Thursday, January 6, 2011

DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Homeless man with velvety
voice wins hearts, p 3

2011 Hall of Fame inductees,
p6
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6
Farm 7
Classifieds 8
TV 9
World News 10
Index
Cloudy Friday
with 20 per-
cent chance
of snow; high
in low 20s.
See page 2.
2011: Good time to serve
BY MIKE FORD
mford@delphosherald.com
Now that a new calen-
dar has been posted on the
refrigerator, some may look
ahead with trepidation. The
recession continues, leaving
many out of work while bills
pile up and local charities
scramble to do their best to
help. It’s no coincidence that
the three food/rent and utili-
ties charities in Delphos are
faith-based. This isn’t simply
because Delphos is a large-
ly-religious community; it’s
because spirituality and ser-
vice go hand-in-hand. One
community leader says there-
in lies the secret to making
2011 a banner year despite
the economy: whether one
warms a pew regularly or
rarely.
The Rev. Jacob Gordon
is an associate pastor at St.
John the Evangelist Catholic
Church. He believes every-
one is spiritual but not being
intentional about it can cause
a confusion which makes it
even more difficult to process
unpleasant circumstances.
“Everyone has a soul;
everyone has a spirituality,
even if it’s a spirituality of
avoidance. The human heart
hopes, dreams, aspires and
questions. Whether those
things are revealed to oth-
ers or not, they’re there,” he
said. “In our society, we’re
so keyed in on ‘having’ but
the pope, the Dalai Lama
and others teach us to focus
on ‘being’ — on a way of
being and a way of living.
Somewhere along the line,
we have to ask ourselves if
we’re finding love in it all.
Do we will the good of oth-
ers for their own sake and
do others will our good for
our own sake? Or, are we
caught up in the notion that
only that which is productive
is good?”
Gordon indicated that
serving others as an exten-
sion of loving relationships is
a key to making the most of
the new year. He also thinks
contemplating how one deals
with suffering is the crux of
overcoming the barriers hard-
ship presents.
“The biggest temptation
in our society is to despair
over one thing, such as not
having a job, and it lead to
despairing over other things.
So, how do we make sense
of suffering? What if suffer-
ing purifies my whole view
of life? The age-old question
concerning the nature of evil
is ‘why does God allow suf-
fering?’ The way this is most
often asked is ‘why does God
allow world hunger’?” he
said. “We can come up with
different theological answers
but the suffering remains.
However, when Jesus fed the
5,000 men, plus the women
and children, he gave the
bread and fish to the dis-
ciples to share. That’s where
we come in. We get to par-
ticipate in the divine plan of
redemption by serving each
other. If God just solved the
problem, we wouldn’t need
to act.”
The former United States
Marine believes most people
are more resilient than they
give themselves credit for.
He said this often reinforces
being “stuck,” so the great-
est grace one can receive is
the grace to let go of all that
holds one back. Gordon says
finding inner freedom can be
another key to thriving in
2011.
“More than anything,
freedom is the grace to be
who one is called to be. It
also means I get to do that
which is good and true, ful-
fills me and brings me out
of myself to find myself
through the giving of myself.
There has to be an awaken-
ing through self-donation,”
he said. “Suffering brings it
out and people rally around
the one who is suffering.
When you get out there and
do some kind of service,
it’s a healthy response to
one’s life situation that goes
along with getting help and
letting other people love
you and care for you. Then,
you get into the ‘enterprise
of love.’ So, this is a good
time to look at how we
think about life, what gives
us meaning and how we
care for ourselves and oth-
ers.”
“In our society,
we’re so keyed in
on ‘having’ but
the pope, the Dalai
Lama and others
teach us to focus
on ‘being’ — on a
way of being and
a way of living.
Somewhere along
the line, we have
to ask ourselves
if we’re finding
love in it all.”
— The Rev. Jacob Gordon
Nancy Spencer photo
Heising moves on to Allen County Bee
Jefferson Middle School seventh-grader Halee Heising is headed to the Allen County
Spelling Bee at 10 a.m. Feb. 5 at the OSU-Lima campus. Heising, daughter of Sherry
Glick and Mike Heising, spelled “aggregate” to take first place in the school’s bee this
week. Eighth-grader Alex Haehn is the runner-up and will be an alternate in case
Heising is unable to attend the county bee. Haehn is the son of William and Constance
Haehn.
Radon not on Ohio radar
BY MIKE FORD
mford@delphosherald.com
The United States
Environmental Protection
Agency has identified radon
gas as the leading cause of
lung cancer for non-smokers
in 2010. Therefore, the agen-
cy has designated January as
National Radon Awareness
Month.
Van Wert County
Emergency Management
Director Rick McCoy says
radon is a toxic gas that is
a concern in Western states
where uranium is found.
“Radon is an odorless,
colorless gas that origi-
nates from uranium in the
ground and comes out of
rocks. Different parts of
the country have problems
with it but I’ve never seen
any problem around here
in terms of reports to our
office or cases where the
EPA has come in that I’m
aware of,” he said.
Nonetheless, the EPA
recommends testing because
the gas cannot be seen or
smelled.
“It seeps up from the
ground and normally, if
someone experiences a prob-
lem with it, it may be from a
crack in the foundation, like
in the basement. That’s where
it will settle in. It’s a good
practice to check for radon
because it isn’t something
people do very often; it’s not
on our radar,” he said.
McCoy said some hard-
ware stores may carry test
kits but recommends check-
ing with the EPA for a refer-
ral. He added that some older
smoke detectors included
radon inside them but it’s not
released unless the detector is
taken apart.
Uranium reserves in the
United States associated
with nuclear power were
active in Arizona, Colorado,
New Mexico, South Dakota,
Texas, Utah, Washington and
Wyoming until two decades
ago.
Egypt puts heavy security around churches
BY MAGGIE MICHAEL
The Associated Press
CAIRO — Egyptian
authorities put up a heavy
security cordon early today
around the main Coptic cathe-
dral in Cairo hours before
Christmas Eve Mass, using
bomb-sniffing dogs, metal
detectors and officers to try to
prevent another attack like the
New Year’s suicide bombing
of a church that killed 21
people.
Al-Qaida in Iraq had
threatened Christians in Iraq
and Egypt in the weeks lead-
ing up to the holidays, and
militant websites have even
posted online lists of church-
es in Egypt to target with
their addresses.
Egypt’s Coptic Christian
minority, which makes up 10
percent of Egypt’s 80 million
people, celebrates Christmas
on Jan. 7. Some Christians
have said they will skip
Christmas Eve services for
fear that there will be more
attacks.
Across the country, police
were preventing vehicles
from parking near churches.
They also planned to check
identity cards of those enter-
ing churches and ban people
from bringing in bags and
pursues. Outside the Coptic
cathedral in downtown Cairo,
security officers with walky-
talkies fanned out across the
surrounding streets to keep an
eye out for suspicious activ-
ity.
In the southern province
of Minya, a worker at a
church found a small explo-
sive device packed with nails
and fireworks planted under
the building’s stairs, a secu-
rity official said, speaking
on condition of anonymity
because he was not autho-
rized to brief the media. He
said the device appeared to
have been put there to “test
security measures.”
Several daily newspapers
reported that Egypt’s Interior
Ministry has asked church
officials to prevent crowds
from gathering in front of
churches after Mass. The
request appeared aimed at
avoiding the same sort of tar-
get hit in the Jan. 1 bombing
in Alexandria — worshippers
lingering outside of a church
after a midnight service.
On Wednesday, the minis-
try published a picture of an
unidentified man whose head
was found at the site of the
Alexandria attack. A security
official said that church offi-
cials could not identify the
man, and presumed that he
might be the attacker.
But six days after the
bombing, Egyptian authori-
ties appear to have made little
headway in their investiga-
tion. The perceived lack of
progress has fanned fears
among many Christians of
possible repeat attacks.
Those concerns have
grown since several Coptic
websites circulated state-
ments allegedly posted on
Islamic militant websites
listing more than 40 other
churches in Egypt and abroad
as possible targets.
The bombing of the
Alexandria church, the worst
act of sectarian violence in
Egypt in a decade, touched
off days of demonstrations
and riots by the Christians
blaming the government for
encouraging discrimination
and prejudice and not doing
enough to protect them.
In a gesture of solidar-
ity with the country’s Coptic
Christian minority, Egyptian
activists have called on
Muslims to form human
shields in front of the church-
es on Christmas Eve.
But in Alexandria, those
still grieving the loss of fam-
ily members killed in the Jan.
1 attack took little solace
from the gesture.
“If our brothers, the
Muslims, come today we
will not say ’no’ ... but
why today?” said Roseanne
Fawzy, whose father was
killed in the church bombing.
“If they think that this is to
protect us, no, we don’t need
protection. The church is pro-
tecting us, God is protecting
us, not humans.”
Gates proposing program
cuts in military budget
BY ANNE FLAHERTY
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Defense Secretary Robert
Gates is announcing the latest
round of cost-cutting mea-
sures for the military, includ-
ing a plan to do away with
a new amphibious vehicle
that can ferry troops to shore
while under fire.
The plan is aimed at stav-
ing off potentially deeper
cuts by the White House or
Congress by showing that the
Pentagon is taking seriously
a call to rein in the nation’s
deficit.
The Defense Department
is responsible for the biggest
piece of discretionary spend-
ing in the federal govern-
ment’s annual budget.
It’s been largely protected
until now. Newly-elected tea
party activists, including Sen.
Rand Paul, R-Ky., have said
that cuts to military spending
must be considered if the fed-
eral government is to reduce
its deficit.
“Gates has done a good job
so far in protecting the bud-
get,” said Loren Thompson,
head of the Virginia-based
Lexington Institute and advis-
er to several major defense
contractors.
“But the deficit is so
huge and the other claims
on the budget so big that he
is starting to lose ground,”
Thompson said.
Gates was expected to
announce today he would
cancel a $13 billion plan to
buy the Marines amphibious
assault vehicles from General
Dynamics Corp. called the
Expeditionary Fighting
Vehicle.
While a top priority for the
Marine Corps, the EFV has
long been considered a target
of Gates as he looked to trim
the budget. Gates has ques-
tioned whether D-Day-style
landings are going to be com-
mon in future wars when the
enemy is developing sophisti-
cated weapons that can easily
attack ships hovering close
to shore.
See MILITARY, page 2
“Gates has done
a good job so
far in protect-
ing the budget. ...
But the deficit is
so huge and the
other claims on
the budget so big
that he is starting
to lose ground.”
— Loren Thompson,
head of the Virginia-based
Lexington Institute
DAAG to host
regional high
school art exhibit
The Delphos Area
Art Guild will sponsor a
regional art exhibit open to
all 9-12 grade students in
the Northwest Ohio area.
All types of media are
accepted and work can be
submitted by their art teach-
ers or brought in by students.
Artwork will be accepted
from 3-5 p.m. on Jan. 13
and 14 and from 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. on Jan. 15 at the 2nd
Floor Gallery of the Delphos
Museum of Postal History at
339 N. Main St. The exhibit
will run through Feb. 6.
The exhibit will be
judged by former Delphos
art teacher Pat Rayman of
Ohio City. Ribbons will be
awarded for first, second
and third place in three or
four categories. The Best of
Show will also be awarded.
If there are any organiza-
tions or community sponsors
interested in donating mon-
etary awards or certificates
for the students, it would
be greatly appreciated.
An opening reception will
take place on Jan. 22 for all
the students and their fami-
lies, friends and community
to view their work and to see
them receive their awards.
Recognition will also be
given to those who offered
to help sponsor the awards.
The Museum of Postal
History will be open dur-
ing the public hours for
the art exhibit: 1-5 p.m.
on Fridays; 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. on Saturdays; and
1-4 p.m. on Sundays.
Contact for making contri-
butions is Judy Grone at 419-
863-0120. For information
regarding the exhibit, contact
Megan Ryan 419-371-6918.
TODAY
Girls Basketball (6
p.m.): Jefferson at LCC
(NWC); New Knoxville at
St. John’s (MAC); Ottoville
at Kalida (PCL); Bluffton
at Spencerville (NWC);
Crestview at Lincolnview
(NWC); Elida at Van Wert
(WBL); Columbus Grove
at Paulding (NWC).
Wrestling: Elida
and Defiance at Wapak
tri (WBL), 6 p.m.
Co-Ed Swimming and
Diving: Elida at Wapak
(WBL), 5:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
Boys Basketball: LCC at
Jefferson (NWC), 6 p.m.;
Spencerville at Bluffton
(NWC), 6 p.m.; Lincolnview
at Crestview (NWC), 6
p.m.; Van Wert at Elida
(WBL), 6 p.m.; Paulding at
Columbus Grove (NWC),
6 p.m.; St. John’s at New
Knoxville (MAC), 6:30 p.m.
Wrestling: Columbus
Grove at Woodmore
Classic, 5 p.m.
2
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CALL CLUB FOR DETAILS
Students can pick up their
awards in their school offices.
St. John’s Scholar of the
Day is Alli
Gerberick.
Congratulations
Alli!
Jefferson’s Scholar of the
Day is Wes
Kroeger.
Congratulations
Wes!
Scholars of the Day
2 – The Herald Thusday, January 6, 2011
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
TODAY
IN HISTORY
COURT NEWS
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 141 No. 173
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
William Kohl,
general manager/Eagle Print
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily except
Sundays and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $2.09 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $105
per year. Outside these counties
$119 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $2.09
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Kay Lynne (Agler)
Reed
Edith Mary
(Armstrong) Adams
Nov. 3, 1951 - Jan. 5, 2011
Kay Lynne (Agler) Reed,
59, of Rockford, died at 3:52
a.m. Wednesday at St. Ritas
Medical Center.
She was born Nov. 3, 1951,
in Van Wert to Peter and
Katherine (Haller) Agler, who
preceded her in death.
She had been married to
Ron King, who survives, and
on Feb. 1, 2002, she married
Wayne Reed, who also sur-
vives.
Other survivors include
children Bill (Catherine) King
of Austin, Arakansas, Mary
“Katie” (James Parker) King
of Ohio City, Angela (Al
Dunn) King of Wabash, Ind.; a
stepson, John C. (Joann) Reed
of Sherwood; two sisters, Jean
Ann (Ted) Furley of Rockford
and Barbara Brown of Van
Wert; 13 grandchildren; and
many aunts and uncles.
Mrs. Reed had formerly
been dietary manager at Van
Wert Manor for many years
and a homemaker. She was a
member of Life House Church
in Van Wert.
Funeral services will
begin at 2 p.m. on Saturday
at Brickner Funeral Home,
the Rev. Matthew Braun
officiating. Burial will be in
Woodlawn Cemetery, Ohio
City.
Friends may call from 2-5
p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Friday at
Brickner Funeral Home, Van
Wert.
Preferred memorials are to
the Riley Children’s Hospital.
Feb. 23, 1921-Jan. 5, 2011
Edith Mary (Armstrong)
Adams, 89, of Spencerville,
died at 4:55 p.m. Wednesday
at her residence following a
short illness, surrounded by her
loving family.
She was born Feb. 23, 1921,
in Middle Point, to George and
Mildred (Ditto) Armstrong Sr.
On March 22, 1941, she
married Layton Adams, who
died on Aug. 30, 1991.
Survivors include daugh-
ters Susan (Fred) Lee of
Spencerville and Joyce
(Edward) Williams of Concord,
N.C.; brother Alfred (Frances)
Armstrong; sister Gwen
Uncapher of Mendon; brother-
in-law Harold Fleming of Van
Wert; sisters-in-law Barbara
and Marilyn Armstrong; grand-
children Sheila Barton, Crystal
(Daniel) Bercaw, Melinda
Murrell, Sharla Adams, Brent
(Shelli) Adams and Michele
Whetstone; stepgrandchildren
Brett and Scott Williams; and
great-grandchildren Philip
(Michele) Etgen, Kyle Etgen,
Cynthia (Kevin) Williams,
Allison and Mitchell Adams,
Alexandria and Reagan
Bercaw, Michael and Samantha
Whetstone, Nick Reynosa and
Cole, Reagan and Gabriel
Williams.
She was preceded in death
by son Larry Adams; broth-
ers George, Paul, Thomas and
infant Larry Armstrong; sis-
ter Catherine Fleming; great-
grandson Brock Bercaw; and
sisters-in-law Mildred and
Linda Armstrong.
Mrs. Adams was a home-
maker who had been employed
with the Journal News for 25
years before retiring in 1983.
She was a Spencerville High
School graduate, member of
Spencerville United Church
of Christ and Sunday School
teacher, Brownie Scout and
Girl Scout leader and 4H advi-
sor. She always had a great
interest in any kind of “crafts”
especially sewing, quilting
and crocheting and was an
avid sports fan cheering on
the Cincinnati Reds and Ohio
State football and basketball.
Funeral services begin at
2 p.m. Saturday at Thomas
E. Bayliff Funeral Home,
the Revs. R. Vincent Lavieri
and David Howell officiat-
ing. Burial will follow in
Spencerville Cemetery.
Friends may call from 4-9
p.m. Friday and for an hour
prior to the service.
Memorials are to the United
Church of Christ memorial
fund.
(Continued from page 1)
Other cost-cutting measures were planned
as well, including the delay of the Marine ver-
sion of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, accord-
ing to defense analysts familiar with the plan.
The steps are part of a broader effort by
Gates to find some $100 billion in budget
fat through 2016 that he says should be rein-
vested into programs for the troops and to
modernize weapon systems.
According to Thompson, the Pentagon had
been told to whittle its budget plan in coming
years by as much as $150 billion. Thompson
says that Gates was able to argue that only
about $80 billion was practical.
Still, the Defense Department is being
directed to create a spending plan for 2012
that doesn’t exceed $554 billion, instead of
the $566 billion it initially wanted. The figure
does not include war spending.
Last year, Gates pledged to trim the depart-
ment’s bureaucracy by disbanding an entire
military headquarters in Norfolk, Va., called
U.S. Joint Forces Command, and cutting back
on the number of general officers that staff
the Pentagon.
Gates also announced that affordability
would be given greater consideration when
buying goods and services and that contracts
exceeding $1 billion would be particularly
scrutinized.
The following individuals
appeared Wednesday before
Judge Charles Steele Van
Wert County Common Pleas
Court:
Shawn M. Jones, 36,
Van Wert, is charged with
the murder of his 84 year old
grandmother, Edna LaRue of
Van Wert in October 2010.
Jones appeared before
Judge Charles D. Steele for
a competency hearing. After
reviewing the evaluation con-
ducted by Court Diagnostics
of Toledo, Judge Steele
found Jones competent to
stand trial.
Attorney Scott Gordon,
who is presently representing
Jones, asked the court provide
funds for a private evaluation
of Jones which was granted.
Gordon told Judge Steele
he would be filing a motion
for continuance and also a
motion for suppression of cer-
tain evidence. Those motions
will be ruled on upon the fil-
ing by Gordon.
Jones case was originally
set for jury trial to start on
Jan. 24. That will be contin-
ued until other matters are
cleared up.
Jones is presently being
held in the Van Wert County
Jail on a $500,000 cash bond,
a further pretrial will be held
after the independent evalu-
ation and suppression of evi-
dence hearings are completed.
Dyllen A. Redding, 19,
Convoy, was placed on three
years of community control
and ordered to spend up to
six months at the WORTH
Center on charges of grand
theft, a felony of the fourth
degree; and vandalism, a fel-
ony of the fifth degree.
A Van Wert County
Sheriff’s Department inves-
tigation lead to the arrest of
Redding after he stole a vehi-
cle from a Convoy resident
in October and deliberately
damaged the vehicle causing
over $9,000 worth of dam-
age.
Redding was ordered to
pay costs of the prosecution
and make restitution to the
victim for the damage done
to the vehicle.
Judge Steele also gave
Redding two 12-month prison
sentences to run concurrently
to one another but deferred
the imposition of the prison
sentence pending the success-
ful completion of the commu-
nity control program.
Thomas L. Anderson
II, 29, Convoy, was placed
on three years of commu-
nity control and ordered to
spend up to six months at the
WORTH Center on a charge
of possession of drugs, a fifth
degree felony.
Anderson was ordered to
pay costs of the prosecution
of the case, had his drivers
license suspended and must
complete a substance abuse
assessment along with any
recommended rehabilitation
programs.
Anderson was also sen-
tenced to an eight-month
prison term, with the impo-
sition of that sentence not
imposed pending the success-
ful completion of the commu-
nity control program.
Ceilia Diaz, Van Wert,
was found to be in viola-
tion of her community con-
trol program for using a con-
trolled substance.
Diaz was ordered to spend
the balance of a 180 day jail
sentence and fined $1,000 for
the violation. She had been
given credit for 56 days she
had already spent in jail on
the original charge.
James E. Kroupa, 20,
Lima, was placed on three
years of community control
and ordered to spend 30 days
immediately in the Van Wert
County Jail on a charge of
theft, a felony of the fifth
degree.
Kroupa is presently on
community control for a very
similar violation in Auglaize
County.
Kroupa and others were
responsible for stealing elec-
tronic games from the local
Walmart store with a value
over $4,000.
Judge Steele ordered that
Kroupa not enter any Walmart
property in the future and
that he was also to spend an
additional 30 days in the Van
Wert County Jail at a time to
be determined by his supervi-
sion officer.
A basic prison term of nine
months was given Kroupa but
the imposition was deferred
pending the successful com-
pletion of the community
control program.
Kasie L. Shisler, 22,
Van Wert, appeared on a
bond revocation hearing and
was found to be in violation
of the terms of his personal
surety pond.
Shisler allegedly used
heroin while out on bond on
another charge.
Judge Steele ordered that
Shisler’s bond be revoked
and he be held in jail until
Jan. 26, his sentencing date.
Christopher Overmeyer,
20, Convoy, was placed on
one year of community con-
trol on a charge of theft, a
misdemeanor of the first
degree.
Overmeyer had originally
been arrested for the theft of
a computer.
A jail term of 180 days
and a fine of $1,000 were
deferred pending the success-
ful completion of the commu-
nity control program.
Andrian Mileto, 27, Van
Wert, was placed on one year
of community control on a
domestic violence charge,
a misdemeanor of the first
degree.
She was ordered to pay all
costs of prosecution of her
case and had a 180-day jail
sentence and a $1,000 fine
deferred pending the success-
ful completion of the commu-
nity control program.
BY NASSER KARIMI
The Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran — Iranian
authorities have detained
a 55-year-old American
woman on spying charges,
local media reported today.
The state-owned newspa-
per IRAN said the woman
had spying equipment hidden
on her body when customs
authorities detained her in the
border town of Nordouz, 370
miles (600 kilometers) north-
west of the capital Tehran.
The report said she arrived
in Iran from neighboring
Armenia without a visa.
The paper identified the
woman in Farsi as Hal Talaian
and said she was found to
have “a microphone” between
her teeth. It did not say when
she was detained.
But Iran’s semiofficial
Fars news agency quoted an
unnamed official as saying
the woman was taken into
custody “about one week
ago.”
Armenian authorities had
no immediate comment on
the reported arrest. The U.S.
Embassy in Armenia’s capital
Yerevan was closed for the
Orthodox Christmas and offi-
cials could not be reached.
If the woman’s arrest is
confirmed, she would be the
fourth American Iran has
detained and accused of spy-
ing in less than two years.
In July 2009, Tehran
detained three Americans
who it initially accused of
crossing the border illegally
from northern Iraq and later
accused of spying.
The U.S. has dismissed
the spying charges. It says
the three are innocent hikers
and has repeatedly called for
their release. The Americans’
families have said if they
crossed the border at all, it
was inadvertent.
One of the three, Sarah
Shourd, was released in
September on compassion-
ate grounds on $500,000 bail.
Her fiance, Shane Bauer, and
friend Josh Fattal remain in
prison and could go on trial
next month.
Iran has suggested in the
past that the Americans in
its custody could be traded
for Iranians held in the U.S.,
raising concerns that the
Americans are to be used as
bargaining chips as the two
countries face off over issues
like Iran’s disputed nuclear
program.
The U.S. and its allies fear
Iran aims to develop atom-
ic weapons. Tehran denies
the allegations, and says its
nuclear program is for peace-
ful purposes.
HILLSBOROUGH, N.C.
(AP) — The will Elizabeth
Edwards signed days before
her death last month makes no
mention of her estranged hus-
band and two-time presiden-
tial candidate John Edwards.
The News & Observer of
Raleigh reported Thursday
that Elizabeth Edwards left all
her possessions to her three
surviving children.
Her last will and testament
names as the executor of her
estate her eldest child, lawyer
Cate Edwards.
Elizabeth Edwards died
Dec. 7, six days after she
signed the will filed in Orange
County Superior Court in
North Carolina.
The Edwardses separated
early last year after 32 years
of marriage. John Edwards
admitted he fathered a child
during an affair with a former
campaign worker.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were drawn
Wednesday:
Classic Lotto
10-15-16-22-26-45
Estimated jackpot: $18 mil-
lion
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $12 mil-
lion
Midday 3
0-7-8
Midday 4
6-2-6-7
Pick 3
6-0-6
Pick 4
3-7-6-8
Powerball
22-26-32-38-40, Powerball: 7,
Power Play: 5
Estimated jackpot: $34 mil-
lion
Rolling Cash 5
03-12-23-24-34
Estimated jackpot: $100,000
Ten OH
02-04-18-19-23-24-26-34-35-
36-38-42-45-48-54-65-68-69-77-
80
Ten OH Midday
02-03-04-05-06-10-19-21-22-
25-26-32-37-40-49-53-55-66-73-
78
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
The Associated Press
TONIGHT: Mostly cloudy
with a 40 percent chance of
snow showers. Lows 10 to
15. West winds 15 to 20 mph.
Wind chill as low as zero.
FRIDAY: Mostly cloudy
with a 20 percent chance of
snow showers. Highs in the
lower 20s. West winds 10 to
15 mph with gusts up to 25
mph. Wind chill as low as 5
below.
FRIDAY NIGHT: Mostly
cloudy with a 30 percent
chance of snow showers.
Lows 10 to 15. West winds
around 10 mph.
EXTENDED FORECAST
SATURDAY: Mostly
cloudy with a 30 percent
chance of snow showers.
Highs in the mid 20s. West
winds 15 to 20 mph. Wind
chill as low as zero.
The high temperature
Wednesday in Delphos was
27 and the low was 14. A
year ago today, the high was
21 and the low was 17. The
record high for today is 61, set
in 1939 and the record low of
-12 was set in 1924.
Corn: $6.05
Wheat: $7.23
Beans: $13.60
Delphos weather
Elizabeth
Edwards
leaves John
out of will
Military
Iran: American woman
detained on spy charges
NOW
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GOOD NEWS
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FAST!
By The Associated Press
Today is Thursday, Jan. 6,
the sixth day of 2011. There
are 359 days left in the year.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On Jan. 6, 1941, President
Franklin D. Roosevelt, in his
State of the Union address,
outlined a goal of “Four
Freedoms”: Freedom of
speech and expression; the
freedom of people to wor-
ship God in their own way;
freedom from want; freedom
from fear.
On this date:
In 1540, England’s King
Henry VIII married his fourth
wife, Anne of Cleves. (The
marriage lasted about six
months.)
In 1759, George
Washington and Martha
Dandridge Custis were mar-
ried in New Kent County, Va.
In 1838, Samuel Morse
and Alfred Vail gave the first
successful public demonstra-
tion of their telegraph, in
Morristown, N.J.
In 1861, Florida militia-
men seized the federal arsenal
at Chattahoochee.
In 1912, New Mexico
became the 47th state.
In 1919, the 26th president
of the United States, Theodore
Roosevelt, died in Oyster Bay,
N.Y., at age 60.
In 1942, the Pan American
Airways Pacific Clipper
arrived in New York more
than a month after leaving
California and following a
westward route.
In 1950, Britain recognized
the Communist government
of China.
In 1967, U.S. Marines
and South Vietnamese
troops launched Operation
Deckhouse Five, an offensive
in the Mekong River delta.
In 1982, truck driver
William G. Bonin was con-
victed in Los Angeles of 10
of the “Freeway Killer” slay-
ings of young men and boys.
(Bonin was later convicted of
four other killings; he was
executed in 1996.)
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COACHING APPOINTMENTS
AFTER
BEFORE
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Lost 30lbs &
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www.THINANDHEALTHY.com
PRESENT THIS COUPONAT OURFRONT DESKTOACTIVATE YOURCOMPLIMENTARY WEIGHT LOSS COACHING
LOSE 6-21 POUNDS IN 21 DAYS!
• Must have at least 20 pounds to lose and agree to
meet with a weight loss coach three times a week for
three weeks.
• There is no obligation to purchase Thin&Healthy®
products or services.
• This offer is limited to the first 50 participants so call
today!
• Membership must be activated by January 31st, 2011
to qualify.
Name:
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Stadium Park Office Complex
Thursday, January 6, 2011 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com


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EarthTalk®
From the Editors
of E/The
Environmental Magazine
Dear EarthTalk: What
is happening to update
and reform the Toxic
Substances Control Act of
1976, which I understand
is considerably outdated
and actually permits the
use of thousands of chemi-
cals that have never been
adequately tested for safe-
ty?
— Henry Huse,
Norwalk, CT
According to the Natural
Resources Defense Council
(NRDC), a leading envi-
ronmental research and
advocacy organization,
upwards of 80,000 chemi-
cals commonly used in the
United States have never
been fully assessed for
toxic impacts on human
health and the environment.
“Under the current law, it is
almost impossible for the
EPA [U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency] to take
regulatory action against
dangerous chemicals, even
those that are known to
cause cancer or other seri-
ous health effects,” reports
the group.
1976’s Toxic Substances
Control Act (TSCA) was
intended to protect people
and the environment from
exposure to dangerous
chemicals. But the standards
at that time dictated that only
those chemicals deemed an
“unreasonable risk” were
subject to testing and regu-
lation. When the law went
into effect, some 62,000
chemicals escaped testing
and most have remained on
the market ever since. In
the interim, however, we
have learned that many of
them have been linked to
hormonal, reproductive and
immune problems, cancer,
and a plethora of environ-
mental problems.
And since 1976, an addi-
tional 22,000 chemicals
have been introduced with-
out any testing for public or
environmental safety. Some
of the potentially worst
offenders can be found in
cleaning and personal care
products, furniture, building
materials, electronics, food
and drink containers, and
even kids’ toys.
“The law is widely consid-
ered to be a failure and, most
recently, the Environmental
Protection Agency’s own
Inspector General found it
inadequate to ensure that
new chemicals are safe,”
reports NRDC, which is not
the only group concerned
about beefing up TSCA. The
Safer Chemicals, Healthy
Families Coalition includes
more than 200 nonprof-
its—including Physicians
for Social Responsibility,
the U.S. Public Interest
Research Group (USPIRG),
the Environmental Defense
Fund and the Lung Cancer
Alliance, among many oth-
ers—representing a collec-
tive membership of more
than 11 million individual
parents, health profession-
als, advocates for people
with learning and develop-
mental disabilities, repro-
ductive health advocates,
environmentalists and busi-
nesspersons from across the
country.
By banding together,
coalition leaders hope to
convince Congress to fix the
problem by finally updat-
ing TSCA and creating the
“foundation for a sound and
comprehensive chemicals
policy that protects public
health and the environment,
while restoring the luster of
safety to U.S. goods in the
world market.”
Specifically, the coali-
tion is lobbying Congress
to revamp TSCA so that the
most dangerous chemicals
are phased out or banned
outright and that others are
tested and regulated accord-
ingly, all the while ensuring
the public’s right-to-know
about the safety and use
of chemicals in everyday
products. Also, the coali-
tion is calling for federal
funding to expand research
into greener alternative
chemicals to replace those
with known health hazards.

Dear EarthTalk: I saw
a TV ad for toilet paper
with no cardboard core
to save paper. I under-
stand that green groups
recently struck a deal with
Kimberly-Clark to protect
eastern U.S. forests from
decimation for, among
other things, toilet paper.
Can you tell me if any
efforts are underway to
protect Canada’s boreal
forest, also long used for
making tissue paper?
— K. Douglas,
Winthrop, ME

In August 2009,
Kimberly-Clark, the paper
giant behind the Kleenex,
Cottonelle and Scott brands
and the largest manufac-
turer of tissue products in
the world, gave in to pres-
sure from Greenpeace and
other environmental groups
to clean up its act in regard
to how it sources its wood
fiber and how much recy-
cled content it includes in
its products. After various
forms of public haranguing
from Greenpeace, the com-
pany committed to sourc-
ing 40 percent of its North
American tissue fiber—
some 600,000 tons year-
ly—from recycled sources
or from forests certified as
sustainable by the nonprofit
Forest Stewardship Council
(FSC). Also, by the end
of 2011 Kimberly-Clark
will stop buying non-FSC-
certified wood fiber from
Canada’s vast but fast-
shrinking boreal forest—the
largest old growth forest on
the continent.
One outgrowth of this
landmark agreement is
Kimberly-Clark’s launch of
Scott Naturals Tube-Free
toilet paper which, to reduce
waste is wound in such a way
that it doesn’t need card-
board tubes. The company
estimates that the 17 billion
toilet paper tubes produced
yearly in the U.S. account
for some 160 million pounds
of trash—most of us dis-
card instead of recycle them.
By eliminating the tubes,
the company hopes to both
save cardboard and allow
customers to use every last
piece of toilet paper, since
the last one won’t have any
glue on it to stick to the roll.
The tube-free TP is being
sold initially at Walmart and
Sam’s Club stores in the
Northeastern U.S. and will
be launched nationally and
beyond if it catches on with
consumers.
Kimberly-Clark’s green
awakening will no doubt
benefit the tree farms and
forests of the Southeast—the
locus of logging operations
in the U.S. these days—and
it will also benefit Canada’s
boreal forest, from which
the company still sources
a large amount of its wood
fiber. North America’s larg-
est ancient forest by far, the
Canadian boreal forest pro-
vides habitat for more than a
billion birds as well as many
a threatened species, includ-
ing woodland caribou, bald
eagles, golden eagles and
wolverines. It is also the
world’s largest storehouse
of terrestrial carbon—all
those miles of trees, moss,
soil and peat soak up an esti-
mated 186 billions tons of
carbon that would otherwise
contribute to global warm-
ing. Despite its value to the
environment, some 60 per-
cent of Canada’s boreal for-
est has already been allocat-
ed to forestry companies for
development and less than
10 percent of it is formally
protected in any way. Clear-
cut logging by Kimberly-
Clark and its competitors
has claimed half a million
acres of boreal forest annu-
ally in Canada’s Ontario and
Alberta provinces alone in
recent years.
“Because of Kimberly-
Clark’s place in the paper
products market, the com-
pany’s new policy will send
a strong signal to its com-
petitors, Procter & Gamble,
SCA and Georgia Pacific,
that creating a policy that
protects ancient forests is
a key element of sustain-
able business,” reports
Greenpeace. Of course,
there are plenty of other
brands of tissue paper that
already make use of pri-
marily recycled and/or sus-
tainably harvested fiber—
check out Greenpeace’s
Recycled Tissue and Toilet
Paper Guide to find out
which ones—but they are
not easily found at main-
stream grocers and big box
stores. The more shoppers
go for greener options, the
more the paper industry will
take notice and modify their
offerings accordingly.
Send your environmental
questions to: EarthTalk®,
c/o E – The Environmental
Magazine, P.O. Box 5098,
Westport, CT 06881; earth-
talk@emagazine.com.
Michael Matisse photo, courtesy Thinkstock
Kimberly-Clark, the largest manufacturer of tissue
products in the world, caved into pressure from Greenpeace
and other environmental groups and has agreed to source
40 percent of its North American tissue fiber from recy-
cled sources or from forests certified as sustainable. One
outgrowth of this landmark agreement is the company’s
launch of Scott Naturals Tube-Free toilet paper which, to
reduce waste is wound in such a way that it doesn’t need
cardboard tubes, which are responsible for some 160 mil-
lion pounds of trash each year.

Description Last Price Change
DJINDUAVERAGE 11,722.89 +31.71
NAS/NMS COMPSITE 2,702.20 +20.95
S&P 500 INDEX 1,276.56 +6.36
AUTOZONE INC. 255.20 -3.16
BUNGE LTD 66.85 +1.42
EATON CORP. 103.95 +0.73
BP PLC ADR 46.50 +0.24
DOMINION RES INC 43.03 -0.11
AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC 35.96 -0.55
CVS CAREMARK CRP 35.39 +0.37
CITIGROUP INC 4.97 +0.07
FIRST DEFIANCE 12.30 -0.03
FST FIN BNCP 18.48 +0.19
FORD MOTOR CO 17.89 +0.51
GENERAL DYNAMICS 70.61 +0.32
GOODYEAR TIRE 12.70 +0.38
HEALTHCARE REIT 47.84 +0.09
HOME DEPOT INC. 34.56 -0.11
HONDA MOTOR CO 39.19 -0.41
HUNTGTN BKSHR 7.18 -0.01
JOHNSON&JOHNSON 63.31 -0.04
JPMORGAN CHASE 44.70 +0.54
KOHLS CORP. 53.90 -0.44
LOWES COMPANIES 24.68 +0.12
MCDONALDS CORP. 74.66 +0.35
MICROSOFT CP 28.00 -0.09
PEPSICO INC. 66.59 +1.18
PROCTER & GAMBLE 64.80 -0.15
RITE AID CORP. 0.96 +0.04
SPRINT NEXTEL 4.62 +0.17
TIME WARNER INC. 33.17 +0.21
US BANCORP 26.82 +0.06
UTD BANKSHARES 9.66 -0.55
VERIZON COMMS 37.67 +0.51
WAL-MART STORES 54.41 -0.36
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business January 5, 2010
By TOM WITHERS
Associated Press
CLEVELAND — From
homeless to household name.
Ted Williams, whose deep,
velvety voice and touching
story prompted an outpouring
of sympathy and job offers
from across the country, has
become an overnight sensa-
tion.
He’s America’s hottest and
most improbable star.
Williams, who was living
in a tent near a highway in
Columbus just days ago, will
be in New York today for
an emotional reunion with
his 90-year-old mother and
to appear on NBC’s “Today”
show — one of many inter-
view requests to come his way
in the past two days.
“I can’t believe what’s
going on,” Williams said
Wednesday in a phone inter-
view with The Associated
Press. “God gave me a mil-
lion-dollar voice, and I just
hope I can do right by him.”
Left homeless after his
life and radio career were
ruined by drugs and alcohol,
Williams has been offered a
job by the NBA’s Cleveland
Cavaliers, and the 53-year-
old is being pursued by NFL
Films and others for possible
work. Williams and his com-
pelling tale became an online
sensation after The Columbus
Dispatch posted a clip of him
on YouTube demonstrating
his voiceover skills while beg-
ging by the side of the road.
Now, he’s in demand.
“This has been totally,
totally amazing,” Williams
said, his voice choking with
emotion. “I’m just so thank-
ful. God has blessed me so
deeply. I’m getting a second
chance. Amazing.”
Williams was contacted
Wednesday by the Cavaliers,
who have offered him a
position that could include
announcing work at Quicken
Loans Arena, the team’s
downtown facility. Williams
said the team has offered him
a two-year contract and said
they would pay his living
expenses.
It’s been a shocking turn of
events for the golden-voiced
man, who had gotten by living
in shelters and occasionally
with family and friends over
the past few years. Williams
has also been in his share of
trouble. His past includes a
lengthy list of arrests. He has
served time in prison for theft
and forgery and has been cited
with numerous misdemean-
ors, including drug abuse.
He was most recently arrest-
ed on May 14. He pleaded
guilty to a first-degree misde-
meanor theft charge. In court
records, his address is listed
as “Streets of Columbus.”
Upon learning of Williams’
criminal history, the Cavaliers
said their offer still stands.
“We believe in second
chances and second opportu-
nities,” said Tracy Marek, the
team’s senior vice president
of marketing. “The gentle-
man deserves an opportunity
to explain certain situations.
We’re not jumping to conclu-
sions. It’s not fair.”
Cavaliers spokesman Tad
Carper said exact details of the
team’s offer and their plans to
help Williams with housing
were still being worked out.
The Cavaliers did not
know much about him, but
were moved by Williams’
ordeal.
“When you know some-
thing’s right, you just have
to launch,” Marek said. “One
of the big things that we talk
about here, with our orga-
nization, is how important
urgency is — when you see
something that feels good and
seems right.”
During a timeout in the
first quarter of Wednesday
night’s game against Toronto,
the Cavaliers put a picture
of Williams on their giant
scoreboard and urged fans to
send him messages at www.
wewanttedwilliams.com.
Williams flew Wednesday
night to New York, where he
was expected to stay in a posh
hotel off Central Park. He
plans to see his mother, Julia,
who lives in Brooklyn. She
has stood by him during his
battles with addiction.
“She has always been my
best friend,” he said, crying.
“When I was a kid, she would
take me down to Radio City
Music Hall and on the sub-
way. I’m just glad that she is
still around. I prayed that she
would live long enough that I
could make her proud and she
could her son do something
other than stand along the
side of the road with a sign
asking for money.”
Julia Williams is thrilled
her only child is turning his
life around. She can’t wait to
see him.
“This will be my day to
see my son get up and do
something to help himself,”
she said. “He has so much
talent. I hope this will be the
thing for him. He came from
a nice family. And then he
went poor, poor. So, maybe
this will build him up and let
him see that there’s more in
life than hanging around with
the wrong people, and taking
drugs.”
Williams said his life
began spiraling downward in
1996 when he began drink-
ing alcohol “pretty bad.” He
used marijuana and cocaine
and lost interest in his radio
career. He eventually wound
up on the streets, despite the
best efforts of his children,
seven daughters and two sons
who all live in the Columbus
area.
Williams said he cele-
brated two years of sobriety
“around Thanksgiving. I just
hope everyone will pray for
me.”
Homeless man
with velvety
voice wins hearts
“She (my mother)
has always been
my best friend.
When I was a
kid, she would
take me down to
Radio City Music
Hall and on the
subway. I’m just
glad that she is
still around. I
prayed that she
would live long
enough that I
could make her
proud and she
could her son
do something
other than stand
along the side
of the road with
a sign asking
for money.”
— Ted Williams
The Delphos
Herald
419-695-0015
405 N. Main St. • Delphos
www.delphosherald.com
Whether you’re a fan of exotic
dance, classical ballet or opera,
you’ll find in-depth news
coverage in
The Delphos Herald.
Entertainment • Movie Reviews
Editorials • Columnists • Sports
Financials, and much more.
“Simplicity is an acquired taste. Mankind, left free, instinctively complicates
life.” — Katharine Fullerton Gerould, American author (1879-1944)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Thursday, January 6, 2011
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
One Year Ago
• Jefferson Athletic Booster President Jerry Gilden pre-
sented a check for $10,000 to Delphos Stadium Club Trustee
Don Neumeier for the booster’s second installment on a
$30,000 pledge to the club. The funds are for improvements
to facilities at Stadium Park.
25 Years Ago — 1986
• James A. Wellman of Delphos, one of 26 state winners
of the American Soybean Association “Lexone” Young
Leader Award, recently attended a leadership seminar spon-
sored by Du Pont Agricultural Products at its headquarters in
Wilmington, Del.
• The Shawnee Indians came away with a 54-51 victory
on their home-court Saturday evening against the St. John’s
Blue Jays. Blue Jays Coach Arnzen was forced to change
offensive strategy after center Mark Wurst left the game with
an ankle injury after only three minutes had elapsed in the
initial period.
• Ottoville Cub Scout Pack 266 held its Christmas party
featuring a buffet supper. Santa helped with the gift exchange,
treated the youngsters and awarded the door prizes to Patrick
Miller, Jason Metcalfe, Cory Boecker, Mark Knippen and
Chad Miller.
50 Years Ago — 1961
• Mrs. Gene Culp was installed as Worthy Matron of
Delphos Chapter No. 26, Order of the Eastern Star Thursday
night and Charles Daulbaugh was installed as Worthy Patron.
The installation ceremonies were conducted in the Masonic
Temple with Mrs. Roger Hoverman serving as installing
officer.
• Delphos City Service Director Irvin Hanf is advertis-
ing for bids for the leasing of ground in the northeast
part of the city, northeast of the sewage disposal plant. The
ground was asked for by the newly formed Go-Kart club
and will be used as additional recreation for the citizens of
Delphos and other nearby communities.
• Reorganization of the Washington Township trustees
in Van Wert County was held with Andy Vorst of Middle
Point elected chairman and Ray Upperman vice chairman.
Aloys Pohlman is the third member of the board and Leander
Knebel, clerk.
75 Years Ago — 1936
• Several amateur boxers from Delphos have signed up to
fight in the Lima American Legion contests to be staged in
Lima Memorial Hall on January 18. The event will feature
Donald Thithoff, who has been entered in the 118 pound
class, along with Gaza Szabo fighting in the 185 pound class.
Harve Himmenger has entered the 147 pound class.
Joe Point, James Taylor and Albert Szabo are in 160 pound
class.
• The annual meeting of the Walnut Grove Cemetery
Association was held in the chapel at the cemetery Saturday
afternoon and the following officers were elected: Jesse
McKenzie, president; Chas. Fosnaught, vice president; C.
C. Laman, secretary; Albert Schmucckle, assistant secretary;
C. R. Morgan, treasurer; C. E. Foust, trustee, three years; S.
S. Brenneman, superintendent and Virgil Laman, assistant
superintendent.
• The Ohio State Board of Optometry met in Delphos
Sunday and Monday at the Phelan Hotel. The meeting was
held in Delphos in honor of Dr. G. K. Miller, newly appointed
member of the board. At this meeting, reorganization of the
board for the new year was one of the principal items of busi-
ness.
WASHINGTON (AP) —
The chin started trembling
partway down the center aisle
as the applause rose to a roar.
John Boehner, the emotional
Ohioan about to become the
House’s new speaker, took his
time, shaking hands with col-
leagues and their children on
his way to the rostrum. At its
foot, the hankie came out.
“It’s still just me,” he told
the House after departing
Speaker Nancy Pelosi, dry-
eyed, handed Boehner his out-
sized “gavel of choice.”
It is known to bug Boehner
that he can’t keep it together
at big moments, but appar-
ently it runs in the family. At
the moment Pelosi transferred
power to her successor, at least
six hankies had been deployed
by Boehner’s proudly weep-
ing family members watching
from the gallery overhead.
By any measure, Wednesday
was a dramatic time for the
Boehners, Congress and a
recession-weary nation that
had voted two months earlier
to break the Democrats’ grip
on Washington power. In the
112th Congress, Democrats
still hold the majority of the
Senate and President Barack
Obama owns the veto pen. The
House, though, will be run
by Boehner and a Republican
caucus determined to undo
much of the Democrats’ work
— starting with Obama’s sig-
nature health care overhaul.
For Wednesday at least, the
atmosphere inside the House
was as much about institutional
change as the political kind.
Democrats gave Boehner
a standing ovation when he
entered, and they started the
applause later when Pelosi, in
her farewell address, noted that
the new speaker had earned
everyone’s respect.
“I can’t say that we’re
over it,” Rep. Doris Matsui,
D-Calif., said of her party’s
Election Day losses, which
were bigger than expected.
As she spoke, some of
the 85 Republican and nine
Democratic freshmen sworn
in Wednesday were picking
up manila envelopes with
their keys to power inside:
gold-and-blue lapel pins, their
voting cards and their House
license plates.
“I’m official!” Rep. Steve
Stivers, R-Ohio, announced to
his new staff, showing off his
pin. “Is it on straight?”
Rep. Frank Lucas, R-Okla.,
pointed to the “99” printed on
his envelope: that’s his rank on
the seniority ladder out of 435
members. It’s an improvement
over number 434, Lucas’ rank
when he was first elected as
a member of the “Republican
revolution” of 1994.
“I’m going from the con-
science of the body back to the
majority,” Lucas said. “I’m
euphoric. No, say I’m enthusi-
astic. That’s a better word.”
Boehner and his lieutenants
have cautioned Republicans
for months against any victory
dancing, rhetorical or other-
wise. Austerity is the name
of their game at the start of
this Congress in a recovering
economy — big-dollar fund
raisers and newoffice space in
the Capitol’s swankiest suites
notwithstanding.
But there was no mistak-
ing the glee which House
Republicans assumed the levers
of power Wednesday. Even
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell, the stern-faced tac-
tician from across the building,
grinned widely and appeared to
engage in lighthearted chit-chat
on the House floor as Boehner’s
big moment approached.
By DINA CAPPIELLO
and HARRY R. WEBER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Decisions intended to save
time and money created an
unreasonable amount of
risk that triggered the larg-
est offshore oil spill in U.S.
history, a disaster that could
happen again without sig-
nificant reforms by industry
and government, the presi-
dential panel investigating
the BP blowout concluded
Wednesday.
The commission find-
ings — the result of a probe
requested by President
Barack Obama after the April
20 rig explosion — described
systemic problems within the
offshore energy industry and
government regulators who
oversee it.
Poor decisions led to tech-
nical problems that the com-
mission, and inquires by BP
and Congress, have identified
as contributing to the acci-
dent that killed 11 people and
led to more than 200 million
gallons of oil spewing from
BP’s well a mile beneath the
Gulf of Mexico.
BP, Halliburton and
Transocean, the three key
companies involved with the
well and the rig that exploded,
each made individual deci-
sions that increased risks of a
blowout but saved significant
time or money.
But ultimately, the
Deepwater Horizon disaster
came down to a single failure,
the panel says — manage-
ment. When decisions were
made, no one was consider-
ing the risk they were taking.
In one example cited
by the commission, a BP
request to set an “unusual-
ly deep cement plug” was
approved by the then-Miner-
als Management Service in
90 minutes. That decision is
one of the nine technical and
engineering calls the com-
mission says increased the
risk of a blowout.
“The blowout was not the
product of a series of abbera-
tional decisions made by a
rogue industry or government
officials that could not have
been anticipated or expected
to occur again. Rather, the
root causes are systemic, and
absent significant reform in
both industry practices and
government policies, might
well recur,” the commis-
sion concluded in a 48-page
excerpt of its final report,
obtained by The Associated
Press. A final report is due to
the president Jan. 11.
Interior Department
spokeswoman Kendra Barkoff
said the report focused on
areas in which the agency in
charge of offshore drilling
has already made improve-
ments.
“The agency has taken
unprecedented steps and
will continue to make the
changes necessary to restore
the American people’s confi-
dence in the safety and envi-
ronmental soundness of oil
and gas drilling and produc-
tion on the Outer Continental
Shelf, while balancing our
nation’s important energy
needs,” Barkoff said in a
statement.
The panel underscores
its central conclusion with a
quote from an e-mail written
by BP engineer Brett Cocales
on April 16, just days before
the disaster. The e-mail was
first unearthed in an inves-
tigation conducted by Rep.
Henry Waxman, D-Calif.,
who at the time led the House
Energy and Commerce
Committee.
“But, who cares, it’s done,
end of story, will probably
be fine and we’ll get a good
cement job,” Cocales wrote,
after he disagreed with BP’s
decision to use fewer cen-
tralizers than recommended.
Centralizers are used to cen-
ter the pipe to ensure a good
cement job. The cement failed
at the bottom of the Macondo
well, allowing oil and gas to
enter it, according to investi-
gations.
The suggestion that the BP
disaster may not be an iso-
lated incident runs counter to
assurances by the oil indus-
try, which has worked hard to
portray the accident as a rare
occurrence.
By PAUL WISEMAN
and CHRISTOPHER
S. RUGABER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Companies added nearly
300,000 jobs in December,
according to an unofficial
count by a private payroll
firm — more than in any
month in the past decade. The
news raised hopes that the
government’s official report
Friday on last month’s job
creation could be a block-
buster.
While there were reasons
to doubt the numbers, the
report from Automatic Data
Processing, and another show-
ing strength in the nation’s
service industries, reversed
what was shaping up to be
an ugly day on Wall Street. It
also generated optimism that
the unemployment rate might
finally start to fall.
Some economists
expressed skepticism about
ADP’s monthly figures
because they often don’t
track the official government
employment data. Others said
that the report’s estimate of
job gains was so high that it
at least reinforced evidence
that hiring is picking up as
employers gain more confi-
dence.
Diane Swonk, chief econ-
omist at Mesirow Financial,
says the ADP numbers sug-
gest the Bureau of Labor
Statistics could report Friday
that the economy created
more than 300,000 jobs last
month. Economists have been
predicting fewer than half as
many — 145,000.
It takes about 125,000 new
jobs a month just to keep up
with population growth and
hold the unemployment rate
— now 9.8 percent — stable.
It takes up to 300,000 new
jobs a month to reduce the
unemployment rate signifi-
cantly, economists say.
The report is just the latest
sign that the job market might
be turning around at last. The
Labor Department said last
week that the number of
people applying for unem-
ployment benefits has fallen
to its lowest point in two
and a half years. The staff-
ing firm Challenger, Gray &
Christmas said Wednesday
that layoffs fell last month
to the lowest level since June
2000.
And big companies, which
have been slow to commit
to hiring full-time workers,
are starting to do so again.
Discount retailer Dollar
General this week said it plans
to hire more than 6,000 work-
ers in 2011. Union Pacific,
the nation’s largest railroad,
plans to replace 4,000 work-
ers — about 10 percent of
its total staff — who are set
to retire in 2011. It’s also
recalling some employees
who were furloughed during
the recession.
Economists had expect-
ed the ADP numbers, the
first major snapshot of hir-
ing in December, to show
that private employers added
100,000 jobs last month. The
actual figure, 297,000, was
“a bolt from the blue,” says
Ian Shepherdson, chief U.S.
economist at High Frequency
Economics.
In part because of that
powerful number, the Dow
Jones industrial average
edged higher for the third day
in a row. The Dow closed up
nearly 32 points, or about 0.3
percent, and broader stock
averages posted larger gains.
Before the ADP issued its
report, futures markets had
suggested the Dow was head-
ed for a steep loss.
Yet many economists are
unconvinced by the ADP
report. Zach Pandl of Nomura
Securities says the report has
a “spotty track record” in
aiming to predict what the
official government numbers
will show.
By BEN FELLER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Robert
Gibbs, the feisty press secre-
tary whose job as President
Barack Obama’s chief spokes-
man and confidant has given
him an outsized presence at
the White House, announced
Wednesday he was quitting
for the less demanding, more
lucrative role of giving paid
speeches and advising the
president from the outside
world.
In a rapidly unfold-
ing makeover, Obama was
also closing in on a decision
whether to tap William Daley,
a former commerce secretary,
for the vital gatekeeping job
of White House chief of staff.
Obama and Daley met at the
White House on Wednesday,
and a presidential decision
on that position was expected
within days.
The changes means Obama
is resetting his presidency as
core members of his team
head for the door, with senior
adviser David Axelrod soon to
follow and uncertainty loom-
ing over who will permanent-
ly replace Rahm Emanuel,
another defining figure who
quit as the top White House
manager three months ago to
run for Chicago mayor.
Obama aides are promis-
ing stability, particularly as
former campaign manager
David Plouffe joins the senior
staff on Monday, but even
Gibbs acknowledged what’s
happening is a “pretty major
retooling.”
“It’s a good time to get
some fresh voices, including
somebody up here,” Gibbs,
39, said from his familiar
perch behind the White House
briefing room lectern.
The crowd for his ques-
tion and answer session with
reporters was bigger than
normal — the news media
and Gibbs’ staff members
packed the room after word
had gotten out about his deci-
sion. But otherwise, it was a
classic Gibbs briefing: a bit
late in starting and then filled
with winding answers, stern
defenses of the president’s
policies and wisecracks with
his questioners.
As attention centers on
the new Congress, Obama is
installing the leadership that
will help define his agenda,
the way he cooperates with
or combats Republicans and
his re-election style. Of all
the faces coming and going,
Gibbs is perhaps the one best
known to America through
his nonstop appearances on
television and his forays into
social media like Twitter.
Obama is now deciding
whether to stick with his
respected, below-the-radar
Pete Rouse as chief of staff,
or bring in Daley, a banking
executive who’s more com-
fortable in front of the cam-
eras. That decision appears
largely to be a matter of
whether Rouse, the interim
chief, wants to stay on for
another two years.
A combination of internal
fatigue and a demand to shift
people to the 2012 re-elec-
tion campaign effort is fuel-
ing all the personnel changes.
The president is expected on
Friday to name a new top eco-
nomic adviser, likely Treasury
official Gene Sperling. And
no matter who serves as chief
of staff, both deputy chiefs
of staff, Jim Messina and
Mona Sutphen, are leaving
soon. As for Gibbs,
he has been at Obama’s side
since 2004, when Obama had
not yet become a U.S. senator
from Illinois. His career has
soared along with Obama’s,
and his friendship and trust
with the president has given
him a profile that went far
beyond the already consum-
ing job of spokesman.
Few people in the West
Wing know how Obama
thinks as well as Gibbs does.
Panel: Massive oil spill
could happen again
Boehner cries
again, gets gavel
Report lifts hopes for more jobs
Press Secretary Robert Gibbs quitting job
1
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DECEMBER 2010
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Thursday, January 6, 2011 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
Happy Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Delphos Fire/Police Station
Kitchen
Press
Hearty Hash
2 teaspoons vegetable
oil
2 teaspoons butter
1 cup chopped onion
1 cup chopped green
bell pepper
2 garlic cloves, minced
8 cups frozen shred-
ded hash brown potatoes,
thawed (about 1 pound)
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon black pep-
per
4 ounces bacon or ham,
diced
4 eggs, beaten
¾ cup (3 ounces) shred-
ded cheddar cheese
Heat oil and butter in a
large skillet over medium
heat. Add onion; cook 5
minutes. Add bell pepper
and garlic; cook 3 minutes.
Add potatoes, salt, pepper,
and meat; cook 15 minutes
or until potatoes are golden
brown, stirring occasional-
ly. Add eggs, and stir until
eggs are cooked through.
Top with cheese; cook 2
minutes or until cheese
melts. Serves 6.
Honeyed Citrus Salad
2 cups grapefruit sec-
tions
2 cups orange sections
1 tablespoon fresh lime
juice
2 tablespoons honey
Place grapefruit and
oranges in a large bowl.
Combine lime juice and
honey in a small bowl, stir
well with a whisk. Pour
dressing over fruit, toss
gently to coat.
If you liked these reci-
pes, made changes or have
one to share, e-mail kitch-
enpress@yahoo.com.
Having a topsy-
turvy day? Turn it
sunny-side up with
breakfast for dinner.
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
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birthday in our Happy Birthday column.
Complete the coupon below and return it to
The Delphos Herald newsroom,
405 North Main St., Delphos, OH 45833.
Please use the coupon also to make changes,
additions or to delete a name from the column.
THE DELPHOS HERALD
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TODAY
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Ladies Club, Trinity United
Methodist Church.
7 p.m. — Delphos
Emergency Medical Service
meeting, EMS building,
Second Street.
7:30 p.m. — Delphos
Chapter 23, Order of Eastern
Star, meets at the Masonic
Temple, North Main Street.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club meets at the
A&W Drive-In, 924 E. Fifth
St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
8:30-11:30 a.m. — St.
John’s High School recycle,
600 block of East Second
Street.
9 a.m. - noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
Cloverdale recycle at vil-
lage park.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Annex
Museum, 241 N. Main St.,
will be open.
1-4 p.m. — Putnam County
Museum is open, 202 E. Main
St. Kalida.
MONDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
6 p.m. — Middle Point
Village Council meets
7-9 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Annex
Museum, 241 N. Main St.,
will be open.
7 p.m. — Marion Township
trustees at township house.
7:30 p.m. — American
Legion Auxiliary meets at the
American Legion hall, State
Street.
Delphos Eagles Aerie 471
meets at the Eagles Lodge.
Middle Point council meets
at town hall.
8 p.m. — Delphos City
Schools Board of Education
meets at the administration
office.
Delphos Knights of
Columbus meet at the K of
C hall.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
6 p.m. — Weight Watchers
meets at Trinity United
Methodist Church, 211 E.
Third St.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Lions Club, Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
7 p.m. — Delphos City
Council meets at the munici-
pal building, 608 N. Canal St.
7:30 p.m. — Ottoville
Emergency Medical Service
members meet at the munici-
pal building.
Ottoville VFW Auxiliary
members meet at the hall.
Fort Jennings Local School
District board members meet
at the high school library.
Alcoholics Anonymous,
First Presbyterian Church,
310 W. Second St.
8:30 p.m. — Elida vil-
lage council meets at the town
hall.
WEDNESDAY
9 a.m. - noon — Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St. Kalida.
Please notify the Delphos
Herald at 419-695-0015 if
there are any corrections
or additions to the Coming
Events column.
THRIFT SHOP WORKERS
SENIOR LUNCHEON CAFE
Jan. 6-8
THURSDAY: Delores German, Margie Rostorfer, Mary
Rigdon, Sandra Rigdon, Sara Miller, Sue Wiseman and
Carlene Gerdeman.
FRIDAY: Judy Kundert, Ruth Calvelage, Sue Vasquez and
Mary Jane Watkins.
SATURDAY: Valeta Ditto, Joyce Day, Linda Bockey and
Norma Vonderembse.
REGULAR THRIFT SHOP HOURS: 5-7 p.m. Thursday;
1-4 p.m. Friday; and 9 a.m.- noon Saturday.
Anyone who would like to volunteer should contact
Catharine Gerdemann, 419-695-8440; Alice Heidenescher,
419-692-5362; Linda Bockey 419-692-7145; or Lorene
Jettinghoff, 419-692-7331.
If help is needed, contact the Thrift Shop at 419-692-2942
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. and leave a message.
WEEK OF JAN. 10-14
MONDAY: Cabbage roll, ranch mashed potatoes, green
beans, Mandarin oranges, blueberry muffin, white or wheat
bread, margarine, coffee and 2% milk.
TUESDAY: Roast turkey with gravy, sweet potatoes,
cauliflower, applesauce, bread dressing, white or wheat roll,
margarine, coffee and 2% milk.
WEDNESDAY: Sloppy Joes on white or wheat bun, cream
of broccoli soup with crackers, Lima beans, peaches, coffee
and 2% milk.
THURSDAY: Teriyaki chicken breast over rice, buttered
beets, tropical fruit, white or wheat bread, margarine, coffee
and 2% milk.
FRIDAY: Baked steak with gravy, whipped potatoes, baby
carrots, pineapple chunks, pudding, white or wheat bread, mar-
garine, coffee and 2% milk.
JAN. 7
Kathy Britt
Kaiden Trentman
Dena Martz photo
Hasselschwert’s first-grade class at St. John’s Elemenetary
Students in Mary Hasselschwert’s first-grade class at St. John’s Elementary include, front from left, Isaac C.,
Cassidy B., Aidan T. and Caitlin G.; center, Devin S., Zane S., Olivia R., Jacob M., Rose F. and Gavin F.; and back,
Brady K., Austin P., Aubrey J., Olivia M., Stephanie N. and Nicole P. Aliyah S. was absent.
LSO presents
Mozart by
Candlelight
The Lima Symphony
Orchestra will warm a cold
winter’s weekend with three
regional performances of
Mozart by Candlelight.
The captivating perfor-
mances will begin at 7:30 p.m.
Jan. 21 at the First Church
of God in Sidney, return to
Lima at 7:30 p.m. on Jan. 22
at Trinity United Methodist
Church and conclude at 4
p.m. on Jan. 23 at St. John
the Evangelist Church in
Delphos.
The professional musi-
cians of the Lima Symphony
Orchestra will present the maj-
esty and splendor of Mozart’s
music as it was written to be
performed surrounded by the
warm glow of hundreds of
glistening candles in stunning
sacred spaces.
The program will include
Mozart’s Concerto for
Flute and Harp, his beauti-
ful Posthorn Serenade, and
Symphony No. 1, which
Mozart wrote when he was
only 8 years old.
Tickets are $20 for adults
and $10 for students.
DivorceCare group to
begin meeting Jan. 18
DivorceCare Seminar and Support Group will begin once
again on Jan. 18 in the St. John’s Ministry Center at 201 N.
Pierce St.
The group will meet for 10 weeks with the goal of moving
from the pain of divorce to forgiveness and healing.
Anyone divorced or separated is invited to attend.
The group will meet from 7-9 p.m.
Call 419-695-4050 to register.
There is a $20 fee to cover the cost of materials.
6 – The Herald Thursday, January 6, 2011
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
Northwest Ohio Girls Basketball
Standings 2010-2011
League Overall
Blanchard Valley Conference
Liberty-Benton 3-0 8-0
Van Buren 3-0 6-3
Pandora-Gilboa 2-1 6-1
Arcadia 2-1 4-3
McComb 2-1 4-5
Arlington 1-2 7-2
Hardin-Northern 1-2 4-5
Cory-Rawson 1-2 2-7
Leipsic 0-3 3-6
Vanlue 0-3 0-8
Buckeye Border Conference
Edon 3-0 7-2
Stryker 3-0 6-2
Pettisville 2-1 4-5
Hilltop 1-2 1-8
North Central 0-3 2-5
Fayette 0-3 1-7
Green Meadows Conference
Tinora 0-0 7-0
Wayne Trace 0-0 7-0
Holgate 0-0 8-1
Antwerp 0-0 6-3
Ayersville 0-0 3-5
Fairview 0-0 2-5
Hicksville 0-0 2-6
Edgerton 0-0 3-7
Midwest Athletic Conference
Versailles 3-0 6-2
Minster 2-0 8-0
Fort Recovery 2-0 6-1
New Knoxville 2-1 5-2
Coldwater 1-1 5-2
St. John’s 1-1 6-3
Marion Local 0-2 2-5
St. Henry 0-2 2-7
New Bremen 0-2 1-6
Parkway 0-2 1-7
Northwest Conference
Jefferson 2-0 8-1
Paulding 2-0 3-5
Lima Central Catholic 1-1 6-3
Crestview 1-1 3-3
Columbus Grove 1-1 3-4
Allen East 1-1 3-5
Bluffton 1-1 2-7
Spencerville 1-1 1-7
Lincolnview 0-2 3-6
Ada 0-2 1-8
Greater Buckeye Conference
Napoleon 3-0 7-1
Findlay 2-1 3-4
Marion Harding 2-1 3-5
Lima Senior 1-2 3-4
Sandusky 1-2 1-4
Fremont Ross 0-3 1-6
Northwest Ohio Athletic League
Patrick Henry 2-0 5-1
Evergreen 2-1 6-1
Archbold 2-1 9-2
Wauseon 2-1 5-4
Bryan 1-1 3-5
Montpelier 1-1 1-7
Liberty Center 1-2 4-7
Swanton 1-2 3-6
Delta 0-3 2-6
Putnam County League
Pandora-Gilboa 2-0 5-2
Ottoville 1-0 8-1
Continental 1-0 6-2
Leipsic 2-1 5-4
Fort Jennings 1-1 4-7
Kalida 1-1 3-6
Columbus Grove 0-2 3-4
Miller City 0-3 5-6
Western Buckeye League
Bath 2-0 8-1
St. Marys 2-0 7-1
Shawnee 2-0 6-2
Celina 2-0 5-2
Kenton 1-1 7-1
Wapakoneta 1-1 4-4
Van Wert 0-2 2-7
Elida 0-2 1-7
Ottawa-Glandorf 0-2 1-7
Defiance 0-2 0-7
GIRLS BASKETBALL
STANDINGS
Alomar and Blyleven
elected to Hall of Fame
By AUSTIN CLARKSON
The Delphos Herald
austinclarkson_24@
hotmail.com
LIMA — The University
of Northwestern Ohio men’s
basketball team once held a
14-point lead in the contest
Wednesday night at “The
Garage” as they went on a
red-hot run in the first half
of action, looking like they
were starting to sway the
momentum to their side of
the bench.
However, visiting Siena
Heights made a second-half
comeback and took it to the
Racers in nipping the hosts
68-67 in a last-second thrill-
er.
After Siena Heights ral-
lied within 42-38 at halftime,
the battle continued into the
second half. The guests ran
off a 14-6 spurt to take their
largest lead at 52-48. From
then on, the biggest margin
was 60-54 by the visitors
with 6:06 remaining. There
were four ties and three lead
changes. A free throw by
Logan Mathews gave the
visitors a 68-67 edge with six
ticks left.
Jake Bolyard brought the
ball up the court. With time
winding down, he found Isaac
Bowers who then quickly
passed to senior big man Kyle
Gillette for a 10-foot jump
shot to decide the contest.
However, Gillette’s jump
shot was just off the mark
and Siena Heights completed
the comeback by getting the
rebound.
The Racers led by four
points going into the locker
room thanks to a big first half
at shooting the basketball
very well. The home team
made nearly half of its shots,
converting on 46 percent in
the first half (18-39). Siena
Heights shot only 13-of-36
in the first half (36%) as they
went into intermission and all
the momentum in the Racer
locker room. The Racers
set the pace of the game by
their defensive pressure on
the Siena Heights guards and
affected the shots that they
put up early in the game.
Leading the way for the
Racers for the night was
freshman sensation Bolyard
who netted 18 points and
really was crucial in the sec-
ond half. Wes Gelhaus also
had a very big night as the
freshman came off the bench
and really contributed in the
second half as he tallied up
a total of 13 points and five
rebounds to really make a
difference for his team.
Despite the lead going into
intermission, Siena Heights
came out in the second half
with a different mentality it
seemed like as they took it to
the Racers and forced them
to take some shots that they
normally would not take on a
normal basis.
UNOH head coach Chris
Adams thought that his team
came out playing well in the
first half and was happy that
they improved from their
last outing against Lourdes
College: “(Siena Heights)
came down in the second
half and made some key bas-
kets to take the lead and the
momentum but I’m glad we
came out and improved and
played better but it is a very
tough home loss today.”
The Racers had seven out
of nine players in the scoring
column on the night.
With the loss the Racers
fall to 4-9 on the season and
just 1-3 in the Wolverine-
Hoosier Athletic Conference
on the year. Siena Heights
moves to 7-9 and 1-2 in the
WHAC.
VISITORS: Siena Heights
7-9 (1-2 WHAC)
FG-FGA 3FG-FGA FT-FTA
TP
Demetrius Andrews 3-4 0-0
3-5 9, Mark Snipes 2-9 2-6 0-0
6, Brent Reynolds 5-11 2-6 1-1
13, Logan Mathews 3-10 1-3 4-6
11, Jake Schirmer 3-6 0-0 0-0
6, Ryan Hopson 3-6 2-3 0-0 8,
Nick Kosovich 1-4 0-0 0-0 2,
Darrell Boswell 2-7 1-2 2-5 7,
Vince Schantz 2-3 0-0 2-2 6.
Totals 24-60(40%) 8-20(40%)
12-19(63.2%) 68.
HOME TEAM: Northwestern
Ohio 4-9 (1-3 WHAC)
FG-FGA 3FG-FGA FT-FTA
TP
Isaac Bowers 2-10 1-7 2-2
7, Jake Bolyard 8-21 2-9 0-0
18, Dustin Guthrie 2-5 0-0 0-0
4, Brandon Miller 0-1 0-0 0-0
0, Todd Watkins 4-7 0-1 0-1 8,
Wes Gelhaus 5-8 0-0 3-3 13,
D.J. Quarles 0-0 0-0 0-0 0, Darko
Bucan 2-3 0-0 0-0 4, Kyle Gillette
6-8 0-0 1-3 13. Totals 29-63(46%)
3-17(17.6%) 6-9(66.7%) 67.
Rebounds: SH 36.11 off.
(Boswell 12), UNOH 37/11 off.
(Gillette 10). Assists: SH 18
(Snipes 4), UNOH 16 (Gillette
4). Steals: SH 8 (Snipes, Boswell
2), UNOH 5 (Bowers, Bolyard,
Guthrie, Bucan, Gillette 1).
Blocks: SH 4 (Boswell 2), UNOH
2 (Gelhaus, Gillette 1). Fouls: SH
19, UNOH 22. Turnovers: SH 17,
UNOH 20.
Officials: Andy Nagy,
Raymond Kelser, Randy
Hutton
Attendance: 158
Score by Halves 1st 2nd Total
Siena Heights......... 38 30 - 68
Northwestern Ohio.. 42 25 - 67
Points in the paint-SHU-M
22,UNOH-M 42. Points off turn-
overs-SHU-M 19,UNOH-M 24.
2nd chance points-SHU-M
15,UNOH-M 9. Fast break points-
SHU-M 4,UNOH-M 6.
Bench poi nts-SHU-M
23,UNOH-M 30. Score tied-8
times. Lead changed-7 times.
Last FG-SHU-M 2nd-01:42,
UNOH-M 2nd-00:41.
Largest lead-SHU-M by 6 2nd-
06:06, UNOH-M by 14 1st-06:39.
Racers build big
lead but can’t hold
on vs. Siena Heights
LOCAL ROUNDUP
Lady Racers grab
10-point win over Siena
Heights
ADRIAN, Mich. — The
University of Northwestern
Ohio women’s cagers hit
the road Wednesday night
and came back from Siena
Height’s Fieldhouse with an
83-73 Wolverine-Hoosier
Athletic Conference win.
The Lady Racers (9-8, 3-2
WHAC) used solid shooting
— 28-of-57 overall (8-of-20
from deep) for 49.1 percent
and 19-of-24 free shots for
79.2 percent. Amanda Francis
led all scorers with 25, while
Kelly Warris (Elida) and
Tara Olberding added 11.
They controlled the glass
34 times (8 offensive) as
Rebecca Puckett led with six.
They had 23 assists (Francis
with 6, Shaye Warman 5);
hsd seven thefts (Francis and
Alexa Kennedy with 2 each);
blocked three shots (Francis,
Molly French and Ashley
Rothney 1 apiece); 22 fouls;
and 22 miscues. They host
Condordia University 1 p.m.
Saturday.
Four players reached dou-
ble digits for SHU (6-11,
1-3 WHAC): Brooke Haines
17, Shalaha Hubbard 15,
She’Meika Nicholson 12 and
Nikki Hughes 10. They con-
nected on 24-of-70 fielders
(5-of-22 downtown) for 34.3
percent and 20-of-25 at the
line (80%). They grabbed
45 off the glass (21 offen-
sive) as Hughes seized 13.
They totaled eight assists
(Nicholson 3); 15 thefts
(Hughes and Hubbard 3
each); four blocks (Haines
2); 21 fouls; and 21 errors.
VISITOR: University of
Northwestern Ohio (9-8 (3-2))
FG-FGA 3FG-FGA FT-FTA
TP
Molly French 0-2 0-0 0-0 0,
Ashley Rothney 2-5 0-0 0-0 4,
Kelly Warris 3-7 3-7 2-2 11, Alexa
Kennedy 2-3 2-3 3-4 9, Amanda
Francis 9-16 0-3 7-9 25, Shaye
Warman 2-3 2-3 0-0 6, Amanda
Henry 3-5 0-0 0-0 6, Tara Olberding
4-12 1-4 2-2 11, Jenna Blackburn
0-0 0-0 2-2 2, Rebecca Puckett 3-4
0-0 3-5 9, Crystal Sloan 0-0 0-0 0-0
0, Brandi McDaniel 0-0 0-0 0-0 0.
Totals 28-57 8-20 19-24 83.
HOME: Siena Heights
University (6-11 (1-3))
Nikki Hughes 4-7 0-0 2-2 10,
Shalaha Hubbard 5-15 3-10 2-2
15, Sierra Brown 2-4 0-0 2-5 6,
She’Meika Nicholson 3-13 1-4 5-7
12, Sierra Calhoun 1-5 0-0 0-0 2,
Amanda Duke 0-0 0-0 0-0 0, Brooke
Haines 6-11 0-0 5-5 17, Kendall
Acho 0-1 0-1 2-2 2, Brittany Gibson
2-8 1-6 2-2 7, Grace Howrigon 1-4
0-1 0-0 2, Chandler Levit 0-1 0-0 0-0
0, Samantha Wolford 0-1 0-0 0-0 0.
Totals 24-70 5-22 20-25 73.
Score By Halves
1st 2nd TOTAL
University of Northwestern
34 49 83
Siena Heights University
31 42 73
----
Hanover sweeps BU in
cage action
HANOVER, Ind. -
The Bluffton University
women’s basketball team
jumped back into Heartland
Collegiate Athletic
Conference action with a
Wednesday night trip to
Collier Arena at Hanover
College. The red-hot
Panthers bolted out to a
47-23 haltime lead and held
Bluffton off for a 78-59
HCAC victory, keeping
Hanover perfect at 11-0
overall and 5-0 in the con-
ference. Bluffton slipped to
4-8 overall and 1-4 in the
HCAC.
The Beavers took an
early 6-2 lead with a layup
from junior Rachel Daman
(Defiance/Tinora) that was
ignited by a Kim Miller
(Delphos/St. John’s) steal.
The Panther defense pres-
sured the Beavers into five
turnovers over the next four
minutes which resulted in
15 unanswered points en
route to a 17-6 lead. A
Kylee Burkholder (West
Unity/Hilltop) jumper
ended the offensive drought
for the Beavers at the 13:12
mark of the half.
Bluffton cut the deficit
to 19-12 on a layup from
Brittany Lewis (Springfield/
Shawnee). However,
Hanover went on another
8-0 run to lead 27-12 at
the 8:56 mark of the half.
Sophomore Lauren Hutton
(New Riegel) traded baskets
with the Panthers before
two Miller free throws cut
the deficit to 32-21 with
5:22 to play. Following the
Miller markers, Hanover
ended the period with a
15-2 run for a 47-23 lead at
the break.
The Beavers started the
second half with hoops
from Miller and Daman.
A trip to the charity stripe
by Miller cut into the def-
icit before a Daman tri-
ple trimmed the lead to
47-32. A Kirstie Runion
(Cincinnati/Christian) three
pulled the Beavers within
13 at the 10:16 mark. Two
more Miller free throws at
the 6:48 mark is the clos-
est (60-48) the Beavers
would get the rest of the
way. Hanover pulled away
and continued their school-
record start (11-0) with a
78-59 victory.
Miller, who went over
the 1,000-point plateau
against #4 Washington
(Mo.), paced the visitors
with 14 points, seven assists
and six steals. She hit 4-of-
7 from the field and 6-for-7
at the line while hauling in
four caroms. Rachel Daman
chipped in with 12 markers
and five rebounds on 5-of-
9 shooting. Post players
Lauren Hutton and Kylee
Burkholder added nine and
eight points, respectively.
Burkholder ripped down
a team-high seven boards,
while Hutton collected five
rebounds.
Bluffton connected on
23-of-54 (42.6 percent)
from the field, compared to
27-of-66 (40.9 percent for
the Panthers. The Beavers
were 4-of-20 on triples,
while Hanover made 7-of-
22 from distance. The home
team finished 17-of-21 from
the stripe, compared to a
9-of-15 night for Bluffton.
The visitors turned it over
six more times (24-18),
while Hanover posted a
commanding 43-32 advan-
tage on the boards.
The Beavers welcome
HCAC foe Rose-Hulman
on Saturday with a 1 p.m.
tip, with the men following
at 3 p.m.
WOMEN
Bluffton University 59
Kim Miller 4-7 0-0 6-7 14,
Brittany Stegmaier 1-8 0-4 0-0 2,
Lauren Hutton 4-5 0-0 1-3 9, Kim
Meyer 1-3 1-3 0-0 3, Rachel Daman
5-9 2-6 0-0 12, Alicia Amis 0-0 0-0
0-0 0, Kirstie Runion 1-4 1-2 1-3 4,
Francena Tate 0-3 0-1 0-0 0, Beth
Yoder 0-4 0-2 0-0 0, Brittany Lewis
2-5 0-2 1-1 5, Elizabeth Webb 0-0
0-0 0-0 0, Mandi Leemaster 0-0 0-0
0-0 0, Kylee Burkholder 4-5 0-0 0-1
8, Rachel LeFever 1-1 0-0 0-0 0.
Totals 23-54 4-20 9-15 59.
Hanover 78
Holly Vogel 5-9 0-1 0-0 10, Torin
Franz 6-15 1-5 4-6 17, Molly Martin
2-4 0-0 4-4 8, Natalie Morse 3-9 2-5
0-0 8, Chelle Bentz 2-6 1-3 0-0 5,
Abbey Schmahl 1-3 0-1 0-1 2, Liz
Sparks 0-0 0-0 0-0 0, Katie Brewer
1-6 1-3 0-0 3, Amanda Trambaugh
0-1 0-0 0-0 0, Katie Gahimer 0-2 0-0
2-2 2, Kendall Withered, 2-4 2-4 2-2
8, Elyse Weddle 1-1 0-0 0-0 2, Sonja
Bowyer 4-6 0-0 4-6 13. Totals 27-66
7-22 17-21 78.
Score by Halves 1st 2nd Total
Bluffton 23 36 59
Record: (4-8; 1-4 HCAC)
Hanover 47 31 78
Record: (11-0; 5-0 HCAC)
MEN
Bluffton University 55
Rob Luderman 0-3 0-0 0-0 0,
Brent Farley 5-9 0-0 0-0 10, Nick
Lee 5-13 4-9 0-2 14, Mychal Hill
4-9 3-7 4-5 15, Josh Fisher 1-3 0-2
0-0 2, Nate Heckelman 1-2 0-0 0-0 2,
Josh Johnson, 0-1 0-1 0-0 0, Dustin
Kinn 0-1 0-1 3-4 3, Cam Saylor 0-0
0-0 0-0 0, Will Pope 3-8 0-0 3-7 9.
Totals 19-49 7-20 10-18 55.
Hanover 66
Mike Case 5-6 0-0 0-1 10,
Mitchell Meyer 1-6 0-1 8-12 10,
Grant Pangallo 3-6 2-3 0-0 8,
Ryan Nowicki 6-14 3-6 3-4 18,
Cody Osmon 1-3 1-3 0-0 3, Drake
Hendricks 1-4 0-1 0-0 2, Clayton
Fletcher 0-1 0-1 0-0 0, Jim Faehr
0-0 0-0 0-0 0, Jason Doehrman 0-0
0-0 0-0 0, Jacob Rieger 3-3 0-0 0-3
6, Brian Gunter 3-4 0-0 3-3 9, Dee
Jones 0-2 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 23-49
6-15 14-23 66.
Score by Halves 1st 2nd Total
Bluffton 21 34 55
Record: (8-4; 1-4 HCAC)
Hanover 31 35 66
Record: (9-2; 5-0 HCAC)
By BEN WALKER
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — After a
narrow miss last year, Bert
Blyleven told voters they
finally got it right by send-
ing him into the Hall of
Fame along with Roberto
Alomar.
And he took
the opportunity to
talk about base-
ball’s dark past
— the Steroids
Era.
All-Star slug-
gers Rafael
Palmeiro, Jeff
Bagwell, Mark
McGwire and
Juan Gonzalez didn’t come
close in Wednesday’s elec-
tion. No telling if they ever
will, either, after Hall voters
sent a clear message: The
drug cloud isn’t going to
cover Cooperstown.
“The writers are saying
that this was the Steroids
Era, like they have done
Mark McGwire,” Blyleven
explained after finally mak-
ing it to the Hall on his 14th
try. “They’ve kind of made
their point.”
Blyleven was cho-
sen on 79.7 percent — it
takes 75 percent approval
by the Baseball Writers’
Association of America to
reach the shrine. The great
curveballer won 287 games,
threw 60 shutouts and ranks
fifth with 3,701 strikeouts.
He was down to his next-to-
last try on the ballot.
“It’s been 14 years of
praying and waiting,”
Blyleven said in a confer-
ence call. “And thank the
baseball writers of America
for, I’m going to say, finally
getting it right.”
Alomar was picked on
90 percent of the ballots.
The 12-time All-Star won
a record 10 Gold Gloves at
second base, hit .300 and
helped the Toronto Blue
Jays win titles in 1992-93.
Palmeiro, McGwire,
Bagwell and Gonzalez fared
poorly, with BBWAA mem-
bers reluctant to choose
bulky hitters who posted big
numbers in the 1990s and
2000s.
A lot of them have already
decided, such as
Susan Slusser of
the San Francisco
Chronicle, who
wrote in an e-mail
that she would not
consider anyone
who used perfor-
mance-enhancing
substances.
Bagwell got
41.7 percent in his first year
on the ballot. His career stats
are among the best for first
basemen since World War
II — .297 batting average,
.408 on-base percentage
and .540 slugging percent-
age. He hit 449 home runs,
topped 1,500 RBIs and runs
and ran the bases hard. He
was Rookie of the Year, NL
MVP and a Gold Glove win-
ner.
Bagwell never tested
positive, there were no pub-
lic allegations against him
and he was adamant that
he never used illegal drugs.
Still, many of the voters and
fans aren’t sure yet how to
assess the huge numbers put
up by the game’s top hit-
ters.
“That stuff’s going to
happen in this era,” Bagwell
said on a conference call.
“People are going to have
suspicion in the era I played
in. .. There’s nothing I can
do about it.”
Palmeiro was listed on
just 64 of a record 581
ballots (11 percent) in his
first try despite lofty career
numbers — he is joined by
Hank Aaron, Willie Mays
and Eddie Murray as the
lone players with more than
3,000 hits and 500 home
runs.
But Palmeiro failed a
drug test and was suspended
by Major League Baseball
in 2005. The penalty came a
few months after he wagged
his finger at members of
Congress and told them: “I
have never used steroids.
Period.”
Former Rep. Tom Davis
was the chairman of the
House committee that held
the March 17, 2005, hear-
ing on steroids in baseball
at which Palmeiro made
that statement and McGwire
refused to “talk about the
past.”
Palmeiro recently reit-
erated the anabolic steroid
that caused his positive test
came in a vitamin vial given
to him by teammate Miguel
Tejada.
McGwire got 19.8 per-
cent, a drop from 23.7 per-
cent last year. This was his
fifth time on the ballot and
first since the former home
run champion admitted he
took steroids and human
growth hormone.
Juan Gonzalez, a 2-time
AL MVP implicated by Jose
Canseco in steroids use,
received 30 votes, just above
the 5-percent threshold for
remaining on the ballot next
year.
Alomar and Blyleven will
be joined by Pat Gillick at
the induction ceremonies
July 24 in Cooperstown.
The longtime executive was
picked last month by the
Veterans Committee. Gillick
helped earn his place with a
trade that brought Alomar to
Toronto.
Smart, graceful and acro-
batic on the field, Alomar
also was guilty in one of
the game’s most boorish
moments. He spit on
umpire John Hirschbeck
during a dispute in 1996 and
was suspended. They later
made up and Hirschbeck
supported Alomar’s bid for
the Hall.
“I regret every bit of it.
I apologized many times to
John,” he said. “I feel good
I’ve had a good relationship
with John.”
Said Hirschbeck: “I’m
very, very happy for him.
It’s overdue.”
Alomar drew 73.7 per-
cent last year in his first try
on the ballot. Blyleven had
come even closer, missing
by five votes while getting
74.2 percent.
Alomar got his first
major-league hit off Nolan
Ryan in 1988. Ryan was
the last pure starting pitch-
er elected to the Hall by
the BBWAA in 1999.
Blyleven, now 59, pitched
against Alomar and his
father, Sandy Alomar.
It was quite a climb for
Blyleven, who helped pitch
Pittsburgh to the 1979 title
and Minnesota to the 1987
crown. Many years ago, he
drew barely over 14 percent
in the BBWAA voting.
Blyleven’s career stats
have gotten a boost in recent
years by sabermetricians
who have new ways to eval-
uate baseball numbers.
“I could not be happier if
it was my own son,” Twins
Hall of Famer Harmon
Killebrew said. “I played in
the first game Bert pitched
for the Minnesota Twins in
1970. ... I wish it wouldn’t
have taken so long but now
that he is in, it’s wonder-
ful.”
Barry Larkin and Tim
Raines showed gains in this
year’s voting. Pete Rose
received three write-in
votes.
Larkin (62 percent) and
Jack Morris (54 percent)
could get more consider-
ation next year, when Bernie
Williams is the top first-year
candidate.
www.delphosherald.com
AGRIBUSINESS
Thursday, January 6, 2011 The Herald — 7
Turning a parking lot into a garden
WOOSTER — An old
asphalt parking lot might not
seem like a good place for a
garden.
But in urban areas it can
be. It tends to be cheap open
land. And an Ohio State
University expert on inten-
sive small-scale horticulture
has started a three-year study
on what works best there.
Joe Kovach, who spe-
cializes in maximizing fruit
and vegetable production in
limited spaces, is comparing
three ways to do it in empty,
abandoned parking lots: in
giant-sized pots and in raised
beds on top of the black-
top, and in trenches cut right
through it.
“There are a lot of vacant
parking lots in places like
Cleveland and Youngstown,”
said Kovach, who works
at the Ohio Agricultural
Research and Development
Center (OARDC) in Wooster
and holds a joint appointment
with Ohio State University
Extension. “We’re hoping to
learn if the trenches work, if
the pots are worth it and of
all three techniques, which is
the best?”
His work could boost the
use of abandoned urban land.
It could help people who live
in urban food deserts — areas
having little or no access to
affordable, nutritious foods
— grow more of their own
tomatoes, spinach and other
fresh produce. And it could
help them do it more easily.
Turning blacktop green
isn’t new. It’s part of the
growing wave of urban farm-
ing. But Kovach wants to
see if there’s a better way to
do it.
Commonly, parking-lot
gardeners use raised beds.
The bottomless wood or plas-
tic boxes — typically some-
thing like 4 feet wide, 8 feet
long and 10 inches deep —
rest on a layer of wood chips.
The wood chips cover the
asphalt. The beds hold the
soil mix and plants.
Some growers tear out
the asphalt instead. They
“depave” the entire park-
ing lot. It’s doable but hard
work. (There’s even a group
dedicated to it: http://www.
depave.org/.) Then they plant
in the ground.
Kovach wants to see if
depaving only the trenches is
a simpler but still-productive
option; if waist-high pots are
easier to tend than ankle- or
knee-high raised beds; and
what sort of freezing, dry-
ing or overheating problems
might come up in any of
the systems. Asphalt holds
in heat, after all, which may
be a boon in March but a
bane in August. He’ll look at
yields, pests and high tunnels
(unheated, plastic-covered
greenhouses) as well.
“I don’t think anyone
else is doing this bonkers
research, quite frankly,” he
said with a laugh on a late fall
day at his test site. “(Starting
it) seemed like a good idea at
the time.”
Dorm Closes, Idea
Grows
Kovach recently com-
pleted a six-year study of
fruit and vegetable polycul-
ture: “ecologically designed”
mixed-crop plots that maxi-
mize biological diversity,
minimize pest problems and
earn the equivalent of near-
ly $100,000 an acre a year.
Dozens of big, healthy apple
trees, peach trees, raspberry
plants and blueberry bushes
were grown for it. And then
they weren’t needed any-
more. But Kovach just didn’t
want to trash them.
He had an idea.
He’d use some of them to
establish a polyculture dem-
onstration site. In the past
few years, he’s been hard-
pressed keeping up with peo-
ple’s interest in the project. A
place for tours would help.
He’d put it in a busy loca-
tion — on U.S. 250 just south
of Wooster — on the lawn of
an obsolete, recently closed
dormitory at the Agricultural
Technical Institute (ATI).
ATI, too, is a part of Ohio
State. It’s next to OARDC.
And he’d start a new study
in the dorm’s adjacent park-
ing lot. There he’d put the
rest of his plants and the
parking lot, too, to new use.
“We’re trying to come up
with different ways to use
asphalt like this,” Kovach
said as he walked the site on a
cold, gray day in November.
“Instead of saying, ‘It’s wast-
ed land, let’s rip it all up,’
we’re saying, ‘Let’s figure a
way we can use it.’ ”
He started the project in
October. The trenches were
cut (done in a day with a rent-
ed pavement cutter). The pots
were bought (black, plastic
and the size of a small hot
tub). The soil-mix materials
were gathered. Then the fruit
trees and plants were trans-
planted. Further, final plant-
ing of other crops will take
place this coming spring. An
irrigation system and six high
tunnels will go in then, too.
Pots vs. Beds vs.
Trenches
The study features three
replicated plantings under
each of the three systems.
The first system will grow
apples, peaches, blueberries
and blackberries in the giant
pots; deep-rooted vegetables,
such as tomatoes, in normal-
sized buckets with drain
holes; and shallow-rooted
crops, such as green beans
and strawberries, in wide
gutters hung on cattle pan-
els (stiff, welded-wire fenc-
ing). This is the system that’s
highest off the ground and so
may be easiest to care for:
less stooping. Will all the
containers be worth it?
In the second system, all
the fruits and vegetables,
including the fruit trees, will
grow in 3-by-30-foot trench-
es cut out of the asphalt. A
low raised bed will surround
each trench. The bed will
raise the trench’s sides; make
it deeper to plant in; and also
make it easier to reach, at
least compared to planting in
the ground. Is taking out only
part of a parking lot, instead
of all of it, a viable option?
The third system will grow
all the crops in tall raised beds
— about 30 inches high, or up
past your knees — set on, not
into, the asphalt. They’ll be
higher than the trench beds
but lower than the pots. The
bottom 15 inches in each bed
will be wood chips for drain-
age and height.
The polyculture demon-
stration site, meanwhile,
located on the grassy lawn,
will serve a second purpose:
as a study control for the sys-
tems on the asphalt.
All three systems will
use the same soil mix: wood
chips, compost, sand and top-
soil in a 4:2:1:1 ratio, respec-
tively.
Parts of all three systems,
too, will grow beneath the
high tunnels. Will the asphalt
capture and retain enough
heat to make a difference
inside them? Can this be used
to advantage in spring?
The site in December is
covered by snow but is fresh
in Kovach’s mind.
“For now I’m getting a
bad feeling about the survival
of the (transplanted) trees and
bushes in this treatment (the
tall beds), and I don’t know
if it’s because of the nor-
mal panic when starting a big
project or something more.
Hopefully, I’ll have clarity
by March,” he said.
“There are still a lot of
issues to be addressed. But
if this research is successful,
land that was paved and con-
sidered unusable for food can
become productive again.”
Kovach is an associate
professor in Ohio State’s
Department of Entomology.
He heads the universi-
ty’s Ohio Integrated Pest
Management Program.
Photo submitted
Ohio State University’s Joe Kovach cuts trenches at his
parking-lot test site in Wooster last fall.
The parking lot garden.
More farmers’ markets year-round
PLYMOUTH, Mass.
(AP) — A steady stream
of customers filled baskets
and shopping bags with veg-
etables, cranberries, cheese,
fresh-baked breads and pies
while chatting with the dozen
or so farmers selling goods in
the visitor’s center of a local
museum.
It was a bitterly cold, gray
December day, but for many,
it felt just right for the farm-
ers’ market as live music and
a warm fireplace helped set a
holiday mood.
A growing number of
farmers’ markets are extend-
ing their operation into and
through the winter months
— even in cold-weather
states like Massachusetts.
The expansion comes as
more farmers are prolonging
their growing seasons with
greenhouses and other meth-
ods. It’s also fueled by an
increased number of people
who aim to eat locally pro-
duced food year-round.
“It can’t be a five-
month-long thing and then
just stop and everybody
go to Walmart,” said Dave
Purpura, a farmer who par-
ticipates in the winter market
at Plimoth Plantation, a living
history museum dedicated to
the Pilgrims. “If you want
to be serious about promot-
ing the local food economy,
you have to go through the
winter.”
Purpura planted some veg-
etables late in the season spe-
cifically for sale at the winter
market.
Nearby, Donna Blischke
sold potatoes, onions and
squash that she stores in a
root cellar at her small organ-
ic farm in Carver. The winter
market also gives her a chance
to sell jams, jellies and sauces
made from produce left over
from the fall harvest.
“It’s a way to earn a little
extra money in the winter
months, while still providing
local foods,” Blischke said.
There are at least 898
winter farmers’ markets run-
ning nationwide, a 17 per-
cent increase from two years
ago, according to the U.S.
Department of Agriculture.
A winter market is defined
as one that operates between
November and March.
Winter markets often run
less frequently than their
summer counterparts; the
Plymouth Farmers Market,
for example, runs weekly
from June through October
and monthly from December
through March.
Perhaps surprisingly, sev-
eral northern states are among
those with the largest numbers
of winter markets, including
Massachusetts, New York,
Pennsylvania, Ohio, New
Jersey, Connecticut and
Michigan, the USDA said.
Chicago’s Green City
Market expanded to year-
round operations three years
ago and draws an estimated
60,000 visitors during the
winter months, said Lyle
Allen, the market’s executive
director. He recalled his anxi-
ety before the first January
opening.
“It was 2 degrees and the
wind chill was 40 below,”
Allen said. “I was worried.
We were concerned about
what kind of reaction we
were going to get from the
general public.”
But his fears evaporated
when he showed up at the
museum where some 35 to
40 farmers set up shop twice
a month in the winter.
The trend toward year-
round markets fits in with
overall growth in farmers’
markets. The number nation-
wide grew 16 percent from
2009 to more than 6,100
nationwide this year, accord-
ing to the USDA’s 2010 farm-
ers’ market directory. Many
markets have been reporting
record sales in recent years.
Year-round markets tend
to do better. A USDA survey
found markets that operated
for more than seven months
in a year had three times the
amount of sales revenue per
month and twice as many
customers per week as those
that didn’t.
The markets encourage
farmers to try a variety of
ways to extend their seasons,
she said. Growers combine
old techniques, such as stor-
ing vegetables in root cel-
lars, with new ones like hoop
houses, which use plastic or
some other material to trap
warmth from the sun and pro-
tect plants from frost.
Ohio grains top priority
DELAWARE — The Ohio
Corn Growers Association
(OCGA) and Ohio Wheat
Growers Association
(OWGA) have taken steps
to unite to better represent
the interests of thousands of
grain farmers throughout the
Buckeye State.
At the Ohio Grains
Symposium Dec. 16 in Lima,
OCGA and OWGA lead-
ers discussed the process
and decision to form a new
organization with the goal to
advance Ohio’s grains with
members.
As a single entity as of
Jan. 1, the Ohio Corn &
Wheat Growers Association
(OCWGA) has positioned
itself for the regulation and
advancement of domestic and
international issues that affect
the success of Ohio’s corn
and wheat markets, including
energy, livestock, trade, envi-
ronment and transportation
issues and relief programs,
research and marketing pro-
grams.
The new organization
is the result of an ongoing
relationship between the for-
merly separate associations
that has been fostered with
shared staff and joint mem-
bership meetings, legislative
visits, public campaigns and
policy-development strate-
gies.
Board members from
each of the previous separate
groups joined forces to plan
for the unification.
”It’s a logical transfor-
mation,” said Ohio Corn &
Wheat Growers Association
Executive Director Dwayne
Siekman. “OCWGA will
build upon the successes of
the two founding groups and
the synergies capitalized on
throughout the past several
years to have more impact.”
A grower survey con-
ducted in 2009 indicated tre-
mendous support for the new
organization.
“In Ohio, many of the
issues that we face are not as
a grower of one crop, but as a
producer of grains that allows
us to successfully manage our
farms,” said current OCGA
president John Davis,” said
current OCGA president John
Davis.
“There’s strength in num-
bers,” said Mark Wachtman,
OWGA president. “We’ll
have more impact to increase
our farmers’ potential.”
Officers have been
elected from the combined
group for a term of one year.
Formalized “action teams,”
comprising OCWGA mem-
bers, will develop grassroots
guidance to board members
and serve as a resource for
members to familiarize them-
selves with advocacy issues.
OCWGA will continue to
work with its national coun-
terparts the National Corn
Growers Association and
the National Association of
Wheat Growers.
“Advancing Ohio grains
is our bottom line,” said
Siekman. “We look forward
to a productive future.”
To visually bond the for-
mer separate associations, the
new entity engaged in a sig-
nificant branding process. As
part of its launch, OCWGA’s
brand elements, including a
new logo, will assist in rais-
ing awareness about its mis-
sion and values.
About Ohio Corn
& Wheat Growers
Association
The Ohio Corn & Wheat
Growers Association rep-
resents the interests of tens
of thousands of corn and
wheat growers throughout
the state. OCWGA works in
Washington, D.C., and at the
Ohio Statehouse to ensure
that government participation
in legislation is beneficial to
advancing the profitability of
Ohio grains. For more infor-
mation, visit ohiocornand-
wheat.org.
Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers unite
Annual Putnam banquets set
The Putnam County annual
Beef, Pork and Dairy Banquets
have been set for 2011 and all
banquets will be at the Kalida
Knights of Columbus Hall for
the first time ever. Tickets
for all three banquets can be
obtained at the Putnam County
Extension office in Ottawa or
from any member of the beef,
pork or dairy producer groups.
These banquets typically draw
300 to 350 people and are a
great opportunity to have a night
out with family and friends.
The 2011 Putnam County
Beef Banquet is set for Jan. 26
starting with a Salisbury steak
dinner at 6:30 p.m. The enter-
tainment will be Jim Bodicker, a
finger style guitar player from the
Ada area. He is well known for
his humorous songs and ability to
play a wide range of music.
The 2011 Putnam County
Pork Banquet is set for Feb. 21.
A pork chop dinner will start
the evening off at 6:30 p.m.
The entertainment will be Matt
Bowers from Fort Jennings who
is a country music singer finish-
ing second in a recent T102
Country Star Playoffs.
The 2011 Putnam County
Dairy Banquet is set for
March 23 starting at 7:15 p.m.
Entertainment for the dairy
banquet is the Crazy World of
Daniel Jay Robison, the Family
Ventriloquist. All the routines
are wholesome and lots of fun
for each and every member of
the family. The dinner will be
a Salisbury steak meal includ-
ing The Dannon Company
milk products, ice cream, vari-
ous cheeses, and other assorted
dairy products.
Proceeds from the ban-
quets are used to improve Jr.
Fair livestock buildings at the
Putnam County Fairgrounds,
fund producer educational
meetings, commodity product
promotion and scholarships for
high school students. Tickets
for the banquets are $8 per
person.
New tractor exhaust technology may take getting used to
BY GLEN ARNOLD
OSU Extension, AG educator
The diesel tractor is very important
to every farmers operation but after the
first of the year it will have some dif-
ferent exhaust technology that may take
some getting used to. Air quality regula-
tions from the Environmental Protection
Agency, affecting only new equipment,
will add cost to the tractor, and may
give off blacker smoke, but the engines
are expected to lower emission level of
nitrous oxide. That is one of the green-
house gases which are currently being
blamed for climate change issues. But
what does it mean for area farmers?
New EPA regulations for diesel pow-
ered equipment, called Tier 4, pertain to
non-road diesel engines with more than
175 horsepower in 2011. The regulations
will apply to smaller horsepower tractors
put into service in 2012 and later. By
2015, the regulations require tractors and
other non-road diesel equipment to have
reduced both nitrous oxide and particulate
matter (soot) by 90 percent. The regula-
tions have only been applied to over the
road diesel engines up until now, but farm
tractors will now have their turn.
There are two primary technolo-
gies being used by tractor manufactur-
ers. Caterpillar, Cummins, Deutz, John
Deere, Komatsu and Perkins are using
EGR technology to comply with Tier 4
regulations. AGCO, Case IH and New
Holland are using SCR technology. The
EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) technol-
ogy takes 20-30 percent of the exhaust
gas, pipes it into a cooling chamber on
the side of the engine. When it is cooled,
its oxygen content is lowered. It is then
piped into the intake manifold where it
lowers the oxygen content and lowers
the overall combustion temperature. That
results in less nitrous oxide, but possibly
more soot.
The SCR (selective catalytic reduc-
tion) technology utilizes a storage tank
on the tractor which holds diesel exhaust
fluid (DEF), a combination of urea and
de-ionized water. One gallon of DEF is
blended with 25 gallons of diesel fuel dur-
ing the tractors operation. This technol-
ogy eliminates the particulate matter with
a high exhaust gas temperature, resulting
in reduced levels of nitrous oxide.
The DEF liquid that will have to be
replenished regularly, and farm petro-
leum suppliers should be planning to
sell it. It is 68 percent water, and has the
potential to both freeze and gel at lower
temperatures. Don’t plan to operate your
tractor without the DEF, since an engine
without the DEF will have a loss of
power, but will be able to get an imple-
ment to the edge of the field or your fuel
tank. Horsepower will drop intentionally,
when the computer senses the DEF tank
is empty. Manufacturers are addressing
all of these concerns with their new
products.
What is the impact of the technology
on farmers? The EPA has indicated the
additional cost will be 1-3 percent of the
cost of the equipment. Should you buy
before the new models are on the market?
This would delay the impact on your
farm until the next time you update your
equipment. That apparently is what hap-
pened when the regulations were applied
to the over the road trucks before the Tier
4 diesel engines were installed. As with
any new technology there will be some
issues that have to be resolved after the
equipment is used in the field and unfore-
seen problems occur. While adding more
cost to each machine, the new engines are
expected to be both more energy efficient
and emit lower levels of nitrous oxide.
8 – The Herald Thursday, January 6, 2011 www.delphosherald.com
The Daily Herald
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Lost & Found
F OU N D B L A C K
long-haired female older
dog. Approx. 60lbs. Found
Dec. 23 in the South 66
area around Krendl Ma-
chine. 419-234-3163
FOUND: CHOCOLATE
Lab around 115lbs. Has
red shock collar on. 20257
Rd U, Ft. Jennings area
(Rushmore)
(419)235-3154
010

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Help Wanted
DANCER LOGISTICS,
INC.. 900 Gressel Dr.,
Delphos, OH 45833
Is now hiring drivers for
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Class A CDL with at least
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ext. 810.
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Rambler’s Roost Restau-
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IN NEED of retail clerk &
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OH 45833
MEDICAL OFFICE Assis-
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IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
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readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
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business opportunities, or
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290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
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Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware, Pocket
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300

Household Goods
NEW, QUEEN plush top
mattress, never used, still
sealed in original wrapper.
$75.00. (260)749-6100.
600

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Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
FREE KITTENS Three 9
Week old, short haired
brown tigers. Box trained,
Vet checked. Need homes
f or t he New Year.
(419)695-2061
999

Legals
ORDINANCE #2010-31
AN ORDINANCE AUK-
T HORI Z I NG T HE
SAFETY SERVICE DI -
RECTOR TO ENTER
INTO A PERSONAL
SERVICE CONTRACT
WITH GLEN LAUSE TO
PROVIDE LEGAL SERV-
ICES TO THE CITY OF
DELPHOS AND DECLAR-
ING IT AN EMERGENCY.
ORDINANCE #2010-32
AN ORDINANCE ESTAB-
LISHING THE PAY SAL-
ARY FOR THE ADMIN-
ISTRATION AND DE-
PARTMENT SUPERVI-
SORS AND DECLARING
IT AN EMERGENCY.
ORDINANCE #2010-33
AN ORDINANCE ESTAB-
LI SHI NG THE PAY
RATES FOR THE
HOURLY EMPLOYEES
AND DECLARING IT AN
EMERGENCY.
ORDINANCE #2010-37
ANNUAL APPROPRIA-
TION ORDINANCE AND
DECLARI NG I T AN
EMERGENCY.
ORDINANCE #2010-40
AN ORDINANCE ESTAB-
LISHING THE MEETING
DATES AND TIME FOR
DELPHOS CITY COUN-
CIL MEETINGS AND DE-
CLARING IT AN EMER-
GENCY.
ORDINANCE #2010-41
AN ORDI NANCE
AUTHORIZING THE CITY
AUDITOR TO TRANSFER
CERTAI N FUNDS
WITHIN THE FUNDS OF
THE CITY OF DELPHOS,
ALLEN AND VAN WERT
COUNTIES AND DE-
CLARING IT AN EMER-
GENCY.
ORDINANCE #2010-42
AN ORDINANCE TO
AMEND ORDINANCE
2009-58, THE ANNUAL
APPROPRIATION ORDI-
NANCE, AND DECLAR-
ING IT AN EMERGENCY.
Passed and Approved this
27th day of December
2010.

Robert Ulm, Council Pres.
ATTEST:
Marsha Mueller,
Council Clerk
Michael H. Gallmeier,
Mayor
A complete copy of this
legislation is on record at
the Municipal Building
and can be viewed during
regular office hours.
Marsha Mueller, Council
Clerk
12-30-10, 1-6-11
Business Services
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N E W S P A P E R
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Call Kathy at AdOhio
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Help Wanted CDL-A
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Help Wanted Drivers-
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seek Owner Operators.
Call 800-569-9232 or
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Help Wanted Indepen-
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Signing Bonus $60K to
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Help Wanted Reefer,
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Call Prime Today 1-800-
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Help Wanted WOOD
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Job Guaranteed after
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Also, Hiring Drivers!
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the Direction” OTR
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Misc. Airlines Are Hiring
- Train for high paying
Aviation Career. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if qualified
- Job Placement
assistance. Call Aviation
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Misc. CANADIAN
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FOR RENT. Walleyes,
jumbo perch, northerns.
Call Hugh or Doris toll
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OHIO SCAN NETWORK CLASSIFIEDS
F E W P R E P K I D
A Y E P E A L S U T A
C R A B A P P L E D E L
E E R I E S T U S U R Y
G A I D D S
L O G O N B O O N I E S
A I N T M A T L O T
M S U A C E K E N O
B E S E E C H B O S S A
I V E A L A
H E N N A A M U L E T S
A G O D E C O R A T O R
K O D E D I C T A L T
E S E D O D O S E A
Answer to Puzzle
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Not very many
4 Warm-up
8 Young goat
11 Yes vote
12 Bursts of laughter
13 Ms. Hagen
14 Flowering tree (2
wds.)
16 PC key
17 Most chilling
18 Excessive interest
20 Moo goo — pan
21 Tooth fxer’s deg.
22 Access the Web (2
wds.)
25 Remote place
29 Dogpatch verb
30 Get tangled
31 House site
32 E. Lansing campus
33 S t r e t c h y
bandage
34 Vegas game
35 Request earnestly
38 — nova
39 — got it!
40 Huntsville’s st.
41 Reddish tint
44 Charms
48 In olden days
49 Interior —
51 Down for the count
52 Mandate
53 Elev.
54 Vane dir.
55 Dull-witted one
56 Most of the Earth
DOWN
1 Watch part
2 Rochester’s Jane
3 Have on
4 Soft drink choice
5 Wholly absorbed
6 Pipe ftting
7 Fake
8 Striped antelope
9 Ovid’s road
10 Actress Tyne
12 Hymn of praise
15 Intolerant person
19 9-digit no.
21 Be too fond
22 Gentle one
23 River into the Seine
24 Wildebeests
25 Fugue composer
26 Monsieur’s islands
27 Practically
forever
28 Portico
30 Kitchen spice
34 Eucalyptus eater
36 Half of zwei
37 Hemmed and
hawed
38 Say without think-
ing
40 Former Exxon rival
41 Ocean fsh
42 They often clash
43 Bump or knot
44 Like vinegar
45 Sorority letters
46 Painted tinware
47 Veracruz Ms.
50 Shoguns’ capital
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13
14 15 16
17 18 19
20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
32 33 34
35 36 37 38
39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47
48 49 50
51 52 53
54 55 56
Shop the
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great deal!
Autos • Appliances
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THE DELPHOS
HERALD
(419) 695-0015
DEAR DR. GOTT: How do
you remove a family of plantar
warts off the bottom of a big toe?
My 10-year-old daughter has had
them for a couple of years (shortly
after starting gymnastics). There
are about six or eight on her big
toe right where it joins her foot.
Please help!
DEAR READER: Since my
last column about plantar warts, I
have received many letters about
various treatments. Many of
the readers claim that over-the-
counter and physician treatments
offered limited success, with the
warts either returning or never
completely disappearing. Many
also complained of the pain
associated with these treatments,
which is why they turned to
alternative and home remedies.
By far the most common
remedy I received was iodine.
The wart is first pumiced to
remove the layers of dead skin
and then the iodine is applied.
One reader suggested Cassia
bark oil applied once a day after
removing the dead skin with a
razor. She warned that it should be
applied only to the wart because
it can damage normal skin. She
also recommended tea tree oil for
common warts on the hands.
Another reader took one
500-milligram capsule of olive
leaf extract three times a day and
was wart-free in three months.
Another person reported
success treating her boyfriend’s
plantar warts with a cotton ball
soaked in apple cider vinegar
applied to the wart and secured
with duct tape each night. After a
few weeks the warts were gone.
A physician wrote in
suggesting soaking the foot
in hot water and gradually
increasing the water temperature
until the skin turns cherry
red. He says that two or three
treatments are usually successful
in eradicating the virus,
thus causing the wart to
disappear.
A final reader,
attempting to avoid
surgery to remove her
son’s wart, was advised
by a friend to use an
herbal product known as
Wart Wonder.
I cannot recommend
or condemn any of these
approaches because I
have no experience with
them. Please let me know
if you and your daughter
try any of these options and what
your results are.
DEAR DR. GOTT: I
recently read your column about
the person suffering from plantar
warts. My son had a number
of these (large and small) a
few years ago. I took him to a
dermatologist, who looked at
his foot and told us to use over-
the-counter Duofilm. He said to
apply the product twice a day,
and every three days either scrape
or pumice the wart and start the
process over again. A month
later, I took my son back, and
the doctor declared the process
was working and to keep at it.
He then proceeded to charge us
$80 for the five-minute visit. The
doctor didn’t even do anything!
I would like to say -- save your
money, folks, and do the removal
yourself.
DEAR READER:
Unfortunately, this situation
is becoming more and more
common. As you saw in my last
column and in the above letter,
many readers are frequently
dissatisfied with the care they get
from a doctor for common and
plantar warts, not to mention how
painful some of the procedures
can be.
Remember, readers, that warts
are caused by a virus and are
commonly acquired by touching
other warts (such as those on
the hands), or by being barefoot
in public showers or pool areas.
Simple precautions such as hand
sanitizers, wearing flips flops
or water shoes, and using warm
soap and water can help prevent
outbreaks.

Dr. Peter H. Gott is a retired
physician and the author of
several books, including “Live
Longer, Live Better,” “Dr. Gott’s
No Flour, No Sugar Diet” and
“Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar
Cookbook,” which are available
at most bookstores or online. His
website is www.AskDrGottMD.
com.
Copyright 2010, United
Feature Syndicate, Inc.
DR. PETER J. GOTT
On
Health
Readers give various treatments
for getting rid of plantar warts
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Thursday, January 6, 2011 The Herald – 9
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Cooperation
needed to get kids
through high school
Dear Annie: It is a tragic
fact that one in four young
people in America does not
graduate from high school.
We are at risk of losing our
leadership position in the
global economy. But I am
convinced that by working
together we can change this
situation.
Already, in some of the
poorest performing schools
in the nation, we are seeing
signs of improve-
ment. In some
c o mmu n i t i e s ,
graduation rates
have increased 10
or more percent
in just six years.
These glimmers of
hope inspire me,
but the pace of
progress is far too
slow. We must act
now.
We have
launched Grad
Nation, a 10-year campaign
to see that 90 percent of
students will graduate and
obtain at least one year of
education or training beyond
high school.
I know we all want to
do our part to keep America
great. Success requires all
of us -- educators, business
and civic leaders, policy-
makers, parents and students
-- to work together. Your
readers can learn how to get
involved at americaspromise.
org. Our nation -- and our
children -- are counting on it.
Sincerely -- Marguerite W.
Kondracke, President and
CEO, America’s Promise
Alliance
Dear Marguerite
Kondracke: Thank you for
giving our readers a way to
improve the opportunities for
students within their commu-
nities. An educated child has
a greater likelihood of being
successful in life and con-
tributing to the overall better-
ment of society. We cannot
afford to let them down.
Dear Annie: My wife
recently found out through
a friend that her ex-husband
remarried and didn’t tell her.
I commented that I didn’t
see anything wrong with that,
and she was shocked at my
response. She told me that if
we divorced after 25 years,
she would expect me to tell
her if I got married again and
she would do the same. She
also said if we divorced and
one of us were dying of some
incurable disease, she would
expect me to drop everything
and take care of her, because
she would do the same for
me.
I told her that would
depend on whether or not
we were on speaking terms,
but she said it is the least she
would expect of me. Now
she calls me a scumbag (jok-
ingly, I hope). Am I missing
something here? -- Scumbag
Dear Scumbag: It is a
courtesy to inform an ex-
spouse of a major change
in one’s life, but it is not a
necessity unless they have
children together. As for tak-
ing care of a sick or injured
ex-spouse, it would depend
entirely on whether the rela-
tionship is friendly, wheth-
er anyone else can care for
the person and whether the
healthy ex has remarried. It is
most certainly not expected.
We are going to assume your
wife is simply a caring, com-
passionate woman,
but ask her how she
would feel if you
rushed to the aid of
an ex-wife (not her)
who needed your
ongoing care.
Dear Annie: I
think you missed
another option
in your response
to “Solicitous
Spouse,” whose
wife has chosen her
daughter’s blind,
incontinent dog over him.
My wife and I have been
married for more than 40
years and are now on our
fifth dog. We’ve loved our
pets as much as our children,
and have spent hundreds of
dollars during the last few
months of their lives to keep
them going as long as pos-
sible.
However, in each case,
there came a time when the
dog had no more quality of
life, and we reluctantly made
the decision that it was time
for the dog to be put down.
This may be what needs to
be done in this case. It is
difficult and sad, but finding
a new puppy as soon as pos-
sible helped ease the grief for
us. -- J.
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie’s Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 5777
W. Century Blvd., Ste. 700,
Los Angeles, CA 90045.
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
Friday, Jan. 7, 2011
You might take it upon yourself to
establish far more important objectives
than usual in future months. Whether
or not you’ll be able to do all of them
will depend upon your knowledge,
skills and the time you have allotted.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19) - There is no need to let
friends pressure you into making a
commitment to do something that you
feel you won’t enjoy or for which you
can’t justify spending the money. Be
your own person.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
- Poor sportsmanship could tarnish
your image, so be sure, when you
involve yourself in a competitive
event, to remain graceful and gracious
should you lose.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -
Just because someone you know is
a far better talker than most people
doesn’t mean this person’s ideas are
better than yours or anybody else’s.
Follow your own thinking.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- Keep to yourself anything that
your instincts warn you not to share.
Usually when your inner voice
speaks, it is wise to heed its advice.
To go against it is folly of the highest
order.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -
Normally you are someone who faces
the truth and doesn’t beat around the
bush, so it is a surprise to see you
being an apple polisher for someone
you think can do you a favor.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) - If
you aren’t attentive to instructions
on to how to do handle something or
tackle a particular job, when you try
to do it, you will wish you had been a
better listener.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -
You’re not usually much of a gambler,
but if you’ve been on a losing streak
in general, you might attempt to take
a chance on a social game that you’re
playing with friends. Better keep the
stakes low, and know when to fold
‘em.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) - Abide
by the original plans that you and
your friends agreed to, even if you
now believe that, because they have
lost their luster, you would like to do
something different.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Be
prepared to come up with some pretty
imaginative excuses when explaining
to a friend why you didn’t do a favor
for him/her as you had promised, or
expect to lose all creditability.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - If
you don’t have as tight of a grip on
your credit cards as you should,
chances are you will go hog wild and
load them up with a lot of imprudent
purchases.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -
Making huge issues out of situations
you normally wouldn’t blink over is
deliberately asking for trouble to erupt
within the household. Get back in
character and be tolerant of your kin.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) - Usually, creative and imaginative
ideas abound within you, whether
they are about what to do or where to
go, but not so currently. Let someone
else make the plans.
Copyright 2011, United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Answers to Wednesday’s questions:
Roman poet Virgil hid his valuables in beehives to keep
them safe.
Ernie is the name of the cartoon elf that serves as chief
baker and spokesman for the Keebler Company. He and his
fellow elf bakers were introduced in Keebler ads in 1968.
Today’s questions:
Who founded and led Hollywood’s original Rat Pack?
In Burger King’s “Have It Your Way” jingle, what line
follows, “Hold the pickle, hold the lettuce?”
Answers in Friday’s Herald.
Today’s words:
Oneirocritic: an interpreter of dreams
Wapiti: the American elk
10 – The Herald Thursday, January 6, 2011
www.delphosherald.com
Vice principal shot, killed by student
By JOSH FUNK
Associated Press
OMAHA, Neb. — The son of a police
detective opened fire at a Nebraska high school
Wednesday, fatally wounding the assistant prin-
cipal and forcing panicked students to take
cover in the kitchen of the building just as they
returned from holiday break.
The gunman, who had attended the school for
no more than two months, also wounded the prin-
cipal before fleeing from the scene and fatally
shooting himself in his car about a mile away.
Authorities declined to speculate about why
the suspect, identified as 17-year-old Robert
Butler Jr., targeted the administrators.
Vice Principal Vicki Kaspar, 58, died at a
hospital hours after the shooting, police said.
Principal Curtis Case, 45, was listed in stable
condition.
Jessica Liberator, a sophomore at Millard
South High School, said she was in the cafeteria
when another administrator “rushed in to tell
everybody to get in the back of the kitchen.”
She said she started to cry when students
heard a knock on the kitchen door and a cafete-
ria worker yelled for everybody to get down. It
was a false alarm. Nobody came in.
She huddled with Brittany Brase, another
sophomore. Asked whether they were best
friends, Brase said, “No, not really.” But, she
added: “She’s my best friend now. These things
bring you together.”
Butler had transferred in November from a
high school in Lincoln, about 50 miles south-
west of Omaha.
In a rambling Facebook post filled with
expletives, Butler warned Wednesday that peo-
ple would hear about the “evil” things he did
and said the school drove him to violence.
He wrote that the Omaha school was worse
than his previous one and the new city had
changed him. He apologized and said he wanted
people to remember him for who he was before
affecting “the lives of the families I ruined.” The
post ended with “goodbye.”
A former classmate of Butler’s from Lincoln
confirmed the Facebook post to The Associated
Press and provided AP with a copy of it.
Conner Gerner said he remembered Butler as
being energetic, fun and outgoing. Gerner said
Butler sometimes got in trouble for speaking out
too much in class, but he did not seem angry.
Butler’s stepgrandfather, Robert Uribe, said
the news still seemed unreal to him Wednesday
evening and didn’t seem to fit with the polite
teen he knew.
“I have no idea what led to this,” said Uribe,
who last saw Butler about a month ago. Uribe
said nothing appeared to be wrong at that time.
Lincoln school officials declined to pro-
vide details about Butler’s student record. But
Lincoln Southwest High School Principal Rob
Slauson said Butler was involved in few, if any,
activities before transferring to the new school.
“I think it’s safe to say that in the yearbook,
there was one picture of Robert Butler, and that
was his school picture,” Slauson said.
Police Chief Alex Hayes provided no details
on the weapon Butler used or how he obtained
it. Butler’s father is a detective for the Omaha
Police Department. Investigators were inter-
viewing the seven-year veteran Wednesday
to learn more about what may have led to the
shooting.
Authorities first received reports of the shoot-
ing around 12:50 p.m. The school was immedi-
ately locked down, but within two hours, stu-
dents were being released in groups.
When the first group of students emerged,
parents began applauding. Some of the students
smiled, raised their hands in the air and flashed
a V for victory sign.
Crystal Losole, whose son and a nephew are
juniors at the school, said she got a call from her
son when he was hiding in the kitchen.
Hugging him later and weeping, Losole said
when she learned of the shooting, “My knees
kind of buckled.”
Her son, Skyler Marion, said he was in the
cafeteria when Assistant Principal Brad Millard
loudly announced that there was “a code red”
and that everybody needed to evacuate.
At first, nobody believed Millard, Skyler
said. But when Millard’s face turned white,
students knew it was no joke.
John Manna, who lives two blocks from the
school, said he knows Kaspar because his older
son graduated from high school with her son
in 1996.
“I was just shocked. I can’t think of a nicer
person. I can’t see how anyone would be cross
with her,” Manna said.
The shooting news jolted the suburban
neighborhood in west Omaha where the prin-
cipal lives.
“I’m really sad,” said Judy Robison, who
lives six houses away from the Case family.
“There’s been shootings downtown, but we’re
really pretty insulated out here.”
The school on the west side of Omaha has
about 2,100 students.
Man in custody after mall standoff
US hopes for consensus with China on NKorea
By BOB CHRISTIE
Associated Press
CHANDLER, Ariz. — A
shootout at an upscale shop-
ping center in suburban
Phoenix sent shoppers fleeing
and prompted a mall lockdown
Wednesday as the suspect who
had exchanged gunfire with
officers holed up in a fast food
restaurant, authorities said.
The suspect surrendered
Wednesday afternoon and no
injuries were reported, officials
said.
Hours after the noon-hour
parking lot gunbattle, authori-
ties reopened the Chandler
Fashion Center following a
search that had been made to
confirm only one suspect was
involved in both the shooting
and the standoff.
“Thankfully, nobody was
shot and nobody got hurt,”
Chandler police Sgt. Joe
Favazzo said.
The mall reopened at about
5 p.m. after police SWAT
teams with dogs finished their
search.
The first burst of gunfire
erupted just outside an entrance
to a Sears store when mem-
bers of a U.S. Marshals Service
fugitive task force confronted
a man they believed to have
committed several robber-
ies in recent days in the sub-
urbs east of Phoenix, Arizona
Department of Public Safety
spokesman Bart Graves said.
The task force included DPS
and Chandler police officers.
The suspect the task force
was tracking was at first
believed to have been the same
man who shot at DPS offi-
cers in Casa Grande, south of
Phoenix, on Dec. 10, and was
wounded by return fire, then
mistakenly released from cus-
tody late last month.
However, authorities later
determined the robbery suspect
was not the same man. Police
identified the man in custody as
27-year-old Adam Hernandez,
who they say may have robbed
a hotel south of the mall ear-
lier Wednesday. Police did not
immediately release any other
information on Hernandez.
When the gunfire erupted
outside the mall, shoppers and
employees inside ran in all
directions trying to get out of
the way.
Minutes after the gunfight,
the suspect entered a nearby
Baja Fresh fast food restaurant,
fired several shots and held off
police for nearly three hours
before surrendering, Chandler
police said.
Police said at least two peo-
ple were in the restaurant dur-
ing the standoff and escaped
injury, but authorities did not
call them hostages.
Tuan Tang, a 27-year-old
Iraq war veteran working at the
mall food court, said security
officers began calling for peo-
ple to evacuate and he relied on
his Army training to help usher
customers outside.
By MATTHEW PENNINGTON
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The United States is hopeful that it
can reach agreement with China and other nations on the best
way to push North Korea to abandon its nuclear program,
amid efforts to revive stalled multinational talks with the
reclusive communist government, the State Department said
Wednesday.
The push comes ahead of a Jan. 19 state visit by Chinese
President Hu Jintao to Washington.
Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and China’s
Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi held “lengthy discussions”
Wednesday at the State Department on North Korea, spokes-
man P.J. Crowley told a news conference, as they ironed out
details of Hu’s visit.
China is North Korea’s main international ally and spon-
sor, and its influence is seen as vital in winning concessions
from Pyongyang. Lingering concerns over the North’s nuclear
program and recent deadly artillery strike against rival South
Korea threaten to overshadow Hu’s visit, which will include a
formal state dinner at the White House.
The six-nation talks, which also involve Japan, Russia and
South Korea, have stalled since 2009, when North Korea with-
drew in anger over international censure of a missile test. It
has since revealed it has a uranium enrichment program, giv-
ing it another means of creating material for a nuclear bomb.
Japan Foreign Minister Seiji Maehara is due to meet with
Clinton today. Meanwhile, the US envoy on North Korea,
Stephen Bosworth, is in east Asia. On Tuesday, on his arrival
for talks in South Korea, he said that he was hopeful for “seri-
ous negotiations” soon on the North. He is also due to visit
Beijing and Tokyo this week.
Crowley said both the United States and China want stability
on the Korean Peninsula. “Neither one of us wants to see the
emergence of a North Korea that is a nuclear state,” he said.
He said both sides want North Korea to meet its obligations
under a 2005 agreement to abandon its nuclear program in
exchange for aid and security guarantees.
“We hope that coming out of the visit and the discussions
with President Hu Jintao we would have a consensus on the
best way to move forward,” Crowley said.
North Korea has signaled its willingness to return to the
six-party talks, and called Wednesday for “unconditional and
early” talks with South Korea to put an end to the months of
tensions.
Although two sides have recently ratcheted down their war-
like rhetoric, Seoul quickly dismissed the offer as insincere
and said it’s waiting for an apology for the sinking of a South
Korean warship that claimed 46 lives, and the shelling of a
South Korean island in November that killed four people.
Even if negotiations on the North’s nuclear program do get
off the ground, it remains unclear what concessions the United
States would be willing or able to grant Pyongyang. A new
Republican-led House could stymie any efforts to grant U.S.
aid to the North in return for steps on denuclearization.
In comments made alongside Clinton before their talks
Wednesday, Yang said he believed the China-U.S. relation-
ship “is on the right track.”
“It is in the best interests of China, the United States and
the world for us to continue to work together,” he said.
On Tuesday, Yang saw national security adviser Tom
Donilon at a White House meeting that President Barack
Obama dropped in on.
They discussed efforts to prevent Iran from acquiring
nuclear weapons and North Korea, the White House said in
a statement.
Donilon stressed the importance of “effective efforts to
reduce imbalances” in the global economy and U.S.-China
trade, it said.
Witness in Jackson case
says things didn’t add up
By ANTHONY McCARTNEY
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES — The career paramedic dashed into
Michael Jackson’s bedroom, looked around and listened to a
doctor’s explanation for why the singer was ostensibly life-
less and came to the conclusion that things didn’t add up.
Richard Senneff said the gaunt patient, an IV stand and
bag next to the bed and the presence of Dr. Conrad Murray
pointed more to a hospice patient, not an international pop
superstar about to embark a series of London concerts.
Although the doctor said he was treating Jackson for dehy-
dration and exhaustion and he had just passed out, Senneff
recalled how the singer’s legs were cold and limp, his open
eyes dried out, and his hands and feet turning blue. The doc-
tor never mentioned that he had given Jackson propofol, a
powerful anesthetic that authorities say killed the musician,
Senneff said.
The medic’s testimony during the second day of Murray’s
preliminary hearing was the latest in a series of witnesses
to describe Jackson as lifeless by the time help was sum-
moned.
Senneff will return to the stand today for defense question-
ing, which so far hasn’t elicited any major contradictions in
the prosecution’s case.
Deputy District Attorney David Walgren described
Murray’s actions as “an extreme deviation from the standard
of care” — ranging from his use of propofol in Jackson’s
bedroom, not telling medical personnel about it and improp-
erly administering CPR.
Murray, facing four years if convicted of involuntary
manslaughter, has pleaded not guilty. His attorneys say the
Houston-based cardiologist did not give Jackson anything
that “should have” killed him.
Senneff’s testimony came after one of Jackson’s former
bodyguards, Alberto Alvarez, testified that Murray told him
to place medicine vials and an IV bag in other bags before
calling 911.
The 34-year-old bodyguard was the only other person in
the room with Murray while frantic efforts were being made
to revive Jackson.
Alvarez said he was “frozen” at the sight of Jackson lay-
ing in bed, a urinary catheter attached and his eyes and mouth
open.
“I said, ’Dr. Murray, what happened?’ And he said, ’He
had a reaction. He had a bad reaction,”’ Alvarez recalled.
The singer’s children, Prince and Paris, walked into the
room at one point and the young girl screamed, “’Daddy!”
and started to cry, Alvarez recalled. At the doctor’s urging,
he ushered them out of the room.
In the courtroom audience, Jackson’s mother, Katherine,
dabbed at her eyes during the most detailed public account
yet of events surrounding the death of her son. She came to
court with her husband, Joe, and children Randy, Janet and
LaToya. They made no eye contact with Murray across the
courtroom.
They heard Alvarez testify that he helped Murray bag the
medicine and saw an unidentified “white milky substance” in
the bottom of an intravenous bag.
“He just grabbed a handful of bottles, or vials, and he
instructed me to put them in a bag,” Alvarez testified, adding
that Murray also told him to place an intravenous bag into
another sack.
After collecting everything and bagging it, Alvarez said,
Murray told him to call 911.
Four minutes later, Senneff and his crew arrived at Jackson’s
rented mansion in the Holmby Hills area of Los Angeles.
He said Wednesday that he saw no signs of the propofol
or the other sedatives ultimately found in Jackson’s body,
and Murray made no mention of the anesthetic as paramedics
rushed to try to find some way to save the singer.
By ERIC TUCKER
Associated Press
CENTRAL FALLS, R.I. —
The teachers at Central Falls
High School struck a deal to get
their jobs back last year after the
entire staff was fired in a radical,
last-ditch attempt to raise student
performance. But if the admin-
istrators thought the teachers
would be grateful for a second
chance, they were wrong.
Many teachers aren’t show-
ing up for work, often calling out
sick. Several abruptly quit within
the first few weeks of the school
year. Administrators have had to
scramble to find qualified sub-
stitutes and have withheld hun-
dreds of student grades because
of the teacher absences.
The progress that the city’s
school board — and the Obama
administration — had hoped for
seems increasingly, and alarm-
ingly, elusive.
The problems come despite a
labor agreement that union lead-
ers and administrators in this
poor, heavily immigrant city
trumpeted as a breakthrough at
Central Falls High, a struggling
school of roughly 840 students
where just 7 percent of 11th-
graders were proficient in math
in 2009.
Exactly what’s causing all the
problems is unclear, but both
sides acknowledge lingering dis-
content over the firings and the
changes that followed.
Richard Kinslow, an English
teacher who has not been calling
out sick, said a new manage-
ment team that was put in place
was inexperienced and failed
to offer support for teachers or
crack down on rampant disci-
pline problems, including what
he said were physical and verbal
assaults on staff members by
students.
“We don’t have a sense of
clarity from our leadership.
We don’t have a clear sense
of their mission or their vision.
Communication has been, again,
awful,” Kinslow said. “If I’m
going to be thrown into the bus
by my supposed leaders every
day, where is my hope? Where is
my sense of team? Why would I
be working?”
But he said he was hopeful
that a team of mediators coming
into the school could encourage
cooperation.
Following months of negoti-
ations, the teachers were rehired
after agreeing to work a longer
school day, undergo more rig-
orous evaluations and provide
more after-school tutoring. At
the time, Gist said the chang-
es would result in “dramatic
achievement.”
That hasn’t happened.
More than a dozen teaches
and sometimes over 20 of the
roughly 90-person staff were
absent on almost any given day
in the last couple of months,
including six on long-term
leave, said Central Falls School
Superintendent Frances Gallo.
Fifteen teachers have left since
August, including six who quit
after school started, though
administrators said they have
only one vacancy left to fill.
Administrators withheld more
than 450 first-quarter grades after
deciding teacher attendance was
too spotty to accurately measure
student performance.
A student walkout disrupted
classes last month, and the presi-
dent of the American Federation
of Teachers held a news confer-
ence to support the teachers.
Some students said they have
grown weary of the negative
attention, arguing teachers are
being scapegoated for prob-
lems beyond their control. But
some also said there are teachers
and administrators who aren’t
equipped to deal with disciplin-
ary and academic problems.
Heavily Hispanic Central
Falls is Rhode Island’s smallest
and poorest city, with a popu-
lation of nearly 19,000. One-
quarter of families live in poverty
and 65 percent speak a language
other than English at home. The
city is under the control of a state-
appointed receiver, who says its
problems are so dire that Central
Falls should consider merging
with neighboring Pawtucket.
Problems at R.I. school are dire
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944 E. Fifth St. 419-692-2202
Soup Supreme
SOUPS
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• Chicken Noodle • Vegetable Beef
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formerly sold at Delphos Food Locker
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