putting them in a metal
container. Keep the container
a safe distance away from
your home.
• Test smoke alarms
monthly.
Protect Yourself and
Your Family from CO
Poisoning
• Install at least one
carbon monoxide alarm with
an audible warning signal
near the sleeping areas and
outside individual bedrooms.
Make sure the alarm has been
evaluated by a nationally
recognized laboratory, such
as Underwriters Laboratories
(UL). Carbon monoxide
alarms measure levels of CO
over time and are designed
to sound an alarm before
an average, healthy adult
would experience symptoms.
It is very possible that you
may not be experiencing
symptoms when you hear the
alarm. This does not mean
that CO is not present.
• Have a qualifed
professional check all fuel
burning appliances, furnaces,
venting and chimney systems
at least once a year.
• Never use your range or
oven to help heat your home
and never use a charcoal grill
or hibachi in your home or
garage.
• Never keep a car running
in a garage. Even if the
garage doors are open, normal
circulation will not provide
enough fresh air to reliably
prevent a dangerous buildup
of CO.
• When purchasing
an existing home, have a
qualifed technician evaluate
the integrity of the heating
and cooking systems, as well
as the sealed spaces between
the garage and house.
The presence of a carbon
monoxide alarm in your home
can save your life in the event
of CO buildup.
State Ofcials Warn of Carbon Monoxide Dangers
“Protecting the public’s safety is the
most solemn obligation we have as
public servants.”
January 8, 2011 - January 14, 2011, The Afro-American B5
More Sports onafro.com
By Stephen D. Riley
AFRO Staf Writer
And now it begins. For the Washington
Redskins, there will be no postseason play
this year—something that became palpably
evident around late October. Instead, the
team will return to where it does most of
its usual winning: the offseason. Summer
success is quite common in the District and
after another distasteful campaign, fans
will be looking for something on which to
pin their hopes. But with two high-priced
professionals seemingly on their way out
the door in Donovan McNabb and Albert
Haynesworth, it’ll be interesting to see
if the club sticks with its money mantra
and goes free spending again. Or, they
could do it the “right way” and focus their
rebuilding effort towards the NFL Draft.
Without their third- and fourth-round
draft picks (courtesy of last year’s McNabb
trade), Washington doesn’t have the
favorable ammunition to restock their
team with talented youngsters. But the
club does possess a pick in each of the
frst two rounds, something Washington
hasn’t enjoyed since the 2002 draft.
This year’s draft class is loaded full of
promising quarterbacks. With Washington
scheduled to pick 10th overall, the club
should be in line to nab a signal caller of
the future to start their rebuilding process.
The free agent market hasn’t been kind to
the Redskins over the years and the 2009
hiring of former Tampa Bay Buccaneers
general manager Bruce Allen should
hopefully push along a speedy recovery if
the front offce decides to go with a youth
movement.
Allen came from a similar situation
with Tampa, where the team was fooding
out its old veterans and instilling youthful
building blocks. The Buccaneers severed
ties with likely Hall of Famers in Warren
Sapp, Derrick Brooks and Simeon Rice
and even parted ways with coveted coach
Jon Gruden. Yet, a few years later, Tampa
is again back atop the NFC despite missing
the playoffs with a 10-6 record and the
league’s youngest team. The casual NFL
fan probably couldn’t identify one single
name associated with the Buccaneers
but that didn’t stop them from making a
seven-game improvement from their 3-13
season in 2009. Maybe Allen can transfer
some of his magic to an ailing Washington
organization in dire need of a makeover.
Several players could be on the
chopping block this summer including
popular veteran tailback Clinton Portis for
starters. Fans will know soon enough about
Washington’s revitalization plans over the
next few months. When the Washington
Redskins start releasing big time names,
it’s clear a change in philosophy has arisen.
The pay-plug-and-play approach hasn’t
gotten the team anywhere and it’s past
due time to give the draft a try. Ironically,
Washington’s 6-10 mark this year was an
improvement over the previous season’s
misery but if the team elects to go with a
youth movement like most expect, things
will probably get worse before they get
better. But at least the team will be walking
in a different direction for a change.
Sports Commentary
For Redskins, Future Begins Now
By Perry Green
AFRO Sports Editor
The Baltimore Ravens have one goal in
mind as they prepare for a playoffs matchup
against the Kansas City Chiefs on Jan. 9 and
that’s win a Super Bowl championship. But
even if the Ravens are successful throughout
the playoffs, they won’t be the only
champions from Baltimore City.
The Forest Park Black Hawks Little
League Football 10-and-under club of West
Baltimore captured the 2010 AYF Under
Armour National Championship after beating
the Naperville Gators of Illinois in the title
game on Dec. 4 in Orlando, Fla.
The Black Hawks earned their way
to the championship by winning the
Maryland state title in early November, then
capturing the regional championship held
in Charlotte, N.C., on Nov. 19. When they
came to Orlando to compete in the national
championship playoffs, they had to beat
teams from California, New York and other
various states around the U.S. before fnally
reaching the title game.
“I’m so proud of these kids because they
worked hard for this,” Forest Park Vice
President Curtis Covington said. “We’re
pretty tough on our kids, but that’s because
we know their full potential is limitless. We
coach them up to hold mind over matter and
I think that really gives them an edge during
tough situations.”
The Forest Park players knew it was going
to be tough to win the national championship
against Naperville; they had lost to the
Illinois based team back during the summer
in a youth football jamboree that Forest Park
put together in Canton, Ohio, home of the Pro
Football Hall of Fame.
“They were a little nervous because we
lost to this same team back in August, but I
told them that was just an exhibition game
for fun,” Covington said. “So we took one
loss for the year, but that was the last loss
we would see because we went on to win 18
straight games and revenge our loss in the
title game.”
Covington, who also coached the team
that played in the championship, said this
accomplishment is major because it’s another
positive occurrence coming out of Baltimore
that the media can talk about.
“You always hear about the negative
things that youths do in our community, but
it’s a lot of good stuff that we got going on
and it never gets talked about,” Covington
said. “So when I see my kids making the
press for their high productivity, that means
the world to me and I’m just so proud of
them.”
Forest Park Black Hawks Claim
Youth National Football
Championship
Courtesy Photo/Forest Park Little League
The Forest Park Little League football team beat the Naperville Gators of Illinois to
claim the 2010 AYF Under Armour National Title.
By Donal Ware
Special to the AFRO
Fuquay-Varina, N.C. – Hampton
University and Winston-Salem State
University top the Boxtorow.com HBCU
Division I basketball top-fve and Division II/
NAIA top-10 power ranking polls released on
Jan. 3.
Hampton has gotten off to a hot 11-3
start to the season, including at one point
reeling off seven straight wins. They are also
1-0 in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference
(MEAC). Morgan State, Tennessee State,
Jackson State and North Carolina A&T round
out the rest of the top fve.
In the Division II/NAIA top-10 poll,
Winston-Salem State Rams is the only
undefeated team and is off to a fast 6-0
start, returning to the Central Interscholastic
Athletic Association (CIAA) this year after
fve years as an independent Division I
program. Xavier (La.) lost its last game
to Dakota Wesleyan, 61-58, in the Miami
Gardens Classic, but currently ranks No. 2
with 13-1 on the season. Shaw (7-2) has won
fve of its last six and sits at No. 3 followed
by Bowie State at No. 4 and Tougaloo at No.
5. Teams ranked 6-10 are Kentucky State,
Texas College, Elizabeth City State, West
Virginia State and Clafin, respectively.
See the full top-10 power ranking lists below:
Boxtorow.com Top 5 HBCU Division I
Basketball Poll
School/ Wins-Losses
1. Hampton/ 11-3
2. Morgan State/ 4-6
3. Tennessee State/ 6-8
4. Jackson State/ 4-8
5. North Carolina A&T/ 5-8
Others: Bethune-Cookman (5-8), Delaware
State (4-7), North Carolina Central (4-6).
Boxtorow.com Top 10 HBCU Division II/
NAIA Basketball Poll
School/ Wins-Losses
1. Winston-Salem State/ 6-0
2. Xavier (La.)/ 13-1
3. Shaw/ 7-2
4. Bowie State/ 5-2
5. Tougaloo/10-3
6. Kentucky State/ 4-1
7. Texas College/ 6-4
8. Elizabeth City State/ 6-2
9. West Virginia State/ 6-4
10. Clafin/ 6-4
Others: Central State (8-5), Livingstone
(4-2).
The Boxtorow.com basketball poll is
presented by DWCommunications, LLC
parent company of FROM THE PRESS BOX
TO PRESS ROW and boxtorow.com. FROM
THE PRESS BOX TO PRESS ROW is the
nationally syndicated radio sports talk show
which places major emphasis on HBCU
Sports.
Hampton, Winston-Salem
State Tops in HBCU
Basketball Power Rankings
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B6 The Afro-American, January 8, 2011 - January 14, 2011
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MISC./TRAINING
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OPPORTUNITY
ANTIQUES &
COLLECTIBLES
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR
BALTIMORE CITY
Case Number
24C09003320/FR
Cypress Properties
Incorporated
c/o Allen C
Tochterman, Esquire
11411 Cedar Lane
Kingsville, Maryland
21087
Plaintiff
v.
EULA HINTON
Tenants of the Subject
Property
The Mayor and City
Council of Baltimore,
Maryland,
And all Persons having
or claiming to have
An interest in the
property listed below;
Their respective heirs,
devisees, executors,
administrators, grantees,
assigns, or successors
in right title and interest
Defendants
AMENDED
ORDER OF
PUBLICATION
The obj ect of t hi s
proceeding is to secure
the foreclosure of all
rights of redemption in
the property in the City
of Baltimore, sold by the
Collector of Taxes for the
City of Baltimore and the
State of Maryland to the
Plaintiff in this proceed-
ing:
Ward 08, Section 04,
Block 1101, Lot 048
Known as: 1824 North
Bond Street, Bal-
timore, Maryland
Lot Size: 15x85
The Complaint states,
among other things, that
the amount necessary
for redemption has not
been paid.
It is thereupon this 13th
day of December, 2010
by the Circuit Court of
Baltimore City,
ORDERED, that notice
be given by the insertion
of a coy of this order in
THE AFRO AMERICAN,
a newspaper of general
circulation in the City of
Baltimore once a week
for three (3) successive
weeks, warning all per-
sons interested in the
property to appear in this
Court by the 11th day of
February, 2011 and re-
deem the subject prop-
erty and answer the
Complaint or thereafter a
final judgment will be en-
tered foreclosing all
rights of redemption in
the property, and vesting
in the Plaintiff title to the
property, free and clear
of all encumbrances.
Frank M.Conaway, Clerk
TRUE COPY TEST
Yolanda A. Tanner
JUDGE, CIRCUIT
COURT FOR
BALTIMORE CITY
1/7, 1/14, 1/21
Baltimore City Public Schools.
INVITATION FOR BIDS:
BCS-11045
Provide Food Service Equipment Services
at Various Baltimore City Public Schools.
The Baltimore City Board of School Commis-
sioners is inviting interested companies to
submit bids to: BCS-11045.
In order to participate, interested bidders
need to visit eMaryland Marketplace website
at https://ebidmarketplace.com
Solicitation BCS-11045 will be available for
review commencing Friday, January 7,
2011.
The Bid Due Date is Thursday, February
10, 2011,at 11:00 a.m. local time. No bids
will be acceptedafter that time. Any questions
related to this solicitation should be directed
to the Buyer.
Invitation to Bid for DBE Firms
Cherry Hill Construction Inc, an EEO Em-
ployer, is currently soliciting cost proposals
from Qualified and MDOT Certified MBE/
WBE subcontractors / vendors, both Union
and Non-Union affiliated, for the MD SHA
Project; Deck Rehab for Bridge No.1513700
on I-495 over NW Branch (Contract#
MO2415180) Bid Date: January 13th 2011.
Bid Documents are available upon request.
For further information concerning subcon-
tracting and/or purchasing opportunities,
please contact Tim Gilmore at Tgilmore@
chconstr.com or (410)799-2362. Come join
our Team!
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
FIRE BOAT REFURBISHING SERVICES
BID NO. T1YN1740
Seeking MBE/WBE/DSBE contractors to bid
on the drydocking and repairs of fireboats.
The major items include cleaning and gas
freeing of tanks, sandblast/coatings , elec-
trical service, marine chemist service, valve
repair, audiogaging, welding service.
Location: On board a fireboat in the Port of
Baltimore.
Bids due: January 28th, 2011.
Any offerors should contact Cary Lynch for
the full specification and insurance
requirements:
Cary Lynch
The General Ship Repair Corporation
(410)752-7620
St. Mary¬s County Metropolitan Commission
Invitation for Bids
Wastewater Lab Digestion System
Contract #11-08-F
The St. Mary's County Metropolitan Commission is currently soliciting Bids for
the purchase of a programmable block digestion system, cooling stand and
glassware. Delivery, training and manufacturer's warranties must be included in
the unit Bid price.
One (1) original and one (1) copy of the sealed Bid should be addressed to Joy
Hamlet Purchasing Agent, and marked ∫SEALED BID FOR ∫WASTEWATER
LAB DIGESTION SYSTEM, CONTRACT #1108-F∫. The Bids will be received
at tie office of the Commission, at 43990 commerce Avenue, Hollywood, Maryland
20636, until 3 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on January 25, 2011 and then and
there the Bids will be publicly opened and read.
Bid packages are available for review at the main office of the Commission
between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. and on the Commission website
at www.metcom.org. Inquiries concerning proposal documents should be directed
to Joy Hamlet, Purchasing Agent at 301-373-4733, Extension 222 or at jhamlet@
metcom.org.
The St. Mary's Metropolitan Commission reserves the right to reject any or all
proposals and to waive any informality in the proposals submitted when such
waiver is in the best interest of the Commission.
CITY OF BALTIMORE
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS
BUREAU OF WATER AND WASTEWATER
NOTICE OF LETTING
Sealed Bids or Proposals, in duplicate addressed to the Board of
Estimates of the Mayor and City Council of Baltimore and marked for
Water Contract 1215-Sidewalk Restorations will be received at the
Office of the Comptroller, Room 204, City Hall, Baltimore, Maryland until
11:00 A.M. on Wednesday, February 16, 2011. Positively no bids will
be received after 11:00 A.M. Bids will be publicly opened by the Board
of Estimates in Room 215, City Hall at Noon.
The Contract Documents may be examined, without charge, at the
Department of Public Works Service Center located on the first floor of
the Abel Wolman Municipal Building, 200 N. Holliday Street, Baltimore,
Maryland 21202 as of Friday, January 7, 2011 and copies may be
purchased for a non-refundable cost of $50.00.
Conditions and requirements of the Bid are found in the bid
package.
All contractors bidding on this Contract must first be prequalified by the
City of Baltimore Contractors Qualification Committee. Interested parties
should call 410-396-6883 or contact the Committee at 751 Eastern
Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21202. If a bid is submitted by a joint
venture (∫JV∫), then in that event, the document that established
the JV shall be submitted with the bid for verification purposes.
The Prequalification Category required for bidding on this project is
D02620 Curbs, Gutters, and SidewalksCost Qualification Range for
this work shall be $1,000,000.00 to $2,000,000.00
A ∫Pre-Bidding Information∫ session will be conducted at 3rd Floor
Conference Room of the Bureau of Water & Wastewater, Abel
Wolman Municipal Building on January 20, 2011 at 10:00 A.M.
Principal Items of work for this project are:
Consist of restoration of various size and types of concrete and
masonry sidewalks, replacement of concrete curb, combination
curb and gutter, and monolithic medians at various locations in
Baltimore City.
The MBE goal is 17%
The WBE goal is 2%
WATER CONTRACT 1215
APPROVED:
Bernice H. Taylor
Clerk, Board of Estimates
APPROVED:
Alfred H. Foxx
Director of Public Works
BALTIMORE COUNTY, MARYLAND
INVITATION FOR BIDS
CONTRACT NO. 10137 SX0
IROQUOIS SEWAGE PUMPING STATION IMPROVEMENTS-
CONSENT DECREE
7611 IROQUOIS AVENUE, EDGEMERE, MD 21219
EDGEMERE - DISTRICT 15 c 7
CONTRACT COST GROUP ∫D∫ ($1,000,000 to $2,500,000)
WORK CLASSIFICATION:
G-2 WITH G-3 PRE-QUALIFIED SUBCONTRACTORS
BID DATE: THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 AT 10:30 A.M.
LOCAL TIME
On or after JANUARY 10, 2011, the above contract documents (See
Note *) may be inspected and purchased from the Division of
Construction Contracts Administration, Department of Public
Works, Room 300B, County Office Building (COB), 111 W.
Chesapeake Avenue, Towson, MD 21204, upon receipt of payment
of $20.00 (TWENTY DOLLARS) per contract, and if sent by U.S. mail
with an additional $10.00 (TEN Dollars) postage and handling fee. All
checks should be made payable to BALTIMORE COUNTY MD. NO
REFUNDS will be made to anyone. Direct any questions to
410-887-3531. Bidders obtaining documents from another source other
than Baltimore County WILL NOT be allowed to submit proposals to
Baltimore County.
*Note: Contract Documents will consist of One (1) Paper Copy
Proposal Book and One (1) Compact Disk (CD) with all of the
required drawings. The CD will be in PDF format. Contractors and
Sub-Contractors can purchase paper copies of the drawings from
Baltimore County - OIT - Central Printing located in the Basement
of the COB, RM G-9 for $1.50 a copy.
The proposed work consists of:
Improvements to the existing wastewater pumping station. See
specifications for description of work.
A pre-bid meeting will be held on Tuesday, January 18, 2011 at 9:00
a.m. local time at the station. A second site visit will be held on Tuesday,
January 25, 2011 at 9.00 a.m. at the station. A third site visit will be
held on Tuesday, February 8, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. at the station. This will
be the last chance to visit the station. No questions will be answered at
this time.
THE PROJECT IS SUBJECT TO A MINORITY BUSINESS ENTER-
PRISE UTILIZATION GOAL AND FEMALE CONTRACTORS UTILIZA-
TION GOALS. THESE GOAL REQUIREMENTS ARE MORE FULLY
EXPLAINED IN THE SPECIFICATIONS. THE MBE/WBE FORMS IN
THE PROPOSAL BOOKLET MUST BE COMPLETED AND SUBMITTED
AT THE TIME OF BID OPENING.
Sealed proposals (the entire book) addressed to Baltimore County,
Maryland for this contract will be received in the Baltimore County
Purchasing Division, Room 148, Old Courthouse, 400 Washington
Avenue, Towson, MD 21204, until the time specified on the contract at
which time they will be publicly opened and read.
ONLY CONTRACTORS WHO HAVE BEEN PREQUALIFIED BY BAL-
TIMORE COUNTY AT LEAST TEN (10) DAYS PRIOR TO THE OPEN-
ING OF BIDS WILL BE ALLOWED TO SUBMIT PROPOSALS.
All proposals must be accompanied by a Bid Bond, on the approved
form provided, in the amount as set forth in the ∫Information for Bidders∫.
No other form of proposal guaranty is acceptable.
The Purchasing Agent reserves the right to reject any or all proposals
or bids or parts of bids and to waive technicalities as may be deemed
best for the interest of the County.
Keith Dorsey, Director
Office of Budget & Finance
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To Advertise
call
410-554-8200
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St. Mary’s County Metropolitan Commission
Invitation for Bids
Wastewater Lab Digestion System
Contract #11-08-F
“SEALED BID FOR “WASTEWATER
#1108-F.”
“D” ($1,000,000 to $2,500,000
A “Pre-Bidding Information”
(“JV”)
January 8, 2011 - January 14, 2011, The Afro-American B7
CAREER CORNER
YOU KNOW
YOU’RE IN THE
KNOW...
WHEN YOU READ
THE AFRO
Strictly Personal
Pen Pals
Truthful man seeking spiritual pen pals. Womb my emana-
tion. Law is unifcation. Breath, knowledge and conscious-
ness! William Piggie, P.O. Box 565, Pittsboro, N.C. 27312
---
Lonesome Hearts - Pen Pals
To have a notice published in the Strictly Personal Section,
write the message you want printed in the space below.
Enclose ten dollars ($10.00), check or money order for 25
words. NO CASH PLEASE. Additional words will cost 50
cents each.
To answer a Lonesome Heart notice, enclose a check or mon-
ey order for $2.00 for each letter you wish to have forwarded.
NO CASH PLEASE. Be sure to include the fox number of
the person you wish to contact.
All letters, queries and notices should be sent to:
STRICTLY PERSONAL
2519 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21218
To
Advertise
call
410-4554-8200
District of Columbia Bureau Chief
This person will be responsible for reporting on local, national
and international newsworthy events, serving as the departmental
personnel manager and monitoring the progress of articles in process
and upcoming editions of the newspaper.
This person will also be responsible for maintaining several
blogs, producing and anchoring webcasts, features writer for
supplemental publications, copyediting and proofreading, news-
room administration, reviewing the public e-mail inbox, helping to
coordinate and addressing tour groups on their visits to the company,
coordinating internship program, and representing the company at
public events.
The minimum qualifcations for this position include a bachelors
degree in journalism and three (3) years practical experience.
Annual salary of $52,000. Send all resumes to:

John E. Leister
The AFRO American Newspapers
2519 N. Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21218
e-mail: jleister@afro.com

No telephone calls will be accepted.
BALTIMORE COUNTY, MARYLAND
INVITATION FOR BIDS
CONTRACT NO. 10137 SX0
IROQUOIS SEWAGE PUMPING STATION IMPROVEMENTS-
CONSENT DECREE
7611 IROQUOIS AVENUE, EDGEMERE, MD 21219
EDGEMERE - DISTRICT 15 c 7
CONTRACT COST GROUP ∫D∫ ($1,000,000 to $2,500,000)
WORK CLASSIFICATION:
G-2 WITH G-3 PRE-QUALIFIED SUBCONTRACTORS
BID DATE: THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 AT 10:30 A.M.
LOCAL TIME
On or after JANUARY 10, 2011, the above contract documents (See
Note *) may be inspected and purchased from the Division of
Construction Contracts Administration, Department of Public
Works, Room 300B, County Office Building (COB), 111 W.
Chesapeake Avenue, Towson, MD 21204, upon receipt of payment
of $20.00 (TWENTY DOLLARS) per contract, and if sent by U.S. mail
with an additional $10.00 (TEN Dollars) postage and handling fee. All
checks should be made payable to BALTIMORE COUNTY MD. NO
REFUNDS will be made to anyone. Direct any questions to
410-887-3531. Bidders obtaining documents from another source other
than Baltimore County WILL NOT be allowed to submit proposals to
Baltimore County.
*Note: Contract Documents will consist of One (1) Paper Copy
Proposal Book and One (1) Compact Disk (CD) with all of the
required drawings. The CD will be in PDF format. Contractors and
Sub-Contractors can purchase paper copies of the drawings from
Baltimore County - OIT - Central Printing located in the Basement
of the COB, RM G-9 for $1.50 a copy.
The proposed work consists of:
Improvements to the existing wastewater pumping station. See
specifications for description of work.
A pre-bid meeting will be held on Tuesday, January 18, 2011 at 9:00
a.m. local time at the station. A second site visit will be held on Tuesday,
January 25, 2011 at 9.00 a.m. at the station. A third site visit will be
held on Tuesday, February 8, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. at the station. This will
be the last chance to visit the station. No questions will be answered at
this time.
THE PROJECT IS SUBJECT TO A MINORITY BUSINESS ENTER-
PRISE UTILIZATION GOAL AND FEMALE CONTRACTORS UTILIZA-
TION GOALS. THESE GOAL REQUIREMENTS ARE MORE FULLY
EXPLAINED IN THE SPECIFICATIONS. THE MBE/WBE FORMS IN
THE PROPOSAL BOOKLET MUST BE COMPLETED AND SUBMITTED
AT THE TIME OF BID OPENING.
Sealed proposals (the entire book) addressed to Baltimore County,
Maryland for this contract will be received in the Baltimore County
Purchasing Division, Room 148, Old Courthouse, 400 Washington
Avenue, Towson, MD 21204, until the time specified on the contract at
which time they will be publicly opened and read.
ONLY CONTRACTORS WHO HAVE BEEN PREQUALIFIED BY BAL-
TIMORE COUNTY AT LEAST TEN (10) DAYS PRIOR TO THE OPEN-
ING OF BIDS WILL BE ALLOWED TO SUBMIT PROPOSALS.
All proposals must be accompanied by a Bid Bond, on the approved
form provided, in the amount as set forth in the ∫Information for Bidders∫.
No other form of proposal guaranty is acceptable.
The Purchasing Agent reserves the right to reject any or all proposals
or bids or parts of bids and to waive technicalities as may be deemed
best for the interest of the County.
Keith Dorsey, Director
Office of Budget & Finance
Evidence-Based Health Promotion Programs Coordinator
SAL: $ 19.78 ph/Contractual
P/T professional needed to assist in coordinating the
federal Evidence-Based Health Promotion Programs
(EBHP) grant and related health promotion programs.
Duties include providing technical assistance, training and
monitoring of local EBHP Coordinators, organizing
trainings, updating materials and supporting outreach/
marketing processes to enhance and expand EBHP pro-
gramming throughout the state, reviewing EBHP budgets,
and submitting required grant-related reports. Statewide
travel and occasional evening or weekend hours are
required. Funding terminates 3/31/12. For the official job
announcement and MS-100 application form, visit www.
mdoa.state.md.us. Send MS-100 by January 18, 2011 to:
MDoA, HR, 301 West Preston St., Suite 1007, Baltimore,
MD 21201. EOE
COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR/PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER
CLOSING DATE: JANUARY 31, 2011
The Maryland Public Service Commission seeks a Public Affairs Officer to communicate
information to the media and others regarding functions, activities, and policies of the
Commission. The Public Affairs Officer will speak on the Commission¬s behalf at civic, non-profit,
charitable, and educational organizations and community associations, and compile and
distribute articles or press releases referencing the Commission or any matters relevant to the
Commission¬s functions or pending proceedings. The Public Affairs Officer also will be
responsible for preparing various informational or educational materials on behalf of the
Commission such as press releases, pamphlets, booklets, manuals, scripts, articles and
newsletters.
Excellent oral and written communications skills are required along with the ability to work well
under pressure with a professional attitude.
Note: This is a political special appointment position and serves at the pleasure of the appointing
authority.
Minimum Education and Experience Requirements:
Education: A bachelor¬s degree from an accredited four-year college or university in English,
Communications, Public Relations, Journalism, Speech or Broadcasting.
Experience: A minimum of six years of experience in public information, public relations,
journalism, broadcasting, or other related experience in consumer outreach or education,
publicity or promotional work.
Preferred: Experience with one or more regulatory agencies, public policy organizations, or
public utility companies and a working knowledge of the principles and practices applicable to
the planning, development and implementation of public information programs and methods.
To Apply: Please send cover letter and resume, and writing sample, to the Public Service
Commission, Personnel Office, 6 St. Paul St. Baltimore, MD 21202 or email your resume and
information to jmilles@psc.state.md.us by January 31, 2011.
EOE/ADA Employer
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LEGAL NOTICES
JOB IAIR
1O PROMO1L DIVLRSI1\ IN INDLPLNDLN1 S(lOOLS
Saturday, Iebruary J9, 20JJ
8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Gilman School in Baltimore. MD
Visit ZZZDLPVPGRUJ íor registration íorms
to 1LA(l in a pri·ate. independent school
Registrations must be mailed with resumes
1R ID[HV RU HPDLOV DFFHSWHG
those postmarked bv lebruarv 4
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will be a·ailable íor schools to pre·iew,
SPONSORLD B\:
ASSO(IA1ION Ol INDLPLNDLN1 MAR\LAND S(lOOLS AIMS,
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AIMS · 890 Airport Park Road Ste 103 · Glen Burnie. MD21061
410, ¯61-3¯00OR 301, 858-6311
SUBSCRIPE TODAY!
“Information for Bidders”.
Commissioner’s
Commissioner’s
bachelor’s
B8 The Afro-American, January 8, 2011 - January 8, 2011
Scratch a Million.

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