Vessel Sanitation Program 

Operations Manual 
August 2005 

U.S. Public Health Service 
Centers for Disease Control 
and Prevention 
National Center for Environmental Health

Department of Health and Human Services 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 
National Center for Environmental Health 
Vessel Sanitation Program 
Atlanta, GA and Ft Lauderdale, FL 

Vessel Sanitation Program 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 
4770 Buford Highway, NE F­59 
Atlanta, GA 30341­3717 
Phone: (770) 488­7070 
Fax: (770) 488­4127 
E­mail: vsp@cdc.gov 
Vessel Sanitation Program 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 
1850 Eller Drive, Suite 101 
Ft Lauderdale, FL 33316­4201 
Phone: (800) 323­2132 or (954) 356­6650 
Fax: (954) 356­6671 
E­mail: vsp@cdc.gov 

The VSP Operations Manual and updates are available at www.cdc.gov/nceh/vsp.

Forward 
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established the Vessel Sanitation Program 
(VSP) in the 1970's as a cooperative activity with the cruise ship industry.  The program assists the 
cruise ship industry in fulfilling its responsibility for developing and implementing comprehensive 
sanitation programs in order to minimize the risk of gastrointestinal diseases.  Every vessel that has a 
foreign itinerary and carries 13 or more passengers is subject to twice­yearly inspections and, when 
necessary, re­inspection. 
The VSP operated continuously at all major U.S. ports from the early 1970's through 1986, when CDC 
terminated portions of the program.  Industry and public pressures resulted in Congress directing CDC 
through specific language included in CDC appropriations to resume the VSP.  The National Center for 
Environmental Health (NCEH) at CDC became responsible for the VSP in 1986. 
The NCEH held a series of public meetings to determine the needs and desires of the public and cruise 
ship industry and on March 1, 1987, a restructured program began.  In 1988, the program was further 
modified by introducing user fees to reimburse the U.S. government for costs.  A fee based on the 
vessel’s size is charged for inspections and re­inspections.  A VSP Operations Manual based on the 
FDA 1976 model code for food service and the World Health Organization’s Guide to Ship Sanitation 
was published in 1989 to assist the cruise ship industry in educating shipboard personnel. 
In 1998, it became apparent that is was time to update the 1989 version of the VSP Operations Manual. 
Changes in the FDA Food Code, new science on food safety and protection, and newer technology in 
the cruise ship industry contributed to the need for a revised Operations Manual.  During the 2 years 
following, the VSP solicited comments from and conducted public meetings with representatives of the 
cruise industry, general public, FDA and international public health community to ensure that the 2000 
manual would appropriately address current public health issues related to cruise ship sanitation. 
Although the previous VSP Operations Manual was in use for 5 years, we have seen new technology, 
advanced food science, and emerging pathogens which require the manual to be updated.  This 
document represents the comments and corrections submitted by all those cooperative partners in 
government, private industry, and the public.  We would like to thank all those who submitted comments 
and participated throughout this process. 
As new information, technology, and input is received, we will continue to review and record that 
information and maintain a public process to keep the Manual current. 
The VSP Operations Manual ­ 2005 continues the 30 year tradition of government and industry working 
together to achieve a successful and cooperative Vessel Sanitation Program that benefits millions of 
travelers each year. 

David Forney 
Vessel Sanitation Program

Forward 

ii 

............23  4.........................................................2  Personnel ........................................................................................................32  5........38  5......................................................................................................................53  7.............................................................................................2  Activities ...........2  Notification.............................7  Water Distribution System Protection .............................................41  5................4  Requirements for Isolating Symptomatic and Primary Contacts of Crew and Passengers with  Gastroenteritis......................................................................................................................................................................................3  Potable Water System............... 5  3..................................................................................................2  Definitions.....................4  Safety .............Table of Contents  1..................... 3  3........................................................................................51  7.........................1  1................................................................................................................29  5..........................................................1  Introduction and Background..28  4..................................................23  4.................................45  6...............................0  Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance ..............................................5  3.................................................................. 5  4....................................................................1  Scope ........................................47  6.................................................................................2  Bunker and Production Halogenation ......................................................................3  Operations Manual.......................................................0  Food Safety .......................................................................................................4  Equipment and Utensils ..................33  5.....................................................1  Reserved .............................................................0  Introduction.................................................................................................31  5...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................0  Swimming Pools and Whirlpool Spas.........................................................................................................................................................2  Recirculating Swimming Pools ...............................................................................26  4.............................53  7.....................................................................41  6.................3  Food ...........................................................................................59  7.....................................................................................6  Microbiologic Monitoring....3  Whirlpool Spas........................................................................................................................................................................................................31  5..............................................1  Source ..........................................................................77 Table of Contents  iv  .. 2  2......................................................................................................................................................................................45  6.38  5.......................................0  Definitions ..................................................................................................................................................0  Potable Water....................................4  Potable Water System Halogenation ...............1  Flow Through Seawater Swimming Pools..........................................53  7..........1  Data Collection........................0  Authority..........................3  Clinical Specimens.................................................... 1  1................................................3  2............................................................................................................................... 1  1..........................................................................................................5  Potable Water System Halogen Monitoring....................................................45  6.....1  Public Health Service Act ...............

........................................................0  Annexes................................................................................................................13  Variances ....................................109  8.....................................8  Inspection Publication.......................................................................................................121  11..................................................................... Humidifiers....1  Integrated Pest Management .................................................................................1  Inspections .......................................................................................127  11......4  Closing Conference ................................................122  11......6  Poisonous and Toxic Materials..................................................................................5  Warewashing ......................................................118  10..........166  13..........................115  9........................................7...............................................................2  Air Systems..................152  13....................................168  13................................................................................................................................................2  Toilets and Handwashing....................................................................113  9..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................2  Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance System .............3  Fountains..................7  Correction Affidavit ...........................................................................9  Recommendation that the Vessel Not Sail ..............................................................................................................................124  11.............................................177 v  Table of Contents  .............................................119  10.........................................................................................................................................................123  11...........................................................................................................................................................................1  Authority .99  7...........................................................................................................................................1  Infection Control Procedures ...............................................................127  11...................................4  Exclusions .........................................117  10...............................................................................................................................................................126  11......................................................................4  Gastrointestinal Illness Outbreak Investigation ..............................0  Integrated Pest Management ..........................87  7....................................................................................0  Index .......................................................................................129  11...........................................11  Construction /Renovation Inspections ..................................162  13.............128  11.........................................122  11......2  Pest Control .......................................................................2  Inspection Report .................................. and Showers .5     Disinfection Calculations for Water and Equipment................................................................117  10.........................................................................................0  Child­Activity Centers .......................................................................................................10  Re­inspection and Follow­Up Inspections....................................................131  12...............126  11.................3  Cleaning and Disinfection ......................7  Facilities................................................133  13.....................5  Inspection Review..........................................3  Risk­Based Scoring and Correction Priority...............................................................................................................0  Administrative Guidelines.....6  Corrective Action Statement .........................................151  13....................................................109  8..........131  11...102  8...........................................................................113  9.....121  11...............3  Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance System Reporting ........................................................................115  10.....1  Diaper Changing....................120  11...................0  Housekeeping .....................................12  Other Environmental Investigations................................................111  9................................................................

...................................................................................0  Bibliography........181  13........................................195  14.....................................6  Food Cooking Temperature Alternatives ..............................................7  Warewashing Evaluation ..................................................................................................................................8  Inspection Report .............................................188  13........10  Summary of Sanitation Inspections of International Cruise Ships ..............................................9  Corrective Action Statement .......192  13..........13.....................................................................................................................................................................................................197 Table of Contents  vi  ..........................190  13....................................183  13....................11  Fecal Accident Plan ..

  keywords  Each of the guidelines is formatted with a keyword or  phrase on the left side of the page to assist the user in  quickly locating a specific section. but are  provided to convey relevant information about specific  exceptions and alternative means for compliance.  inspection report  number  The individual inspection report item number that will be  found in violation if this recommendation is not followed is  shown to the right of the description.  description  The public health compliance recommendation is provided  in this statement.  noncritical items  Noncritical compliance items are the other items in this  manual.  italics  Portions of some sections of these guidelines are written  in italics.  criticals  Critical compliance items are designated in these  guidelines with a C to the right of the inspection report  number which is also highlighted in red along with the  section number. vii  Information to assist the user the Manual format  .  section number  The international numbering system is used to organize  the guidelines in this document.INFORMATION TO ASSIST THE USER ON THE  MANUAL FORMAT  organization  The Vessel Sanitation Program Operations Manual is  divided into chapters and then sections that focus on each  operational area important to safeguarding public health  aboard vessels.  These provisions are not requirements.

 port.  cooperation  1.2  The program fosters cooperation between the cruise ship industry  and government to define and reduce health risks associated with  vessels and to ensure a healthful and clean environment for  vessels’ passengers and crew.1.  surveillance  1. Introduction  1  .0  Introduction  1.1  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established  the Vessel Sanitation Program (VSP) in 1975.3  Introduction and Background  Activities  Operations Manual  1.2  The program conducts ongoing surveillance of gastrointestinal  illness and coordinates / conducts outbreak investigations on  vessels.1. as a cooperative  activity with the cruise ship industry. and carry 13 or more passengers. call on  a U.1.1  Prevention  inspections  1.2.1.  This program assists the  cruise ship industry in fulfilling its responsibility for developing and  implementing comprehensive performance­based systems to  protect the health of the traveling public.2  1.1.  1.1  Introduction and Background  1.S.1.1  1.1  Cooperative Activity  history  1.1.1  The VSP conducts a comprehensive food safety and environmental  sanitation inspection on vessels that have a foreign itinerary.2.  The industry’s aggressive and  ongoing efforts to achieve and maintain high standards of food  safety and environmental sanitation are critical to the success of  protecting public health.2  Activities  1.1.2.

3.1  The VSP provides food safety and environmental sanitation training  seminars for vessel and shore operations management personnel.  information  1. introduction  of new technologies within the industry. industry recommendations.2.2.  program  guidance  1.1  Revisions  manual  1.3.2.2  The program provides consultative services for reviewing plans for  renovations and new construction. port.1.2.3.4  The program disseminates information to the public. new guidance from sources  used in the previous edition.2.  1.3  Operations Manual  1.3.S.  periodic  review  1. 2  Introduction  .2  The program operations and inspections are based on this manual.1.3  The program conducts construction inspections at the shipyards and  when the vessel makes its initial call at a U.2.2.1.2.2  Information  training  1. and CDC’s experience.3  The Operations Manual will be reviewed annually in the public meeting  with written submissions for revision based on emerging public health  issues and new technologies that may better address the public health  issues on vessels.1.  construction  inspections  1.2.1  The Operations Manual for the VSP has been modified as a result of  emerging public health issues.  plan review  1.

  This purpose of the inspection is to determine the  existence of vermin. port from a  foreign area (42 CFR Section 71. Section 264.1  Although cooperation by vessels with the VSP is voluntary. or other insanitary  conditions that may contribute to the introduction.) authorizes the promulgation  of regulations applicable to vessels for preventing the introduction into  the United States of "any communicable disease by securing the best  sanitary condition of such vessels.  Quarantine and Inspection ­ Regulations to control  communicable diseases) to take measures necessary to prevent the  introduction.1.S.1  Public Health Service Act  2.1.1.S. or  transmission of communicable disease. the Public  Health Service (PHS) is authorized by the Public Health Service Act (42  U. Foreign  Quarantine ­ Requirements Upon Arrival at U.1  Communicable Disease Prevention  communicable  disease  prevention  2. and  crews. or spread of communicable diseases into the  United States from a foreign country.2."  inspections  2.3  Regulations promulgated to carry out these duties authorize the PHS to  conduct sanitary inspections on carriers traveling to a U.1. transmission. spread. the Public Health Service Act (42 U.41.  regulation  promulgation  2.1.C. Ports: Sanitary  Inspection). passengers.1. their cargoes. Section 269.S.S.  Quarantine and Inspection ­ Bills of health.1.C. contaminated food or water. Authority  3  .  General Provisions.0  Authority  2.2  In addition.

.

1  Definitions provided in the Operations Manual are provided to clarify  terminology commonly used in public health. Definitions  5  .2  The terms defined are shown in relation to Operations Manual chapters where  they are used.S. or device discharges indirectly into another fixture. plumbing fixture.3.1.2  Definitions  Authority  "USPHS or PHS" means the U.  "Atmospheric vacuum breaker" means an approved backflow prevention  device that is necessary on a potable water outlet designed for an attachment  that does not have a shutoff downstream from the attachment to preclude the  possibility of backflow. but they may also pertain to other chapters in this manual.  The air­gap must be at least twice the  diameter of the supply pipe or faucet or at least 25 mm (1 inch).1 Scope  3. receptacle. whichever is  greater.  The device is not approved for use when it is  installed in a manner that will cause it to be under continuous water pressure.  3.  "Air­gap" means the unobstructed vertical distance through the free  atmosphere between the lowest opening from any pipe or faucet supplying  water to a tank.  An atmospheric vacuum breaker must be installed at least 152 mm (6 inches)  above the flood level rim of the fixture or container to which it is supplying  water. or  interceptor at a point below the flood­level rim.1  Scope  3.0  Definitions  3. Public Health Service.2 Definitions  3.1. or other device and the flood­level rim of the  receptacle or receiving fixture.  Means an approved backflow prevention plumbing  device utilized on potable water lines where shut­off valves do not exist  downstream from the device.  Potable Water  "Air­break" means a piping arrangement in which a drain from a fixture.  appliance.  3.

  "Back­siphonage" means the flowing back of used. citation of coordinates. and bath and washbasin drains.  "Halogen" means the group of elements including fluorine. or substances from any  source other than the potable water supply. whereas others are non­pressure  types.  and iodine used for the disinfection of water.  The VSP only accepts vented devices. or  polluted water from a plumbing fixture or vessel or other source into a water  supply pipe as a result of negative pressure in the pipe. piers.  "Black water" means waste from toilets."Backflow" means the flow of water or other liquids. urinals.  Bypass arrangements. or non­return valve" means a mechanical device  installed in a waste line to prevent the reversal of flow under conditions of  back pressure.  It does not include black  water or bilge water from the machinery spaces. 6  Definitions  . laundries. industrial fluid.  In the check valve type.  "Harbor area" means that portion of a harbor set aside for vessel anchorage  or for ports including wharves. swivel or change­over devices. jumper connection.  "Backflow.  "Gray water" means all water including drainage from galleys.  "Backflow preventer" means an approved backflow prevention plumbing  device that must be used on potable water distribution lines where there is a  direct connection or a potential connection between the potable water  distribution system and other liquids. a thorough review of  the water system shall be made to confirm that the appropriate device is  selected for each specific application. to preclude obstructing the flow. medical sinks. the flap should swing into a recess  when the line is flowing full. check. and others as determined by legal  definition.  Back­siphonage is  one form of backflow. and service areas. bromine. removable  section. mixtures. and other  similar facilities.  "Cross­connection" means any unprotected actual or potential connection  or structural arrangement between a public or a consumer’s potable water  system and any other source or system through which it is possible to  introduce into any part of the potable system.  To ensure proper protection of the water supply. the  boundaries are the high­water shore line. mixtures.  Some devices are designed for  use under continuous water pressure. and other temporary or permanent  devices which or because of which backflow can occur are considered to be  cross­connections. contaminated. chlorine.  showers. quays. or other means. dishwashers.  gas. or substance other than the intended potable water with which the  system is supplied. any used water. or substance  into the distribution pipes of a potable supply of water from any source or  sources other than the source of potable water supply.

  inorganic. toilets and waste­  treatment areas."Hose connection vacuum breaker" means an approved backflow  prevention plumbing device that attaches directly to a hose bib by way of a  threaded head. mechanically  independent pressure differential relief valve located between the check  valves and at the same time below the first check valve. washing. but is intended for use in technical and other areas where  potable water is not required (laundries. utensils. which is the metric equivalent of parts per  million (ppm). Definitions  7  .  "Sewage" means any liquid waste containing animal or vegetable matter in  suspension or solution. preparation. preparing.  or showering; for use in freshwater swimming pools and whirlpool spas; for  use in the vessel’s hospital; for handling.  "mg/L" means milligrams per liter. and equipment.  The unit shall  include properly located resilient seated test cocks and tightly closing resilient  seated shutoff valves at each end of the assembly. or storage areas).  It is not approved for use under continuous pressure (when a shut­off  valve is located downstream from the device).  "Pollution" means the presence in water of any foreign substance (organic. bubbling or jetted  water effects which physically break at the water surface. or biologic) that tends to degrade water quality to create  a health hazard.  "Reduced pressure principle backflow prevention assembly (RP  Assembly)" means an assembly containing two independently acting  approved check valves together with a hydraulically operating. 30­40 °C or 86­104 °F. and for washing decks in areas other than the vessel’s  hospital.  This device uses a single check valve and vacuum breaker  vent.  "Specialty backflow preventer" means an approved backflow device used  in low hazard situations that has two independent check valves with an  intermediate vacuum breaker and relief valve. but a water depth and volume  more comparable to a pool (ie. or cooking food; and for  cleaning food storage and preparation areas. and volume exceeds 6 tons of water).  "Potable water tanks" means all tanks in which potable water is stored from  bunkering and production for distribution and use as potable water.  "Non­potable fresh water” means fresh water that may or may not be  halogenated. shape is normally non­circular.  "Spa Pool" means a fresh or saltwater supplied pool with water temperatures  and turbulence comparable to a whirlpool spa. including liquids containing chemicals in solution.  "Potable water" means fresh water intended for drinking. engine room. depth over 1 m (3  feet). radiologic. bathing. food service.

 and  Cosmetic Act. or an open­end  wrench. and  Cosmetic Act.  "Bottled drinking water" means water that is sealed in bottles. Drug. including bottled mineral water. utensils. §201(t) and 21 CFR 70. §402.  "Approved" means acceptable to the VSP based on a determination of  conformity with principles.  "CIP" means cleaned in place by circulating or flowing mechanically  through a piping system of a detergent solution. bathing.  "Certification number" means a unique combination of letters and  numbers assigned by a shellfish­control authority to a molluscan shellfish  dealer according to the provisions of the National Shellfish Sanitation  Program. Drug. to clean and sanitize a frozen dessert machine.  (b) "Color additive" has the meaning stated in the Federal Food. such as the  method used. or cooking food: and 4) cleaning food storage and preparation  areas. §201(s) and 21 CFR 170.  preparing.  federal regulations or equivalent international standards and regulations."Technical water" means fresh water NOT intended for 1) drinking. and sanitizing  solution onto or over equipment surfaces that require cleaning.  Food Safety  Additive.  or other containers and offered for sale and that is safe for human  consumption.  "aw" means water activity which measures the free moisture in a food. ASSE standards. in part.  "Accessible" means capable of being exposed for cleaning and inspection  with the use of simple tools such as a screwdriver.  washing. and generally recognized standards  that protect public health such as ANSI/NSF standards. and equipment. or showering: 2) use in the vessel’s hospital: 3) handling. packages. practices.  It is  the quotient of the water vapor pressure of the substance divided by the  vapor pressure of pure water at the same temperature.  "Adulterated" has the meaning stated in the Federal Food. and  Cosmetic Act. Drug. pliers.  (a) "Food additive" has the meaning stated in the Federal Food.  "Blast Chiller" means a unit specifically designed for rapid intermediate  chilling of food products from 60 °C (140 °F) to 21 °C (70 °F) within two  hours and 21 °C (70 °F) to 5 °C (41 °F) within an additional 4 hours. water rinse.  "Beverage" means a liquid for drinking. including water. 8  Definitions  .

Definitions  9  . and Wildlife and Fisheries rules in 50 CFR. USDA rules in 7 CFR and 9 CFR. molding. or other design that eliminates  the usual angles of 90 degrees or less. and does not offer the food for  resale.  "Critical­control point" means a point or procedure in a specific food  system where loss of control may result in an unacceptable health risk. gyros. and  sausage; and a mixture of 2 or more types of meat that have been reduced  in size and combined. or mixers that are subjected to in­place manual cleaning without the  use of a CIP system. such as sausages made from 2 or more meats. takes  possession of food. Section 1010. is not functioning in the capacity of an operator of a  food establishment or food processing plant. and Section numbers.  "Consumer" means a person who is a member of the public.  "Confirmed disease outbreak" means a foodborne or waterborne disease  outbreak in which laboratory analysis of appropriate specimens identifies a  causative agent and epidemiologic analysis implicates the food or water as  the source of the illness."CIP" does not include the cleaning of EQUIPMENT  such as band saws.  "CFR" means Code of Federal Regulations.  flaking. Government Printing Office; and  (b) Contains FDA rules in 21 CFR. ground beef. such as 21  CFR 178.  "Coved" means a concave surface.  "Comminuted" means reduced in size by methods including chopping. the normal use of cleaning compounds and  sanitizing solutions.  "Comminuted" includes fish or meat products that are reduced in size and  restructured or reformulated such as gefilte fish.1010 refers to Title 21.  "Code of Federal Regulations" means the compilation of the general and  permanent rules published in the Federal Register by the executive  departments and agencies of the federal government which:  (a) Is published annually by the U. Part 178.S.  Citations in this Code to the  CFR refer sequentially to the Title.  "Corrosion­resistant material" means a material that maintains  acceptable surface cleanability characteristics under prolonged influence of  the food to be contacted. EPA  rules in 40 CFR. or mincing. and other conditions of the environment where the  material is used. Part. grinding.  slicers.

  "Easily cleanable" includes a tiered application of the criteria that qualify  the surface as easily cleanable as specified under Subparagraph (a) of this  definition to different situations in which varying degrees of cleanability are  required such as:  (a) The appropriateness of stainless steel for a food preparation surface. and installation of the  surface; and  (c) Varies with the likelihood of the surface's role in introducing pathogenic  or toxigenic agents or other contaminants into food based on the surface's  approved placement. purpose. or chemical parameter must be  controlled to minimize the occurrence of risk from an identified food safety  hazard." "wastewater.  "Deck sink" means a sink recessed into the deck. biologic." "mop water."  "rainwater. such as "boiler water."Critical limit" means the maximum or minimum value at a critical­control  point to which a physical. and use. construction. sized to contain waste  liquids from tilting kettles and pans.  "Drinking water" means water that meets 40 CFR 141 National Primary  Drinking Water Regulations.  compared with the lack of need for stainless steel to be used for floors or for  tables used for consumer dining; or  (b) The need for a different degree of cleanability for a utilitarian attachment  or accessory in the kitchen.  "Drinking water" is traditionally known as "potable water.  "Disinfection" means the destruction of all vegetative cells (not spores) in  or on inanimate objects.  "Dry­storage area" means a room or area designated for the storage of  packaged or containerized bulk food that is not potentially hazardous and  dry goods such as single­service items. design." and "nondrinking" water."  "Drinking water" includes the term "water" except where the term used  connotes that the water is not potable.  "Easily cleanable" means a characteristic of a surface that:  (a) Allows effective removal of soil by normal cleaning methods;  (b) Is dependent on the material. 10  Definitions  . compared with a decorative attachment or  accessory in the consumer dining area.

 a utility connection that disconnects quickly. or ingredient used or intended for use or for sale in whole or in  part for human consumption. sea cucumber. gliders.  "Food­contact surface" means:  (a) A surface of equipment or a utensil with which food normally comes into Definitions  11  .  beverage.  "Equipment" means an article used in the operation of a food  establishment. sink.  "Foodborne disease outbreak" also includes a single case of illness such  as 1 person ill from botulism or chemical poisoning. grinder.  or a flexible utility connection line of sufficient length to allow the equipment  to be moved for cleaning of the equipment and adjacent area. aquatic turtle.  mixer. forklifts.  and sea urchin and the roe of such animals) other than birds or mammals. or rollers; or provided with a  mechanical means to safely tilt a unit of equipment for cleaning; and  (b) Having no utility connection.  and all mollusks. crustaceans."Easily movable" means:  (a) Portable; mounted on casters. Environmental Protection Agency.  "Fish" means fresh or saltwater finfish. including fish that have been processed in any manner. or processed edible substance. hood.  "Equipment" does not include items used for handling or storing large  quantities of packaged foods that are received from a supplier in a cased or  overwrapped lot. cooked. jellyfish. or  warewashing machine. vending machine.  "Foodborne disease outbreak" means an incident in which:  (a) 2 or more nonrelated persons experience a similar illness after ingesting  a common food; and  (b) Epidemiologic analysis implicates the food as the source of the illness. frog. such as a freezer. dollies. if such animal life is intended for human consumption.  "Floor sink" see deck sink. stove. ice maker.  "Food" means a raw. scale. and  skids. ice. and other forms of  aquatic life (including alligator.  "EPA" means the U. meat block.  temperature measuring device for ambient air. slicer. such as hand trucks. oven. racks. table.S. reach­in refrigerator. or chewing gum.  "Fish" includes an edible human food product derived in whole or in part  from fish. pallets.

  "HACCP plan" means a written document that delineates the formal  procedures for following the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point principles  developed by The National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria  for Foods. bison.  "Game animal" does not include ratites such as ostrich.  "General­use pesticide" means a pesticide that is not classified by EPA  for restricted use as specified in 40 CFR 152.  "Game animal" includes mammals such as reindeer.contact; or  (b) A surface of equipment or a utensil from which food may drain. raccoon.  "Food­processing plant" means a commercial operation that  manufactures. drip. the products of which are food. horse. deer. or as  fish as defined under Subparagraph 1­201. and rhea.  See seam. or  splash into a food. that is  not classified as cattle.  "Game animal" means an animal. or physical property that may cause  an unacceptable consumer health risk. table linens. elk.  (replaces the term hand sanitizer)  "Hazard" means a biologic. in the case 12  Definitions  .  "Hermetically sealed container" means a container that is designed and  intended to be secure against the entry of microorganisms and. squirrel.  "Food employee" means a person working with unpackaged food.  and nonaquatic reptiles such as land snakes. Part 301.  water buffalo.10(B)(25). rabbit.  "Grade A standards" means the requirements of the PHS/FDA "Grade A  Pasteurized Milk Ordinance" and "Grade A Condensed and Dry Milk  Ordinance" with which certain fluid and dry milk and milk products comply. nutria. mule.175. opossum. goat. or stores food for human consumption and  does not provide food directly to a consumer. labels. or muskrat. chemical. or onto a surface normally in contact with food. emu. as Poultry in 9  CFR Subchapter C ­ Mandatory Poultry Products Inspection. antelope. Part 381. swine. or food­contact surfaces. food  equipment or utensils.  "Hand Antiseptic" means antiseptic products applied to human skin. sheep. or other equine in 9  CFR Subchapter A ­ Mandatory Meat Inspection.  "Gap" means an open juncture between two materials or equipment  components and is generally larger than a seam. packages.

 and work garments including cloth gloves.  "Law" means applicable local. swine.  poultry. mussels. or other equivalent  international statutes. and toiletries such as toothpaste and Definitions  13  . federal. severity. or Chef.  "Person in charge" means the individual present on a vessel who is  responsible for the food operation at the time of inspection such as the Food  and Beverage Manager.”  "Kitchenware" means food preparation and storage utensils. or appearance.  "Personal­care items" means items or substances that may be poisonous. circumstance. canned. or  securely wrapped.  "Injected" means manipulating a meat so that infectious or toxigenic  microoganisms may be introduced from its surface to its interior through  tenderizing with deep penetration or injecting the meat such as with juices  which may be referred to as "injecting. or event creates a situation that requires  immediate correction or cessation of operation to prevent injury based on  the number of potential injuries. cloth napkins.  "Linens" means fabric items such as cloth hampers. practice.  clams." or "stitch pumping. Food Manager. whether packaged in a food establishment or a food­  processing plant.  "Packaged" does not include a wrapper. or a source of contamination and are used to maintain or enhance a  person's health.  "Meat" means the flesh of animals used as food including the dressed flesh  of cattle. except fish. wiping cloths. hygiene.  "Packaged" means bottled.  "Personal­care items" include items such as medicines; first aid supplies;  and other items such as cosmetics.  "Molluscan shellfish" means any edible species of fresh or frozen oysters. except when the  scallop product consists only of the shucked adductor muscle.  toxic. to maintain the commercial sterility of its contents  after processing." "pinning. regulations. or other nondurable  container used to containerize food to the facilitate food protection during  service and receipt of the food by the consumer. sheep.  "Imminent health hazard" means a significant threat or danger to health  that is considered to exist when evidence is sufficient to show that a  product. state. and the nature. and scallops or edible portions thereof. or goats and other edible animals. cartoned. and duration of the  anticipated injury.of low­acid canned foods. and wild game animals. and ordinances. table  cloths. carry­out box. securely bagged.

 polishes.  "Physical facilities" means the structure and interior surfaces of a vessel’s  food storage. or sewage directly or indirectly  to the drainage system of the vessel. and attachments.  The value for pure distilled water is 7. including their respective connections. which is a measure of the degree of acidity or basicity of a  solution. drying agents. such as petroleum products and paints.  "pH" means the symbol for the negative logarithm of the hydrogen ion  concentration.  "Poisonous or toxic materials" means substances that are not intended  for ingestion and are included in 4 categories:  (a) Cleaners and sanitizers.  Values between 0 and 7 indicate acidity and values between 7 and 14  indicate alkalinity. waste materials. devices.  "Potentially hazardous food" means a food that is natural or synthetic and  that requires temperature control because it is in a form capable of  supporting: 14  Definitions  . which is  considered neutral. including accessories such as  soap and towel dispensers. waste. which include substances such as  insecticides and rodenticides;  (c) Substances necessary for the operation and maintenance of the  establishment such as nonfood­grade lubricants and personal care items  that may be deleterious to health; and  (d) Substances that are not necessary for the operation and maintenance of  the vessel and are on the vessel. preparation and service areas.mouthwash. acids. and other  chemicals;  (b) Pesticides except sanitizers.  "Plumbing system" means the water supply and distribution pipes;  plumbing fixtures and traps; soil. and vent pipes; sanitary sewer  drains and vessel drains.  and appurtenances within the vessel; and water­treating equipment.  "Plumbing fixture" means a receptacle or device that:  (a) Is permanently or temporarily connected to the water­ distribution  system of the vessel and demands a supply of water from the system; or  (b) Discharges used water. such as light fixtures and  heating or air conditioning system vents. which include cleaning and sanitizing agents  and agents such as caustics.

85 or less;  (c) A food with a pH level of 4. Definitions  15  . the growth of Salmonella Enteritidis. Enteritidis in eggs or C. but  that does not support the growth of microorganisms as specified under  Subparagraph (a) of this definition.  "Potentially hazardous food" includes an animal food (a food of animal  origin) that is raw or heat­treated; a food of plant origin that is heat­treated  or consists of raw seed sprouts; cut melons; and garlic and oil mixtures that  are not acidified or otherwise modified at a food processing plant in a way  that results in mixtures that do not support growth as specified under  Subparagraph (a) of this definition.6 or below when measured at 24 ° C (75 ° F);  (d) A food in an unopened hermetically sealed container that is  commercially processed to achieve and maintain commercial sterility under  conditions of nonrefrigerated storage and distribution; and  (e) A food for which laboratory evidence demonstrates that the rapid and  progressive growth of infectious or toxigenic microorganisms or the growth  of S.  "Potentially hazardous food" does not include:  (a) An air­cooled hard­boiled egg with shell intact. but has been treated to destroy all viable Salmonellae;  (b) A food with an aw  value of 0. or a shell egg that is not  hard­boiled.  (f) A food that may contain an infectious or toxigenic microorganism or  chemical or physical contaminant at a level sufficient to cause illness. or a combination of barriers that inhibit the  growth of microorganisms. such as a food that  has an aw  and a pH above the levels specified under Subparagraphs (b)  and (c) of this definition and that may contain a preservative.(a) The rapid and progressive growth of infectious or toxigenic  microorganisms;  (b) The growth and toxin production of Clostridium botulinum; or  (c) In raw shell eggs. other barrier to  the growth of microorganisms. botulinum can not occur.

 lamb flank. as defined in 9  CFR 362 Voluntary Poultry Inspection Program. or guinea.  "Ready­to­eat food" includes:  (a) Potentially hazardous food that is unpackaged and cooked to the  temperature and time required for the specific food;  (b) Raw. pork loin. warehousing. goose. cut fruits and vegetables;  (c) Whole. whether live or dead. quail.  "Primal cut" means a basic major cut into which carcasses and sides of  meat are separated.  "Poultry" does not include ratite. or squab such as pheasant. game bird.  "Refuse" means solid waste not carried by water through the sewage  system. duck.  partridge. transportation.  cooking. as defined in 9 CFR 381 Poultry Products Inspection  Regulations; and  (b) Any migratory waterfowl. washed. raw fruits and vegetables that are presented for consumption  without the need for further washing. or veal  breast. state. turkey. or other  food establishment. or federal or equivalent  international enforcement body or authorized representative having  jurisdiction over the food processing.  "Ready­to­eat food" means food in a form that is edible without washing. or guinea.  "Readily removable" means capable of being detached from the main  unit without the use of tools. grouse. or shells are  removed. peels. 16  Definitions  . such as at a buffet; and  (d) Other food presented for consumption for which further washing or  cooking is not required and from which rinds. husks.  whether live or dead. or additional preparation by the food establishment or the  consumer and that is reasonably expected to be consumed in that form.  "Regulatory authority" means the local."Poultry" means:  (a) Any domesticated bird such as chicken. such as a beef round.  "Readily accessible" means exposed or capable of being exposed for  cleaning or inspection without the use of tools.

 tribal. which is equal to a 99. and Cosmetic Act; or  (c) Other materials that are not additives and that are used in conformity  with applicable regulations of the FDA."Removable" means capable of being detached from the main unit with  the use of simple tools such as a screwdriver.  "Shellstock" means raw. Drug.  "Sealed seam" means a seam that has no openings that would permit the  entry of soil or liquid seepage.8 mm (1/32 inch) and less than 3 mm (1/8  inch). of representative disease microorganisms of public health  importance. is  sufficient to yield a reduction of 5 logs. and that is limited to use by or under the direct supervision  of a certified applicator.175 Pesticides classified for  restricted use.  "Shellfish­control authority" means a state. when evaluated for efficacy.  "Sealed" means having no openings present that will permit the entry of  soil or seepage of liquids.  "Shucked shellfish" means molluscan shellfish that have one or both Definitions  17  . in­shell molluscan shellfish. in their becoming a  component or otherwise affecting the characteristics of any food;  (b) An additive that is used as specified in §409 or 706 of the Federal  Food. directly or indirectly. federal.  "Sanitization" means the application of cumulative heat or chemicals on  cleaned food­contact surfaces that.  "Restricted­use pesticide" means a pesticide product that contains the  active ingredients specified in 40 CFR 152. foreign.  "Sewage" means liquid waste containing animal or vegetable matter in  suspension or solution and may include liquids containing chemicals in  solution.  "Safe material" means:  (a) An article manufactured from or composed of materials that may not  reasonably be expected to result. pliers. or  other government entity legally responsible for administering a program  that includes certification of molluscan shellfish harvesters and dealers for  interstate commerce.  "Seam" means an open juncture between two materials or equipment  components greater than 0.999%  reduction. or an open­end  wrench.

 Department of Agriculture. one person  use. cups. thermistor.  "Single­use articles" includes items such as wax paper. air. toothpicks. strength. pickle barrels. and other  items such as bags. butcher paper. plastic tubs or  buckets.  and wrappers that are designed and constructed for one time.  "Single­use articles" means utensils and bulk food containers designed  and constructed to be used once and discarded. and number 10  cans which do not meet the materials.  thermocouple. placemats.  "Slacking" means the process of moderating the temperature of a food  such as allowing a food to gradually increase from a temperature of ­23 ° C  (­10 ° F) to ­4 ° C (25 ° F) in preparation for deep­fat frying or to facilitate even  heat penetration during the cooking of previously block­frozen food such  as spinach. and tumblers; and plates.  "Tableware" means eating. durability. or water and is numerically scaled in Celsius and or Fahrenheit.  "Utensil" means a food­contact implement or container used in the 18  Definitions  . straws. wall. drinking. and serving utensils for table use  such as flatware including forks.  "Table­mounted equipment" means equipment that is not portable and  is designed to be mounted off the floor on a table.  "Temperature measuring device or TMD" means a thermometer. serving dishes. bread wrappers.  "Single­service articles" means tableware. jars. or ceiling having an even or level surface with no  roughness or projections that renders it difficult to clean. stirrers.  "USDA" means the U. counter. formed aluminum food containers. or other device that indicates the temperature of  food.  plastic wrap.S. knives. ketchup bottles.shells removed. carry­out utensils. containers. or shelf. and cleanability  specifications.  "Smooth" means:  (a) A food­contact surface having a surface free of pits and inclusions with  a cleanability equal to or exceeding that of (100 grit) number 3 stainless  steel;  (b) A nonfood­contact surface of equipment having a surface equal to that  of commercial grade hot­rolled steel free of visible scale; and  (c) A floor. and spoons; hollowware including  bowls.

  “Attack rate” – (1)   means the proportion of individuals who are exposed  to an infectious agent who becomes clinically ill. or environmental health hazard. or  single­use; gloves used in contact with food; food temperature measuring  devices; and probe­type price or identification tags used in contact with  food. mechanically tenderized.  Outbreak­related Definitions  “Acute gastroenteritis (AGE)” – means an irritation and inflammation of  the digestive tract characterized by sudden onset of symptoms of diarrhea  and/or vomiting. illness. a health hazard or nuisance will not result from the modification  or waiver. if in  noncompliance. single­service.  Child­Activity Centers  "Child­activity center" means facilities for child­related activities where  children under 6­years old are placed to be cared for by vessel staff. preparation. in the opinion of the Vessel Sanitation  Program.  such as kitchenware or tableware that is multiuse. reconstructed.  "Variance" means a written document issued by the Vessel Sanitation  Program that authorizes a modification or waiver of one or more  requirements of these guidelines if. or scored and marinated.  from which beef steaks may be cut. dispensing. transportation. effective sanitation and maintenance and judicious  use of chemical compounds. sale. is more likely than other deficiencies to contribute to food  or water contamination. intact beef" means whole muscle beef that is not  injected.  "Warewashing" means the cleaning and sanitizing of utensils and food­  contact surfaces of equipment. traps. as well as other constitutional symptoms.  "Critical item" is an item that is denoted in these guidelines with a “C” to  the right of the section number which is also highlighted in red.  "Whole­muscle. or service of food.  (2)  The cumulative Definitions  19  .  Integrated Pest Management  "Integrated Pest Management (IPM) " means a documented organized  system of controlling pests through a combination of methods including  inspection.  Administrative Guidelines  "Critical item" means a provision of these guidelines that.storage. baits.

  “Disinfectant” – (see chemical disinfectant)  “Disinfection” – means the process that reduces the level of microbial  contamination.  Intended uses and directions for use are found both on the labels of the  products and/or in package inserts. vector or the inanimate environment." "intermediate­level. bedding.incidence of infection in a group observed over a period during an  epidemic." and "low­level" according to their  comparative levels of potency and their intended uses. animal or inanimate reservoir to a  susceptible host; either directly or indirectly through an intermediate plant  or animal host. or  other inanimate articles or substances including food and water.  “Chemical disinfectant” – means a chemical agent that is applied to  inanimate objects to kill microbes. and unlike the sanitizers for food­contact surfaces. toys. or from an infected  person to animals. products that  are termed disinfectants are usually not intended for use in association  with food­contact surfaces. surgical instruments or dressings. A disinfectant is a chemical or physical agent that is  applied to inanimate objects to kill microbes.  “Communicable disease” – means an illness due to a specific infectious  agent or its toxic products that arises through transmission of that agent or  its products from an infected person.  “Chemical sanitizer” – means a chemical that.  “Diarrheal Disease” – means 3 or more episodes of loose stools in a 24­  hour period or of a greater than normal (for the person) amount of loose  stools.  Chemical disinfectants are classified as  "high­level. Disinfectant performance is  typically not defined in terms of a specific percentage or log­reduction  target. Chemical  disinfectants are regulated either by FDA (medical instrument uses) or the  Environmental Protection Agency EPA (environmental surface uses).  “Epidemic” – means the occurrence in a community or region of cases of 20  Definitions  . from an infected animal to humans. when applied to a  surface. including arthropods  “Contamination” – means the presence of an infectious agent on a body  surface. reduces the number of microbes to a safe level.  “Communicable period” – means the time during which an infectious  agent may be transferred directly or indirectly from an infected person to  another person. Material Safety and Data Sheets  (MSDS) for each product are available from the manufacturer.  “Date/Time of onset” – means the date/time on which the first symptom  appeared. in clothes.

 including birds and  arthropods.  fungus.  “Epidemic curve” – means a graphic plotting of the distribution of cases  by date/time of symptom onset. or fever; and (3) reported to the master of the vessel. that affords subsistence or lodgment to an infectious agent  under natural conditions. or abdominal cramps. the  medical staff or other designated staff by passenger or a crew member. fomes) – means articles that convey infection to  others because they have been contaminated by pathogenic organisms. drinking glass. or  muscle aches.  “Quarantine” – means the limitation of movement of apparently well  persons who have been exposed to a case of communicable (infectious)  disease during its period of communicability to prevent disease  transmission during the incubation period if infection should occur.  “Incubation period” – means the time interval between invasion by an  infectious agent and the appearance of the first sign or symptom of the  disease in question. or headache.  “Index case” – means the first case in a family or other defined group to  come to the attention of the investigator  “Infectious agent” – means an organism (virus.  “Reportable gastrointestinal illness case” (VSP definition) – means a  case of gastrointestinal illness with one of the following characteristics; (1)  diarrhea (three or more episodes of loose stool in a 24­hour period). rickettsia.  “Fomite transmission” – means the transmission of pathogenic  organisms via inanimate objects (see fomites)  “Foodborne disease outbreak” (see food safety definition section)  “Gastrointestinal illness case” – (see reportable gastrointestinal illness  case)  “Host” – means a person or other living animal.an illness. protozoan. or helminth) that is capable of producing infection or  infectious disease. or (2)  vomiting and one additional symptom including one or more episodes of  loose stool in a 24­hour period.  “Fomites” (singular.  Examples include handkerchief.  “Sanitization” (food­contact surfaces only)– means the application of  cumulative heat or chemicals on cleaned food­contact surfaces that. door handle. when Definitions  21  . clothing. or other health­related events clearly in  excess of normal expectancy. specific health­behavior. bacteria. and  toys.

9%  or 3 logs (1000.  (2) Indirect transmission – Occurs when an infectious agent is  transferred or carried by some intermediate item.  A  single case of chemical poisoning or a laboratory­confirmed case of  primary amebic meningoencephalitis is considered an outbreak.  “Vehicle” – means the mode of transmission of an infectious agent from  its reservoir to a susceptible host. systematic collection. and evaluation of public health practice  “Transmission” (of infection) ­ means any mechanism by which an  infectious agent is spread from a source or reservoir to another person.  “Secondary attack rate” – means the proportion of cases of an infection  that occur among contacts within the incubation period following exposure  to the primary case in relation to the total number of exposed contacts; the  denominator is restricted to susceptible contacts when these can be  determined.  “Waterborne outbreak” (USEPA)– means an outbreak involving at least  two people that experience a similar illness after ingesting or using water  intended for drinking or after being exposed to or unintentionally ingesting  or inhaling fresh or marine water used for recreational purposes and  epidemiological evidence implicates the water as the source of illness.  The secondary attack rate is a measure of contagiousness  and is useful in evaluating control measures. resulting in disease.  This can be by food. and  vectors.  implementation. 22  Definitions  . of representative disease microorganisms  of public health importance. among others. waterborne.  Included are  airborne. organism. means.g.  “Sanitization” (non­food­contact surfaces) – means the performance  standard used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for these  sanitizers has required a reduction of the target microorganism by 99. or 10 3 ) after 5 minutes of contact time. fomites) and  vectorborne modes of transmission. water. vehicleborne (e.  “Surveillance” (CDC) – means the ongoing.evaluated for efficacy. is sufficient to yield a reduction of 5 logs.999% reduction.  These mechanisms are defined as follows:  (1) Direct transmission (includes person­to­person transmission) –  Direct and essentially immediate transfer of infectious agents to a  receptive portal of entry through which human or animal infection  may take place..  or process to a susceptible host. foodborne. which is  equal to a 99. 1/1000.  “Sanitizer” – (see chemical sanitizer).  analysis and interpretation of outcome­specific data used in planning.

1.2  4.1.0  Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance  4. or muscle aches.1. or  fever (temperature of ≥ 38 °C (100.1  4.1. both of which are done for reporting  purposes.  Documentation of the 3 day  assessment for each crew member WITH SYMPTOMS  shall be maintained on the vessel and be available for  review during inspections.4  Data Collection  Notification  Clinical Specimens  Requirements for Isolating Symptomatic and Primary Contacts of Crew and  Passengers with Gastroenteritis  4.1  A reportable case of gastrointestinal illness shall be  defined as:  02  (1)  Diarrhea (three or more episodes of loose stools in a  24 hour period); or  (2)  Vomiting and one additional symptom including one  or more episodes of loose stools in a 24­hour period.  For many conditions  of public health importance.1.1. although a common symptom of  gastrointestinal illness.  onset time  4.  (4)  Nausea.  or other designated staff by a passenger or a crew  member.1.1  Reportable Cases  4.1.1.1  case definition  Data Collection  4. the medical  staff. action to contain disease Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance  02  23  . or headache.1.1.  definition  purpose  4. or  abdominal cramps.4 °F)); and  (3)  Reported to the master of the vessel.2  The reportable cases shall include those crew members  with a symptom onset time of up to 3 days before  boarding the vessel. is specifically excluded from this  definition to avoid misclassifying seasickness (nausea  and vomiting) as gastroenteritis.3  These case definitions are to be used for identifying and  classifying cases.  They should not be used as criteria for clinical  intervention or public health action.4.1  Definition  4.3  4.1.

should be initiated as soon as a problem is identified; in  many circumstances. the cruise dates and the cruise  number.1.1. or other designated staff.1.2.2.1. GA 30333 USA. 1600 Clifton  Road.  Division of Global Migration and Quarantine.2.  log details  4.  foreign quarantine  4.  02  log contents  4.1  Log  responsibility  4.1  A standardized gastrointestinal illness surveillance log for  02  each cruise shall be maintained daily by the master of the  vessel.2  Records  4.1.1.1.1.  cruise information  4.1. or other designated staff.  More information can  be obtained from:  Centers for Disease Control and  Prevention.  4. fax (404) 498­1633.1. age and gender;  (3)  A designation as passenger or crew member;  (4)  Crew member position or job on the vessel. Atlanta.3  The log shall list:  02  (1)  All reportable cases of gastrointestinal illness;  (2)  All passengers and crew members who are  dispensed antidiarrheal medication from the master of  the vessel.1. National Center for Infectious Diseases.1.2.2.4  The gastrointestinal illness surveillance log entry for each  02 passenger or crew member shall contain the following  information:  (1)  The first date of clinic visit or report to staff of illness;  (2)  The person’s name. appropriate public health action  should be undertaken even though insufficient  information is available to determine whether cases meet  the case definition. telephone (404)  498­1600. the medical staff. MS E­03.4  regulations  Foreign quarantine regulations require death and certain  illnesses of an arriving international passengers or crew  members to be reported to the quarantine station having  responsibility for the port of entry.1. the medical staff. if  applicable;  24  Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance  .2  The gastrointestinal illness surveillance log shall list the  name of the vessel.

  4.2.2. recorded temperature.  The completed  questionnaires shall be maintained alongside the  gastrointestinal illness surveillance log.2. including the presence of the  following selected signs and symptoms: numbers of  episodes each of diarrhea and vomiting per day. bloody  stools.3  Retention  4. gastrectomy.1.  A yes/no entry for antidiarrheal medications sold or  dispensed at medical will be recorded on the  gastrointestinal illness surveillance log form.2. inflammatory bowel  disease.1.1.  headaches and muscle aches;  (9)  Notation on whether or not a stool specimen was  requested and received;  (10)  Use of antidiarrheal medication; and  (11)  The presence of underlying medical conditions  which may affect interpretation of acute gastrointestinal  illness for example diabetic diarrhea.(5) Cabin number;  (6) Meal seating information;  (7)  Date and time of illness onset;  (8)  Illness symptoms.1.3. or others.1.2.  Retention of a  paper record or crew medical log for crew members with  symptoms up to 3 days prior to boarding the vessel is  Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance  02  02 25  .  The self­administered questionnaires shall  contain all of the data elements that appear in the  questionnaire found in Annex 13. abdominal cramps.  Electronic  records of these documents are acceptable as long as  the data are complete and can be retrieved during  inspections and outbreak investigations.2  Questionnaires  4. fever. gastrointestinal illness log and the 72  hour self­administered questionnaires shall be  maintained on the vessel for 12 months.1  The medical log.2.  medications sold  or dispensed  food/  beverage  questionnaire  retention  4.1  Questionnaires detailing activities and meal locations for  02  the 72 hours before illness onset shall be distributed to all  passengers and crew members who are gastrointestinal  illness cases.5  Antidiarrheal medications shall not be sold or dispensed  to passengers or crew except by designated medical  staff.2.1.  4.

S.2  Report Contents  4. facsimile.1.  Privacy Act ­ Records maintained on individuals and the  Freedom of Information Act.C.  These materials shall be transmitted by  facsimile to the VSP for review in outbreak investigations.  The vessel shall maintain proof onboard that the report  was successfully received by the VSP.2. port.2.  5 U.  review  privacy  4.1  All personal medical information received by CDC  personnel shall be protected in accordance with  applicable federal law.2  Notification  4.2. Section 552.4  Confidentiality  4.2  02  The gastrointestinal illness surveillance log and the 72  hour self­administered questionnaires shall be available  for review by the VSP during inspections and outbreak  investigations.1.1.4.2.1. including the additional cases.1.S.2.1.acceptable and shall also be maintained on the vessel for  12 months.2.S.1  The gastrointestinal illness report shall contain:  contents  26  Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance  01  C .2. an updated report shall be submitted no less  than 4 hours before the vessel’s arrival at the U.  4.3.  4.1. orders. records.  C  4­hour update  report  4.  C  4.1.1  The master.  as requested. or preferably electronically.  4. opinions.  The 4­hour update report shall be a cumulative total  count of the reported crew and passengers during the  entire cruise.S. the medical staff.2.1  Routine Report Timing  24­hour report  4. port from a foreign port shall  submit at least one standardized gastrointestinal illness  report based on the number of reportable cases in the  gastrointestinal illness log to the VSP no less than 24  hours.  Administrative Procedure ­ Public information; agency  rules.S. Section 552a.2. and proceedings. port.C.1.1  Routine Report  4. but not more than 36 hours before the vessel’s  expected arrival at the U.3  02  Routine (24 hour) and 4­hour update reports may be  made by telephone.2  01  If the number of cases changes after submission of the  initial report.2.1. including 5 U. or other designated staff of  01  a vessel destined for a U.2.1.1.

2. of a  vessel with an international itinerary destined for a U.1  A telephone notification to the VSP shall accompany a  special 2% report. even if the number is 0;  and  (5)  The total number of passengers and crew members  on the cruise.1. or designated corporate representative.3  Routine 24­hours before arrival and 4­hours before  arrival reports shall continue to be submitted by the  master. or designated corporate representative. ports.2.2. including those who have been disembarked  or removed because of illness. S.2.2.(1)  The name of the vessel;  (2)  The ports of embarkation and disembarkation;  (3) The dates of embarkation and disembarkation;  (4)  The total numbers of reportable cases of  gastrointestinal illness among passengers and crew  members.2. of a  vessel that has submitted a special report.2  For cruises lasting longer than 15 days prior to entering a  U.2.  cruise length  2% illness rate  4.  reaches 2% among passengers or 2% among crew and  the vessel is within 15 days of expected arrival at a U.2. port.2.S.2  01  Daily reports of illness status shall be submitted as  requested by the VSP following the initial submission of a  special report. S.S. when:  01  C  (1)  The cumulative percentage of reportable cases  entered in the gastrointestinal illness surveillance log.  4.2. including between two U.1. port.2.  port shall submit a special report at any time during a  cruise.2.  daily report  4.1.2.1  The master.1.2.S.  port.1  Special Report Timing  4.2.2  Special Notification  4.2  Special Report  4. the gastrointestinal illness report may include  only those reportable cases and total numbers of  passengers and crew members for the 15 days prior to  the expected arrival at a U.  C  routine reporting  continues  4.2.  01  C  4.  01  C telephone report  Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance  27  .

1.2.1. the  medical staff will begin collecting whole stool specimens  for viral analysis.1  Clinical Specimen Submission  4.  The  specimen packaging shall include the proper  documentation as required by the receiving laboratory.2.4 of this  manual. the medical  staff should consult with epidemiology staff at the VSP for  clinical specimen collection requirements.3.2  Clinical Specimen Submission Collection Procedures  when to collect  4. unless it is clear from clinical and  epidemiological data that the causative agent is of  bacterial or parasitic etiology.3.  02  review  4.1  02  When a vessel reaches 2% reportable gastrointestinal  illness in either passengers or crew members.3.2.2.  proper packing  4.1  The 24 hour.3.4  and the specific details provided in the VSP website.  specimen/  shipping  containers  28  Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance  02  . and special reports shall be  maintained on the vessel for 12 months.3.1.  02  4. 4 hour.3  Report Retention  4.1  The medical staff will be responsible for maintaining a  supply of at least 10 clinical specimen collection  containers for both viral and bacterial agents (10 for  each).  If the etiologic agent is  suspected to be bacterial and/or parasitic.2  02 All clinical specimens shall be packaged and shipped in  accordance with the guidelines outlined in Annex 13.3.1  Retention  retention  4.3  Clinical Specimens  4.3.2. as well as the proper shipping containers and  labels for same and provided in Annex 13.4.  Specific information on vendors where supplies  may be ordered is provided in the VSP website.  4.2  The reports shall be available for review by the VSP  during inspections and outbreak investigations.3.2.

4. Staff.2  b.1  a.2  Passengers  4.4  Requirements for Isolating Symptomatic and Primary  Contacts of Crew and Passengers with Gastroenteritis  isolate ill crew  4. Officers and other Employees  4.4.  Food Employees  ­Isolation in cabin or designated restricted area until  symptom­free for a minimum of 48 hours;  ­Follow­up with and approval by designated medical  personnel is required before returning crew to work;  ii.1  a.1  Crew.  Symptomatic and meeting the case definition for  Acute Gastroenteritis (AGE):  11  C  11  C  4.  cabin mates/  contacts  4.4.  Food and Non­Food Employees:  ­ Restrict exposure to symptomatic crew member(s);  ­ Medical or supervisory staff shall conduct a verbal  interview with asymptomatic cabin mates and immediate  contacts to confirm their condition.  Symptomatic and meeting the case definition for AGE:  11  C i.1.4.1. and to instruct them to  report immediately to medical if they develop illness  symptoms;  ­ Medical or supervisory staff shall conduct verbal  interviews daily with asymptomatic crew until 48 hours  after onset of the ill crew members symptoms began.2.  isolate ill  passengers  ­ Advised to remain isolated in cabin until well for a  minimum of 24 hours after symptom resolution;  Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance  29  .  Non­food Employees:  ­ Isolation in cabin or designated restricted area until  symptom­free for a minimum of 24 hours;  ­ Follow­up with and approval by designated medical  personnel is required before returning crew to work.  Asymptomatic cabin mates or immediate contacts of  symptomatic crew:  i.4. advise them of the  hygiene and handwashing facts.4.

30  Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance  .­ Follow­up by infirmary personnel advised;  ­ Handwashing tips and personal hygiene information  sheet provided by ship.

1.  5.1.1.1  5.1.  onboard test  5.1.  If a vessel bunkers potable water from the  same port more than once per month only one test per  month is required. and the report should include an analysis for  Escherichia coli at a minimum.0  Potable Water  5.2.1.1.5.1.1.7  Source  Bunker and Production Halogenation  Potable Water System  Potable Water System Halogenation  Potable Water System Halogen Monitoring  Microbiologic Monitoring  Water Distribution System Protection  5.1.  These samples  shall be analyzed utilizing a method accepted in  Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and  Wastewater.2  Sample Reports  water report  5.3  5.1  Bunkering  5.5  5.1  Where available.2  Water samples collected and analyzed by the vessel for  the presence of Escherichia coli may be substituted for  port water system supplied reports.  safe source  Potable Water  03  C  06  06 31  .  A recent microbiological report shall  mean a report where the date of the analysis report is  30 days or less from the date of potable water  bunkering.1.1  Source  5.2.6  5.3  These records shall be maintained on the vessel for 12  months and shall be available to the VSP for review  during inspections.1  Standards  5.1.1.  review  5.2  5.2.1.4  5. the vessel shall have a copy of the  most recent microbiologic report from each port before  bunkering potable water to verify that the water meets  potable standards.1  Drinking water bunkered from shore supplies shall be  from a potable source which meets World Health  Organization standards for potable water.

  03  5. distillation plant or other process  that supplies water to the vessel’s potable water system  shall not operate in polluted areas.1  Residual Halogen  5.2. piping system.2  Free residual halogen monitoring shall be performed at  least hourly during the bunkering of potable water and  performed at least once every 4 hours during the  onboard production of potable water.1.1. and connections  from the potable water system may be used to produce  technical water while in polluted areas.2.  08  analyzer­chart  recorders  5.1.2.2  Water Production  5. or at  anchor.1.1  A reverse osmosis.  The results of the pre­test shall be recorded  and available for review during inspections.2.2.1.2.  08  hourly test  5.4  Halogen analyzer­chart recorders used in lieu of manual  tests and logs shall be calibrated at the beginning of  bunkering or production.1  Location  5.1  A free halogen residual and pH test shall be conducted  on the shore­side water supply before starting the  bunkering process to establish the correct halogen  dosage.1.2.2. harbors.1.  06 halogen level  32  C  Potable Water  03  C  . or at  anchor.2.2.  03  5.1.2.polluted harbors  5.2  A reverse osmosis unit or evaporator with a completely  separate plant/process.3  Accurate records of this monitoring shall be maintained  aboard for 12 months and shall be available to the VSP  for review during inspections.2.1.1  Potable water shall be continuously halogenated to at  least 2.  5. in port.1.1.2.2  Monitoring  halogen pre­test  5.  08  records  5.2.  The amount of halogen injected during  bunkering or production shall be controlled by a flow  meter or a free halogen analyzer.1. and the calibration shall be  recorded on the chart or in a log book.2  Bunker and Production Halogenation  5.0 mg/L (ppm) free residual halogen at the time of  bunkering or production with an automatic halogenation  device.1.2.1  Procedures  5.1.

  08  vent/overflow  5.2.8  5.2.3. and all  manufacturer’s recommendations for application.1.1  Protection  potable water  tank walls  5.1.1.1.1.  Minimize the use of non­potable lines above potable  water tanks.3  06  08  Bunker water or production water halogen samples may  also be taken from potable water tanks which were  previously empty.1.1.1.3.2.3.2  Tank Construction  identification  5.construction  5.  Water samples for halogen testing shall be obtained  from a sample cock located on the bunker or production  water line at least 3 m (10 feet) after the halogen  injection point and before the storage tank.2.3.1.3.2  Potable water tanks shall have sample valves which are  turned down.  08  sample valves  5.1.2.  08  coatings  5.2.  08  5.1.  Potable Water System  5.1  Potable Water Tanks  5.3  The potable water tank or combined vent and overflow  08 Potable Water  C  33  .3.2.3.  Non­potable lines above potable water  tanks shall not have any mechanical couplings.  or curing shall be followed.2  Piping systems carrying sewage or other non­potable  liquids shall not pass through potable water tanks.1.  Written documentation for  the coating used and recommendations followed shall  be available for review during inspections.1.6  halogen sample  5. drying.5  Halogen analyzer­chart recorders used on bunker water  systems shall be constructed and installed in  accordance with accepted engineering practices.  data logger  5.2.1.1.  tank sample  5.2.7  Electronic data loggers with certified data security  features may be used in lieu of chart recorders.1  Potable water tanks shall not share a common wall with  the hull of the vessel or with tanks or piping containing  non­potable water or other liquids.3  Interior coatings on potable water tanks shall be  approved for potable water contact.5 inch) high.  07  non­potable  piping  5.2.3.3.1  Potable water tanks shall be identified with a number  and the words “POTABLE WATER” in letters 13 mm  (0.2.

 stamped on a non­corrosive label plate or the  equivalent and located at or near the point of hose  connection.2.3.  08  non­potable fresh  5.1  Paint or stripe potable water piping and fittings in  auxiliary blue.  08  identification  5.1.  and bulkheads.6  water  Non­potable freshwater.  08  different piping  Non­potable freshwater shall flow through a completely  different piping system and be identified with a different  color.  Manual sounding of potable water tanks shall be  performed only in emergencies and shall be performed  in a sanitary manner.  08 34  5.3.  The  connections for the hose attachments shall be unique  and fit only potable water hoses.3.2.1. except where décor would be marred by  such markings.1.5  Each bunker station potable water filling line shall be  painted auxiliary blue and clearly marked “POTABLE  WATER FILLING” in letters at least 13 mm (0.5  Any device for determining the depth of water in the  potable water tanks shall be constructed and maintained  so as to prevent contaminated substances or liquids  from entering the tanks.  07  bunker  connection  5.2.2.3.2  Potable Water Piping  5. shall be  bunkered through separate piping using fittings  incompatible for potable water bunkering.1. if used on the vessel.2.2.2  Potable water piping shall not pass under or through  sewage or other tanks holding non­potable liquids. decks.7  Potable Water  C  . at a point at least 460 mm (18 inches)  above the bunker station deck.1.3. at 5 m  (15 feet) intervals and on each side of partitions.3.  08  cap/keeper chain  5.5 inch)  high.1. or in accordance with ISO 14726.  level  measurement  5.1.3.1.3.  08  08  5.1.3.3.2.4  The potable water filling line shall have a screw cap or  plug fastened by a non­corroding chain to an adjacent  bulkhead or surface in such a manner that the cap or  plug shall not touch the deck when hanging free.1  Protection  identification  5.3.3  The potable water bunker filling line shall begin either  horizontally or in a gooseneck position pointing  downwards.2.  08  protection  5.4  manual sounding  5.2.2.shall be protected from contamination.

3. corrosion resistant.3.  08  locker  construction  5.3. easily cleanable  material and shall be maintained in good repair. fittings. fittings.3.3.2.3. sanitizing buckets.1  Potable water hoses shall not be used for any other  purpose.3.1.  08 Potable Water  08  35  .1  08  identification  5. nontoxic.4  All hoses.5  inch) at each connecting end.  08  locker restriction  5.2  All hoses.3. and appurtences used  for connection with the bunkering of potable water shall  be maintained in good repair.6  Potable water hose lockers shall be marked “POTABLE  WATER HOSE AND FITTING STORAGE” in letters at  least 13 mm (0. and  appurtences used for connection with the bunkering of  potable water shall be handled and stored in a sanitary  manner.1.9  The locker shall not be used for any other purpose than  storing potable water hoses.3. and appurtences used  for connection with the bunkering of potable water shall  be constructed of safe.3. fittings.3.3.  08  locker closed  5.1.3.5.  08  locker  identification  5.1.  08  handling  5.2  Potable water hoses shall have unique fittings from all  other hose fittings on the vessel.1.3.3.3  All hoses.3.  08  locker height  5. water filters.  construction  5.1.1  Construction  fittings  5.3.  08  5.2  Handling  limit use  5. water filters. fittings.8  The locker doors shall be closed when not removing  hoses and equipment.3.1.1.3.3  Potable Water Hoses  5.1.3.5  Potable water hose lockers shall be constructed of  smooth.3.  08  good repair  5.3.3. water filters.3.3.7  The potable water hose lockers shall be mounted at  least 460 mm (18 inches) above the deck and shall be  self­draining. easily cleanable materials.  and other associated equipment.3. buckets.  Potable water hoses shall be labeled for use with the  words “potable water only” in letters at least 13 mm (0.5 inch) high.2.3.

 and flushing shall be  maintained for 12 months and shall be available to the  VSP for review during inspections. and  flushed with potable water:  disinfecting  07  C  (1)  Before being placed in service; and  (2)   Before returning to operation after repair.1  Potable water tanks and any parts of the potable water  distribution system shall be cleaned.3.2.3.3. maintenance. or every 2  years.  08  flush/drain  5.5  Potable water hoses shall be stowed rolled tight with the  ends capped.  08  5.4.3. and  disinfected during dry docks and wet docks.  pier.3. or by dropping the hose into the  harbor.  07  36  Potable Water  C .3.2  Potable water tanks shall be inspected.3. disinfection (to include concentration and  contact time of disinfectant).4  Potable Water System Contamination  5.  08  disinfection  residual  5.contamination  prevention  5. or racks. disinfected.4  Potable water hoses shall be flushed before being used  and shall be drained after each use.  08  storage  5. including  entry into a potable water tank. or deck surfaces.1  Cleaning and Disinfection  5.3.4.4  Disinfection following potential contamination shall be  accomplished by increasing free residual halogen to at  least 50 mg/L (ppm) throughout the affected area and  maintaining this concentration for 4 hours. on reels.4. whichever is less. or by way of  another procedure recognized and accepted by the  VSP. or with ends coupled  together in potable water hose lockers.4.  annual inspection  5.3.3  Potable water hoses shall be handled with care to  prevent contamination by dragging ends on the ground.1.2.  cleaning.  08  record retention  5.1. cleaned.1.  replacement; or  (3)  Being subjected to any contamination.3  Documentation of the inspection.1.3.3.3.4.2.

);  (5) Ensure that the tank surfaces remain wet with the  chlorine solution for at least 2 hours;  (6) Refill the tank and verify that the chlorine level is  ≤ 5.3.  flush  5. including filling lines. etc.emergencies  5.6  The disinfected parts of the system shall be flushed with  potable water or otherwise de­chlorinated until the free  residual halogen is  ≤ 5.00 mg/L (ppm).3.7  An alternative potable water tank cleaning and  disinfection procedure which is ONLY approved for  routine cleaning and disinfection and is NOT approved  for known or suspected contaminated tanks is as  follows:  08 (1) Remove (strip) all water from the tank;  (2) Clean all tank surfaces. this contact time may be shortened to  1 hour by increasing free residual halogen to at least  200 mg/L (ppm) throughout the affected area.4.3. rollers.4.5  In an emergency.4. clean mops. etc.1.  Potable Water  37  .1.  08  alternative  method  5.1.0 ppm (mg/L) before placing the tank back  into service.  with an appropriate detergent;  (3) Thoroughly rinse the surfaces of the tank with  potable water and strip this water;  (4) Wet all surfaces of the tank with at least a 200  ppm (mg/L) solution of chlorine (this can be done  using new.

1  All distribution water system halogenation devices shall  be constructed and installed in accordance with  recommended engineering practices.1.1.2.  06  construction  5.1  A halogen analyzer­chart recorder shall be installed at a  distant point in the potable water distribution system  where a significant water flow exists and represents the  entire distribution system.2  Operation  residual  5.  In cases where dual  distribution loops exist and no pipes connect the loops  there shall be an analyzer and chart recorder for each  loop.0 mg/L (ppm) throughout the distribution  system.4.  data logger  5.1  Construction and Installation  5.1.1  Installation  distant point  5.5.4.4.1.5  Potable Water System Halogen Monitoring  5.1.1.1  Halogenation Devices  5.5.  5.1.2  The amount of halogen injected into the potable water  system shall be controlled by a free halogen analyzer.5.2 mg/L  (ppm) and ≤ 5.2. 38  06  Potable Water  06  C  .1.1.4.1.4.1  The halogenation device shall provide continuous  halogenation of the potable water distribution system  and shall maintain a free residual halogen of ≥ 0. an increase in demand occurs.1.3  At least one backup halogen pump shall be installed  with an active automatic switchover feature to maintain  the free residual halogen in the event that the primary  pump fails.4.1  Halogen Analyzer­Chart Recorder  5.  04  controlled  5.5.2.  08  backup pump  5.2  Electronic data loggers with certified data security  features may be used in lieu of chart recorders. or the low  chlorine alarm sounds.1.4  Potable Water System Halogenation  5.4.5.

1.5.1.  Calibration shall be made whenever  the manual test value is > 0.5.3  Electronic data logging shall be in increments of ≤ 15  minutes.2.2.2  Operation  maintenance  5.5.5.2  The daily.2.  06 Potable Water  C  39  .5.  06  5.  06  calibration  5.2 mg/L  (ppm) in the range of free residual halogen normally  maintained in the potable water system.2.  06  accuracy  5.2.2.2 ppm higher or lower than  the analyzer reading.1.5.5.1  The halogen analyzer­chart recorder shall be properly  maintained.5.4  The test kit used to calibrate the halogen analyzer shall  be graduated in increments no greater than 0.  06  5.1  Halogen analyzer­chart recorder charts shall have a  range of 0.5.2  Halogen Analyzer Charts  5.2. manual comparison test or calibration shall be  recorded either on the recorder chart or in a log book. and dated daily. and calibrated/verified daily in  accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.2  Operation  charts  5.1  Halogen analyzer­chart recorder charts shall be  changed. including  printing the records.5. operated.2.1.5.  06  retention  5.5.5.0 mg/L (ppm) and have a recording  period of 24 hours.2.2.1.  05  test kit  5. initialed.5.2.2  Halogen analyzer­chart recorder charts shall be retained  for at least 12 months and shall be available to the VSP  for review during inspections.0 to 5.  Charts shall contain  notations of any unusual water events in the potable  water system.2.1.1.  A  manual comparison test shall be conducted daily to  verify calibration.1.  06  5.3  The free residual halogen measured by the halogen  analyzer shall be ±0.  06  data logger  5.2  Electronic data loggers with certified data security  features used in lieu of chart recorders shall produce  records that conform to the principles of operation and  data display required of the analog charts.2 mg/L (ppm) of the free residual  halogen measured by the manual test.1  Chart Design  range  5.2.

2.2 mg/L (ppm) and  ≤ 5.3.5.5.  06  low level alarm  5.  06 40  Potable Water  06  . ie:  the engine control room.1  Free residual halogen shall be measured by a manual  test kit at the halogen analyzer at least every 4 hours in  the event of equipment failure.3  Manual Halogen Monitoring  5. to indicate  low free halogen readings at the distant point (bridge)  analyzer.1.  5.2.  06  limit  5.4  Provide an audible alarm in a continuously occupied  watch station.5.2  Manual readings shall be recorded on a chart or log.3.0 mg/L (ppm) in the water distribution system for at  least 16 hours in each 24­hour period since the last  inspection of the vessel.1.3. and shall be  available to the VSP for review during inspections.5.5.3.1  Equipment Failure  every 4 hours  5.3  Repairs on malfunctioning halogen analyzer­chart  recorders shall be completed within 10 days of  equipment failure.3.5.5.  shall be retained for at least 12 months.1.3  Records from the halogen analyzer­chart recorder shall  verify the free residual halogen of ≥ 0.1.chart review  5.  06  recording  5.

7.1  Sampling and Analysis  5. and lower decks of the  vessel.1  A minimum of four potable water samples per month  shall be collected and analyzed for the presence of  Escherichia coli.  07  C Potable Water  41  .1.1.7.6.1.1  Methodology  samples  5.7.1.6.1. and shall be available to the VSP  for review during inspections.6.  Samples shall be collected from  locations forward.  06  5.1  The potable water distribution system shall be  maintained free of cross­connections with non­potable  piping systems and tanks.1.1.  06  analysis  5.1.2  Records  5.  07  C  protection  5.6.1  Cross­Connection Control  5.1.1.1.6.2  The potable water system shall be protected against  backflow or other contamination by backflow preventers  or air­gaps.6.1.2.  Sample sites shall be changed each month in  order to obtain a good representation of the potable  water distribution system.7  06  Water Distribution System Protection  5.1  Program  cross­  connections  5. aft.  records  5.7.6  Microbiologic Monitoring  5.2  Samples shall be analyzed utilizing a method accepted  in Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and  Wastewater. upper.1  Sample results shall be maintained onboard the vessel  for at least 12 months.5.

 showers.  whirlpool spas. bilge. an overflow line at least  twice the diameter of the potable water supply line and  located below the tank supply line. bathtubs. and deck taps;  (5)  Garbage grinders and pulpers;  (6)  Mechanical warewashing machines;  (7)  Hospital and laundry equipment;  (8)  Air conditioning expansion tanks;  (9)  Boiler feed water tanks;  (10)  Fire systems;  (11)  Toilets;  (12)  Potable water. or  42  Potable Water  08 . is an acceptable  form of backflow prevention provided that there is an  indirect connection to the wastewater system;  (2)  Photographic laboratory developing machines and  utility sinks;  (3)  Beauty and barber shop spray­rinse hoses;  (4)  Potable water faucets where hoses are connected  or can be connected by threaded or quick­connect  outlets such as those serving tanks containing chlorine  and other chemicals.1.1. and sanitary pumps that  require priming;  (13)  Freshwater or saltwater ballast systems;  (14)  Bilge or other waste water locations;  (15)  International shore connections for fire/sprinkler. hot tubs.7. if present:  (1) Potable water supply lines to swimming pools. and similar  facilities;  In the case of a potable water supply to a pool  or whirlpool spa make­up tank.  high saline overboard discharge from evaporators.control/ program  5.3  The vessel shall provide a comprehensive cross­  connection control program that provides safe  connections to the potable water system through air­  gaps or appropriate backflow devices at the following  locations.

  08  after valve  5.  Repeat devices such as toilets can be  grouped under a single device type.1.7.2.1.1.5  A continuous pressure­type backflow preventer shall be  installed when a valve is located downstream from the  backflow preventer.7.2.7.  08  2X diameter  5.  08  continuous  pressure  5.2.2.1.7.1.1.  A log documenting the  inspection or maintenance in written or electronic form  shall be maintained and be available for review during  inspections.7.2.7  A vacuum breaker shall be installed on a potable water  supply that is connected to a vacuum toilet system.2.2.1  Backflow preventers shall be installed when air­gaps are  impractical or when water under pressure is required.other such cross­connections involving high pressure  require reduced pressure assembly backflow prevention  devices installed; and  (16)  Any other connection between potable and non­  potable water systems.3  An atmospheric vacuum breaker shall be installed at  least 150 mm (6 inches) above the flood­level rim of the  fixtures.  08  vacuum toilets  5.4  A cross­connection control program shall include at a  minimum:  a complete listing of cross­connections and  the backflow prevention method/device for each.  08  flood­level rim  5.  An  atmospheric vacuum breaker shall be located on the  discharge side of the last control valve (flushing device).4  An atmospheric vacuum breaker shall be installed only  in the supply line on the discharge side of the last  control valve.  5.  log  5.7.7.6  Backflow preventers shall be provided on all fixtures  using potable water and which have submerged inlets.1.1.7. so  there is a match to the plumbing system component and  location.7.2  Air­gaps shall be at least twice the diameter of the  delivery fixture opening and a minimum of 25 mm (1  inch). the program shall set a schedule for inspection  frequency.  08 Potable Water  08  43  . and air­gaps shall  be included in the listing.2  Device Installation  backflow  preventers  5.  08  backflow  preventers  5.1.1.

  separate  compressor  5.diversion valves  5. serviced.  08  5.  08  location  5.2. for  example reduced pressure backflow preventer and  double check valves with test cocks.2.2.1.3  The inspection and test results for backflow preventers  shall be retained for at least 12 months and shall be  available to the VSP for review during inspections.  Test results  showing the pressure differences on both sides of the  valves shall be maintained for each device. shall be inspected  and tested with a test kit at least annually.2  Inspection and Service  schedule  5.7.2.3.7.2.  08  RP annually  5.1.1.7.2  Backflow prevention devices requiring testing.2  A fixed connection of this valve may be used when the  air supply is from a separate compressor used  exclusively for pressure to potable pneumatic tanks.7.7.1.2.7.3  Air Supply Connections  air supply  5. and maintained.  5.2.2  Backflow­Preventer Inspection and Testing  5.1  Backflow prevention devices should be periodically  inspected and any failed units shall be replaced.1  Backflow preventers shall be maintained in good repair.2.8  Lines to divert potable water to other systems by valves  or interchangeable pipe fittings shall have an air­gap  following the valve.2.7.  5.  08 maintained  44  Potable Water  08  08  .2.1  Maintenance  5.7.1.1.9  Backflow preventers shall be located so they may be  inspected.1  The air supply to a compressed air system that supplies  pressure to both non­potable and potable water  pneumatic tanks shall be through a press­on (manual)  type of air valve or hose.  08  records  5.2.7.7.3.7.7.

0  Swimming Pools and Whirlpool Spas  6. and it shall remain  empty while in port.3  No bathers shall be allowed to use the pool before a free  residual halogen of 1.1  6.1.1  Flow­through seawater supply systems for swimming  pools shall be used only while the vessel is under way and  at sea beyond 20 kilometers (12 miles) from nearest land.1.1.1.1.1.2.  10 Swimming Pools and Whirlpool Spas  45  .2  If the pool is not drained before arriving in port.1.1  Recirculated swimming pool water shall be filtered.2  In Port  drained  6.1.6.2.2.1.0 mg/L (ppm) is achieved.1  Filters  filtered  6. the pool’s  seawater filling system shall be shut off 20 kilometers (12  miles) before reaching land.1.3  6.  10  media  6.  09  12 miles  6.1.1  The pool (when in flow­thru seawater mode only) shall be  drained before the vessel reaches port.  A  written or electronic record of the backwashing shall be  available for review during inspections.1.1  Flow Through Seawater Swimming Pools  6.1.1.1.1  At Sea  6.2.  A filter shall  be backwashed as recommended by the manufacturer.2.2.2.2  Filter pressure differential shall be monitored.1.1.1.2  6.1  Operation  6.  10  backwashed  6.2. and a recirculation system  shall be used with appropriate filtering and halogenation.1.1.0 mg/L (ppm)  6.4  Flow­Through Seawater Swimming Pools  Recirculating Swimming Pools  Whirlpool Spas  Safety  6.  10  1.3  Filter media shall be examined and changed as  recommended by the manufacturer.  10  switched to  recirculation  6.2  10  C  Recirculating Swimming Pools  6.1  Operation  6.1.  6.

 and halogenation shall  be maintained aboard the vessel in a location that is  known by and is accessible to crew members who are  responsible for the pool’s operations and maintenance.  6. pH.1.  10  analyzer­chart  recorder  6.  10  data logger  6.2. response steps taken.2  Halogenation  6.2. 46  Swimming Pools and Whirlpool Spas  C  .2.4  Swimming pool filter pressure gauges and valves shall be  replaced when they are defective.  10  record of fecal  accidents  6.4  Electronic data loggers with certified data security features  may be used in lieu of chart recorders.2.1.1  Residual Halogen  residual  6.1  A halogen test kit shall be provided and used.2.  manuals  6.2.2.2.2.2.2.0 mg/L (ppm) shall  09  be maintained in recirculated swimming pools.2  Water Quality  10  water chemistry  6.11 shall be  documented and available to the VSP for review during  inspections. and contact times.1.2.2.2.1.0 and ≤ 5.  maintenance  6.  10  6.2.1  A free residual halogen of ≥ 1.2.  10  fecal accident  6.2.2.1.  alkalinity.3  Halogen analyzer­chart recorders used in lieu of manual  tests and logs shall be calibrated daily. and clarity shall be monitored and adjusted as  recommended by the manufacturer and to maintain  optimum public health protection.2.2.2  Residual halogen logs shall be maintained with residuals  measured and recorded every 4 hours during operation. date and time of  incident.3  A written or electronic record shall be made of all fecal  accidents which includes pool name.2.1.1  The recirculated swimming pool’s water flow rates.  10  testing  6.1.1.2  Halogenation systems shall be operated and maintained in  10  good repair in accordance with the manufacturer’s  recommendations.2. free residual halogen level  achieved following cleaning.1.2  A fecal accident response procedure which meets or  exceeds the procedure provided in annex 13. pumps.2.gauges  6.2.  6.2.5  The operating manuals for all recirculating swimming pool  10  components such as filters.2.2  Residual Halogen Monitoring  test kit  6.2.2.2. and the calibration  shall be recorded on the chart or in a log book.1.2.

  If.5  Halogen analyzer­chart recorder charts shall be initialed.3.  Shake  sampled media and water in a clean. a measurable layer of sediment is  within or on top of the filter media or fine. or holes in the filter media.3.3.3.3  Cartridge or cannister­type filters shall be inspected at  least weekly for cracks.2.2.1  Filters  filtration  6.1. or holes. The filter housing shall be cleaned and sanitized  10 Swimming Pools and Whirlpool Spas  47  .  A core sample of the filter media shall be inspected for  excessive organic material accumulation using a  recommended sedimentation method. the organic loading may be  excessive. after  30 minutes of settling. breaks.7  Logs and charts shall be retained for at least 12 months  and shall be available to the VSP for review during  inspections.1.2.1.  10  backwash  6.  One acceptable  method is to draw water down to the media surface and  inspect the granular filter for cracks.3.3. mounds.1. and changed daily. and media replacement should be considered.3.  10  logs  6.1.1.  10  6. colored particles  are suspended in the water.2.  10  replacement  6.5  The granular filters shall be opened at least monthly and  examined for cracks. damaged components. clear­  plastic container and observe the settling action.2.2.4  Granular filters shall be backwashed at least daily.2  At least one replacement cartridge or cannister­type filter  shall be available at all times for whirlpool spa filtration  systems that use this type of filter. stoppered.  and excessive organic material accumulation.1.6  Logs and charts shall contain notations of any unusual  water events with the swimming pool operation and  corrective actions taken.1.  Backwashing shall be repeated until the water viewed  through the sight glass or discharge point is clean flowing.  10  examination  and core  sample  6.1  Whirlpool spa water shall be filtered.2.1  Public Operations  6.2.6  The granular filter media shall be replaced at least every 6  months.1.  10  inspection  6.1.  dated.  10  replacement  6.3  Whirlpool Spas  6.1.1.charts  6.3.2.  10  retention  6. mounds.  Take a sample from the filter core and inspect it for  excessive organic/dirt build­up at least monthly.1.

3.0 mg/L (ppm) in whirlpool spas and circulated for at  least 1 hour at the end of each day.  10  fecal accident  6. free residual halogen level  achieved following cleaning.1. date and time of  incident.2.2.  10  pH  6.before the new filter media is placed in it.1. the free residual  halogen shall be increased to at least 10.0 mg/L (ppm) and ≤ 10 mg/L (ppm).3 and 6.2.1  Whirlpool spas shall maintain a free residual chlorine of ≥  3.8.  09  shock  6.2.3. response steps taken.1.8  The operating manuals for all whirlpool spa components  such as filters.1.  10  maintenance  6.3.3.3.0 mg/L (ppm) and ≤ 10 mg/L (ppm).1.3.  10  6.1.2  Halogenation  6.1  Residual Halogen  residual  6. and halogenation equipment shall  be maintained aboard the vessel in a location that is  known by and is accessible to crew members who are  responsible for the whirlpool spa’s operations and  maintenance.1.3.3.  10 48  Swimming Pools and Whirlpool Spas  C  .3.  Whirlpool spas filled with seawater are  exempt from this requirement.2.2  The whirlpool spa water shall be maintained with a pH  between 7.  10  6. and contact times.2  The free residual halogen shall be increased to at least  10.2. or a free residual  bromine of ≥ 4.4  A written or electronic record shall be made of all fecal  accidents which includes pool name.  10  6.1.3.1.7  Whirlpool spa filter pressure gauges and valves shall be  replaced when they are defective.3.  10  record of fecal  accidents  6. pumps.1  The whirlpool spa water shall be changed daily.1.  Except for areas  covered in section 6.1.1.11 shall be  documented and available to the VSP for review during  inspections.3  A fecal accident response procedure which meets or  exceeds the procedure provided in annex 13.3.  maintenance  6.3.2  Water Quality  changed  6.2.0 mg/L (ppm) in  whirlpool spas and circulated for at least 1 hour at the end  of each day.2 and 7.3  Halogenation systems shall be operated and maintained in  good repair in accordance with the manufacturer’s  recommendations.4.3.2.

3.  6.2  Residual Halogen Monitoring  test kit  6.  10 Swimming Pools and Whirlpool Spas  10  10  49  .6  Halogen analyzer­chart recorder charts shall be initialed.2.  Logs and charts shall contain notations of any unusual  water events with the whirlpool spas and corrective actions  taken.2.  retention  6.1  A halogen test kit shall be provided and used.2.3.3.2. core sample sedimentation test.3  Halogen analyzer­chart recorders used in lieu of manual  tests and logs shall be calibrated daily. backwashing.2.2.  dated and changed daily.2  Residual halogen logs shall be maintained with residuals  measured and recorded hourly during operation.  10  testing  6.3.2.5  10  logs  6.2.2.7  Logs and charts shall be retained for at least 12 months.  10  analyzer­ chart  recorder  6.3.1.3.2.  10  data logger  6.2.3. and the calibration  shall be recorded on the chart or in a log book.  and shock halogenation (concentration in ppm and time)  shall be available for review during inspections.3.records  6.3.3.2.4  A written or electronic record of whirlpool spa filter  inspections.3.3.  charts  6.2.4  Electronic data loggers with certified data security features  may be used in lieu of chart recorders.

3.1  Private whirlpool spas located in individual passenger  cabins shall be cleaned and disinfected.4.4.3  Private Cabin Operations  6.  10  maintenance  6. between occupancies or  weekly.3.  10 50  Swimming Pools and Whirlpool Spas  .3.  10  6.1  Individual hydrotherapy pools shall be cleaned and  disinfected.1.3.3. including associated recirculation systems.1  Maintenance  cleaning  6.  10  maintenance  6.1.2  Manufacturer’s operation and maintenance instructions  shall be available to personnel that service the units.1.3.1  Maintenance  cleaning  6.  between customers.6. including  associated recirculation systems.3.3.4. whichever is more frequent.3.3.2  Manufacturer’s operation and maintenance instructions  shall be available to personnel that service the units.4  Individual Hydrotherapy Pools  6.3.1.

4.8M or an equivalent standard.2  Equipment  6.19. so  that it can be seen from the deck and in the pool.1.4.2.  Depth  markers should be labeled either in feet or meters.  10  depth markers  6.3  A sign shall be installed near the whirlpool spas that list  standard safety precautions and risks.4.1.  10  spas  6.  10  anti­entrapment  6. depth markers shall be installed for every 1 m  (3 feet) change in depth.1. or a letter  maintained onboard the vessel certifying that the cover  meets the safety requirements outlined in ASME/ANSI  A112.2.  Additionally. Consumer  Product Safety Publication 363­009801(dual  drains/channel drains) shall be provided on swimming  pools and whirlpool spas.1.4.  10  temperature  A temperature control mechanism to prevent the  temperature from exceeding 40°C (104°F) shall be  provided on whirlpool spas.4  Safety  6.1.  10 life saving  6.2.4.4.1.2  The depth of each pool shall be displayed prominently.1  Public Swimming Pools and Whirlpool Spas  6.1  Safety signs shall be provided for public swimming pools  and whirlpool spas.4.1.1.4.  10  6. such as those who are  immunocompromised.1. warning against use  by particularly susceptible people.4.1.6.  An approved cover shall have  either the plumbing/engineering approving organization  stamp and flow rate affixed to the cover.2  drain  Anti­entrapment drain covers or other drains that prevent  entrapment hazards as specified in U.1  Easy access shepherd’s hook and approved floatation  device (with a length of line ½ the pool width or 16 m (50  feet)) shall be provided at a prominent location near each  public swimming pool.S.1. or both.3  Swimming Pools and Whirlpool Spas  51  .1  Signs and Markings  signs  6.

4.1.2  Spa Pool (an independent pool with combined elements  of a whirlpool spa)  6.1. or filters are shared  with the spa.  spa standards  6. all elements of the whirlpool spa standards  shall apply to the pool.1.2 is not required.2 is also not  required.4.3.1. except that daily water change in  section 6. recirculation system equipment.3  Restrictions  6.  diapers  52  Swimming Pools and Whirlpool Spas  10  9/10  .3.1.3.  6.3.4.4.4.1  The spa pool halogen shall be operated and maintained  according to whirlpool spa standards provided in sections  6.1 ­ 6.6.3.2.2.2  9/10 For any pool with an attached whirlpool spa.1. where the  water.4.2.1.2.  If the spa pool uses only  seawater the daily shock in section 6.1.1.4.1  Maintenance and Operating Standards  operation and  maintenance  6.1  Children in diapers or who are not toilet trained are not  permitted in the public swimming pools and whirlpool spas.1.

2  Personnel  7. during inspections and upon request the person in  charge of the food operations on the vessel shall demonstrate  to the VSP knowledge of foodborne disease prevention.0  Food Safety  7.1  Reserved  7.6  7.7.  The areas of knowledge shall include:  personal  hygiene  (1) Describing the relation between prevention of foodborne  disease and personal hygiene of a food employee;  employee to  food disease  transmission  (2) Explaining the responsibility of the person in charge of  preventing the transmission of foodborne disease by a food  employee who has a disease or medical condition that may  cause foodborne disease;  symptoms  (3) Describing the symptoms associated with the diseases  that are transmissible through food;  PHF time/  temperature  (4) Explaining the significance of the relation between  maintaining the time and temperature of potentially hazardous  food;  Food Safety  13  C 53  .1  Based on the risks of foodborne illness inherent to the food  operation.5  7.4  7.1.  The  person in charge shall demonstrate this knowledge by  compliance with these guidelines.1  7.1  Food­Safety Knowledge  7.7  knowledge  Reserved  Personnel  Food  Equipment and Utensils  Warewashing and Laundering  Poisonous and Toxic Materials  Facilities  7.1.3  7. by being a domestically or  foreign certified food protection manager who has shown  proficiency of required information through passing a test that  is part of an accredited program.2.2.1.2. or by responding correctly to  the inspector's questions as they relate to the specific food  operation. and the food­safety guidelines in this manual.2  7.  application of the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point  principles.1  Food­Safety Management  7.

 including meat. except that brief visits and tours may be authorized if  steps are taken to ensure that exposed food; clean  54  Food Safety  13  C . and cleaned;  equipment and  food safety  (10) Explaining correct procedures for cleaning and sanitizing  utensils and food­contact surfaces of equipment;  cleaning and  sanitizing  (11) Identifying poisonous or toxic materials on the vessel and  the procedures necessary to ensure they are safely stored. and maintaining the food operations in a clean  condition and in good repair;  cross­  contamination  (9) Explaining the relation between food safety and providing  equipment that is sufficient in number and capacity. food storage. poultry. installed. and reheating of  potentially hazardous food;  safe holding  temperatures  (8) Describing the relation between prevention of foodborne  illness and management and control of the following:  cross­  contamination. and fish;  safe cooking  temperatures  (7) Stating the required temperatures and times for the safe  refrigerated storage.1.1  The person in charge of the food operations on the vessel  shall ensure that:  separate areas  (1)  Food operations are not conducted in a room used as  living or sleeping quarters;  unnecessary  persons  (2)  Persons unnecessary to the food operation are not  allowed in the food preparation. constructed.2. and fish;  raw/  undercooked  PHF  (6) Stating the required food temperatures and times for safe  cooking of potentially hazardous food.  dispensed.2. poultry. located. eggs.2. or warewashing  areas. and disposed of according to law; and  toxic material  control  (12) Identifying critical­control points in the operation from  purchasing through service that when not controlled may  contribute to the transmission of foodborne illness and  explaining steps taken to ensure the points are controlled in  accordance with the guidelines in this manual.  handwashing. cooling.1. and  properly designed. hand contact with ready­to­eat foods. used.  hot holding.2  Food­Safety Duties  7.  eggs. operated.  maintained.  critical­control  points  monitoring  duties  7.(5) Explaining the hazards involved in the consumption of raw  or undercooked meat.

 spatulas. utensils. such as eggs and  comminuted meats. pH. and chemical concentration. being particularly careful in cooking foods known to  cause severe foodborne illness and death. and exposure time for chemical sanitizing;  clean tableware  (10)  Consumers are notified that clean tableware is to be  used when they return to self­service areas such as salad  bars and buffets;  no bare hand  contact  (11)  Employees are preventing cross­contamination of ready­  to­eat food with bare hands by properly using suitable utensils  such as deli tissue. tongs.  temperature. food storage. by  routinely monitoring the employees' handwashing;  receiving  (5)  Employees are observing foods as they are received to  determine that they are from approved sources.  unadulterated. through daily oversight of the  employees' routine monitoring of food temperatures during  cooling;  consumer  advisory  (8)  Consumers who order raw or partially cooked ready­to­eat  foods of animal origin are informed that the food is not cooked  sufficiently to ensure its safety;  sanitizing  (9)  Employees are properly sanitizing cleaned multiuse  equipment and utensils before they are reused. protected from contamination. or Food Safety  55  . and accurately presented. and linens; and unwrapped single­service  and single­use articles are protected from contamination;  access control  (3)  Employees and other persons such as delivery and  maintenance persons and pesticide applicators entering the  food preparation.equipment. delivered at  the required temperatures. through daily oversight of the employees'  routine monitoring of the cooking temperatures using  appropriate temperature measuring devices properly scaled  and calibrated;  PHF cooling  (7)  Employees are using proper methods to rapidly cool  potentially hazardous foods that are not held hot or are not for  consumption within 4 hours. and warewashing areas  comply with the guidelines in this manual;  handwashing  (4) Food employees are effectively cleaning their hands. by routinely  monitoring the employees' observations and periodically  evaluating foods upon their receipt;  PHF cooking  termperature  (6)  Employees are properly cooking potentially hazardous  food. single­use gloves. through  routine monitoring of solution temperature and exposure time  for hot water sanitizing.

1  Hands and Arms  7..1  Food employees suspected of.2. or hepatitis A virus. diarrhea. warewashing clean  equipment.  other symptoms  7. warewashing. sore throat with fever.dispensing equipment; and  (12)  Employees are properly trained in food safety as it  relates to their assigned duties. diagnosed with.3  Food employees experiencing persistent sneezing. infected wounds.1.4  The restriction may be removed when the person in charge of  the food operation obtains written approval from the vessel’s  physician or equivalent medical staff.3. utensils. single­  service and single­use articles.1  Food employees shall keep their hands and exposed portions  of their arms clean.  or other communicable diseases that can be transmitted by  food. utensils.2. including working with exposed  food.2. and unwrapped single­service and single­use articles.2.2  Employee Health  7.2. or exposed to  11  C  any communicable disease caused by Salmonella typhi.  restrictions  removal  7. coughing. equipment. utensils.2.2. fever.  11  C  or a runny nose that causes discharges from the eyes.2.1.1  Communicable Diseases and Symptoms  communicable  diseases  7.  hands and arms  clean  56  Food Safety  12  C  C .2  11  C  Food employees who have conditions or symptoms of boils. and table linens; or unwrapped single­  service or single­use articles.2. or discharges from the nose  or mouth shall report these conditions or symptoms to the  vessel’s medical staff and shall be restricted from working with  exposed food.  Shigella spp.  The restricted individual shall  not be allowed to return to the above duties until they are  symptom free for a minimum of 48 hours.  or mouth may not work with exposed food.1. Escherichia coli O157:H7.3  Employee Cleanliness  7.  11  record of  restriction and  release  7. nose.  sneeze/cough  7.  open sores.1. table  linens.3. table linens.2. shall be restricted from working in any food or food  related areas or operations. clean equipment.  employee  training  7.  vomiting. warewashing.5  A written or electronic record of both the work restriction and  release from restriction shall be maintained onboard the  vessel for 12 months for inspection review.1.2.2.2.2. jaundice.1.2.2.  02  7.

 184.3.3.4  A hand antiseptic or a hand antiseptic used as a hand dip.2.1. or drinking;  after soiled  equipment  (4)  After handling soiled equipment or utensils;  (5)  During food preparation. sneezing. or 186. using tobacco.3. exposed portions of arms;  after toilet  (2)  After using the toilet room;  after  cough/sneeze  (3)  After coughing.2.1.1  Food employees shall keep their fingernails trimmed.2. as often as necessary to remove  soil and contamination and to prevent cross­ contamination  when changing tasks;  changing tasks  between raw  and RTE  (6)  When switching between working with raw food and  working with ready­to­eat food; and  after other  contamination  (7)  After engaging in other activities that contaminate the  hands.  182.2.3.2  Food employees shall clean their hands and exposed portions  12  C  of their arms with a cleaning compound in a handwashing sink  by vigorously rubbing together the surfaces of their lathered  hands and arms for at least 20 seconds and thoroughly  rinsing with clean water.  when to wash  hands  7.1.2.3  Food employees shall clean their hands and exposed portions  12  C  of their arms immediately before engaging in food preparation  including working with exposed food.  and maintained so the edges and surfaces are cleanable and  not rough.2. using a handkerchief or  disposable tissue.2.3.2  Fingernails  7.1.  12  7. filed. 178. or  a hand antiseptic soap shall:  comply with applicable  formulation and use laws under FDA or 21 CFR 170.3.5  A hand antiseptic or a hand antiseptic used as a hand dip. and unwrapped single­service and single­use articles  and:  after touching  (1)  After touching bare human body parts other than clean  hands and clean. eating. clean equipment and  utensils.  fingernails  Food Safety  C  14 57  .cleaning  procedures  7.  14  apply to clean  hands  7. Employees shall pay particular  attention to the areas underneath the fingernails and between  the fingers.39.  hand sanitizer  7. or  a hand antiseptic soap shall only be applied to hands that are  cleaned.

  utensils. hostesses.4  Outer Clothing  7.1  While preparing food. linens. or use any form of tobacco only  12  C  in designated areas where the contamination of exposed food;  clean equipment.2  A plain ring such as a smooth simple wedding band may be  allowed to be worn by food employees.3.4.2  This section does not apply to food employees such as  counter staff who serve only beverages and wrapped or  packaged foods.  and using  tobacco  58  Food Safety  14  14  14  14  .4.  counter staff/  wait staff  7. and table linens; unwrapped single­  service and single­use articles; or other items needing  protection can not result.2.2.3. drink. beard restraints. a food employee  may not wear fingernail polish or artificial fingernails when  preparing exposed food.4.fingernail polish/  artificial nails  7. or Using Tobacco  7.  and linens; and unwrapped single­service and single­use  articles.4.2.  7.2.  7. utensils.2. utensils.2  Unless wearing intact gloves in good repair. Drinking. hair  coverings or nets.2. utensils. and single­  service and single­use articles.2.1  Food employees shall wear clean outer clothing to prevent  contamination of food. and wait staff if they present a  minimal risk of contaminating exposed food; clean equipment. that are designed and worn to effectively keep their  hair from contacting exposed food; clean equipment.4.  7.2.2.2.3.4  Hygienic Practices  7.2.3.2.  plain ring  7.1  Food employees shall wear hair restraints such as hats. and linens; and unwrapped single­service and single­  use articles.2  Hair Restraints  hair restraints  7.1.3. and clothing that covers  body hair. drinking.  7. food employees may not wear jewelry  on their arms and hands.2.2.3.3.3  Jewelry  jewelry  7.3.4.1  An employee shall eat. outer clothing  eating.1  Eating. equipment.2.

1. intact beef; or  from processing  plants  cut on vessel  (2)  If individually cut on a vessel.1.  15  C  fish for  undercooked  consumption  7.1.1  food from  private home  sound condition  15  C  Food shall be obtained from sources that comply with  applicable local.3. and ordinances.1  Food Condition  7.S.2.2.2  Food prepared in a private home may not be used or offered  for human consumption on a vessel.2  Food Sources  7.3  Fish.3.1.2.3.1.3.2.2. federal.1.1  Lawful Sourcing  comply with law  7.3  Food  7.6  Food Safety  59  .3. and prepared so they remain intact.4  Whole­muscle.1.  milk  15  C U. intact beef steaks that are intended for  consumption in an undercooked form without a consumer  advisory shall be:  15  C  (1)  Obtained from a food­processing plant that packages the  steaks and labels them to indicate they meet the definition of  whole­muscle.3. supplied fluid milk and milk products shall be obtained  from sources that comply with Grade A standards as specified  in law. other than molluscan shellfish.7.1  Safe and Unadulterated  7.5  sealed container  Food in a hermetically sealed container shall be obtained from  15  C  a food­processing plant that is regulated by the food  regulatory agency that has jurisdiction over the plant. that are intended for  consumption in their raw form may be served if they are  obtained from a supplier that freezes the fish to destroy  parasites; or frozen on the vessel and records are retained.  15  C  7.S.2.3.1.  Non­U. intact  beef.  15  C  steaks  7.  7. or country of origin’s statutes.3.1.3.  hermetically  7. cut from whole­muscle  intact beef that is labeled by a food­processing plant to  indicate the beef meets the definition of whole­muscle.3. sourced fluid milk and milk products shall be  obtained from sources which meet or exceed the standards of  the health authorities from the source Country.3.  7.1  Food shall be safe and unadulterated.  regulations. state.2.

8  Mushroom species picked in the wild shall be obtained from  sources where each mushroom is individually inspected and  found to be safe by an approved mushroom identification  expert. and processed in an operation that is regulated by  the food regulatory agency that has jurisdiction over the  operation; or  (2) Wild mushroom species if they are in packaged form and  are the product of a food­processing plant that is regulated by  the food regulatory agency that has jurisdiction over the plant.7  15  C  15  C  15  C (1)  Fish that are received for service shall be commercially  and legally caught or harvested or otherwise approved for  service by the VSP.2. National Shellfish  Sanitation Program Guide for the Control of Molluscan  Shellfish or equivalent standards; and received in interstate  commerce shall be from sources that are listed in the FDA  Interstate Certified Shellfish Shippers List or equivalent  foreign certified shellfish listing.  no recreational  caught  (3)  Molluscan shellfish shall be obtained from sources  according to law and the requirements specified in the U.9  If game animals are received for sale or service they shall be:  (1) Commercially raised for food and raised.3. or bison) that are inspected and  approved in accordance with 9 CFR 352 Voluntary Exotic  Animal Program or rabbits that are "inspected and certified" in  accordance with 9 CFR 354 Rabbit Inspection Program.1.  Department of Health and Human Services.2. elk.  Food Safety  .1. Food and Drug Administration.3. water buffalo. slaughtered.  game animals  commercially  raised  inspection  program  endangered  species  60  7.  deer.  certified source  wild mushrooms  Fish and Molluscan Shellfish Sources:  7.1.7.  fish/molluscan  shellfish  (2)  Molluscan shellfish that are recreationally caught may not  be received for service.S.  This requirement does not apply to:  (1) Cultivated wild mushroom species that are grown.3. antelope.  harvested. Public Health  Service.  (3)  A game animal may not be received for service if it is a  species of wildlife that is listed in 50 CFR 17 Endangered and  Threatened Wildlife and Plants.2. and  processed under law; or  (2) Under a voluntary inspection program administered by the  USDA for game animals such as exotic animals (reindeer.

 for  curing certain cheese varieties.  15  C  egg and milk  products  7.  Food Safety  61  . frozen.1  Receiving temperatures shall be as follows:  16  C  (1)  Refrigerated.  (2)  If a temperature other than 7°C (45°F) for a potentially  hazardous food is specified in law governing its distribution.2.3.2.3. molluscan shellfish.2.2. and shell  eggs.2. and dry eggs and egg products shall be  obtained pasteurized.3.  15  C  shell eggs  7. the food may be received at the specified temperature.  (4)  A food that is labeled frozen and shipped frozen by a  food­processing plant shall be received frozen. such as ice cream.2.  (3)  Potentially hazardous food that is cooked and received  hot shall be at a temperature of 60°C (140°F) or above.3.  frozen milk  cheese  (3)  Frozen milk products.  milk products  (2)  Fluid and dry milk and milk products complying with  Grade A standards as specified in law shall be obtained  pasteurized.3.2  Receiving Condition  7.3  Shell eggs shall be received clean and sound and may not  exceed the restricted egg tolerances specified in law.4  Eggs and milk products shall be received as follows:  15  C egg products  (1)  Liquid.  (4)  Cheese shall be obtained pasteurized unless alternative  procedures to pasteurization are specified in the CFR.  such as laws governing milk. potentially hazardous food shall be free of  evidence of previous temperature abuse. potentially hazardous food shall be at a  temperature of 7°C (45°F) or below when received.2. such  as 21 CFR 133 Cheeses and Related Cheese Products. shall be  obtained pasteurized as specified in 21 CFR 135 Frozen  Desserts.  food additives  7.2.2.2  Food may not contain unapproved food additives or additives  that exceed amounts specified in law.  (5)  Upon receipt.receiving  temperatures  7.

  19  7.  (2)  Be maintained by retaining shellstock tags or labels for 90  calendar days from the date the container is emptied by using  an approved record keeping system that keeps the tags or  labels in chronologic order correlated to the date when the  shellstock are served.2.  Dead shellfish or shellstock with badly broken shells shall be  discarded.  Food Safety  .2.  15  C  shellstock  condition  7.2. dead shellfish.3.6  15  C  shucked  shellfish  7.2.2.3.2.2.2.3.7  Raw shucked shellfish shall be obtained in nonreturnable  packages which bear a legible label as specified in the  National Shellfish Sanitation Program Guide for the Control of  Molluscan Shellfish.9  Shellstock shall be reasonably free of mud.2.  15  C  shellstock  shellfish  7.  15  C  ice  7.  Ice for use as a food or a cooling medium shall be made from  drinking water.8  Shellstock shall be obtained in containers bearing legible  source identification tags or labels that are affixed by the  harvester and each dealer that depurates.2.3.3.3.2.  and shellfish with broken shells when received by a vessel.1  Shucked molluscan shellfish may not be removed from the  container in which they are received other than immediately  before preparation for service. or reships  the shellstock.5  Food packages shall be in good condition and protect the  integrity of the contents so that the food is not exposed to  adulteration or potential contaminants.  Canned goods with  dents on end or side seams may not be used.3  Maintaining Molluscan Shellfish Identification  shucked  identification  7.3.2. ships.  15  C  shellstock  identification  7.3. as specified in the National Shellfish Sanitation  Program Guide for the Control of Molluscan Shellfish.3.package  integrity  7.2.2  Shellstock shellfish tags shall:  15  C attached  retained 90 days  62  (1)  Remain attached to the container in which the shellstock  are received until the container is empty.3.

1  Food employees shall wash their hands. or other raw ready­to­eat food such as  vegetables.  12  C  not RTE contact  minimized  7.3.1  Food shall be protected from cross­contamination by:  (1)  Physically separating raw animal foods during storage.  pork.  12  C  RTE – hand  contact  prohibited  7.1. lamb.3.3.3.  7.1.3.  7. and cooked ready­to­eat food; so products do not  physically touch.3.3.3. ready­to­  eat food with their bare hands and shall use suitable utensils  such as deli tissue. covered containers.3. or  wrappings;  (5)  Cleaning hermetically sealed containers of food of visible  soil before opening;  (6)  Protecting food containers that are received packaged  together in a case or overwrap from cuts when the case or  overwrap is opened;  damaged/  Food Safety  63  . tongs.1.3.3. and  display by using separate equipment for each type.1  Employee Contamination  wash hands  7.2  Food and Ingredient Contamination  7. separating types of  raw animal foods from each other such as beef.4  A food employee shall not use a utensil more than once to  taste food that is to be served. food employees may not contact exposed.3.1. holding.  preparation.3  Food Protection  7. and poultry during storage. and so as to prevent dripping of one product  into another;  (2)  Except when combined as ingredients.2. spatulas. fish. single­use gloves. preparation.2  Except when washing fruits and vegetables or when otherwise  approved. or  arranging each type of food in equipment so that cross­  contamination of one type with another is prevented. and display from raw ready­to­eat food  including other raw animal food such as fish for sushi or  molluscan shellfish.7.3.3. or  dispensing equipment. holding.3. and  preparing each type of food at different times or in separate  areas;  (3)  Cleaning and sanitizing equipment and utensils;  (4)  Storing the food in packages.3  12  C  12  C  18  C tasting  cross­  contamination  raw animal foods  different species  cleaning/  sanitizing  packaging/contai  ner  cleaning  containers  protecting  containers  Food employees shall minimize bare hand and arm contact  with exposed food that is not in a ready­to­eat form.

 eggnog.  from ready­to­eat food.2. spices.  Containers holding food that can be readily and  unmistakably recognized such as dry pasta need not be  identified.2  Storing the food in packages.  7.  such as cooking oils. quarters.3. before they are washed.6  Fruits and vegetables may be washed by using chemicals  specified under 21 CFR 173. processed meats such as country hams.  18  wash fruits/  vegetables  7. and  smoked or cured sausages that are placed on clean. spoiled. or Béarnaise sauce. ice  cream. and egg­fortified beverages or dessert items that are  not cooked. served. or wrappings  does not apply to:  (1)  Whole. herbs. cooked.2.  19  vegetable  washes  7. sanitized  racks;  (4)  Food being cooled; or  (5)  Shellstock.3.3.3.3.4  Pasteurized eggs or egg products shall be substituted for raw  shell eggs in the preparation of foods such as Caesar salad.315. that require peeling or hulling before consumption;  (2)  Primal cuts.3.  hollandaise. uncut.3.  and sugar shall be identified with the common name of the  food. flour.  combined with other ingredients. or sides of raw meat or slab bacon  that are hung on clean. uncut.2.  sanitized racks;  (3)  Whole. or offered for  human consumption in ready­to­eat form.  container  identity  7.3.  19  pasteurized  eggs  7.3.2.2. 64  Food Safety  C  .spoiled  (7)  Separating damaged. sanitized hooks or placed on clean.5  Raw fruits and vegetables shall be thoroughly washed in water  to remove soil and other contaminants before being cut.3. or recalled food being held  on the vessel; and  raw/RTE  vegetables  (8)  Separating fruits and vegetables.3  Working containers holding food or food ingredients that are  removed from their original packages for use on the vessel. salt. raw fruits and vegetables and nuts in the  shell. potato flakes. mayonnaise. covered containers.

3.1  After use as a medium for cooling the exterior surfaces of food  19  such as melons or fish.3. or cinnamon;  clean surfaces  running water  19 (3)  On a clean portion of the food preparation table or cooking  equipment only if the in­use utensil and the food­contact  surface of the food preparation table or cooking equipment are  cleaned and sanitized at least every four hours;  (4)  In running water of sufficient velocity to flush particulates to  Food Safety  65  .3. or cut potatoes; and tofu may be  immersed in ice or water.  ongoing meal  service  7. food  preparation and dispensing utensils shall be stored:  handles out  (1)  In the food with their handles above the top of the food and  the container;  storage bins  (2)  In food that is not potentially hazardous with their handles  above the top of the food within containers or equipment that  can be closed. individual eggs.3. packaged foods such as canned  beverages or cooling coils and tubes of equipment. unpackaged food may not be stored  19  in direct contact with undrained ice.3. flour.  19  raw chicken/ fish  7.3.4. such as liquid egg product.3.3.  storage during  use  7.3.3.6  Other unpackaged foods in a raw. or partially cooked  state may be immersed in ice as part of an ongoing meal  service process.2  During pauses in food preparation or dispensing.3. Utensils. ice may not  be used as food.2  Packaged food may not be stored in direct contact with ice or  water if the food is subject to the entry of water because of the  nature of its packaging.  7.3.4.  coolant  7.3.3. or service.3.3.3.  undrained ice  7. display.3. raw vegetables such as  celery or carrot sticks.1  Food shall only contact surfaces of equipment and utensils that  26  C  are cleaned and sanitized.3.3. cooked. or container.4  Whole.3.7. raw fruits or vegetables; cut.3.  pasta.3  Except as specified below.3.3.3.  raw fruit/  vegetables  7.5  Raw chicken and raw fish that are received immersed in ice in  shipping containers may remain in that condition while in  storage awaiting preparation. wrapping. such as bins of sugar.3. and reconstituted powdered mixes.3  Ice as Coolant  ice used as a  coolant  7. and Linens  cleaned/  sanitized  7. or its  positioning in the ice or water.4  Equipment.

3.3.3. if used with moist food such as ice cream or mashed  potatoes;  ice scoops  (5)  In a clean.  66  Food Safety  .4. such as ice  scoops.4.  separate for raw  (3)  Dry or wet cloths that are used with raw animal foods shall  be kept separate from cloths used for other purposes.  19  wiping cloths  7. and wet  cloths used with raw animal foods shall be kept in a separate  sanitizing solution.4  Wiping cloths shall be restricted to the following:  25 no other  purpose  dry or stored in  sanitizer  (1)  Cloths that are in use for wiping food spills shall be used  for no other purpose. and used for  wiping spills from food­contact and nonfood­contact surfaces of  equipment.  (2)  Cloths used for wiping food spills shall be dry and used for  wiping food spills from tableware and single­service articles or  wet and cleaned.  linen/ napkins  7.3  Linens and napkins may not be used in contact with food  unless they are used to line a container for the service of foods  and the linens and napkins are replaced each time the  container is refilled for a new consumer.  clean solution  (4)  Wet wiping cloths used with a freshly made sanitizing  solution and dry wiping cloths shall be free of food debris and  visible soil.3. stored in a chemical sanitizer. are used only with a food that is not potentially  hazardous; or  heated water  (6)  In a container of water if the water is maintained at a  temperature of at least 60°C (140°F) and the container is  frequently cleaned and sanitized.the drain. protected location if the utensils.

  soiled tableware  (2)  Except as specified below.  covered when  RTE food prep  (4)  Cloth gloves may not be used in direct contact with food  unless the food is subsequently cooked such as frozen food or  a primal cut of meat. including single­service articles.3. single­use gloves shall be used for only one task  such as working with ready­to­eat food or with raw animal food. including single­service  articles.  cloth gloves  7.  one task/ discard  (2)  Slash­resistant gloves that are used to protect the hands  during operations requiring cutting shall be used in direct  contact only with food that is subsequently cooked such as  frozen food or a primal cut of meat. nonabsorbent glove or a single­use glove. durable.5  19  (1)  If used. food employees may not  use tableware. self­service consumers may not  be allowed to use soiled tableware.3. to provide second portions or refills.3.  self­service  (3)  Drinking cups and containers may be reused by self­  service consumers if refilling is a contamination­free process. durable.6  second portions  and refills  Gloves shall be used as follows:  Procedures for second portions and refills shall be as follows:  19 (1)  Except for refilling a consumer’s drinking cup or container  without contact between the pouring utensil and the lip­contact  area of the drinking cup or container.  slash­resistant  (3)  Slash­resistant gloves may be used with ready­to­eat food  that will not be subsequently cooked if the slash­resistant  gloves have a smooth.  used for no other purpose.7.4. to obtain additional food from the display and serving  equipment.3. soiled by the  consumer.  Food Safety  67  .4. and nonabsorbent outer  surface; or if the slash­resistant gloves are covered with a  smooth. and discarded when damaged or  soiled or when interruptions occur in the operation.

1  Food on display shall be protected from contamination by the  use of packaging; counter. dry location;  clean dry  (2)  Where it is not exposed to splash. dust. or salad bar food  guards; display cases; or other effective means.3.5  Food Storage and Preparation  7.1  Food shall be protected from contamination by storing the food:  19  (1)  In a clean.3.3.5.6  Food Display and Service  7.3.2  prohibited  storage  Food may not be stored:  19  (1)  In locker rooms;  (2)  In toilet rooms;  (3)  In dressing rooms;  (4)  In garbage rooms;  (5)  In mechanical rooms;  (6)  Under sewer lines that are not continuously sleeve welded;  (7)  Under leaking water lines.6. service line.3.  19  preparation  7.3  Potentially hazardous food dispensed through a vending  machine shall be in the package in which it was placed at the  galley or food­processing plant at which it was prepared. including leaking automatic fire  sprinkler heads.4  During preparation.5.3.3.3.  19  7.5. or under lines on which water has condensed;  (8)  Under open stairwells; or  (9)  Under other sources of contamination from nonfood items  such as ice blocks.3.5.  display  preparation  68  Food Safety  19 .3.3.3.  PHF packages  in vending  machines  7.3. ice carvings and flowers.3. or other  contamination; and  not exposed  above deck  (3)  At least 15 centimeters (6 inches) above the deck.storage  protection  7.  7. unpackaged food shall be protected from  environmental sources of contamination such as rain.

 a food­processing plant.3  Consumer self­service operations.  food re­service  7. salt.3. under strict employee monitoring. or wine; or the food. such as a narrow­neck  bottle containing catsup.3. for unpackaged ready­to­eat foods:  19  (1)  Shall be provided with suitable utensils or effective  dispensing methods that protect the food from contamination;  and  (2)  Shall be monitored by food employees trained in safe  operating procedures.3. such as the galley that provides food to  the vending machine location.3. such as salad bars and  buffets. original containers designed for dispensing. and complete protection from any other  contamination sources. food that is unused or  returned by the consumer:  15  C  (1)  May not be offered as food for human consumption.6.3. or a  properly equipped facility that is located on the site of the  vending machine location. or pepper.2  Condiments shall be protected from contamination:  19  (1)  By being kept in dispensers that are designed to provide  protection. protected food displays provided with the proper  utensils.6.  such as crackers.3. is in an unopened original  package and is maintained in sound condition.4  After being served and in the possession of a consumer or  being placed on a buffet service line. steak sauce.  (2)  Except a container of food that is not potentially hazardous  may be transferred from one consumer to another if the food is  dispensed so that it is protected from contamination and the  container is closed between uses.Condiments  7.3.  strict temperature control of hot/cold potentially hazardous  foods. or  individual packages or portions; and  (2)  Condiments at a vending machine location shall be in  individual packages or provided in dispensers that are filled at  an approved location.3. proper cooling and reheating of hot held potentially  hazardous foods.1  Food shall be protected from contamination that may result  Food Safety  19 69  .  self­service  7.6.3.7.7  Other Contamination  7.  other  contaminants  7.3. including pests is permitted.  (3)  Except re­service for foods served to passengers from a  fully enclosed display case.

1  Cooking Temperatures / Times  7. fish. stuffed fish. may be served or  Food Safety  16  C . stuffed poultry. and pork including  game animals commercially raised for food and game animals  under a voluntary inspection program;  (2)  68°C (155°F) for 15 seconds or equivalent temperature­  time combination for ratites and injected meats; the following if  they are comminuted:  fish. soft cooked eggs. pork roasts. poultry.  (5)  A raw or undercooked whole­muscle. shall be cooked to 63°C  (145°F) or above for 15 seconds or to equivalent temperature­  time combination in ovens operated in accordance with the  specifications in Annex 13.3. or rare meat  other than whole­muscle.1  Raw animal foods such as eggs. wild  game animals not specified in (2). intact beef steak may  be served or offered for sale in a ready­to­eat form if the steak  is labeled to indicate that it meets the definition of “whole­  muscle. raw­marinated fish. or  hydraulic or fuel lines.6.  raw molluscan shellfish.  stuffed pasta.4. poultry. meat. shall be cooked to heat all  parts of the food to a temperature and for a time that complies  with one of the following methods based on the food that is  being cooked:  (1)  63°C (145°F) or above for 15 seconds for raw shell eggs  that are broken and prepared in response to consumers’ orders  and for immediate service.1. meat. or stuffing  containing fish. game animals commercially  raised for food.  (6)  A raw animal food such as raw fish. intact beef steaks.4. and  cured pork roasts such as ham. meat. bilge water. or steak tartare; or a partially cooked  food such as lightly cooked fish.from a factor or source such as seawater. and fish.  (4)  Whole beef roasts.3. stuffed meat. meat.3. and game animals under a voluntary inspection  program; and raw eggs that are not prepared for immediate  service; or  (3)  74°C (165°F) or above for 15 seconds for poultry. intact beef;” and the steak is cooked on both the top  and bottom to a surface temperature of 63°C (145°F) or above  and a cooked color change is achieved on all external  surfaces. corned beef roasts. or ratites. and foods  containing these raw animal foods. stuffed ratites.  cooking  63 °C/  145 °F  68 °C/  155°F  74°C/  165 °F  roasts  beef steaks  raw/lightly  cooked  70  7.4  Pathogen Destruction  7.

 T. southern).2.  fruits/ vegetables  7.  partially cooked. or T. such as gravlax. they may be served raw. raw­  marinated.  albacares (yellowfin tuna).4.  (2)  If the fish are tuna of the species Thunnus alalunga.1  Before service in ready­to­eat form.  microwave  7. fish  carpaccio.2  Raw animal foods cooked in a microwave oven shall be:  16  C  (1)  Rotated or stirred throughout or midway during cooking to  compensate for uneven distribution of heat;  (2)  Covered to retain surface moisture;  (3)  Heated to a temperature of at least 74°C (165°F) in all  parts of the food; and  (4)  Allowed to stand covered for 2 minutes after cooking to  obtain temperature equilibrium.3. thynnus (bluefin  tuna. or partially cooked ready­to­eat form without  freezing. or marinated­partially cooked fish other than  molluscan shellfish:  17  16  C (1)  Shall be frozen throughout to a temperature of ­20°C (­4°F)  or below for 168 hours (7 days) in a freezer; or  ­35°C (­31°F) or below for 15 hours in a blast freezer. or sashimi. T. raw­  marinated.4. seviche.1.3  parasite  destruction  Fruits and vegetables that are cooked for hot holding shall be  cooked to a temperature of 60°C (140°F).4.  (3)  If foods.  The HACCP plan must verify  that equipment and procedures for food preparation and  training of food employees meet the conditions of the variance.3.1.  Food Safety  71  . obesus (bigeye tuna).  7.  The HACCP plan must document scientific data or other  information showing that a lesser time and temperature  regimen results in a safe food.2  Parasite Destruction  7. raw­marinated.offered for sale in a ready­to­eat form if the consumer is  informed by the written consumer advisory; or the VSP grants  a variance from the cooking recommendations based on a  HACCP plan that is submitted by the vessel and approved. atlanticus. or partially cooked ready­to­eat without freezing the  product on­board the vessel. northern).3. T. T. are prepared in a food processing plant  and certified as parasite free. the fish may be served in a raw.3. raw.4. maccoyii (bluefin  tuna.

5  Reheating for hot holding shall be done rapidly and the time  the food is between 5°C (41°F) and 74°C (165°F) may not  exceed 2 hours.4.  7. shall be heated to a temperature of at least  60°C (140°F) for hot holding.4. or marinated­partially  cooked fish are served in ready­to­eat form:  17  (1)  The person in charge shall record the freezing temperature  and time to which the fish are subjected and shall retain the  records on the vessel for 90 calendar days beyond the time of  service or sale of the fish; or  (2)  If the fish are frozen by a supplier.  16  C  commercial  products  7.4  17  Ready­to­eat potentially hazardous food taken from a  commercially processed. partially cooked. cooled. or from  an intact package from a food processing plant that is  inspected by the food regulatory authority that has jurisdiction  over the plant.3. potentially  hazardous food shall be reheated so that all parts of the food  reach a temperature of at least 74°C (165°F) and the food is  rotated or stirred.4.4.3. a written letter from the  supplier which specifies the fish species involved and both the  temperature to which the fish was frozen and the total time  period at that temperature.4.  74 °C/  165 °F  7. such as a  roast beef sandwich au jus.  If the supplier provides any of the  same fish species to the vessel in a fresh state.6  Potentially hazardous food may not be reheated more than  once.4.3.3.3.  16  C  microwave  heating  7.3  Reheating  immediate  service  7.4.3.3.3. there shall be  some designation on the outer packaging for the parasite­free  fish.  17  reheat roast  beef  72  7.7  Remaining unsliced portions of roasts of beef that are cooked Food Safety  C  .3. and  reheated for hot holding shall be reheated so that all parts of  the food reach a temperature of at least 74°C (165°F) for 15  seconds. and allowed to stand covered for 2  minutes after reheating.3. may be served at any temperature.  rapid reheat  7.2.3.1  Cooked and refrigerated food that is prepared for immediate  service in response to an individual consumer order.2  Potentially hazardous food that is cooked.3.  16  reheat once  7.4.3. hermetically sealed container.3. raw­marinated.3  If reheated in a microwave oven for hot holding. covered.records  7.2  If raw.3.4.3.

3  Potentially hazardous food shall be thawed:  17 (1)  Under refrigeration that maintains the food temperature at  5°C (41°F) or less; or  (2)  Completely submerged under running water at a water  temperature of 21°C (70°F) or below.1.2  Frozen potentially hazardous food that is slacked to moderate  the temperature shall be held:  17  (1)  Under refrigeration that maintains the food temperature at  5°C (41°F) or less; or  (2)  At any temperature if the food remains frozen. Slacking and Thawing Procedures  7.1.5.3.5  Food Holding Temperatures and Times  7. or the time  it takes under refrigeration to lower the food temperature to  5°C (41°F); or  (3)  As part of a cooking process if the food that is frozen is  cooked.  slacking  7.1  Stored frozen foods shall be maintained frozen.  thawing under  refrigeration  running water  cooking/  microwave  7.3.1.on the vessel may be reheated for hot holding using the oven  parameters and minimum time and temperature conditions  used in the original cooking process.5.5.  17  7. with sufficient water  velocity to agitate and float off loose particles in an overflow. the time needed for preparation for cooking. or thawed in a microwave oven.  (4)  Using any procedure if a portion of frozen ready­to­eat  food is thawed and prepared for immediate service in  response to an individual consumer's order.1  Frozen.  Food Safety  73  .5.3. or for a period of  time that does not allow thawed portions of a raw animal food  requiring cooking to be above 5°C (41°F) for more than  4 hours including the time the food is exposed to the running  water.3.  and for a period of time that does not allow thawed portions of  ready­to­eat food to rise above 5°C (41°F).3.

2.4  Shell eggs need not comply with the cooling time if the eggs  are placed immediately upon their receipt in refrigerated  equipment that is capable of maintaining food at 5°C (41°F) or  less.5.3.3.2  Food Cooling  7.5.  7.5. from 60°C (140°F) to 21°C (70°F); and  (2) Within 4 hours.2.2. beginning with the day of  Food Safety  17 .5. food  containers in which food is being cooled shall be arranged in  the equipment to provide maximum heat transfer through the  container walls; and loosely covered. if prepared from ingredients at ambient  temperature. freezers.1 thru the control points at 2 and 6 hours shall be  maintained onboard the vessel for a period of 30 days from  the date the food was placed in a cooling process. shall also be  maintained for a 30 day period.cooling times/  temperatures  7. such as reconstituted foods and canned tuna. from 21°C (70°F) to 5°C (41°F) or less.  16  C  cooling  received food  7.2.3.1  Cooked potentially hazardous food shall be cooled:  16  C  (1) Within 2 hours.2.3.  7.3  A potentially hazardous food received in compliance with laws  allowing a temperature above 5°C (41°F) during shipment  from the supplier shall be cooled within 4 hours to 5°C (41°F)  or less.  Logs  documenting cooling of potentially hazardous foods prepared  from ingredients at ambient temperatures.6  Logs documenting cooked potentially hazardous food cooling  temperatures and times from the starting points designated in  7.  cooling  prepared food  7.5.3.5. with the start time  to the time when 5 °C (41 °F) is reached. or  other rapid cooling equipment; stirring the food in a container  placed in an ice water bath; using containers that facilitate  heat transfer; adding ice as an ingredient; or other effective  methods.2.5.  arrangement  cooling logs  74  (2)  When placed in cooling or cold­holding equipment.3. during the cooling  period to facilitate heat transfer from the surface of the food. or uncovered if  protected from overhead contamination.5.3.  16  C  7.2.5  Cooling shall be accomplished using one or more of the  following methods based on the type of food being cooled:  cooling  methods  17  (1) Placing the food in shallow pans; separating the food into  smaller or thinner portions; using blast chillers.2  Potentially hazardous food shall be cooled within 4 hours to  5°C (41°F) or less.3.

 provided it is  effective. cooking. ready­to­eat.3  Food Holding Temperatures and Times  7. including the day the original  container is opened. to indicate the date by which the food  shall be consumed which is.5. or other system. 7 calendar days or fewer after the  original container is opened.5.2  life Refrigerated. potentially hazardous food:  prepared on  vessel  (1)  Prepared on a vessel and held refrigerated for more than  24 hours shall be clearly marked at the time of preparation to  indicate the date or day by which the food shall be consumed. ready­to­eat.3.  from food  processing  plant  (2)  A container of refrigerated. ready­to­eat potentially  hazardous food prepared and packaged by a food processing  plant and held on the vessel after opening for more than 24  hours shall be clearly marked.3  PHF  Refrigerated.3.and pasteurized  process cheese manufactured according to 21 CFR 133 are  exempt from the date marking requirement. fermented sausages and salt­cured  products such as prosciutto and parma ham that are not  labeled “Keep Refrigerated”) are exempt from the date  marking requirement. potentially hazardous food shall be  discarded if not consumed within 7 calendar days from the  date of preparation or opening. at the time the original  container is opened. or when time  is used as the public health control.1  16  C  Except during preparation.3.5.  holding  temperature/  time  7.  which is 7 calendar days or fewer from the day the food is  prepared.  Food Safety  16  C  16  C 75  .  The day of preparation is counted as day 1.5.  discarding RTE  7.  The day of opening is counted  as day 1.3. day.  RTE PHF shelf­  7. color­code. except that roasts may be held  at a temperature of 54°C (130°F); or  (2)  At 5°C (41°F) or less. or cooling.  system used  and exempted  products  (3) The date marking requirement can be accomplished with a  calendar date.preparation.3.  Hard and semisoft aged cheeses.  Some shelf  stable meats (dry.3.3. potentially hazardous food  shall be maintained:  60 °C/140 °F  5 °C/41 °F  (1)  At 60°C (140°F) or above.

  is used as the public health control for a working supply of  potentially hazardous food before cooking.3.  written  procedures  7.5  health control  If time only.  16  C  time as a public  7. potentially hazardous. upon request. it shall be  with equipment that can maintain the potentially hazardous  food at 5°C (41°F) or less.5.  ready­to­eat food that is subsequently combined with  additional ingredients or portions of food shall retain the date  marking of the earliest or first­prepared ingredient.3. potentially hazardous.5. ready­to­eat food  ingredient or a portion of a refrigerated.3. within 4 hours from the time when the food  is removed from temperature control; and  (3)  The food in unmarked containers or packages or marked  to exceed a 4 hour limit shall be discarded.  16  C  day stores  7.3.5.6  Written procedures that ensure compliance with these  guidelines shall be maintained on the vessel and made  available to the VSP.retain date  7.4  A refrigerated. or discarded.  Food Safety  . potentially hazardous food may be  held at 7°C (45°F) up to 24 hours in existing short term  holding refrigeration equipment provided:  16  C designation  label  (1)  The equipment is designated by a permanent label affixed  to it indicating the maximum allowable product temperature is  7°C (45°F) and the maximum allowable storage time is 24  hours;  container  labeling  (2)  All containers of potentially hazardous foods placed in the  unit must be labeled with a date and time by which food shall  be used or discarded;  pre­cooled PHF  replacement  76  (3)  Potentially hazardous foods when placed in the  equipment shall be at 5°C (41°F) or less; and  (4)  When the equipment is upgraded or replaced.3.7  Refrigerated.3. or for ready­to­eat  potentially hazardous food that is displayed or held for service  for immediate consumption:  16  C  (1)  The food shall be marked or otherwise identified to  indicate the time that is 4 hours past the point in time when  the food is removed from temperature control;  (2)  The food shall be cooked and served.3. rather than time in conjunction with temperature.3. ready­to­eat. served if ready­to­  eat.5.

 placards.3.3.7  Contaminated Food  7.1.  18  C  restricted or  excluded  employee  7. or not otherwise  processed to eliminate pathogens is offered in a ready­to­eat  form or as a raw ingredient in another ready­to­eat food.7.3. milk.1.1  Materials that are used in the construction of multiuse utensils  and food­contact surfaces of equipment may not allow the  migration of deleterious substances or impart colors. fish.4.1. or  other persons through contact with their hands; bodily  discharges.  18  C  contaminated  by others  7.1.3.3. menu  advisories.  7.3.7.1.3.1  A food that is unsafe or adulterated shall be discarded.3. consumers.7.  18  C  C  consumer  advisory  7. or other written means of the significantly  increased risk to certain especially vulnerable consumers  eating such foods in raw or undercooked form.6  Consumer Information  7.1  Discarding Food  unsafe/  adulterated  7. or shellfish that is raw.2  Materials that are used in the construction of multiuse utensils  and food­contact surfaces of equipment shall be:  20 (1) Durable. such as nasal or oral discharges; or other means  shall be discarded.1.1  Multiuse Characteristics and Use Limitations  safe food­  contact  materials  7.7.4  Equipment and Utensils  7.4.1  16  C  If an animal food such as beef.1.2  Food that is not from an approved source shall be discarded.3.6.4.  Raw shell egg  preparations are prohibited in uncooked products as  described in 7.  18  C  unapproved  source  7. or  tastes to food and under normal use conditions shall be safe.1.4.2.  brochures.  26  food­contact  surfaces  7.6.3. lamb.3  Ready­to­eat food that may have been contaminated by an  employee who has been restricted or excluded for food  employee health issues shall be discarded.3. pork. undercooked.4  Food that is contaminated by food employees.1  Advisory  7. and nonabsorbent;  (2) Sufficient in weight and thickness to withstand repeated  Food Safety  77  .7. odors. eggs.  poultry. the  passengers shall be informed by vessel newsletter articles.1. embarkation television broadcasts.1  Materials  7.7.4. corrosion­resistant.1.

4. fruit juice.  Cast iron may be used as a surface  for cooking.  20  lead  7. crazing.warewashing;  (3) Finished to have a smooth.  cast iron  7.1. china. chipping. scoring.  (2)  Copper and copper alloys may be used in contact with  beer brewing ingredients that have a pH below 6 in the  prefermentation and fermentation steps of a beer brewing  operation such as a brewpub or microbrewery.  distortion.4. crystal utensils.1.1.  (2)  Pewter alloys containing lead in excess of 0. and decomposition.4  Limitation of lead use shall be as follows:  20  (1)  Ceramic.4.  (3)  Solder and flux containing lead in excess of 0.  Food Safety  .1.3  Cast iron may not be used for utensils or food­contact  surfaces of equipment.6  Galvanized metal may not be used for utensils or food­contact  26  C surfaces of equipment that are used in contact with acidic  food.  Cast iron may be used in utensils for serving  food if the utensils are used only as part of an uninterrupted  process from cooking through service.05% may not  be used as a food­contact surface. scratching.5  Copper and copper alloys such as brass:  26  C  (1)  May not be used in contact with a food that has a pH  below 6 such as vinegar.2% may not  be used as a food­contact surface.1.1.  copper/ brass  7.1. easily cleanable surface; and  (4) Resistant to pitting.4.  galvanized  78  7. or wine or for a fitting or  tubing installed between a backflow prevention device and a  carbonator.1. and decorative utensils  such as hand painted ceramic or china that are used in  contact with food shall be lead­free or contain levels of lead  not exceeding the limits for specific utensil categories as  allowed by law.

9  Nonfood­contact surfaces of equipment that are exposed to  splash.4. salad  bowls. uncut. odors.1.1. raw fruits and vegetables. the whole. or tastes to food and  shall be clean.  nonfood­  contact  surfaces  7.1.4.1.1. until the fruits. spillage.4. uncut.  7. or shells before consumption.  (2)  Hard maple or an equivalently hard. or other food soiling or that require frequent  cleaning shall be constructed of a corrosion­resistant.4.1.Wood  7.1  Materials that are used to make single­service and single­use  articles shall not allow the migration of deleterious substances  and shall be safe.2  Materials that are used to make single­service and single­use  articles shall not impart colors. and smooth material. and waffle bakers that have a  perfluorocarbon resin coating shall be used with nonscoring or  nonscratching utensils and cleaning aids. vegetables. and chopsticks; and wooden paddles used in  confectionery operations for pressure scraping kettles when  manually preparing confections at a temperature of 110°C  (230°F) or above.4.  coatings  7.1.7  Wood use shall be limited as follows:  20  (1)  Wood and wood wicker may not be used as a food­  contact surface. griddles.  nonabsorbent.  (3)  Whole.  husks.3800 Preservatives for Wood. cookie sheets.  (4)  If the nature of the food requires removal of rinds. sauce  pans.  20 Food Safety  21  C  79  .2. doughnut dowels.8  20  Multiuse kitchenware such as frying pans.2. peels. and nuts in the  shell may be kept in the wood shipping containers in which  they were received. or nuts are  used.  26  no colors/  odors/  taste  7. raw  food may be kept in untreated wood containers; or treated  wood containers if the containers are treated with a  preservative that meets the requirements specified in 21 CFR  178.2  Single­Service and Single­Use Characteristics  single­ service  materials  safe  7.4.1. close­grained wood  may be used for cutting boards; cutting blocks; bakers' tables;  and utensils such as rolling pins.1.

2  Nonfood­contact surfaces of equipment and utensils shall be  designed and constructed to be durable and to retain their  characteristic qualities under normal use conditions.4.2  CIP equipment shall meet the following criteria:  (1) It shall be designed and constructed so that cleaning and  sanitizing solutions circulate throughout a fixed system and  contact all interior food­contact surfaces.4. inclusions.2.2.  20  nonfood­  contact  durability/  strength  7. pits.2.2.2. or by easy  disassembling with the use of handheld tools commonly  available to maintenance and cleaning personnel such as  screwdrivers.  This section does not apply to cooking oil storage tanks.1  Food contact surfaces of equipment and utensils shall be  designed and constructed to be durable and to retain their  characteristic qualities under normal use conditions. and the system is  self­draining or capable of being completely drained of  cleaning and sanitizing solutions; or  (2)  CIP equipment that is not designed to be disassembled  for cleaning shall be designed with inspection access points to  80  Food Safety  20 C  . and crevices;  (4)  Finished to have smooth welds and joints; and  (5)  Accessible for cleaning and inspection by one of the  following methods without being disassembled.3  Food temperature measuring devices may not have sensors  or stems constructed of glass.2  Cleanability  7.4.4.2. except that thermometers with  glass sensors or stems that are encased in a shatterproof  coating such as candy thermometers may be used. and Allen wrenches. corners.2  Design and Construction  7. open seams >0.4.7.1.8 mm (1/32 inch).4.  21  7.1.  CIP equipment  design/  construction  7. or beverage syrup lines or  tubes.4.2.2.  chips.  distribution lines for cooking oils. and similar imperfections;  (3)  Free of sharp internal angles.1  Durability and Strength  food­contact  durability/  strength  7. open­end wrenches.1  Multiuse food­contact surfaces shall be:  glass TMD’s  multiuse food­  contact  surfaces  20  (1)  Smooth;  (2)  Free of breaks.4.2. by  disassembling without the use of tools.1. pliers. cracks.  26  7.

5°C in the intended range of use.2  Ambient air temperature measuring devices:  21 (1)  That are scaled in Celsius or dually scaled in Celsius and  Fahrenheit shall be designed to be easily readable and  accurate to ±1.2.4  Hot oil filtering equipment shall be readily accessible for filter  replacement and cleaning of the filter. and crevices.  21  kick plates  7.4.1  Food temperature measuring devices:  21  20  (1)  That are scaled only in Celsius or dually scaled in Celsius  and Fahrenheit shall be accurate to ±1°C in the intended  range of use; and  (2)  That are scaled only in Fahrenheit shall be accurate to  ±2°F in the intended range of use.7  Kick plates shall be designed so that the areas behind them  are accessible for inspection and cleaning by:  21  (1) Being easily removable or capable of being rotated open;  and  (2) Being removable or capable of being rotated open without  unlocking equipment doors.2.6  Nonfood­contact surfaces shall be free of unnecessary  ledges.2.  20  can openers  7. and designed and  constructed to allow easy cleaning and to facilitate  maintenance.8  Filters or other grease extracting equipment shall be designed  to be readily removable for cleaning and replacement if not  designed to be cleaned in place.2.2.2.2.  7.2.3.4. "V" type  threads may not be used on food­contact surfaces.4.  “V” type  threads  7.  20  nonfood­  contact design  7.3  Except for hot oil cooking or filtering equipment.  grease filters  food TMD  accuracy  7.3  Accuracy  7.2.4.3.  ambient air  TMD accuracy  7.ensure that all interior food­contact surfaces throughout the  fixed system are being effectively cleaned.2.2.4.  Food Safety  81  .  20  oil filtering  equipment  7.2.2.2.4.5  Cutting or piercing parts of can openers shall be readily  removable for cleaning and for replacement.4. projections.  (2)  That are scaled only in Fahrenheit shall be accurate to  ±3°F in the intended range of use.2.4.4.

 and orifice shall be protected  from manual contact such as by being recessed;  (3)  The delivery tube or chute and orifice of equipment used  to vend liquid food or ice in unpackaged form to self­service  consumers shall be designed so that the delivery tube or  chute and orifice are protected from dust. and dust from  openings into the food; and the opening shall be flanged at  least 5 millimeters (2/10 of an inch).  equipment  openings. closures and deflectors shall conform to:  20  7. temperature measuring devices. temperature  measuring devices. such as with barriers. and other parts extending into equipment shall be  provided with a watertight joint at the point where the item  enters the equipment.4.4  Functionality  ventilation hood  7.2.  beverage/ ice  dispensing  7.  (4) If a watertight joint is not provided.2. drips. utensils.4.7. and single­service and single­use  articles. baffles.4.1  design  Exhaust ventilation hood systems in food preparation and  warewashing areas including components such as hoods.  (2)  An opening located within the top of a unit of equipment  that is designed for use with a cover or lid shall be flanged  upward at least 5 millimeters (2/10 of an inch).3  In equipment that dispenses liquid food or ice in unpackaged  form:  (1)  The delivery tube. orifice. chute. rotary shafts. guards.4.2. and splash surfaces  directly above the container receiving the food shall be  designed in a manner. linens. rotary  shafts. and  deflectors  Equipment openings. chute.4.4. insects.4.  and other contamination by a self­closing door if the  equipment is located in an outside area that does not  82  Food Safety  20 .2  37  (1)  A cover or lid for equipment shall overlap the opening and  be sloped to drain.2. and ducting shall be designed to prevent grease  or condensation from draining or dripping onto food. or drip  aprons.  fans. the piping.  closures.  (3)  Fixed piping. rodents. so that drips from condensation and splash are  diverted from the opening of the container receiving the food;  (2)  The delivery tube. and other parts extending  through the openings shall be equipped with an apron  designed to deflect condensation.  equipment.

4.4  Equipment containing bearings and gears that require  lubricants shall be designed and constructed so that the  lubricant cannot leak.  (3)  The above section does not apply to equipment for which  Food Safety  83  .2.4.2. drip.4.4. insects.2.4.  equipment  drainage  7.  (2)  Cold or hot holding equipment used for potentially  hazardous food shall be designed to include and shall be  equipped with at least one integral or affixed temperature  measuring device that is located to allow easy viewing of the  device's temperature display.  This guideline does  not apply to cold plates that are constructed integrally without  seams in an ice storage bin.4. the  sensor of a temperature measuring device shall be located to  measure the air temperature in the warmest part of a  mechanically refrigerated unit and in the coolest part of a hot­  food storage unit.6  Equipment compartments that are subject to accumulation of  moisture because of conditions such as condensation.4. or be forced into food or onto food­  contact surfaces. food or  beverage drip. or available  for self­service during hours when it is not under the full­time  supervision of a food employee; and  (4)  The dispensing equipment actuating lever or mechanism  and filling device of consumer self­service beverage  dispensing equipment shall be designed to prevent contact  with the lip­contact surface of glasses or cups that are refilled.  21  ambient air  TMD’s  7. windblown debris.7  Liquid waste drain lines may not pass through an ice machine  or ice storage bin.8  If a condenser unit is an integral component of equipment.otherwise afford the protection of an enclosure against the  rain.4.  20  condenser unit  7.5  Beverage tubing and cold­plate beverage cooling devices may  20  not be installed in contact with stored ice.2.4. or water from melting ice shall be sloped to an  outlet that allows complete draining.  beverage line  cooling  7.  21  drain lines  7.4. rodents.2.4.9  Temperature measuring devices shall conform to the following  21 guidelines:  21  (1)  In a mechanically refrigerated or hot­food storage unit. and other  contaminants that are present in the environment.2.4.  bearings/ gears  7. the  condenser unit shall be separated from the food and food  storage space by a dustproof barrier.

 cold plates. Heating.the placement of a temperature measuring device is not a  practical means for measuring the ambient air surrounding the  food because of the design.2  Each self­service food dispensing utensil shall be covered or  located beneath shielding during service.1.1  A food­dispensing utensil shall be available for each container  displayed at a consumer self­service unit such as a buffet or  salad bar.1  20  Food­contact surfaces of food equipment shall comply with  American National Standards Institute (ANSI) or other  internationally accredited food equipment sanitation standards  for materials. and Holding Capacities  cold/hot holding  7. heat lamps.3  Utensils.5.1  Cooling.2. and construction. and use of the equipment.  (4)  Temperature measuring devices shall be designed to be  easily readable.4. shall be sufficient in number and capacity to  maintain specified potentially hazardous food temperatures.  nonfood­  contact  equipment  standards  7.3  Numbers and Capacities  7.5.4. bains­marie.2  ventilation hood  7.2.  7. design.  such as calrod units.3.3.3. type.  20  Ventilation Hood Systems  Ventilation hood systems and devices shall be sufficient in  number and capacity to prevent grease or condensation from  collecting on bulkheads and deckheads.1  Equipment for cooling and heating food.4.4.3. or digital readout in  increments no greater than 1°C (2°F) in the intended range of  use.  19  utensil  protected  7.3.4.2. and construction.5  Food Equipment.4.  steam tables.1  capacity  7.3.3.4. and salad  bars.  19 84  Food Safety  . printed record.4.4. Consumer Self­Service  dispensing  utensil  7.  20  7. and holding cold and  hot food. Standards and Classification  food­contact  equipment  standards  7.2. insulated food transport containers.4.3.2  Nonfood­contact surfaces of food equipment shall comply with  21  American National Standards Institute (ANSI) or other  internationally accredited food­equipment sanitation standards  for materials.  (5)  Food temperature measuring devices shall have a  numerical scale.  37  7.3.4. design.

2.8 millimeter or 1/32  inch; or  (3)  Sealed to adjoining equipment or bulkhead.2  If no part of the deck under the deck­mounted equipment is  more than 150 millimeters (6 inches) from the point of  cleaning access.4.3.1  Equipment that is fixed because it is not easily movable shall  be installed so that it is:  20  21  (1)  Spaced to allow access for cleaning along the sides.1  Fixed Equipment.  Food Safety  21  21 85  . the clearance space may be only 100  millimeters (4 inches).food TMD  fixed  equipment  installation  7.4.3. Spacing or Sealing  7.4.4.4.2  Fixed Equipment. and  deckhead at a distance of not more than 0.1.1  Deck­mounted equipment that is not easily movable shall be  sealed to the deck or elevated on legs that provide at least a  150 millimeter (6­inch) clearance between the deck and the  equipment.4.3  Table­mounted equipment that is not easily movable shall be  elevated on legs that provide at least a 100 millimeter (4­inch)  clearance between the table and the equipment.1  Food temperature measuring devices shall be provided and  readily accessible for use in ensuring attainment and  maintenance of food temperatures.4. bulkhead. Elevation or Sealing  deck­ mounted  sealed or  elevated  7.  table­mounted  elevated  7.4.4  Food Temperature Measuring Devices  7.4.1.4. under and above the equipment;  (2)  Spaced from adjoining equipment.4.2.4.  7.4.4.2  Table­mounted equipment that is not easily movable shall be  installed to allow cleaning of the equipment and areas  underneath and around the equipment by being:  21  (1)  Sealed to the table; or  (2)  Elevated on legs.4.  7.4.  deck­ mounted  clearance  7.  table­ mounted  sealed or  elevated  7.  behind.4.4.2. if the  equipment is exposed to spillage or seepage.4  Equipment Location and Installation  7.

  (2)  Cutting or piercing parts of can openers shall be kept  sharp to minimize the creation of metal fragments that can  contaminate food when the container is opened. or equivalent. and  operation specifications of these guidelines.5.2.1.  food­contact  equipment in  good repair  7. or discarded if they  are not capable of being resurfaced. seals.4. hinges.4.1.2  Nonfood­contact equipment shall be maintained in good repair  21  and proper adjustment including:  (1)  Equipment shall be maintained in a state of repair and  condition that meets the materials.table­mounted  clearance  7.10 Microwave Ovens.  (2)  Equipment components such as doors.1.4.4. construction.4.4  The clearance space between the table and table­mounted  equipment may be:  (1)  75 millimeters (3 inches) if the horizontal distance of the  table top under the equipment is no more than 500 millimeters  (20 inches) from the point of access for cleaning; or  (2)  50 millimeters (2 inches) if the horizontal distance of the  table top under the equipment is no more than 75 millimeters  (3 inches) from the point of access for cleaning.  nonfood­  contact  equipment in  good repair  7. and  adjusted in accordance with manufacturer's specifications. construction. and kick plates shall be kept intact.1  Food­contact equipment shall be maintained in good repair  and proper adjustment including:  20  (1)  Equipment shall be maintained in a state of repair and  condition that meets the materials.3  Surfaces such as cutting blocks and boards that are subject to  20  scratching and scoring shall be resurfaced if they no longer  can be effectively cleaned and sanitized.  microwave  ovens  7.4  Microwave ovens shall meet the safety standards specified in  21 CFR 1030. and  operation specifications of these guidelines.  fasteners.4.4.5.4.5  Maintenance and Operation  7.  86  Food Safety  20 .5.5.5. tight.  cutting boards  7.1. design.1  Equipment  7. design.

3.5.5.1  Warewashing Measuring Device Accuracy  7.4.  28  bulk milk tubes  7.2  Good Repair and Calibration  7.5.  (2)  Food temperature measuring devices shall be calibrated  in accordance with manufacturer's specifications as necessary  to ensure their accuracy.4.1  [Reserved]  7.  ambient air  TMD’s good  repair and  calibration  7.1  Utensils and temperature measuring devices shall be  maintained in good repair and proper adjustment including:  20  (1)  Utensils shall be maintained in a state of repair or  condition that meets the materials.4.5.5.2.4.5.1  Water temperature measuring devices:  22 (1)  That are scaled in Celsius or dually scaled in Celsius and  Fahrenheit shall be designed to be accurate to ±1.5.  Food Safety  87  . design and construction  specifications of these guidelines or shall be discarded.3  Single­Service and Single­Use Articles  7.5°C in the  intended range of use.4.5.4.5.3  Mollusk and crustacean shells may not be used more than  once as serving containers.2.2.2  The bulk milk container dispensing tube shall be cut on the  diagonal leaving no more than 25 millimeters (1 inch)  protruding from the chilled dispensing head.5.4.1.  (2)  That are scaled only in Fahrenheit shall designed to be  accurate to ±3°F in the intended range of use.3.  7.3.5.2  Warewashing Design and Construction  7.2.  20  shell reuse  7.utensils and  TMD’s in good  repair and  calibration  7.  28  7.5  water TMD  accuracy  21  Warewashing  7.1  Single­service and single­use articles may not be reused.2  Ambient air temperature measuring devices shall be  maintained in good repair and be accurate within the intended  range of use.

5.2.2.5.5. or  digital readout in increments no greater than 1°C (2°F) in the  intended range of use.5.  baffles/ curtains  7.2  accuracy  Pressure measuring devices that display the pressures in the  water supply line for the fresh hot water sanitizing rinse shall  have increments of 7 kilopascals (1 pounds per square inch)  or smaller and shall be accurate to ± 14 kilopascals (± 2  pounds per square inch) in the 100­170 kilopascals (15­25  pounds per square inch) range.1  Water temperature measuring devices shall be designed to be  22  easily readable. printed record.  water TMD  scale  7.2.2.  sanitizer level  alert  88  7. curtains. and sanitizing;  (2) Pressure required for the fresh water sanitizing rinse  unless the machine is designed to use only a pumped  sanitizing rinse; and  (3) Conveyor speed for conveyor machines or cycle time for  stationary rack machines.5.2.2.2  Water temperature measuring devices on warewashing  machines shall have a numerical scale.2.5. rinsing.2.  warewash  TMD’s  A warewashing machine shall be equipped with a temperature  22  measuring device that indicates the temperature of the water:  7.  Food Safety  22 .3  A warewashing machine shall be provided with an easily  accessible and readable data plate affixed to the machine by  the manufacturer that indicates the machine's design and  operating specifications including the:  22  (1) Temperatures required for washing.5.2.2.2. or other means to minimize  internal cross­contamination of the solutions in wash and rinse  tanks.4  22  Warewashing machine wash and rinse tanks shall be  equipped with baffles.  22  warewasher  data plate  7.pressure gauge  7.1.5.6  A warewashing machine that uses a chemical for sanitization  and that is installed after adoption of these guidelines shall be  equipped with a device that indicates audibly or visually when  more chemical sanitizer needs to be added.2.2.2.2  Warewashing Functionality  water TMD  readable  7.5  (1) In each wash and rinse tank; and  (2) As the water enters the hot water sanitizing final rinse  manifold or in the chemical sanitizing solution tank.  22  7.

5.2.1.2.pressure gauge  7. and sanitizing equipment and  utensils.  size  7.2.5.1  Three­Compartment Sinks  3­compartment  sink  7.  7. the device shall  be mounted in a 6.3. shall be used.2.1  A sink with at least 3 compartments shall be provided for  manually washing.1.5.8  If hot water is used for sanitization in manual warewashing  operations. a  warewashing machine or alternative equipment.  (3)  These guidelines do not apply to a machine that uses only  a pumped or recirculated sanitizing rinse. the sanitizing compartment of the sink shall be:  22  (1) Designed with an integral heating device that is capable of  maintaining water at a temperature not less than 77°C  (171°F); and  self­draining  7.5.3.  manual  sanitizing  booster heater  7.9  Sinks and drainboards of warewashing sinks and machines  shall be self­draining.5. such as a 3­  bucket system.5.3. rinsing.  If equipment  or utensils are too large for the warewashing sink.2.4 mm (1/4 inch) Iron Pipe Size (IPS) valve.7  Warewashing machines that provide a fresh hot water  sanitizing rinse:  22  (1)  Shall be equipped with a pressure gauge or similar device  such as a transducer that measures and displays the water  pressure in the supply line immediately before entering the  warewashing machine; and  (2)  If the flow pressure measuring device is upstream of the  fresh hot water sanitizing rinse control valve.2.  Food Safety  22  22  89  .3  Warewashing Numbers and Capacities  7.5.2  22 Sink compartments shall be large enough to accommodate  immersion of the largest equipment and utensils.

1  Good Repair and Proper Adjustment  7.  (2)  Water pressure.3.3  Sanitizing Solutions.5.5.3.1  Drainboards.3.4  Warewashing Equipment Maintenance and Operation  7.3.5. utensil racks.5.  90  Food Safety  22  22  22 .1  A test kit or other device that accurately measures the  concentration in mg/L (ppm) of sanitizing solutions shall be  provided.5. and water temperature measuring  devices shall be maintained in good repair and be accurate  within the intended range of use.  7.3.1  Warewashing equipment shall be maintained in good repair  and proper adjustment including:  (1)  Warewashing equipment shall be maintained in a state of  repair and condition that meets the standards of the materials.manual  warewashing  alternatives  7.5.  soiled/clean  storage  test kit  warewash  equipment  repair  7.2. and construction of these guidelines.  7.1.5.5.3  Alternative manual warewashing equipment may be used  when there are special cleaning needs or constraints and its  use is approved.3. or tables large enough to  accommodate all soiled and cleaned items that may  accumulate during hours of operation shall be provided for  necessary utensil holding before cleaning and after sanitizing. Testing Devices  7.1.4.  Alternative manual warewashing equipment  may include:  (1) High­pressure detergent sprayers;  (2) Low­ or line­pressure spray detergent foamers;X  (3) Other task­specific cleaning equipment;  (4) Brushes or other implements;  (5) Receptacles such as a 3­bucket system that substitute for  the compartments of a 3­compartment sink.4.  design.2  Drainboards  7.

  utensils.3  A warewashing machine and its auxiliary components:  22  (1)  Shall be operated in accordance with the machine's data  plate and other manufacturer's instructions. and sanitize solutions shall be maintained  clean.5.5. basins.  or other receptacles used for washing and rinsing equipment.  abrasive cleaner. or laundering wiping cloths; and  drainboards shall be cleaned:  22  (1) Before use;  (2) Throughout the day at a frequency necessary to prevent  recontamination of equipment and utensils and to ensure that  the equipment performs its intended function; and  (3) If used. or wash receptacle of alternative  manual warewashing equipment shall contain a wash solution  of soap.5.4.  warewash  equipment  operation  7. at least every 24 hours.4. or other cleaning agent according to the  cleaning agent manufacturer's label instructions.warewash  equipment  cleaning  7.5  The wash.5. the wash compartment of a sink.2.  22  mechanical warewasher.  (2) A warewashing machine's conveyor speed or automatic  cycle times shall be maintained accurately timed in  accordance with manufacturer's specifications. or raw foods.4.4.  solution clean  7.1. detergent. acid cleaner.1.2  Wash Temperatures  7.4.4.  7. alkaline cleaner.1  The temperature of the wash solution in manual warewashing  equipment shall be maintained at not less than the  temperature specified on the cleaning agent manufacturer's  label instructions.1.1.2  A warewashing machine; the compartments of sinks.  manual wash  temperature  Food Safety  22  23 91  .  cleaners  7. degreaser.4  When used for warewashing.5.5. rinse.

 dirt.  wash  temperatures  for chemical  machines  7.1. fish.2.5.4  Equipment food­contact surfaces and utensils shall be  cleaned:  26  (1)  Before each use with a different type of raw animal food  such as beef.5. 74°C  (165°F);  (2)  For a stationary­rack.2  The temperature of the wash solution in spray type  warewashers that use hot water to sanitize may not be less  than:  23  (1)  For a stationary­rack.1. food residue.5.4.5.5. 66°C  (150°F);  (3)  For a single­tank.2  The food­contact surfaces of cooking equipment and pans  shall be kept free of encrusted grease deposits and other soil  accumulations. pork.5.1  Cleaning Frequency  food­contact  surfaces clean  7.1  Food­contact surfaces of equipment and utensils shall be  clean to sight and touch.warewash  wash  temperatures  7.1.  27  7.5.  66°C (150°F). lamb. and other debris. multitemperature machine.5.3  The temperature of the wash solution in spray­type  warewashers that use chemicals to sanitize may not be less  than 49°C (120°F).5.3  Nonfood­contact surfaces of equipment shall be kept free of  an accumulation of dust. conveyor.5.2.1.  71°C (160°F); or  (4)  For a multitank.5  Cleaning Equipment and Utensils  7.  26  C  encrusted  7.5. or poultry;  (2)  Each time there is a change from working with raw foods  to working with ready­to­eat foods;  (3)  Between uses with raw fruits and vegetables and with  potentially hazardous food;  (4)  Before using or storing a food temperature measuring  device; and  92  Food Safety  23  C . single­temperature machine. dual­temperature machine.5.  7. conveyor.4.5. dual­temperature machine.  26  C  nonfood­  contact  surfaces  food­contact  cleaning  frequency  7.

 and distribution  lines.  dry cleaning  7. at a frequency  necessary to preclude accumulation of soil or mold.5.  (2)  The cavities and door seals of microwave ovens shall be  cleaned at least every 24 hours by using the manufacturer's  recommended cleaning procedure. cooking oil storage tanks.5.5.  cooking/ baking  7.1.(5)  At any time during the operation when contamination  might have occurred.1  Food debris on equipment and utensils shall be scrapped over  23  a waste disposal unit.3  Precleaning and Racking  precleaning/  scrapping  7.2.1. pulper. scraping.  dispensing  equipment  cleaning  7.5. or  (2)  Absent manufacturer specifications. and equipment  shall be preflushed. and  coffee bean grinders shall be conducted:  28  (1)  At a frequency specified by the manufacturer.  7.6  28  Cleaning of equipment such as ice bins and beverage  dispensing nozzles and enclosed components of equipment  such as ice makers.  Food Safety  23 93  .1  Dry cleaning shall be accomplished as follows:  28  (1)  If used. presoaked.5.5.3.  presoak/  scrubbed  7.5.2  If necessary for effective cleaning.1. or scrubbed with abrasives.  (2)  Cleaning equipment used in dry cleaning food­contact  surfaces may not be used for any other purpose.5.5. utensils.7  equipment  cleaning  Cooking and baking equipment shall be cleaned as follows:  28  (1)  The food­contact surfaces of cooking and baking  equipment shall be cleaned at least every 24 hours.  and vacuuming shall contact only surfaces that are soiled with  dry food residues that are not potentially hazardous. and syrup dispensing lines or tubes.5. dry cleaning methods such as brushing.5.  in­use food­  contact  equipment  7.5.5.5.5.5  If used with potentially hazardous food. beverage. equipment food­  contact surfaces and utensils used on a continuing basis shall  be cleaned throughout the day at least every 4 hours.3. or garbage receptacle or shall  be removed in a warewashing machine with a prewash cycle.2  Dry Cleaning Methods  7.5.

4. alkaline.5. washing shall be done by using  alternative manual warewashing equipment in accordance  with the following procedures:  alternative  warewashing  procedures  23  (1)  Equipment shall be disassembled as necessary to allow  access of the detergent solution to all parts;  (2)  Equipment components and utensils shall be scrapped or  rough­cleaned to remove food particle accumulation; and  (3)  Equipment and utensils shall be washed.5.1  If washing in sink compartments or a warewashing machine is  impractical such as when the equipment is fixed or the  utensils are too large.5. trays.5.5.  7.2  The washing procedures selected shall be based on the type  and purpose of the equipment or utensil. or baskets or onto conveyors in a  position that:  (1)  Exposes the items to the unobstructed spray from all  cycles; and  (2)  Allows the items to drain.3  Soiled items to be cleaned in a warewashing machine shall be  22  loaded into racks.Racking  7.  sponges limited  7. and on the type of  soil to be removed.4  Wet Cleaning  washing  7.5.5.5.3.  22  7.4.5.5.5.5.5.5  Alternative Manual Warewashing Procedures  7. or abrasive cleaners; hot water;  brushes; scouring pads; high­pressure sprays; or ultrasonic  devices.2  94  Sponges may not be used in contact with cleaned and  sanitized or in­use food­contact surfaces.  23  soil­specific  7.5.5.5.1  Equipment food­contact surfaces and utensils shall be  effectively washed to remove or completely loosen soils by  using the manual or mechanical means necessary such as  the application of detergents containing wetting agents and  emulsifiers; acid.  Food Safety  22 .

 and sanitizing  procedure in a warewashing system for CIP equipment;  (2)  If using a warewashing machine that does not recycle the  sanitizing solution.  Food Safety  95  .  warewasher  hot­water  sanitizing  7.1. or alternative manual warewashing  equipment such as sprayers. or a 3­step washing. alternative  manual warewashing equipment equivalent to a 3­  compartment sink.  and wasted immediately after each application; or  (3)  If using a warewashing machine that recycles the  sanitizing solution for use in the next wash cycle. use of a nondistinct water rinse  that is integrated in the application of the sanitizing solution.6.5.5.5.  7.6.6  Rinsing Procedures  7.rinsing  7.5. rinsing. 74°C  (165°F); or  (2)  For all other machines.5. if immersion in hot water is used for  sanitizing:  24  C  24  C (1)  The temperature of the water shall be maintained at 77°C  (171°F) or above; and  (2)  The food­contact surface shall be immersed for at least 30  seconds. the temperature of the fresh hot  water sanitizing rinse as it enters the manifold may not be  more than 90°C (194°F).5. 82°C (180°F).1  water sanitizing  In a manual operation.  (3)  A utensil surface temperature of 71°C (160°F) as  measured by an irreversible registering temperature indicator  shall be achieved. use of a  nondistinct water rinse that is integrated in the application of  the sanitizing solution.5.1  Washed utensils and equipment shall be rinsed so that  abrasives are removed and cleaning chemicals are removed  or diluted through the use of water by using one of the  following procedures:  23  (1)  Use of a distinct.6.6  Sanitizing  7. single temperature machine.2  In a mechanical operation. or less than:  (1)  For a stationary rack.5.6. separate water rinse after washing and  before sanitizing if using a 3­compartment sink.1  Sanitizing Temperatures  manual hot­  7.1.

2. iodine. it shall be applied  in accordance with the manufacturer's use directions included  96  Food Safety  24  24  C  C . or  quaternary ammonium compound is used.6.6.1010 Sanitizing  Solutions and as indicated by the manufacturer's use  directions included in the labeling.  7.1  A chemical sanitizer used in a sanitizing solution for a manual  or mechanical operation shall be listed in 21 CFR 178.1010  Sanitizing Solutions.6.5.  chemical  sanitizing  exposure  7.1.  the vessel shall demonstrate to VSP that the solution  achieves sanitization and the use of the solution shall be  approved; or  (5)  If a chemical sanitizer other than a chlorine.2.2. iodine. and a concentration between 12. or quaternary ammonium compound is used.6.2  24  C  A chemical sanitizer shall be used in accordance with the  EPA­approved manufacturer's label use instructions at a  minimum temperature of 24°C (75°F) with an exposure time of  7 seconds for a chlorine solution and 30 seconds for other  chemical sanitizers. spraying devices used for the in­place  cleaning and sanitizing of equipment such as meat saws.  (4)  If another solution concentration or temperature of a  chlorine.2  Sanitizing Concentrations  chemical  sanitizing  solutions  7. does not  apply to the high pressure and temperature systems with  wand­type.5.5.  chemical  sanitizing  concentration  7.0 or less or a pH  no higher than the level for which the manufacturer specifies  the solution is effective.  warewasher  hot­water  sanitizing  pressure  7.5  mg/L (ppm) and 25 mg/L (ppm); or  (3)  A quaternary ammonium compound solution shall have a  concentration as specified in 21 CFR 178.3  22  The flow pressure of the fresh hot water sanitizing rinse in a  warewashing machine may not be less than 100 kilopascals  (15 pounds per square inch) or more than 170 kilopascals (25  pounds per square inch) as measured in the water line  immediately downstream or upstream from the fresh hot water  sanitizing rinse control valve. hand­held.5.6.(4)  The maximum temperature of 90°C (194°F).5.3  The sanitizing solutions shall be used with the following  concentrations:  (1)  A chlorine solution shall have a concentration between  50  mg/L (ppm) and 200 mg/L (ppm);  (2)  An iodine solution shall have a pH of 5.

1  Drying  7.  Cleaned.  original  package  7.4  Eating utensils dispensed at a consumer self­service unit such  28 as a buffet or salad bar shall be protected from contamination.5.  storing inverted  7.1  Lubricants shall be applied to food­contact surfaces that  require lubrication in a manner that does not contaminate  food­contact surfaces.5. dry. dry location;  (2)  Where they are not exposed to splash.  sanitizer  concentration  testing  7.  7.  Food Safety  28  97  .1  Cleaned equipment and utensils.3  Single­service and single­use articles shall be kept in the  original protective package or stored by using other means  that afford protection from contamination until used. Utensils.in the labeling. laundered linens.7. and  single­service and single­use articles shall be stored:  air­dried/  drained  storing  protected  22  28  28  (1)  In a clean.7.5. and  utensils may be polished with a clean.5.6.2  Lubricating and Reassembling  lubricating  7.3.5.3  Storing Equipment.3.5. glassware.2.7.  utensil  dispensing  7. lint­free cloth that  is maintained clean and dry.7.7. dust.2  Clean equipment and utensils shall be stored:  28  (1)  In a self­draining position that allows air drying; and  (2)  Covered or inverted.7.7  Protection of Clean Items  7.1  After cleaning and sanitizing. Linens. and air­dried dishware.2.5. or other  contamination; and  (3)  At least 150 millimeters (6 inches) above the deck.  7.1.7.  28  7.2  Equipment shall be reassembled so that food­contact  surfaces are not contaminated.3.4  Concentration of the sanitizing solution shall be accurately  determined by using a test kit or other device.3.  28  assembling  7.7. equipment and utensils shall be  air­dried or adequately drained before contact with food.5.2.5. sanitized.7.5. and Single­Service  and Single­Use Articles  7.7.5.5.

1. utensils.8.5.8.8.5.1. a  mechanical clothes washer and dryer shall be provided and  used.  28 laundry  equipment  laundry  operations  location  98  Food Safety  28  28  . or  visibly soiled.1.8.8.5  Dry wiping cloths shall be laundered as necessary to prevent  contamination of food and clean serving utensils. and linens; and  unwrapped single­service and single­use articles. clean utensils. sticky.8.5.  7. nonabsorbent.  7.  28  laundry  procedures  7.2  If laundering is limited to wiping cloths intended to be used  moist.1  Laundry Facilities  7.2  Laundry Procedures  laundry  frequency  7.7  Linens shall be mechanically washed.5.3  Linens and napkins that are used to line food service  containers and cloth napkins shall be laundered between  each use. or to wiping cloths that are air­dried.4  Wet wiping cloths shall be laundered daily.  28  washing  7.7.5.2.  and fish.2.3  Laundry operations shall be located so that the operations are  protected from contamination and only where there is no  exposed food; clean equipment. pork.  28  wiping cloths  7.1  If linens used in the food areas are laundered on the vessel.8.5.  receptacles or clean.1  Linens that do not come in direct contact with food shall be  laundered between operations if they become wet.8. and single­service and single­use  articles.  28  cloth gloves  7.6  Soiled linens shall be kept in clean.  28  linens/ napkins  7.2.5.5.5.2.2.8.5.5. clean  equipment.5.2.5.8. lamb.  7.8  Laundering  7.8. washable laundry bags and stored and  transported to prevent contamination of food.2. a mechanical  clothes washer and dryer need not be provided.  28  7.8.2  Cloth gloves shall be laundered before being used with a  different type of raw animal food such as beef.

 utensils. and single­service and single­use  articles by separating the poisonous or toxic materials by  storing in a cleaning materials locker.  equipment.  7.1.1.1  Storage  7. and rodenticides shall be stored in a  locked area of the vessel that is not in a food area.6. utensils. linens.  31  C  use conditions  7.6.2  Working containers used for storing poisonous or toxic  materials such as cleaners and sanitizers taken from bulk  supplies shall be clearly and individually identified with the  common name of the material.6  Poisonous and Toxic Materials  7.6.2.  Food Safety  99  .  31  C  pesticide/  rodenticide  locker  cleaning  7.1.1  Only poisonous or toxic materials that are required for the  operation and maintenance of a food areas of the vessel.1  Labeling  manufacturer  label  7.7.1.6.2.2  Poisonous or toxic materials shall be used according to:  31  C (1)  Law and these guidelines;  (2)  Manufacturer's use directions included in labeling.2.3  This guideline does not apply to equipment and utensil  cleaners and sanitizers that are stored in warewashing areas  for availability and convenience if the materials are stored to  prevent contamination of food.1. linens.2  Use  necessary  materials  7.6. equipment.  7. for  a pesticide.2.6.  and single­service and single­use articles.2.  31  C  working  containers  7.6. if certification is required.1  Pesticides.2.1.6.1  Original containers of poisonous or toxic materials and  personal­care items shall bear a legible manufacturer's label.2.2  Operational Supplies and Applications  7.2. manufacturer's label instructions that state that  use is allowed in a food area; and  (3)  The conditions of certification.2.6.1  Identification  7.1.6.6.  31  C  7. shall be  allowed in the food areas of the vessel.6.2  materials locker  31  C  Poisonous or toxic materials used in food area cleaning and  maintenance shall be stored so they cannot contaminate food.  such as for the cleaning and sanitizing of equipment and  utensils and the control of insects and rodents. insecticides. and.1.

  31  C  7.3  Chemicals used as boiler water additives for culinary steam or  31  C other food area purposes shall meet the requirements  specified in 21 CFR 173.2.4  For a restricted­use pesticide.6.for use of the pest­control materials.1  Chemical sanitizers and other chemical antimicrobials applied  31  C  to food­contact surfaces shall meet the requirements specified  in 21 CFR 178.  restricted­use  applications  7.  fruit/ vegetable  wash  7.3.2. and single­service and single­use articles shall be  removed; covered with impermeable covers; and other  precautions. food.3.2.  application  7.2.6. and  (2)  Contamination including toxic residues resulting from  drip.  31  C  equipment  cleaning and  sanitizing  7.3  Sanitizers and Other Food Area Chemicals  sanitizers  7. whole fruits and  vegetables shall meet the requirements specified in 21 CFR  173.315 Chemicals Used in Washing or to Assist in the Lye  Peeling of Fruits and Vegetables.  31  C  containers  7.  linens. drain. equipment. fog.  boiler water  additives  7.2.6. Fungicide and  Rodenticide Act or a person under the direct supervision of a  certified applicator. of the Federal Insecticide.2  Chemicals used to wash or peel raw.  linens.  100  Food Safety  31  C  .7  A container previously used to store poisonous or toxic  materials may not be used to store.3  Poisonous or toxic materials shall be applied so that:  31  C  (1)  A hazard to employees or other persons is not  constituted.6.2. splash or spray on food. or dispense  food.2. equipment.1010 Sanitizing Solutions. transport.2. and single­service and single­use articles is prevented.6.5  A restricted­use pesticide shall be applied only by an  applicator certified as defined in 7 USC 136(e) Certified  Applicator.2. utensils.  31  C  restricted­use  applicator  7.6.6.2.310 ­ Boiler Water Additives.2.2.6.2. utensils.6  Food equipment and utensils in the area treated shall be  cleaned and sanitized following the application.6.2.3.

  19 Food Safety  101  .  31  C  7.3.6. if used.2.3.6.2.3570 Lubricants with Incidental Food­Contact.4.2.6.2  Rodent bait used in food areas shall be contained in a  covered.4  A nontoxic tracking powder such as talcum or flour.4.6.  31  C  7.5  Drying agents.1  Restricted­use pesticides used in food areas shall meet the  requirements specified in 40 CFR 152 Subpart I Classification  of Pesticides. drip.4  Pesticides and Rodenticides  restricted­use  pesticides  7.  may not contaminate food.4.2.2.  31  C  lubricants  7. when used with chemical sanitization.6. if they are  used on food­contact surfaces.6.  31  C  tracking  powders  7.  31  C  rodent bait  7.4.2. shall be  specifically approved for use with chemical sanitizing  solutions.6.2.39 Threshold  of Regulation for Substances Used in Food­Contact Articles.6  Lubricants shall meet the requirements specified in 21 CFR  178. on bearings and gears located  on or within food­contact surfaces.6.  approved for  use with  chemical  sanitizers  7.drying agents  7.2.4  Drying agents used in conjunction with sanitization shall  contain only components that are listed as one of the  following:  31  C  (1)  Generally recognized as safe for use in food as specified  in 21 CFR 182 ­ Substances Generally Recognized as Safe or  21 CFR 184 ­ Direct Food Substances Affirmed as Generally  Recognized as Safe;  (2)  Generally recognized as safe for the intended use as  specified in 21 CFR 186 ­ Indirect Food Substances Affirmed  as Generally Recognized as Safe;  (3)  Approved for use as a drying agent under a prior sanction  specified in 21 CFR 181 ­ Prior­Sanctioned Food Ingredients;  (4)  Specifically regulated as an indirect food additive for use  as a drying agent as specified in 21 CFR Parts 175­178; or  (5)  Approved for use as a drying agent under the threshold of  regulation process established by 21 CFR 170. or on bearings and gears  that are located so that lubricants may leak.3  A tracking powder pesticide may not be used in a food area. or be forced  into food or onto food­contact surfaces.3. tamper­resistant bait station.

3.1.3.1.  29  C  metered faucet  A self­closing. equipment.1. utensils.6.1. if used. warewashing area.  may not contaminate equipment.7.7.  30 102  7.6.6.7.  31  C  medicines  labeling/  separation  7.3  A handwashing sink shall be equipped to provide water at a  temperature of at least 43 ° C (110 ° F) through a mixing valve or  combination faucet. and single­service and single­use articles.4  Food Safety  .7.3  First aid supplies that are in a food area for the food  employees' use shall be labeled and stored in a kit or a  container that is located to prevent the contamination of food. linens.1. utensils.7.1.  equipment.2.  7.1.1  Handwashing and Toilet Facilities  7. or metering faucet shall provide a  flow of water for at least 15 seconds without the need to  reactivate the faucet.7.2  Medicines that are in a food area for the food employees' use  shall be labeled and be located in an area such as the chef’s  office to prevent the contamination of food.1. the temperature provided to the user after the  mixing valve shall not exceed 52 °C (125°F).  where the user makes hand­contact with the door. linens. where the user cannot make temperature  adjustments.1  Only medicines necessary for the health of the food  employees shall be allowed in a food area.3.1.3.6. linens.7.1  Handwashing Facility Installation  convenient  7. and single­  service and single­use articles. bar.  29  C  tempered water  7.  For handwash sinks with electronic  sensors.  31  C  first aid  supplies  7.7  28  Facilities  7. and single­service and single­use  articles  31  C  7.1  Restriction and Storage  necessary  medicines  7.4.1.1  29  C  Each food preparation area.3  Medicines  7.1.  utensils.6. slow­closing.2  The handwashing facility shall be located within 8 m (25 feet)  of all parts of the area and should not be located in an  adjacent area that requires passage through a closed door.6.  8 m/25 feet  7.5  A nontoxic tracking powder such as talcum or flour. and  garbage­processing area shall have at least one handwashing  facility located in it.1.

3.  enclosed/  doors  7.7.1.5  A supply of toilet tissue shall be provided at each toilet at all  times.3  Each handwashing facility shall have a supply of hand­  cleansing soap or detergent and a supply of single­service  paper towels available.  30  7.7.7.7.1.4  Toilet rooms shall be completely enclosed and shall have  tight­fitting.  29  C  sign  7.2  Handwashing facilities shall be provided in or immediately  adjacent to toilet rooms or vestibules.7  A sign stating “WASH HANDS OFTEN" in a language that the  food employees understand shall be posted over  handwashing sinks.7.7. and waste receptacle.1.  30  7.1.1.  30  sign  7.7.2.2.1.3  Handwashing and Toilet Facility Maintenance  accessible  7.7.1.  30  dispenser/  receptacle  7.1. self­closing doors which shall be kept closed  except during cleaning or maintenance.7.2.  30  toilets  clean/good  repair  toilet tissue  7.1.1.2.  30  7.  30  waste  receptacle  7.1  Toilet rooms shall be provided and conveniently located. soap dispenser.  30 Food Safety  C  103  .  29  facilities clean/  good repair  soap/towels  7.7.2  Toilet Facility Installation  convenient  7.1.1.7.automatic  systems  7.1.2  Handwashing facilities shall be kept clean and in good repair.1.  single­use towels dispenser.1.4  Toilet fixtures shall be kept clean and in good repair.1.3.5  An automatic handwashing facility shall be installed in  accordance with manufacturer’s instructions.7.1.7.6  A handwashing facility shall include a sink. reading "WASH HANDS AFTER  USING TOILET" in a language that the food employees  understand.3.1  Handwashing facilities shall be used for no other purpose and  shall be accessible at all times.1.7.5  Easily cleanable receptacles shall be provided for waste  materials.  29  C  handwashing  facilities  7.  30  7.3.3.3  Signs shall be conspicuously posted on the bulkhead adjacent  30  to the door of the toilet.7.2.

 nonabsorbent.1.2.1  Receptacles and waste­handling containers for refuse and  recyclables and for use with materials containing food residue  shall be durable.7.7.7.7.2  Garbage and Refuse Storage Room  easily  cleanable/  durable  7. access to detergent. easily cleanable and  leakproof.2  Receptacles and waste­handling containers for refuse.7.1  The dry and refrigerated garbage and refuse storage room  shall be constructed of easily cleanable.2.7.2.2. and  suitable drainage.1.2.  32 104  Food Safety  .7.  nonabsorbent.2  The garbage and refuse storage room shall be large enough  to store and process the garbage and refuse.2.1.2. corrosion­resistant.7. and durable materials.  32  insect/ rodent  resistant  7.3  The garbage and refuse storage room shall be located so as  to prevent contamination in food preparation.  32  design/  supplies  7.7.2.7.2.7.  32  size  7. storage.7.4  The garbage and refuse storage room shall be maintained in  good repair and kept clean.  32  prevent  contamination  7.  32  cleaned  7.  32  covered/  provided  7.6  The designated container wash area shall be easily cleanable  and shall have tempered water.2. and  utensil washing areas.2.1.2.  32  good  repair/clean  7.2.  recyclables and for use with materials containing food residue  shall be insect and rodent resistant and shall have tight­fitting  lids.5  Facilities suitable for washing receptacles and waste­handling  containers shall be provided separate from food equipment  and utensil storage areas or food preparation areas.1.2.7  Receptacles and waste­handling containers shall be cleaned  when emptied.2  Solid Waste  7.2.1  Receptacles and Containers  containers  7.7.4  A receptacle or waste­handling container shall be provided in  each area of the vessel or premise where refuse is generated  or commonly discarded or where recyclables are placed.  32  wash facilities  7.2.1.  32  location  7.2.1.7.3  Receptacles and waste­handling containers shall be kept  covered when not in continuous use and after they are filled.  32  7.7.

 pantries.  overhead  7.3.7.7. or  intended to be used in the preparation. designed for.  35  leakage  7.3.1  A plumbing system in a food area shall be maintained in good  repair.2  Liquid Waste Disposal  discharge  7.2.4  All drain lines from warewashing sinks or machines shall drain  28  through an air­gap or air­break to a drain or scupper.  7.1.7.1  Design and Construction  cleanable  7.  35  7. processing.7. bulkheads.1  Decks.4.1. or devices that are used. or  handling of food. sinks.3.2.4.7.1.1  Drain lines from all fixtures. serving.  7.1  Black and gray water shall be discharged to the vessel’s  wastewater disposal system and shall not pool on the deck.3.7.7.  warewash  sink/machine  drains  7.3. and deckheads in food preparation.3.  Drain lines that are  unavoidable in these food areas shall be sleeve­welded and  shall not have mechanical couplings.  non­skid  7.2  The leakage of sewage tanks or discharge of sewage into the  bilge or other areas on the vessel shall be prohibited.3.3  Liquid Waste Disposal and Plumbing  7.3. and storage areas shall be  constructed and maintained for easy cleaning.  hand/mop sink  drain lines  7.3.  19  refrigeration units.4.1.3  19  Drain lines carrying sewage or other liquid waste shall not  pass directly overhead or horizontally through spaces used for  the preparation.7. ice or drinks shall be indirectly connected to  appropriate waste systems by means of an air­gap or  air­break. and Deckheads  7. or storage of food or the washing or  storage of utensils and equipment.2  Decks may be of non­skid construction provided they are  easily cleanable.1. appliances.  warewashing. compartments.3.7.4  Decks.2  Drain lines from handwashing and mop sinks may be directly  connected to the appropriate waste system.3.7.3  Plumbing  7. storage. Bulkheads.7.7.7.1  Drain Lines  drain lines  7. good repair  Food Safety  34  33  105  .7.7.1.7.

  and light colored surfaces.7.2. warewashing. bars.  shall be cleaned as often as necessary.8  Surfaces subject to routine splashes. bulkheads.2. pantries.1  Intensity  7. and deckheads in food preparation.4  Bulkheads and deckheads shall have smooth. toilet rooms.1  Decks. pantries.4.9  Mats shall be designed to be removable and easily cleanable. and dining room work counters).1.1  36 The light intensity shall be at least 220 Lux (20 foot candles)  on food preparation surfaces.1. and storage areas shall be corrosion­  resistant.  and utensil storage.1.  waiter stations. pantries.7.1. spillage or other soiling  during normal use shall have easily cleanable features.1.3  Decks.  warewashing.7.4. pantries. and similar equipment attached to  the bulkheads or deckheads shall be easily cleanable.2  Cleaning shall be done during periods when the least amount  of food is exposed. deck/counter junctures at buffets. deckheads.7.3  Bulkhead and deck junctures shall be coved (including  galleys. including lines for fire  detection and protection systems.  33  attached  equipment  7.7.5. pantries. shall be installed so they do  not obstruct or prevent cleaning.5  Decks.6  Light fixtures. bulkheads. bulkheads.  33  exposed lines  7.4. equipment.7.  33  7. and deckheads in food preparation.Coving  7.2  Maintenance  clean  7.1.1. and attached equipment in  food preparation.  33  deck mats  7.4.7.  warewashing.7.1.5  Lighting  7.4.7. and storage areas. vent covers.4. hard finishes.2.4.  33  7.  33  corrosion­  resistant  7.  33  good repair  7. and consumer self­  service areas. warewashing areas.  33  finishes  7.4.7.7.7. and at a distance of 75  centimeters (30 inches) above the deck in food preparation  areas. shall be  maintained in good repair.4. handwashing facilities.4.4.7.7.  220 Lux/ 20  foot candles  106  Food Safety  .  33  timing  7.7  33  Exposed utility service lines and pipes.5. and storage areas.  cleanable  surfaces  7.

110 Lux/ 10 
foot candles 

7.7.5.1.2 

The light intensity shall be at least 110 Lux (10 foot candles) 
at a distance of 75 centimeters (30 inches) above the deck 
when in use, in walk­in refrigerator units and dry storage 
areas, and in other areas and rooms during periods of 
cleaning. 

36 

during cleaning 

7.7.5.1.3 

In bars and dining room waiter stations provide 220 lux (20 
foot candles) light intensity during cleaning operations. 
Protected 

36 

7.7.5.2 
shielded/ 
shatter­ 
resistant 

7.7.5.2.1 

Light bulbs shall be shielded, coated, or otherwise shatter­ 
resistant in areas where there is exposed food; clean 
equipment, utensils, and linens; or unwrapped single­service, 
and single­use articles. 

36 

heat lamps 

7.7.5.2.2 

An infrared or other heat lamp shall be protected against 
breakage by a shield surrounding and extending beyond the 
bulb so that only the face of the bulb is exposed. 

36 

7.7.6 

Ventilation 

7.7.6.1 

Design and Operation 

sufficient 

7.7.6.1.1 

All food preparation, warewashing, and toilet rooms shall have  37 
sufficient ventilation to keep them free of excessive heat, 
steam, condensation, vapors, obnoxious odors, smoke, and 
fumes. 

effective 

7.7.6.1.2 

Ventilation hood systems and devices shall operate effectively  37 
to prevent grease and condensate from collecting on the 
bulkheads and deckheads and remove contaminants 
generated by equipment located under them. 

no
contamination 

7.7.6.1.3 

37 
Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems shall be 
designed and installed so that make­up air intake and exhaust 
vents do not cause contamination of food, food­contact 
surfaces, equipment, or utensils. 

7.7.6.2 

Maintenance 

7.7.6.2.1 

Filters and other grease extracting equipment shall be 
designed to be readily removable for cleaning and 
replacement if not designed to be cleaned in place.  Intake 
and exhaust air ducts shall be cleaned and filters changed so 
they are not a source of contamination by dust, dirt, and other 
materials. 

filters 

Food Safety 

37

107 

7.7.7 

Cleaning Equipment and Unnecessary Articles 

7.7.7.1 

Storage 

necessary 
articles 

7.7.7.1.1 

Only articles necessary for the food service operation shall be 
stored in food preparation, food storage, and warewashing 
areas. 

38 

cleaning locker 

7.7.7.1.2 

Maintenance tools such as mops, brooms, and similar items 
shall be stored in a designated locker so they do not 
contaminate food; food­contact surfaces of utensils; and 
equipment; linens, and single­service and single­use articles. 

38 

orderly manner 

7.7.7.1.3 

38 
Maintenance tools such as mops, brooms, and similar items 
shall be stored in an orderly manner that facilitates cleaning of 
the area used for storing the maintenance tools. 

mop drying 

7.7.7.1.4 

After use, mops shall be placed in a position that allows them 
to air­dry without soiling walls, equipment, or supplies. 

7.7.7.1.5 

Wash, rinse, and sanitize buckets or other containers may be 
stored with maintenance tools provided they are stored 
inverted and nested.

108 

Food Safety 

38 

8.0  Integrated Pest Management 
8.1 
8.2 

Integrated Pest Management 
Pest Control 
8.1 

Integrated Pest Management 

8.1.1 

Plan Development and Implementation 

8.1.1.1 

IPM Plans 

IPM plan 

8.1.1.1.1 

Each vessel shall develop an Integrated Pest Management 
Plan to address effective monitoring and control strategies for 
pests aboard the vessel. 

40 

monitoring 

8.1.1.1.2 

The Integrated Pest Management Plan shall set a schedule for 
periodic monitoring inspections including some at night. 

40 

logs 

8.1.1.1.3 

The Integrated Pest Management Plan shall include provisions 
for active monitoring including pest sighting logs for the 
operational areas of the vessel and training for crew members 
in charge of log completion. 

40 

passive 
surveillance 

8.1.1.1.4 

The Integrated Pest Management Plan shall include passive 
surveillance procedures such as glue traps and other 
monitoring tools, as well as location of each.  A monitoring log 
on passive surveillance procedures shall be maintained. 

40 

8.1.1.2 

Plan Evaluation 

2 years 

8.1.1.2.1 

The vessel’s Integrated Pest Management Plan shall be 
evaluated for effectiveness every 2 years or whenever there is 
a significant change in the vessel’s structure such as a 
renovation or operation. 

40 

reviews 

8.1.1.2.2 

Reviews shall be documented and changes noted in the 
vessel’s Integrated Pest Management Plan. 

40 

inspections 

8.1.1.2.3 

The vessel’s Integrated Pest Management Plan documentation 
shall be made available during the VSP inspections. 

40

Integrated Pest Management 

109 

8.1.2 

IPM and Pesticide Use 

8.1.2.1 

Pesticide Application 

records 

8.1.2.1.1 

The Integrated Pest Management Plan shall include a record of 
pesticides used.  The record shall include only pesticides 
currently onboard the vessel and those used in the previous 12 
months. 

40 

restricted­ 
use 

8.1.2.1.2 

A restricted­use pesticide shall be applied only by a certified 
applicator or a person with training and testing equivalent to 
that of a certified applicator. 

39 

applicator 
training 

8.1.2.1.3 

The training of the pest­control personnel shall be documented 
in the Integrated Pest Management Plan. 

40 

safety 

8.1.2.1.4 

The Integrated Pest Management Plan shall establish health 
and safety procedures to protect the passengers and crew. 

40

110 

Integrated Pest Management 

2.2  Entry points where pests may enter the food areas shall be  protected.2. rodents.2.  A  record of these inspections shall be maintained onboard the  vessel and shall be available for review during inspections.  40  incoming  food  supplies  8.1.1.  40  IPM  inspections  8.2. and service areas and warewashing and  utensil storage areas aboard a vessel.1.2  Pest Control  8.1. and other pests.3  Incoming shipments of food and supplies shall be routinely  inspected for evidence of insects.1. rodents.  39  exclusion  8.1.  40 Integrated Pest Management  C  111  .4  The vessel’s food areas shall be inspected under the  Integrated Pest Management Plan at a frequency that can  quickly detect the evidence of pests or the creation of  harborage conditions. preparation.1.2. and other pests shall be  effectively controlled to minimize their presence in the food  storage.1  Food Areas  effective  control  8.1.1  Exclusion  8.2.8.1  The presence of insects.1.

 unwrapped  single­service. utensils.2.2  The insect devices shall not be located over food storage.1  Chemical control measures shall conform to products and  application procedures specifically allowed in the food safety  section of these guidelines and the vessel’s Integrated Pest  Management Plan.3  The insect devices shall not be located over warewashing.  utensil storage areas.2.2.2.2.2. or the  attraction of pests.2.2.2.2  Control Measures  8.2.2.  preparation.2.  8.  Dead insects and insect  fragments shall be prevented from being impelled onto or  falling on exposed food.2.2.2.2  Physical  insect­  control  devices  8.4  Dead or trapped insects.1  Chemical  8. rodents.  19  utensil  protection  8.  Dead insects and  insect fragments shall be prevented from being impelled onto  or falling on clean items. equipment. linens.2.2.2.  28  cleaning  8. and other pests shall be  removed from control devices and the vessel at a frequency  that prevents their accumulation or decomposition.2.8.  40 chemical  controls  112  Integrated Pest Management  39  C  .1  Insect­control devices that are used to electrocute or stun flying  insects shall be designed to retain the insect within the device.2. and service areas.  40  food  protection  8. and single­use articles.

1.1  9.2. the  infection control response shall include cleaning and  disinfecting all public areas.1  Cabins  9. Humidifiers.1.1  public areas  Infection Control Procedures  9.1.3  Public toilet facilities shall be equipped so that persons exiting  the toilet room are not required to handle the door with bare  hands.1.gov/nceh/vsp.1.1.1.1.1  Cabins that house passengers or crew with gastrointestinal  illness shall be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected daily while  the occupants are ill.1.  41  Each vessel shall have a written Outbreak Prevention and  Response Plan (OPRP) which details the standard procedures  and policies to specifically address gastrointestinal illness  onboard.1.2  (b)  Steps in outbreak management and control and the  trigger for each step  (c)  A detailed example OPRP is provided in the VSP  website at http://www.  on a continuous basis until the proportion decreases to <2%.1.1.9.2.1  Disinfection  9. including handrails and restrooms.cdc. or other effective means.1.  Housekeeping  41  41 113  .  The written OPRP shall include at a minimum. installing mechanically operated doors.0  Housekeeping  9. the  following:  (a)  Duties and responsibilities of each department and their  staff  41  written OPRP  9.  door removal.  This may be accomplished by methods such as  locating paper towel dispensers at sinks and waste containers  near the room door.  public toilet  facilities  cabin  cleaning  9.1.1  When the cumulative proportion of cases of gastrointestinal  illness among passengers or crew members is ≥2%.  9.2  9.1  Public Areas  9.1. and Showers  9.3  Infection­Control Procedures  Air Systems  Fountains.

2. which are changed after each cabin.1.1.1.1.  including gloves.  example  Precautionary measures by the housekeeping personnel may  include using disposable personal protection equipment. 114  9.3  Housekeeping  41  .2.precautionary  9.2  measures  Extra precautionary measures by housekeeping personnel  shall be taken in consultation with the vessel’s medical staff to  prevent the spread of gastrointestinal illness from cabin to  cabin.

 maintenance.3.2.2  Dustless cleaning methods shall be used.2.1.3.2.  The  written inspection.3. curtains.1  Water Source  9.1  Construction  condensate  pans  9.3.2.  41  self­draining  9.1  Carpets.1.1.  41  9. and air­conditioning system shall be  maintained on the vessel and available for review during  inspections.  41  condensers  9.3  Dust Control  cleaning  9.1  Air handling units shall be kept clean.9.2.1. decks.  Installation of sight windows or other effective methods for full  inspection and cleaning of condensate collection pans shall be  utilized when original equipment access makes evaluation  during operational inspections impractical.  41  inspection  and  maintenance  plan  9.1.2  Air Systems  9.  41  methods  9. ventilation.1  Air handling unit condensate drain pans and collection systems  shall be accessible for inspection.1.1. drapes.1.2.3.  41  9.1.2. lighting fixtures.2.2  Maintenance  air handling  units  9. and cleaning.1  Design and Maintenance  9.1. and air­conditioning systems in accordance with  manufacturers recommendations and industry standards.1  Fountains and Humidifiers  9.2  Evaporative condensers shall be inspected at least annually  and cleaned as necessary to remove scale and sediment.1  Water used in conjunction with decorative fountains and water  sprays in HVAC air­ distribution systems shall originate in the  vessel’s potable water system and shall be further treated to  Housekeeping  41 115  . cleaning.2.2.2  Air condition condensation collection pans shall be self­  draining.1. Humidifiers.2. furniture. and maintenance plan for the  heating.  41  9.1.3  sprays  Fountains.1.  ventilation. and Showers  9.2.3  Vessels shall have a plan to inspect and maintain heating.1.2.  Cooling coils and condensate pans shall be cleaned as  necessary to remove dirt and organic material.1.2. and  decorative items on the vessel shall be cleaned to minimize  accumulation of dust and soil.

2.1  Maintenance  hot­water  system  9.2.1  The potable hot­water system including shower heads shall be  maintained to preclude growth of Mycobacterium or  legionella.  41  showers  9.2.2  Fountain and Water Spray Maintenance  9.3.3.avoid microbial build­up in the operation of the sprays and  fountains.3.2  Hot­Water System and Showers  9.2.1.1  Decorative fountains and water sprays in HVAC air­ distribution  systems shall be maintained free of algae and mold.1.1.  9.1.3.  9.2  Shower heads shall be cleaned and disinfected every 6 months  to preclude growth of Mycobacterium or legionella.3.  41 clean  116  Housekeeping  41  .3.

2  10.1  Diaper Changing  10. diaper­changing stations and disposal facilities shall be  provided.1.1  Diaper­Changing Facilities  10.4  Diaper Changing  Toilet and Handwashing  Cleaning and Disinfection  Exclusions  10. and designed for  diaper changing;  (2)  A supply of disposable diapers. durable.0  Child­Activity Centers  10.1. table  cleanser.1  Design  diaper  changing  10.1. and disinfectant;  (3)  An airtight.1. wipes.1  10.2  Each station shall include:  41  (1)  A changing table that is impervious.  nontoxic.  41  facilities  10.10.1  If children who wear diapers are accepted in the child­activity  center.1.1. gloves.1.  signs  10.3  Signs shall be posted in the diaper­changing area advising  handwashing after each diaper change.3  10. smooth.1.  Child­Activity Centers  41 117  .1.1.1.1. soiled­diaper receptacle; and  (4)  An adjacent handwashing station. nonabsorbent. and cleanable.

2.1. and waste towel receptacle  shall be located at handwashing stations.2.  41  toilet supplies  10.  before eating.1.1.1.1.1  Child­Activity Centers  .  41  assistance  10.2  Toilets and Handwashing  10.2.1.6  Children under 6­years old shall be assisted in washing their  hands in the child­activity center after using the toilet room.10.2.1.1.  41 118  10.2.2. and sanitary wipes.1  Facilities  10.  41  separate  10.1.1.1. waste receptacle shall be conveniently  located to dispose of excrement. if  toilet rooms are located in a child­activity center. disposable gloves. soiled sanitary wipes that  cannot be disposed of in the toilet and gloves.1.  41  waste  receptacle  10.2.  Waste materials  shall be removed from the child­activity center each day.2.1  Design  child­size  toilet  Child­size toilet and handwashing facilities shall be provided.2. or after otherwise contaminating their hands.4  Soap.5  Signs shall be posted in children’s toilet room advising the  providers to wash their hands and the children’s hands after  assisting children use the toilet.1. washable.  41  handwashing  supplies  10. paper towels or air dryers.7  Separate toilet facilities shall be provided for child activity  center staff.2  Each toilet facility shall be provided with a supply of toilet  tissue.3  An airtight.1.  41  signs  10.1.

1. chairs.3.2.3.1  Construction  cleanable  10.2  Toys used in the child­activity center shall be maintained in a  clean condition.10.1.3.3  Tables or high chair trays shall be cleaned and disinfected  before and after they are used for eating.  41  toy cleaning/  ball pits  10.2.3.1.  41  decks  10. and pillow cases shall be  laundered between each use.2  Toys used in the child­activity center shall be cleaned and  disinfected daily.3.  41  facility  cleaning/  disinfecting  10.  Balls used in ball pits/pens shall be cleaned  at least once per week.  41  10.1.2.  41  tables/ high  chairs  10.3  Linens  linens  laundered  10.3.1.2.1  Surfaces that children touch with their hands shall be cleaned  and disinfected at least daily with products labeled by the  manufacturer for that purpose.1.3.1.2.3. unless otherwise contaminated.  41  10.1.1  Furnishings and Toys  10.1  Linens such as blankets.1.3.3.3.2  Procedures  hard surfaces  10.1  Surfaces of tables.3  Cleaning and Disinfection  10.  41  construction  10.1.  Decks  shall be mopped and disinfected when soiled or at least daily.  Child­Activity Centers  41 119  .4  Carpeting shall be vacuumed at least daily and shall be  periodically cleaned when it becomes visibly soiled.1.3. and other furnishings that children  touch with their hands shall be cleanable. sheets.3.1.5  Diaper changing and handwashing facilities and toilet rooms  shall be cleaned and disinfected when soiled during use and at  least daily.1.

1.1  Written guidance on symptoms of common childhood infectious  illnesses shall be maintained in the child­activity center.4.2  The child­activity center shall have a written policy on  procedures to be followed when a child develops symptoms of  an infectious illness while at the center.1.4.1  Children with Infectious Illness  10.  41  illness policy  10.  41 120  Child­Activity Centers  .4  Exclusions  10.4.  41  infectious  illness  10.1.1.1.1.4.4.1  Procedures  written  guidance  10.10.1.3  Children with infectious illness shall not be allowed in the child­  activity center without permission of the vessel’s medical staff.

1.4  The VSP EHO shall then conduct the inspection in a logical  sequence until the EHO has completed the inspection of all  areas identified in this manual.9.4  Closing Conference  11.8  Inspection Publication  11.1  Inspections  11.1  Inspections  11.1  Inspection Procedures  routine  inspections  11. if the vessel is available.1.9  Recommendation that the Vessel Not Sail  11.10  Re­inspections and Follow­Up Inspections  11.1.  imminent  11. VSP. immediately during an  inspection about a possible recommendation that the vessel  not sail.  inspectors  11. Administrative Guidelines  121  .0  Administrative Guidelines  11.1.2  Inspection Report  11.1.5  Inspection Review  11.1  An unannounced.11  Construction/Renovation Inspections  11.3  The VSP EHO shall board the vessel and immediately inform  the master of the vessel or a designated agent that a vessel  sanitation inspection is to be conducted.2  VSP EHO’s shall be trained in the interpretation and  application of the USPHS / CDC / VSP Operations Manual.11.1. if an imminent health hazard as specified in section  11.7  Correction Affidavit  11.6  Corrective Action Statement  11.2 is found to exist on the vessel and if these deficiencies  possibly cannot be corrected before the inspection is  completed.3  Risk­Based Scoring and Correction Priority  11.1.13  Variances  11.  sequence  11.1.1.  boarding  11.5  health hazard  detection  The VSP EHO shall contact the master of the vessel or a  designated agent and the Chief.12  Other Environmental Investigations  11.1. complete sanitation inspection by VSP  Environmental Health Officers (EHOs) shall be done twice  each federal fiscal year.1.

1  Draft Report  provided  11.  medical  review  11.2.  11.2.2.  information  11.2.2.2.1  The VSP EHO shall provide a draft inspection report to the  master of the vessel.2.3  The item number and the credit point value for that item  number shall be indicated if the vessel does not meet the  Operations Manual standard for that item.2  The draft inspection report shall provide administrative  information.2  Inspection Report  11.  A complete inspection shall be conducted at  a later date.2.2.  the results of an incomplete inspection shall be discussed with  the vessel’s staff.6  The inspection shall be completed in the same visit once it has  begun.2.incomplete  inspections  11.2.  The description shall  include the deficiency location and Operations Manual section  citation.  In the event that the inspection cannot be completed.1.) shall be available for review by VSP for  accuracy and timeliness of reporting.2. and  inspection score.  11.1. gastrointestinal illness log review details. etc.  special reports.2  Final Report  report form  11.3  Risk­Based Scoring and Correction Priority 122  Administrative Guidelines  .4  The medical documentation (e.1. at the conclusion  of the inspection.  The deficiencies shall be itemized with references to  the section of the Operations Manual.  deviations  11.  deficiency  descriptions  11.1  The VSP EHO shall use the Vessel Sanitation Inspection  Report (Annex 13.1.8) to summarize the inspection score.2.; GI logs.2  Administrative information that identifies the vessel and its  master or designee and the numerical rating when the credit  point values for all observed deficiencies are subtracted from  100.2.2.3  The draft inspection report shall provide a written description of  the items found deficient and where the deficiency was  observed. or a designated agent. The  inspection report shall contain the following elements:  administra­  tive  11.  11.  report detail  11.1. medical logs.g.5  A written description of the items found deficient shall be  included.

1.  Critical items are designated in this Operations Manual with a  red C to the right of the inspection report item number which is  also shown in red. for the vessel to correct critical  deficiencies.1.  critical items  11.3.3.  risk­based  11.  noncritical  items  11.2.  The VSP EHO shall provide one copy  of the signed invoice to the master or designee and shall Administrative Guidelines  123  .  invoice  11.2  Considering the nature of the potential hazard involved and the  complexity of the corrective action needed.1.3.11.1.  report copy  11.6  Each weighted deficiency found on an inspection shall be  deducted from 100 possible credit points.1.1  Scoring System  weighted  items  11.1.3. a longer time frame.  11.1.4.1.3.4.3.4.2  Inspection items are weighted according to their probability of  increasing the risk for a gastrointestinal disease outbreak.  11.3  critical  designation  11.1  The results of the inspection shall be explained to the master  or a designee before the VSP EHO leaves the vessel.  The draft  report is provided so that the vessel personnel can begin  correcting deficiencies immediately.5  Noncritical items are those with a weight of 1 to 2 credit point  values on the inspection report.  The section numbers of the critical items in  this Operations Manual are also provided in red.  The report shall be reviewed in detail and  opportunity provided for discussions of the findings.4  Critical items are those with a weight of 3 to 5 credit point  values on the inspection report.3. or specify.1  The inspection report scoring system is based on inspection  items with a total value of 100 points.  scoring  11.4  Closing Conference  11.3.1  Procedures  closing  conference  11.4. not to exceed 10 calendar  days after the inspection.1.3.2.2  Risk­Based Correction Priority  critical  correction  time frame  11.3. the VSP may agree  to.  extension  11.1  A vessel shall at the time of inspection correct a critical  deficiency of this Operations Manual and implement a  corrective­ action plan for monitoring the critical item for  continued compliance.2  A copy of the draft inspection report shall be left with the  master or designee.3  The master or a designee shall be provided with a payment  invoice for a signature.

4  The vessel owner or operator shall make a written request for  review within 2 weeks of the inspection with specific reference  and facts concerning the contested deficiencies that the VSP  EHO documented during the inspection.1  The Chief. the VSP EHO shall mark  the vessel’s inspection report as under review at the request of  the vessel owner or operator.  report  remarks  11.2  Inspection Report Review Procedures  11.  fee schedule  11.2.5.  11.  VSP.  In the response.5.1  If the master disagrees with the findings.5.5.5  Inspection Review  contested  results  11. shall review the matter and respond within 2  weeks of receiving the request for a review.  published annually in the Federal Register.1.1  Inspection Report Review Requests  11.1.4  The fee for inspections shall be based on the existing fee  schedule for routine inspections of passenger cruise vessels. VSP. as necessary.  address  11.  This request must be submitted to VSP within 48  hours of the closing conference.1.5.3  After receiving a request for review.4. Vessel Sanitation Program Branch  National Center for Environmental Health  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  4770 Buford Hwy NE.forward one copy to the vessel’s company office along with the  final inspection report.   Mailstop F 23  Atlanta. VSP. shall state whether the inspection report is to Administrative Guidelines  . GA 30341­3724  USA  review  124  11.2  An interim report shall be completed at the request of the  owner or operator if an inspection is under review.  The VSP shall modify the final  inspection report.5.1.  interim report  11.5  The written request shall be sent to:  Chief. indicating  the item(s) under review.1. and the  substantive reasons for disagreement.1.5.5.  written  request  11. the master shall notify  the VSP EHO during the closing conference of the intent to  request a review of the specific items being contested. after the review by the Chief.  the Chief.  the corporate official may submit a request to review the  inspection.  If a designated corporate official disagrees with the findings.

  Publication of  inspection results shall indicate the vessel’s status as under  review at the request of the vessel owner or operator.2.5. shall review the issue and respond within 2  weeks of receiving the statement.5. Administrative Guidelines  125  .  written  request  11. VSP. advising whether the  recommendation shall be revised.4  Copies of the contested inspection results that are released  before the Chief. VSP.5. they may appeal the decision to the Director.  11.3.  no score  11.be changed. makes a final determination on the  review shall have each contested deficiency clearly marked as  under review at the request of the vessel owner or operator.3. VSP.  report copies  11. or an inspection.1  A vessel owner or operator shall have the right to request a  review of recommendations made during a technical  consultation. they may appeal the decision to the Director.  National Center for Environmental Health.  The interim report shall be issued as a final report if the written  request for review is not received within 2 weeks of the  inspection.3  final report  11.5  If the ship owner does not agree with the review and decision  of the Chief VSP.5. within 30  days of the date the recommendation was made.  review  11.2  The owner or operator shall send a written statement  explaining the problem in detail to the Chief. VSP.5.3.2  No numerical score shall be published before the Chief.  National Center for Environmental Health.5.  Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services.  appeal  11.3  Other Recommendations Review  review  11.  Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services.3  The Chief.5.3.4  If the ship owner does not agree with the review and decision  of the Chief VSP. if the owner or operator believes  that VSP officials have imposed requirements inconsistent with  or beyond the scope of this manual.  appeal  11.  makes a final determination on the review.5.2.5.2.2.

1.1. made  available for public distribution.  and it shall be corrected within a reasonable period.  11.1.6.  and the corrective action taken. by the master.  The procedure may be used only one time  for an item.7.9) shall be  submitted to the Chief.4  The corrective­action statement shall be appended to the final  inspection report for future reference and.6.6.   The  request for clarification shall be included in the cover letter from  the vessel’s master.  Clarification of these  items will be provided back to the requestor. the vessel’s master or a representative shall provide Administrative Guidelines  . owner or operator  which details each deficiency identified during the inspection. or the EHO who conducted the inspection in  question.  public  distribution  11. or operator. VSP. The item shall be structure­ or equipment­related.  same score  11.3  The corrective­action statement may contain requests for  clarification of items noted on the inspection report.1  Procedures  corrective  actions  11.3  After the inspection.  requested at  inspection  126  11.1  A signed corrective­action statement (Annex 13.  critical­  corrective  actions  11. if requested.7.1.7. VSP.7.1  An affidavit of correction from the owner or operator. by the  Chief. may be submitted  to the Chief.1.2  At least one of the following conditions shall apply for an item  to qualify for an affidavit of correction:  (1)  It shall be a longstanding deficiency that has not been  identified during previous inspections; or  (2)  It shall be a deficiency in which the function of the  equipment is being accomplished by an alternative method. in writing.1.6  Corrective Action Statement  11.6. VSP.2  Critical­item deficiencies shall also include standard operating  procedures and monitoring procedures implemented to prevent  the recurrence of the critical deficiency.6.5  A corrective­action statement shall not affect the inspection  score.  conditions  11.  clarification  requests  11. owner.6.1.7  Correction Affidavit  11. but before the VSP EHO leaves the  vessel.1.11. certifying  that corrective action has been completed.1  Procedures  procedures  11.

4  Upon acceptance of the affidavit. the dates of their most  recent inspections.notification of the intent to submit an affidavit of correction.1  Methods  report  11.  11.1.2 mg/L (ppm) and this deficiency is not  corrected before the inspection ends;  PHF  temperature  facilities  (2)  Inadequate facilities for maintaining safe temperatures for  potentially hazardous food;  cleaning and  sanitizing  (3)  Inadequate facilities for cleaning and sanitizing equipment;  liquid/solid  waste  disease  outbreak  (4)  Continuous problems with liquid and solid waste disposal.2  The announcement shall include.9  Recommendation that the Vessel Not Sail  11.3  Reports.1.7. shall be  available to the public upon request.1.cdc. including the corrective­action statement.1  health hazard  potable water  halogen  Imminent Health Hazards  An imminent health hazard shall be determined to be. and the numerical score achieved by each  vessel.  The draft inspection report  will include a notation of the items to be corrected. Administrative Guidelines  127  .8  Inspection Publication  11. but not  limited to. the final inspection score will  be recalculated to include credit for the items corrected.9.gov/nceh/vsp.1.8.  This notice shall specify the deficiency(s) to be corrected and  the corrective action to be taken.8.  data  11.  final  inspection  score  11.9.  such as inoperative or overflowing toilets or shower stalls in  passenger and crew member cabins; or  (5)  Infectious disease outbreak among passengers or crew. the names of  the vessels in the inspection program.  public record  11.1  imminent  11.8.8.1  availability on  website  CDC shall publish an announcement of inspections performed  in the Summary of Sanitation Inspections of International  Cruise Ships on the VSP Web site  http://www. at a minimum.1.  and where it is suspected that continuing normal operations  may subject newly arriving passengers to disease. one of the following situations:  (1)  Free halogen residual in the potable water distribution  system is less than 0.  11.

1.1.1  Re­inspection Procedures  failing  vessels re­  inspections  11.  one re­  inspection  11.2.4  If such a no sail recommendation is made.  written  requests  11.10.1  A re­inspection is a complete sanitation inspection performed  on vessels that. VSP. VSP shall give priority to the re­  inspection of those vessels that failed the routine inspection.3  Re­inspections shall be unannounced.1.5  In scheduling inspections.10.2  Procedures  notify Chief. did not score at  least 86.1  A follow­up inspection is a partial inspection to review the  status of deficiencies identified during the previous periodic Administrative Guidelines  .  reasonable  time  11.1  no sail  11. on the previous inspection.10.10.2  Vessels that fail on a routine inspection shall be reinspected  within a reasonable time.9.10. depending on:  (1) Vessel schedules; and  (2) Receipt of the corrective­action statement from the vessel’s  management.10.1.1.2  Follow­Up Inspection Procedures  11.  National Center for Environmental Health.2. VSP. when the owner or operator submits  a written request for an additional re­inspection to the Chief.10.1.  VSP  11.  Such a recommendation shall be  signed by the Chief.  CDC shall recommend or direct the master of a vessel not to  sail when an imminent health hazard is identified and cannot  be immediately corrected.  unannounced  11.  unannounced  11.  VSP stating the reasons why the additional re­inspection is  warranted.11.6  Vessels that fail a routine inspection shall undergo only one re­  inspection.10  Re­inspection and Follow­Up Inspections  11.  follow­up  128  11.  no sail re­  inspections  11.7  Exceptions may be made.2  The VSP EHO shall immediately notify the Chief.  11.10.8  /inspection  fee  These additional re­inspections shall be unannounced and the  vessel shall be charged the standard inspection fee. or the Director’s  designee.9.1. when  any of these imminent health hazards or similar imminent  threats to public health are found aboard a vessel.10.10.10.9.1. with concurrence of the Director. a follow­up  inspection shall be conducted as soon as requested.2.  scheduling  priority  11.

inspection or re­inspection. 
not periodic 
or re­ 
inspection 

11.10.2.2 

A follow­up inspection cannot be a substitute for a periodic or 
re­inspection. 

follow­up 
reasons 

11.10.2.3 

Follow­up inspections may be conducted to resolve a 
contested inspection; or inspect imminent health hazards that 
resulted in a recommendation to prohibit the vessel from 
sailing. 

next arrival 

11.10.2.4 

These inspections shall be conducted as soon as possible after 
the routine inspection or re­inspection, preferably the next time 
the vessel arrives at a U.S. port. 

limited 

11.10.2.5 

They shall be limited to inspection of deficiencies in question. 
For example, if an item under the refrigerator section of the 
inspection was found to be a deficiency and was the only item 
contested, only refrigeration would be checked during the 
follow­up inspection. 

other items 

11.10.2.6 

Any other problems noted during the follow­up inspection shall 
be brought to the attention of the vessel’s master or designee 
so that the deficiencies can be corrected. 

no score 

11.10.2.7 

There shall be no inspection score provided nor fee charged 
for these follow­up inspections. 

11.11  Construction /Renovation Inspections 
11.11.1 

Procedures 

construction 

11.11.1.1 

Whenever possible, the VSP staff shall conduct inspections of 
vessels being constructed or undergoing major retrofits upon 
the request of the vessel owner or operator. 

requesting 
inspection 

11.11.1.2 

An official written request shall be submitted to the Chief, VSP, 
requesting a voluntary construction renovation inspection. 
CDC’s ability to honor these requests shall be based on the 
availability of VSP staff.

Administrative Guidelines 

129 

time frame 

11.11.1.3 

Construction / renovation inspections shall normally be 
conducted at the shipyard 4 to 6 weeks before completion.  An 
additional inspection may also be conducted upon completion 
of the work and before the vessel enters operational status. 

construction 
compliance 

11.11.1.4 

Construction / renovation inspections shall document the 
vessel’s compliance with CDC’s Vessel Sanitation Program 
Construction Guidelines, which provides a framework for 
consistency in the sanitary design, construction, and 
construction inspections of cruise vessels. 

new vessels 

11.11.1.5 

The CDC Vessel Sanitation Program Construction Guidelines 
shall apply to all new vessels in which the keel is laid after 
June 1, 2005. 

major retrofits  11.11.1.6 

The construction guidelines shall also apply to major retrofits 
planned after June 1, 2005. 

minor retrofits  11.11.1.7 

These guidelines shall not apply to minor retrofits. 

fee schedule 

11.11.1.8 

The fee for these construction / renovation inspections shall be 
based on the existing fee schedule for routine inspections. 

11.11.2 

Construction / Renovation Inspection Reports 

report 

11.11.2.1 

A written report shall be issued by the VSP after a construction 
/ renovation inspection.  These reports shall summarize any 
changes recommended to ensure conformity with CDC 
guidelines. 

guides 

11.11.2.2 

The reports prepared by VSP personnel in the shipyards during 
construction shall be used as guides if VSP conducts a final 
construction / renovation inspection on the vessel before the 
vessel enters operational service. 

no score 

11.11.2.3 

No score shall be given for construction / renovation 
inspections.

130 

Administrative Guidelines 

11.12  Other Environmental Investigations 
11.12.1 

Procedures 

environ­ 
11.12.1.1 
mental 
investigations 

The VSP may conduct or coordinate other activities such as: 
investigating disease outbreaks; checking a specific condition 
such as halogen residual in the potable water distribution 
system; or investigating complaints of unsanitary conditions on 
a vessel. 

problems 
noted 

11.12.1.2 

Public health problems noted during other environmental 
investigations shall be brought to the attention of the vessel’s 
master or designee when these investigations are performed. 

no score 

11.12.1.3 

There shall be no inspection score provided nor fee charged 
for other environmental investigations. 

11.13  Variances 
11.13.1 

Procedures 

variance 
procedures 

11.13.1.1 

The VSP may grant a variance by modifying or waiving the 
requirements of this Operations Manual if in the opinion of the 
VSP a health hazard or nuisance will not result from the 
variance. 

VSP records 

11.13.1.2 

If a variance is granted, the VSP shall retain the information in 
its records for the vessel or, if applicable, multiple vessels. 

vessel 
records 

11.13.1.3 

If a variance is granted, the vessel using the variance shall 
retain the information in its records for ready reference.

Administrative Guidelines 

131 

detailed 
justification 

11.13.2 

Documentation 

11.13.2.1 

Before a variance from a requirement of this Operations 
Manual is approved, the information that shall be provided to 
the VSP by the person requesting the variance and retained in 
the VSP’s file on the vessel or vessels shall include: 

section 
specific 

(1)  A statement of the proposed variance of the Operations 
Manual requirement citing relevant section numbers; 

hazard 
analysis 

(2)  An analysis of the rationale for how the potential public 
health hazards and nuisances addressed by the relevant 
Operations Manual requirement will be alternatively addressed 
by the proposal; 
(3) If required, a HACCP plan, standard operating procedures, 
training plan and monitoring plan that includes all the 
information as it is relevant to the variance requested; and 

HACCP/ 
procedures/ 
training/ 
monitoring 

(4)  Additional scientific data or other information as required to 
support the determination that public health will not be 
compromised by the proposal. 

scientific/ 
supporting 
data 

11.13.3 

Conformance 

11.13.3.1 

If the VSP grants a variance, the vessel shall: 

conformance 

(1)  Comply with the HACCP plans, standard operating 
procedures, training plan, and monitoring plan that are 
submitted and approved as a basis for the modification or 
waiver; and 

records 

(2)  Maintain and provide to the VSP, upon request, records 
that demonstrate that procedures monitoring critical­control 
points are effective, monitoring of the critical­control points are 
routinely employed, necessary corrective actions are taken if 
there is failure at a critical­control points and periodic 
verification of the effectiveness of the operation or process 
protects public health. 

rescinding 
variance 

132 

11.13.3.2 

The variance approval may be rescinded at any time for 
noncompliance with these conditions or if it is determined that 
public health has the potential of being compromised.

Administrative Guidelines 

............................122  follow­up inspections......... installation of ................. Foreign  Quarantine ­ Requirements Upon Arrival at U.................. 44  installation..............152............................................. 158  Quarantine and Inspection ­ Bills of health (42 U...... cooking................12................. 130–31  failed inspection ........152................... inspection invoice...................105  air­gap  in drain lines .......124  closing conference........... 158  vessel....................See specimens  bains­maire.......................0  Index  A additives.................121  score.....123  corrective action statement....................... for pesticides and rodenticides .............................................................................. accessibility of................ 70  antibiotic medication.......... 56  approved sources.....................S................................................S...........  Sanitary Inspection ...124  no sail recommendation ................................................................................... 121........107  maintenance ................................ 83  bait station.................... 157  penalties .....................127  unannounced inspection............................... installation of...... requirements for sale or service ................... 176  atmospheric vacuum breaker. 129–30  risk­based scoring...................................115  sight window ..................................................................123  public record..............122  summary of sanitation inspections ..................................115  air handling unit............. inspection.................................................... Vessel Sanitation Program ........................ 1  bacteriologic specimens .................................................................................. 51  approval................................... 156  Public Health Service Act..................................................................................................... 101  baking equipment..44  air system  compressed...... 154  regulations ...... 43  cross­connection control program ..................... temperature measuring device ............................................................43–44  location .............................154–55  Code of Federal Regulations (Title 42) . 161  Foreign Quarantine ­ Notice of Communicable Disease  Prior to Arrival (42 CFR 71) ................................................................................127  inspection report........ 128  variances .. 60  animals.....................................................128  renovation inspection .............................................................................................. Vessel Sanitation Program. 3  quarantine laws ...................See medication  antidiarrheal medication.........122  enrvironmental investigation ............................................................. 152  Food and Drug Administration.......... 3  health measures......124  final report.C................................................................. 161  notice of communicable disease prior to arrival............................... 157  gastrointestinal illness surveillance system reporting............................122  routine inspections ......................................157............................................... game................................................162  advisory........................ 130  inspection publication............... 152  quarantine....... 43  maintenance ................................. regulations to secure sanitary conditions.....123  draft inspection report...128  inspection fee...................152............................................. review request .......... 154  sanitary inspection.... 161  food and potable water ................ in drain lines .......................................................................................................................... consumer...................................................................................... See handwashing  B backflow preventer  continuous pressure............ air supply to..... unapproved ........................... 156  quarantine station.............................. See warewashing and  warewashing machine  ambient air temperature measuring device See temperature  measuring device  American National Standards Institute .............................. food .......126  correction priority ..........44  design and maintenance ........................................... Ports...S................... 158  sanitary conditions..............See medication  anti­entrapment drain .............................. raw................. 154  U... 129–30  correction affidavit .....115  air­break........................ 54  aseptic techniques.....................................................115  air supply connections............................................................................................See consumer advisory  air conditioning system  cross connection program for ...................... 44  background.....................128  reinspection procedures .....................................61  administrative guidelines  address of the Vessel Sanitation Program................123  construction inspection .......... restriction removal ......................................................... 44  service for .......................... 127–28  noncritical items on the inspection report correction.............. 154  automatic handwashing facility....................................................................... 129.....127  reinspection fee............. 161  Surgeon General .................................................123  payment........................................................................................................ 166  General Provisions (42 CFR Section 71..128  fee schedule .......42  design.....................................122  correction time frame.................................... military services ..  Section 269) .............................126  critical items on the inspection report ......................................................... 41–43  alternative manual warewashing........ 93 133  ................... See ANSI  Index  animals.........................................................105  in potable water systems .. 157  control communicable diseases ......... and heating ................... cleaning of.................................................................................................................................................................................. 154  report of death or illness ...................... reports. in draft inspection report....... 41  inspection.................. sampling ................................................................................. 43  authority  Bills of Health (Sec............................41)....... 269) ............................ 131–32  Web site............................. 158  inspection.... 158  infected person................

..... 78  certified  food protection manager .................................................................. See clean in place  clean in place......................................................... cross­connection program for.............................................................. cross­connection program for.............................117–18  illness symptoms ................................................................................................................................................... 54.......................................................................... 187  exposure time.........................................42  bare hands  cross­contamination from .............. 61  chemical sanitzing  chlorine solution ..................................................................................................................................................... 94  wet................. 120  facilities....................................................................................80–81  fruits and vegetables...........42  Bills of Health (Sec................ 119  written illness policy.................. 115  in child­activity center ............ 96  evaluation ............ 63........... 39...................... 100  Cheeses and Related Cheese Products (21 CFR 133) .............100  brass.71  boiler feed water tanks...........................................83  bilge pumps..... cleaning of  general housekeeping .......... 34–35  filling line................................... 63  in toilet facilities......  cross­connection control program for ............................................32  C cabin...barber shop................................................................................ cross connection control program for ..................................... 87.............................................................................................. food protection ... 96  labeling ................................................................74  for parasite destruction ............................................................................................. 96  monitoring .........................74  blast freezer  for food cooling ............. 34  carbonator........................................................ 80  rough ..................................................... with dents ...................................... halogenation..... 119  cast iron.....................................69  utensil dispensing................................................ 86  canned goods............................................................................................. 118  furnishings.59  beef....................................64  beauty shop.............. 54  pH...... 32–33  hourly tests ....................................................... 120  toilet and handwashing facilities ............................................ 119  handwashing.............. food sources.......................... 106  child­activity center ............................................. 103  housekeeping............... 60  pest control applicator................42  bilge water..88  temperature measuring device..........................................82  splash surfaces .......... 67.................................... backflow prevention for .............................. 81  cutting or piercing parts............................................ 83....................................... 49  pressure measuring device............................ 119 ................ 94  cleaning frequency  child­activity center .............................83  lubricants .............................................................. 118  toys............................118–19  cooking equipment .......................................................... 80  cleaning  attached equipment ..................................................42  beef steaks......................... 92  food equipment..............................................78  beverage dispensing  cleaning equipment ................................ also see halogen........................................................................................................ 154–55  blast chiller ............................. 118  diaper changing facilities............................. 96  temperatures ...................... used as a food equipment surface............100  boiler water additives............................ equipment criteria .................................................78  buffets  food protection ..................................................................................................................... cross­connection program for................................................. 269)......50  calibrate  halogen analyzer­chart recorder ............................ 80  nonfood contact surfaces ................................................. 120  medical staff...... 64.................315)...............................................................................310)........................................................... 82  delivery tube for .......................................................................................................................69  monitoring............ private  housekeeping .............................93  cooling......82  beverage line  cleaning of .........................83  tubing ............................ 117  exclusions .......113  whirlpool spas.. 84  bulkheads  design and construction.............................................................................. FIFRA (7 USC 136 (e)) .93  contact with the lip­contact surface ....................... 96  quaternary ammonium compound solution ...........................34  halogen procedures................................64....................................... 53  molluscan shellfish source .................................... 96  iodine solution ......................... 177...............  and sanitizing  CIP ..........118–19  construction................ 62  cap/keeper chain........................ chemicals used for .................................................................. 100  Certified Applicator..... 100  handwashing facilities.............................................................106  bunker  connection ....................................................................................................................................................................... 95  Chemicals Used in Washing or to Assist in the Lye Peeling  of Fruits and Vegetables (21CFR 173......... 183  can opener  134  Index  cleaning and replacement .................................................................105  maintenance . 120  chlorine compound..........................................................................113–15  mulituse food contact surfaces ........................... 110  pesticide applicator.................................................................................... 101  Béarnaise sauce .... 100  child­activity center  cleaning and disinfecting.................................................................................58  protection of.. 78  carpeting.......................58  bearings and gears  design and construction...............................82  food employees...................................................42  beard restraints......................32..... 120  symptom guidance ................................42  Boiler Water Additives (21 CFR 173........ 46....... use of....................................113  bathtubs......81.....................63  beer brewing..................... 69................................... 119  design.......

........................ 190  critical­control points  for variances ........................................152  cooking  alternative temperature times ...................................................................................................................... for food equipment..................................................190–91  management monitoring plan................................. 49  data plate...............................................84  fruits and vegetables using hot holding ........... 58 135  ................................................ 65.. specimens ...................... consmer  container  opening hermetically sealed containers............................................................................................................................................182  equipment capacities......................... 24....... used as a food equipment surface ..................115  unit....................28  clothing............ 119  in food areas...  mechanically  compressed air system ....................................... 91................................................................ 88...106  food­contact surfaces .... 79  resurfacing ..................................................... 83  facility................... food  knowledge of.......... 70  temperatures and times ............................ design....................................... 129–30  report ........................................................................... 105  design and construction.............................................70  for undercooked beef ...............113  non­food contact surfaces ......... 157...................................................................................................54  Index  partially cooked food................................................................................................ 36......................................................................................54  consumer self­service ...................................................... working  chemicals ..................................69  construction  inspection ....75–76  death or illness.................................................................................................................................................................................................. searchable on Web site .. 85  depth markers ............ See self­service.......... 84  methods......................................................................... 106  decks  cleaning  in child­activity centers .. 42  cross­contamination................................. See backflow  preventer  Control of Communicable Diseases (21 CFR1240) ...................... 123  corrective­action statement  format ...........................................................63–64  species ..........................................................................66  coatings  for multiuse kitchenware................................................................................................................99  food........................................................................ 54  time and temperature............64  contamination  food..107  ventilation ........ for outbreak investigations ..................................................... cooking ............................... 105  maintenance ................................ 105  maintenance ................................ 190  procedures ...................... 70  temperature­time alternatives................................................................................................. warewashing machine ................................................................................................................................................91  whirlpool spas....................................................... 78  correction affidavit .............. 65  copper....................84  condenser  air handling system .............. design and maintenance for  ..................... 36–37  swimming pools ........ 86  D data logger  for potable water systems ........ 173  cross­contamination.............................115  condensation  equipment.... quarantine..... 53  knowledge of........................................................................................ 177  swimming pool ......................................................................73–75  using ice................................................................................33.........77  management duties.........................................33  Code of Federal Regulations (Title 42)..................................................... 74  monitoring methods ....................................................... 38..........................food facilities ..................48  contingency plan...............92  potable water system ...... 92–93  housekeeping ................................................................................... 46  for whirlpool spas ...................................................... 190  purpose............. food.91  use and storage ....................................................... 126  correction priority................ 132  identifying.............................................................. for food employees ....77  potable water system ..... 39  for swimming pools....83  condiments......................................... 47................................................... 54  prevention of .......... 86  scratching and scoring............................ protection of ................................................................................................................. 48............ 88  cutting boards  hard maple...............59  informing passengers ........................................................................169  continuous pressure backflow preventer ....46  whirlpool spa... 53  monitoring of ......................... outer.................................. and operation ......................................................... 51  designated employee areas .......................... 181  deck mats ..........79  for potable water tanks ............... 192  date marking.........2  consumer advisory  for animal food .............................................. 158  decimal log reduction...........130  new ...................................... 63  spacing .......................157  cold food holding equipment............................................................................................................................50  warewashing equipment............................................................................... 181  cooling  equipment ....................................................... wiping  cleaning.............................................. 106  deckheads  design and construction....................................... 82.....See air system  condensate collection system................. 53  cross­connection control program .............. 63  cross­contamination................ warewashing machine..........................................122......................126........................................63  container identity.. 70  raw animals...................77  for raw or partially cooked food.71  in microwave.....................................................58  cloths.............. 184  database... 106  mounted equipment to .........................71  monitoring duties.................... 50  clinical specimens ......62..See refrigerated unit.................

........................................................................................................................................................................... and deckheads.................51  drainboards ...........................90  draining.. 118–19  housekeeping ................................................. 85  functionality ........ 86  materials ...........................................................................................................32  distant point....61..........107  of food .................................. 36–37  whirlpool spas.................................................. food protection .............. placement of ....................................................................................105  drain............................................. 60  F  facilities................65  location of .....................................................84  in use.................................. pools  and spas .....82  food protection .................... 57................................................................................................82–84  limitations................................................ functionality of........77–79  location and installation..................................... 85  utensils.........93–94  standards  accredited food equipment sanitation standards.......................... 63  monitoring .....................42  diaper­changing facilites..........51  dust control......................................52  diarrhea  food employees with....... 24  Direct Food Substances Affirmed as Generally Recognized  as Safe (21 CFR 184) ............................................................................................. 69...................115  136  Index  E eggnog .......................168  disinfecting  cabins and public areas............................. 100  cleaning and sanitizing.............................................. 23... 63  cleaning................................... 64  receving conditions of .................................................117  diapers..........................................................................................82. preflushing.................................................................... 70  fortified..................................... 94  Escherichia coli O157  H7.. 56  training....................................................... components of.... pests ............................................................................................ 54  equipment.......................................... potable water system ................ 70  Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants (50 CFR  17) ........................................ self  air condensation collection pans ............................................ 82  fixed..........97  display  cases....... spacing or sealing . multiuse.............. housekeeping..................................... 96  equipment disinfection........ 179  equipment failure.68  for handwashing sinks......................113  child­activity center...................................63  monitoring................................................ 111  EPA­approved manufacturer's label .......................................................................... 60  entry points...62  drinking................... 113–14  potable water system ...................... 77–79  openings of ................................ elevation or sealing.........................................................54......... 82  precleaning................................. 63  health.................................................... 54  bulkheads.... 84  table­mounted equipment ............... monitoring for.................................. food source...... consumer................................... 85  fixed.......................................................................................... potable water system........................................................................................................................................... 68–69  protection................................... 77  wet cleaning of .............................................................. in swimming pools and whirlpool spas . 63................................... 56  contamination..........................................................................101  disease transmission............................................. food areas  access to............................................................................................... 93  design of ..........................105  food storage..................................................................................50  dispensing equipment  cleaning of ..........................................................................................83  for liquid waste disposal and plumbing........93  design of....................................... dual.............. 64  eggs cooking ....................................... refilling.................................. 56  etiology of disease... 172  exhaust ventilation hood systems.... dispensing  cleaning of.........105  carrying sewage................................................................................................................developing machines..................54........................................................101  dual drain ........ 61  employee  cleanliness ..................................54  dispensing utensil  availability of ..................................................................................................................................................... 64  pasteurized ........................115  CIP equipment ...................................................................35  warewashing sinks and drainboards ............................. 40  equipment....................68  food............105–6 .............................80  equipment and utensils.....84  covered.................. 84  ANSI .........82  drain lines  air­gap or air­break in ................ 107  exotic animals.67  drinking water . decks.....................................................93  dry storage  lighting for.. food employee ........................... 82  food protection ...................................105  for ice machine or storage ... and presoaking.. potable water ................84  protection of... 77  multiuse .............................................................................................................68  drying agents...........................97  potable water hose lockers .............. food  cleaning and sanitizing................................................... 85  maintenance and operation.............. 181  cooking temperatures/times ...............................................................68  distallation plant .......................................................... cross­connection control program ...................................................... access for......................................... self­closing in toilet rooms..................................................................................................................89  drinking cups......................................... 84  standards and classification ...................................38  door.....................56  gastrointestinal illness ............................................................. Also see potable water  made from ice ...................................................... 58  dry cleaning methods .... 85  drainage...............................................

................63  frozen ............................................................................................48  fecal specimens  bacteriologic diagnosis ........................................................ 58  training for...........................................................................................72  Index  partially cooked .............................. temperatures and times.......................................................................... 56  hygienic practices ......................................................106  first aid supplies ........104  handwashing..................................45  pressure gauges ...............47  examing.... 54  discarding contaminated food .See equipment................................................................................................ 58  fingernails of......................107  FDA  a certified source.........174  viral diagnosis .........................................................45  media ......................................................................................................................................................... 45  fluid milk............. potentially hazardous food ........... 176  sample temperatures ................................. 84  logs....................................................... 175  procedures ................................ 74  food display................................173  fee schedule .................................................................................................................. 53  training for person in charge...........63...... See milk  follow­up inspection...81  for grease extraction.........................................................................................................................................................................................................124  fever food employee..................... 73  food packages.......................................................47  replacement of .......................102  fish ......................................................................105  maintenance ...................................................... 70  ready­to­eat....................................................... See inspections  food  approved sources ...............................................47  fingernail  artificial .................. 29  food equipment ..............................................................................................105  solid waste................................................68–69  food employee  cleanliness ............................................................47  manuals for......................................................................................108  design and construction............................. 61  Food and Drug Administration.... 74  methods.............................. 105–6  cleaning equipment storage......................................................................................................... 63  handwashing signs for .......................................58  fire system  backflow protection ..........47  granular filters .................................................... 70  raw...........46  valves ................................46  pressure differential......................... food  food guards............... 84  in microwave ...........................................................58  polish....59–61  fixed equipment................................................................................................................................................................................ 54  temperatures and times ...................................60  potable water approved by ................................... 74  monitoring ..........................................................47  replacement cartridge..............................23  filters................................................................ 71  receiving condition............................................ 106–7  liquid waste disposal ............................................................................. 56  clothing ..................................................................................................................... 70  raw­marinated . 176  sample plan.........................................81  filters...................... 58  jewelry .56  gastrointestinal illness ..............................................81  removable............................................................................................................................. 64 137  ....................................................................161  fecal accident procedure  record ........................................................................................................................................ 103  health......................................................................................................................................46  filters..............57................. 63  food contamination............................... 60  source..............................................................................48  replacement cannister­type filter ..................................................................... 176  support equipment......................... whirlpool spas  backwash ..........................................................106  drain lines ........................................................................... See FDA  food and water samples  aseptic techniques.......... health ..................................................................................................................... 69.70  food protection ...........................46  whirlpool spas.61–62  recreationally caught...................Also see molluscan shellfish...........................cleaning.......................................................................................................81  for hot oil..................................... 68  food holding.........................47  core sample ................................... food areas  cleaning.... 53  with symptoms of acute gastroenteritis ..................................................................... 71  monitoring ................................................................ 54  time and temperatures.. 102–3  lighting...... 77  discarding ready­to­eat.............................. 175  food condition...................................................................................................................................................... 175  disinfection agents.................................................................................................. 103–4  ventilation ............................................................................... 57  hair restraints ..................................................................................... 176  sample identification ............174  guidelines for collecting ..........................................................................................................42  installation............................................................... 77  food cooking  equipment capacities .......................................................................62..... 181  food cooling  equipment capacities ......... swimming pools  backwashed....................................... 175  containers .........................106  plumbing..................... 59  food containers............................................................................................................ 75  food additives.................................................................. Also see shellfish  cooking..........................45  operating manuals......................85–86  flow­through seawater swimming pools .................................. 176  collection kit .............47  inspecting ..................................46  sample plan .................................................................. 176  sample amount.............................................70–71  temperature­time alternatives.....................................................................................................195  swimming pools .... 58  handwashing......105  garbage and refuse storage room .........................................................................................................................................................................................

..........................68  cross­contamination protection .......................................................................................... 72  fresh water tanks...........61  cheese.............................................................................................................................. 75  steaks........ 107  food protection........................................................................... 102.................................. imminent health hazards .............................................................................................................................................................. 53  galvanized metal .. 74  freezing  parasite destruction ...... 54  fountains.................... 99–102  warewashing.................................. 80  cleaned and sanitized ....................... 53–58  poisonous and toxic materials............................................ 61  Frozen Desserts (21 CFR 135) . 94  storing equipment on ................................................................... 102–8  food............................................................................ 60  garbage  grinders............................................................................61  frozen ............................................................................................................................... 67  labeling ....................60............62  temperatures...............................................................................................................................................69  poisonous and toxic materials... 168  data collection .......................................................................................................... 65  wood limitations.61  ice ..............65  ice .............................61  eggs ............................................................... 97...........59  processing plants .................... 79  food­safety duties ................... and deckheads in..... 93  lubricants ............................................................65  ingredient contamination ...................... 78  game animals  cooking ............................................................................. 101  materials for the construction of ............................................................................................................................................................................ 113  consultation...............................................................................................................S.................. 115  Freedom of Information Act (5 U....... 68.......111  milk products......................................................................63  prohibited storage ............................................... 57............. 77  design and construction................................................................... 61................................................ 105–6  lighting intensity .........................................69  food safety  duties................................. 59–62  endangered species ...62  shucked shellfish.......................................... 84  food­contact surfaces  cast iron ...................... 23  cleaning of occupant cabins with.............. 70  source.................................................... 82...........................................................................68  service............ 166  forms ........ 59.....................111  potentially hazardous food...................... 116  water source .....................................................................23...........................63  display ..................... 68–69  employee contamination......................................................................... 552)...70  food sources ...................................................... bulkheads.............. 78  CIP equipment .food preparation................................... 61  G  galvanized metal ......................... 80  employee knowledge of ....................................................71.............................. 54  disease prevention ............. 87–98  food service .............................................................................................................................................................................. See temperature  measuring device  138  Index  food temperatures............. 78  in­use cleaning ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 70  food preparation area  decks........................................................................................................................68  cooking and heating raw animals .............. decorative  maintenance for....................................................................................... 86  standards ......95–96  sponge use on.................................60  hermetically sealed container .....................  training employees ..............................106  ventilation hood design.....59  food processing plants........................................................................................................................................................... 92  deleterious substances .........................61  shellstock........ 53  food­contact equipment  maintenance .....59  personnel......................61  food re­service............................................ 77  multiuse ......... See Privacy Act  freezer ............................................................. 63–64  lighting.............................. backflow prevention............... 93  rooms.......... 80  sanitizing............................60  private home........................................... 127  foodborne  death ....................................................................... 77–87  facilities.. 61  milk..............59  lawful sourcing .................. 42  receptacles.68  cross­contamination ...107  other types of contamination.. 99–102  preparation and storage ..................................................... 113  intervention .................................. 65  cleaning frequency ............ 83................. 177  frozen  desserts ........................................................................... 69  game animals ......................................................................... 168 .......................... 71....61  package integrity..C......................................................63  equipment and utensils....68  food temperature measuring device........................ 68..............62  pest control .............. 53  illness..................................................................59  food storage.....................................................59.......................................................62  inspection of area.......................68  above deck .............................................. 68–69  food receiving  additives ....................................... disinfection.................................................. 61  food ...............................................................59  milk....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................59  molluscan shellfish ................................................................................... 71–72  records.......................... 162  infection control procedures ........................ 104  gastrointestinal illness  case definition .............................................................................54  equipment and utensils.............................................................................................................. 68..............60  fish ..............................................................................

.........24  reporting requirements ...............................................168  two percent ............................................................... Foreign Quarantine ­ Requirements  Upon Arrival at U.................................................................................................................... 169................................................................................... 46  whirlpool spas .......................27  specimen submisson........................................................................................................................................171  specimens ...........169  specimen collection..........................................106  garbage room ...... 49  halogen monitoring manual.......................................................24.......................................................................................................................................................... 167................................................. 171–75  stool specimens ........... 90  whirlpool spas halogenation equipment ............................................ 164  records ................................................ 32  distribution......................................S............................................................................. bunkering.........................63  housekeeping ......................... 38  potable water system  bunkering ....168  outbreak prevention and response plan........... potable water system  chart design ................................................................................................................................ 46  warewashing equipment ................................. 39  calibrated.................. 57  handheld tools.............................81................................. 127  swimming pools........169  isolation requirements ....................................................................... 49  halogen analyzer chart..................... 162............................................................ imminent health hazards ............................................................................. 33  data loggers.............. 53.....172  objectives ..........58  food protection ...26  special report ........ 46  whirlpool spas ................................. 57  contact ............................................................................... distribution ....................................................................... distribution .. 86.. 175–76  samples ..................38  handwashing and toilet facilities...........67  use of ............................................................114  laundering cloth........................................................... 48  hand  antiseptic..................................67  glue traps .................................... 175  medical staff instructions ............................................................................................................................... Ports................................ 37  pre­test............................................. 54......... 63  dip ........................................... bunkering............................................ 40  halogenation ......................................169  patient instructions ................................ 39  calibration records.......................... bunkering....................................................... 38  swimming pools..................................................... distribution....... 35  swimming pool halogentation equipment ............................. 48  Grade A standards............................................ required............168  outbreak detection........................................ 32  dosage..................................................................... 170  log entries........................................................................... 103 139  ................. bunkering................................... 32  calibrated............................................................170  sample collection kit ..... 32  injection point..................................................... distribution ..........................26  retention ......................................... 87  food facilities ......................................................................................... 105  potable water hose lockers ..... 38  distant point................................168  underlying medical conditions.................................. 179  General Provisions. 70............................................................................................................... 63.......................................................104  gloves...53......................................... 61  gravlax..................................172  gastrointestinal illness surveillance system reporting  itineraries........................... 32  residual...........................................................................................67  fingernails ...........................................................................24  vigilance ............ 25................ 80  handwashing  child­activity center  facilities ................................................................. 39  construction.............. 27................................166  report contents..................................................................................101  gloves  cloth ....................................................................................... 32  distribution...172  specimen supplies...........53  nonfood contact equipment. 39  halogen monitoring  potable water system  bunkering .........168  gastrointestinal illness outbreak investigation  food and water samples ................................................................26  reportable cases ....................... Sanitary Inspection.......................23  routine report ....... 35  potable water hoses ........................................................................................170  investigation procedures.......................... 71  grease filters .........................44  food equipment ........................ 38  swimming pools............103  knowledge of food equipment ................. bunkering .......................................29  log .................. 33  halogen analyzer chart recorder  potable water system  accuracy........ 67  slash­resistant........interviews ............98  single­use ..........................................................................109  good repair  backflow preventers ..................................................... 122............................................113  questionnaire ....................... 58  halogen  demand test ...............................................169  report.............59........................................................................... 131–32  hair restraints ................................... 168  submission methods..........24  monitoring............................... 57  sanitizer ...........3  generally recognized as safe ..........28  surveillance.....58  halogen analyzer­chart recorder ............................................................................................ 33  data loggers.................... distribution ...........................................................................................86  Index  plumbing .......................................... 107  H HACCP..................................................... unusual patterns...................................................................................... 118  food area  automatic handwashing facility ...............................................172  procedures............................ 38  emergency ......25  special report ......................................................................................................... bunkering........ 46  whirlpool spas ........................ milk ... Also see equipment disinfection  devices ............................

................. backflow prevention for ..........................................................................88  sanitizing temperatures .......................................................................................................... 124 ........................................................................................................................................84  protection.................................... 127  potable water halogen ...........62  Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point................................................... 35–36  spray­rinse hose ............................................................ 128  closing conference..................42  hospital equipment................................................................................................................................. 126  construction....................................................................................................................... 35  tags.................................................................................................................................. 130  critical items ................................................ 125  non­critical items ..................115  hydrotherapy pools .............. opening................................115  hot water system ........... 193  interim report.........................................................................................................115  humidifiers .......................................................................... 65  identification  containers ............... 124  risk­based scoring ........................................................... 127  renovation ....................... 60  inspection report  clarification requests ......81  hot tubs...... 123  inspections  additional ...................................................................................... 127  Indirect Food Additive for Use as a Drying Agent (21 CFR  175­178) .....123........... 65  equipment storage bin .............................................................32  harborage pests................. 65  source..................................................................54  food safety knowledge......................................................................................................54  pressure gauge......107  temperature measuring device.............................................................. 64..........................................................................89  wash temperatures........................................... storage of ..... 64  food ...................................................... 123  public information ...................................................................2......................102  facility maintenance ........facility installation ....... 34  potable water filling line..................................... 122  scoring system ................................................................ 130  review procedures ..........115  infection control procedures.... molluscan shellstock .................................................................................................................... 63  insect­control devices ............42  hot holding  cooking...............................................115  cabins...........................113  disinfection.......................................... 112  insecticides............................................................. 62  imminent health hazards  detection of ..................................................................................................44  potable water hose..........73  hollandaise ...................................................................................................... shellfish .................................................................................................. 123  construction..............................83  hot oil filtering equipment.............................................................................................................. 127  inadequate facilities ..... 62  undrained.................................... 63–64  temperature and time ...116  public areas ... 119................ 33  water hose lockers......................... 101  Indirect Food Substances Affirmed as Generally  Recognized as Safe (21 CFR 186).......................42  hot water sanitizing  manual sink design ....74  hepititis A virus...... See HACCP  heat lamps  protected ....... 34  piping ................................................................63  food safety duties ....................................................61................53  reheating ........................................................ 129  liquid or solid waste disposal............. backflow prevention.............................................................................................................................................................................................................102  when to wash ............... 65  ice cream .......... 113...75  temperature measuring device........................................ 127  potentially hazardous food ...................................92  housekeeping  air system ..............................50  140  Index  I  ice  as a coolant............................................................. 93  scoops ........................................84  knowledge ................................................ food sources ............113  dust control ............... 76  potable water system  non­potable fresh water ........................................... cooling....116  humidifiers ............................ 35  potable water tanks............................................................................111  harvester. 122  final report.................................................. 82  machines............................63  high chairs................................... cleaning...................72  temperature ......... 129  contested results .. 50  infection control........................................................192....................115  fountains.....................................................................124.............................. 168  ingredient contamination............................................................................................................ 121  disease outbreaks .......................................... 127  inspections to determine potential ........................................................................................................ 126  draft report ...................................................................................... 99  containers .......... 101  individual hydrotherapy pools.................... 122  in database ...........................64  hose air supply hose.......................... cleaning .......................................................119  holding........................................................... food  capacity ..................................................................................71  equipment.............................83  heat transfer.............................................. 99  inspection program................................53  method.....................................................113  Mycobacterium or legionella .........................56  hermetically sealed containers.............................115  HVAC ............................................... 126  publication of........................89  monitoring......................................................................................................................................................................103  food protection ......................................................................................................113  showers ......................95  warewashing machine requirements .................................................................................................................................................................................................57  harbor area... 34  potable water hoses..................................................57  sink......

.........................................................................110  physical control measures ........................ 98  laundry equipment..................................................................................................................131  objectives for.....................................123  no sail recommendation ..121  invoice ....................................58  Index  K kick plates..........................................112  plan development and implementation............ 40  outbreak specimens and samples ..............................................................169  overview of .....112  logs .................. 97.................................................128  federal fiscal year............... 130  summary of sanitation inspections ......................................................................................................................................... 24  medical condition................... halogen monitoring  potable water...................................................................... 39  manual monitoring........................................................................See warewashing and warewashing  machines  mats.......... 121.. 78  Legionnaires' Disease ...... 81  L  laundering........................................................................ potable water........24..................................70.. 170  public health concerns...... 127................ potable water tanks .............................................................................................171  invoice ................................................................................................................. 101  M  manual sounding........................................................... backflow prevention........46......................................... sample . 169  report for....................................................................................... 106  mayonnaise ...60  investigate  complaints ..............................................................  calibration................................109  plan evaluation...........129  report.............. 131..........................................121  publication ......... 23  lubricants........................... 129..... 64  meals and activities questionnaire................................................ confidential .......................112  insect control devices ....................128  renovation........... 116  light  bulbs......See warewashing and  warewashing machines  mechanically refrigerated unit .................................................. swimming pools / whirlpool spas  ............123  no sail recommendation .................................126  failing............... 42  lawful sourcing.............. limitations of on food contact surfaces ...................................................................................111  pesticide application.......................................................... 32  gastrointestinal illness..............................166  J  jaundice.................................... easily cleanable .............. 127–28  partial inspection .......... 56  medical informatin...............................................................................................................112  chemical control measures ......... 26  medical staff 141  ..................................................................................121  non­routine investigations..........................109  training .................. 176  swimming pool ....................121  fee .................................... 105  drain lines .109  pest control ....................................................122  informing the master................ food equipment.............................125  scheduling priority ............................ 127  logs  bunkering.................... See refrigerated unit............ 129.....109  passive surveillance ...........................................................46................................................................. 192  incomplete ................... food safety..............................  mechanically  medical condition  food safety .................................................................... 107  220 Lux / 20 foot candles ...............................................29  itinerary.................................... 126....................................................................... 106  liquid waste  disposal ...110  International Organization for Standardization (ISO 14726)  ......................... 34  manual tests.................................................................................................................. food service linens.........83... prohibited food storage .............................................47............................................................. 49  manual warewashing.......42  Interstate Certified Shellfish Shippers List .. 125.............. 68  mechanical warewashing machine.................................... 40  swimming pools and whirlpool spas.......................................................................................... 165  meat................................... food..........128  procedures.............................. 107  fixtures .........................................................................................................................................................................131  disease outbreaks .................... 49  loose stools........................... 131...........................................127  re­inspection .......correction affidavit ............ 181  mechanical rooms............................................ 47  unusual occurrences...............112  food protection .32............................170  isolating crew and passengers.........175  gastrointestinal illness specimens for ........ potable water..............................56  jewelry....................................... 106  intensity  110 Lux / 10 food candles ... 168–69  procedures for........................ 105  imminent health hazards........................128  frequency............ 83......................192  integrated pest management  chemical application procedures ..................... 53  underlying ..................................................... food equipment.............128  score ........................173............................................................................................................................... cooking.................................. 170  halogen analyzer­chart recorder.......................................................128.................34  international shore connection........................................131  investigations  food and water samples ..122  review of recommendations ........................... 131  follow­up............................. 59  lead....126  corrective action statement...............................................

........... 84  knowledge....................... 92  nonabsorbent ..... 53  ventilation................. 192  scores ............................................87  consumer advisory for .................................................................................................... 79  nonfood items ................................................................10) .................................................... 61  receiving conditions of.. 79  crevices ......................................... 77  single service and single use .............. 32..............................................................................41  report...........72  safety standards.............................................................. 170  no bare hand contact.................................................................................................... 64  mollusk and crustacean shells...........................................................................................................food safety duties ................................................................................102  microbiologic monitoring..... 81  outbreak investigation  antidiarrheal medication.................................................................................................................................................................. 70...............................24  outbreak specimen labeling .................. 77  nonfood­contact surfaces.......169  gastrointestinal illness surveillance ................................................................................................. 68  nonfood­contact surfaces  corrosion­resistent .......................................................... 25............ 80  easily cleanable................................... 69  gastrointestinal illness surveillance .......................... 98  National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (40 CFR 141)  ......................................................................... 177  swimming pools and whirlpool spas ................... 192  most recent ship inspected ....................33............................. wild.............86  milk  bulk milk tubes .................................................................................................. 23.....170  metal fragments ....................................93  cooking.................................................... 83  nonfood­contact..........................109  potable water ............................................................24  storage.....77  142  Index  gastrointestinal illness outbreak ....71  reheating ............................................. 49  variances ........................................................................................73  Microwave Ovens (21 CFR 1030........................................... potable water system  distribution system ................................ 192  inspection reports .. 79  normal use conditions................... 60............................23  integrated pest management .... 79  standards ..............................................................81..........................................................26....................................................................................................................... 192  not satisfactory ................... 107  online information  Green Sheet.................. 54................................................................................... 107  warewashing ....... 38...........................................................................77  for gastrointestinal illness outbreaks .............................................................................................................. flow time..24  logging the use of ..............................................................................................................................................................................................108  mushrooms................................. 194  onset  gastrointestinal illness.................................................................................................. 166  NSF International ..............................................................132  mop storage........ 79  splash ....................................173  selling and dispensing of..................................................... 79  spillage ........60  mycobacterium legionella ......25  dispensing and sales..................... 163–65  open seams  equipment installation..........31  microbrewery .................................................................................................................................................. 59................84..................... 63  no sail recommendation. 23  time...............................................................126  food safety duties . 79  ventilation.....56  gastrointestinal illness outbreaks ............ 80  durable............................................. 169 ...................10  newsletter  consumer advisory ........33............ 71  molluscan shellstock .. 62........................................ 183  number and capacity  cooling and heating food.................................................................. 45...........................173  antidiarrheal  logging and dispensing of ........................................................................................................ 79  maintenance ................................ 173  on gastrointestinal illness surveillance log .................... gastrointestinal illness surveillance ........................................86  thawing................................ 127  nonabsorbent  food­contact surfaces ......................... 41  tanks...........54...........................116  N napkins.. 61  Grade A standards .............. reuse................................................................................... 192  VSP contact information ...............................................................................................102  menu  consumer information.................................... 64  wood containers .......................................61  molluscan shellfish..... 40........ 41  notification.......................... 173  collaboration...........................114  medication  antibiotic  outbreak specimen labeling ....................................... infection control procedures..............86  metering faucet......... critical items ................ 80  projections.................................................. 66.........................................................87  monitoring  corrective action statement...................................... 89  nuts  storage........................... 81  design... 59....................................................... 62....... 85  food contact . 84  non­potable  piping.................................. food area ........................................................ 59................................................61  receiving temperature of................... 80  ice bin cold­plate .................................................................................. 79  O  odors  food­contact surfaces ...... 61.... 41............78  microwave ovens  cleaning frequency .............23  housekeeping........................................ 81  smooth material.............. 81  frequent cleaning.................77  fluid ..............................

............................................................... 99  lubricants ........................... 96  potable water................................................................................................. 62–64.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 99  pewter alloys..................................................................... 112  in food areas .ii  PHS authority..................................................................................61  egg and egg products...........................................................................114  personnel  food safety ............79  pantries  design and construction.......................... 166  housekeeping... 54.................................................................. 112  pesticides...............................36–37  contamination...... 170  rapid response .................................................................................................................................. 162–65  gastrointestinal illness surveillance ...106  parasite  destruction ..................................................................... 32  potable water and potable water system  alternative cleaning / disinfection.......... 171.................................... 36–37.......................................... 37 143  ..........................181  peeling....................................................................................77  passive surveillance procedures............ 110  applicators...............................79  person in charge .............. 42  physician........................... 100  bulk supplies ................................................ See potentially hazardous foods  photographic laboratory .................169  periodic review of outbreak plan.................. 175  survey.........70  passengers  gastrointestinal illness outbreaks ............................................................................................................ 53  labeling ............................................. 71–72  specimens ................... 32  swimming pools..... 102  food­contact surfaces ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 102  use...................................63...................................................... 36  audible alarm.............. 109–10  application....................100–101  storage................................... 54  locker.................54  practice............................... 48  PHF ................ 60...... 99  boiler water additives .. 182–83  P package integrity................................................................................................................99–100  polluted areas and harbors ........................................................................... 101  fruit and vegetable washes ..... 31  cleaning ................................. 116  disinfection........................... 114....................................... 34  pneumatic tanks ...171  supplies ..... sauce .......................................152  vulnerable consumers ............contingency plan ........................................171  interviews ............................... 99  pesticides and rodenticides................72  pathogenic bacteria levels..................................................................................................... 101.......................................................................... 40  bunkering...........................................................................................................................................................................................................64  milk................................................170  laboratory studies.............................................. cooking alternatives........... 25–26.... 106  plumbing .. 44  poisonous and toxic materials  application..................................................... 100  generally recognized as safe..........................53  monitoring............................................................................................................ 58.36–37  decorative fountains ..... 68–69............................100.................................. 99................ 99  insecticides .......................170  special circumstances ..99...................................................... 99  culinary steam .......169  epidemiologic studies .......................175  partially cooked food ........................................................................................170  objectives .................................................................................................... 100  rodent bait........................... 111  physical measures..58  personal protection equipment........ 109–11  pest control... 101  identification ................169  newsletters ............... 37  annual inspection ............................................ 101  sanitizers.... 53–58  housekeeping .................................................................................................................. 53–56  personal hygiene  knowledge .................................................................. 178–80  emergency .......... 56.............................................. 100  drying agents.............169  questionnaires .................................................................................................................................... 100  operational supplies.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................104–5  repair........................................................................ 101  first aid supplies. IPM............................................................................................... 46  whirlpool spas ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 99  knowledge................................................................................ 99  locker............ 99–100  law..................170  procedures......................... 99–102................................................................. 164–65....................................113  introduction.........................................169  preliminary report ............................................170  requested documents.........168  specimens .....................170  oven type...... infection control............... 109–10  residue....................169  recommendation ...............78.... Also see medical staff  pipes  food area  installation ................... 99................61  egg and egg products............................................... food protection.... 105  potable water  color of .................................................................................. 100................................ cooking ........................ 78  pH  food safety ........105  maintenance ............................................................................................................................ 76  pans.....................62  packaged food ....109  pasteurized  cheese......................................................................61  pathogen destruction.............................................111  Index  chemical measures......................................................................... 99  containers .............54...........................................................170  final report...... 118–20  pest control ...................... infection control......64  perfluorocarbon resin ......................... 101  manufacturer's label ....... 27............................................................

....................32  protection...................................25  144  Index  data for investigations............... 84  mechanically............101  Privacy Act/Freedom of Information Act (5 U........84  food holding temperatures and times ......S...................131–32  whirlpool spas ..............................................................75  frozen.................. 77  cooking ...........................See fish  refills..................................... 63  receiving  condition ..............54.................127  monitoring......3  pulpers ................................... 28  potable water.......................................54  receiving temperatures ....................... 74  rare meat ......64  questionnaires  data collection.....................55–56  protecting from cross contamination.......... 165  R R/O.. 69  fruits and vegetables....61–62  food ........ clean equipment and utensils ...................................................................................................................................75–76  walk­in  design..........................................................................115  potato flakes ................................................ warewashing..................88  primal cut............................. 47  whirlpool spas. 83  time / temperature ...................................48............................. 60  racking............36  sampling..............42  flushed potable water hoses ........................................ 39–40........................ 38–40  piping........................ 2.. 67  Prior­Sanctioned Food Ingredients (21 CFR 181)....... 111  potable water................. 25  inspection report.................................. 31–32  standards........................... 170  gastrointestinal illness surveillance system .............................. 65  knowledge..............3800)............56.............................36  halogen monitoring..................................................................................... 63  single­use gloves................................................................................................................................... 53–54  monitoring................................................................................................... 70–73  cooling.................... 68................................... heating.................................................... infection control ... 36.......................................................68  protection........................... 187  gastrointestinal illness.....25.............32–33.........45........C................................. food safety ............. 63  handwashing..... 72..................... 45  records  food safety ....................................................................................................................... 75  food holding temperatures and times....................... 44  retention  gastrointestinal illness surveillance .......... 41......................S... 24........... 552) ................................. food areas ...................................................................................................................40  halogenation ..................... 127  integrated pest management................... 42.............................................. 34–35  production............................................................ 93  pumps. 93  rapid cooling equipment / methods........................................................................................... 46  variances ...........64  potentially hazardous food  cooking and reheating ............................................................... 53  management ...............114  preparation.................... 59..................................97  public  information................................ 107  lighting intensity ..... 67  temperature / time ......... 31.................................................................. 176  sources. 62. food........................ 164  meals and activities ..........3  Quarantine Laws.. 35–36  imminent health hazard ............................... ambient air TMD ....................................................75  equipment cleaning . 152–56  quarters.......................................24–25................................. 37–38  hoses.................................63–64  single use gloves.... 31..............................................................................63–64  hand contact with ................................. warewashing machine ...............................................................................................73  holding temperatures and times...............................................31  supplies ................................................53  Q  quarantine .......... 83  storage  ice.............. and thawing.....................................  Section 269) .......................................................................................................................................................110. 190  record .......................................... 82  refrigerated unit  capacity ............................................. 3....................................................................................................................... 41......................................................................... 41–44  pumps ....... construction...................................................70–72  date marking for ..................................................................................... 62–70  Preservatives for Wood (21 CFR 178.................. infection control ..... 33–34  water sprays . 49  swimming pools............................................ 70  ratites..................................................................................................................................................................67....................68  knowledge .........36..................................127  public areas..........79  pressure gauge....................................... 76  recalled food ....... and holding ............................. 107 .................................. 64........................... 49  recreationally caught fish .......131  faucet ............................................................................ 70  ready­to­eat food  contaminated..................................... 39  swimming pools .............................................................................................................. 61–62  precautionary measures.................................. slacking.....................................................................74  date marking for ...... 59–62  recirculating swimming pools ........................... 75  for self­service...............113  Public Health Service Act ..... 32...........environmental investigation ...........92  equipment cooling............................................................................................................ See reverse osmosis  Rabbit Inspection Program (9 CFR 354)........42  purchasing.......26  prohibited storage..42  record retention...................................................... sanitary ....................................................... 53  temperature measuring device........31  tanks ................................................. 57  knowledge....... and maintenance............. meat .....................C.......... 176  gastrointestinal illness surveillance....................................................... 26................................................................................................. 73–76  in vending machines....... 152  Quarantine and Inspection ­ Bills of health (42 U........................ beverage.................................................................................

......................................................... 54  rinse....................................... 24.. 97  wiping cloths ...................... 29................................. 175–76  sampling procedures............................................................................................................... operations manual ...............................122  for outbreak investigations........79  Salmonella Typhi ........................................ gastrointestinal illness outbreaks  aseptic techniques.............................. potable water . 63  hand dips ............ 127....................... 127................................................................ 23–24  residual halogen  potable water ......... 31  sample ................................................................... 176  indentification .......................................................................................................................................... chemical ............................. 129–30  report....regulations............. See ready­to­eat food  S safe source................................................................................... 66  Sanitizing Solutions (21 CFR 178...169.......................... 69  lighting in..................................................... 175  environmental.....................1010)....... wooden ..72  time and temperature .......... 101.................93–94  scrub .................................170  sample reports.................... 100  scientific data......... 91  concentration..................91  procedures...................................................................................................................... 175  sample kit..................169............................................ 175  disinfection agents.96............. 192  scrapping.... 106  monitoring .............................. 152–56  reheating food  commercial products ............................. 41  cock .............77  eggs............................................................................................................................................. 68  shatterproof or shatter­resistant coating  lights ................................................... 176  collection tools..94  risk­based scoring............................... food employees.... 111–12  RTE..........................................................................................................................................................................32  revisions........................ 71  sewage .........................................170  gastrointestinal illness surveillance ............................................................................. 57  knowledge........84................. 82  drinking cups and containers................. storage................... 67  for salad bars and buffets....................... 174...............35  medicine....... 105  sewer lines......................... 97  bowls.... cross­contamination. 65  score.... 107 145  ............................................................56  saltwater ballast system .... 176  viral.......................................... 33  water........................................................................................................................ 42  sanitizer level alert.......................... alternative cooking........................................................................................................72  reinspections ....... 41.........................56  wiping cloth requirements ....................................................... 125.2  ring...................................... 176  food .......................... 96  contact time................................. chemical ....... 100  CIP equipment ........................................................128  renovation inspections......See draining.............................................72  reheat once...... 36–41....................... 110  removal... 126......... 99–102  rodents ....... swimming pools and whirlpool spas  ..................................................................................................................................... 97  seviche ............................................................... 95  data plate ..................... Also see  inspection report  draft inspection report........................... 158  outbreak investigation ......................................... 96  test kit .............................. potable water  Index  analysis........................................................................................... 88  equipment.................................................................................... warewashing machine............................72  hot holding .........................122  final inspection report ...54.................... 176  support equipment.............. 157................................. 54..........................90.....................................122  roast beef  reheating ............. 166–67  of death or illness........................................................................................... potable water .............................................66... 41................................................... 33  valves .......................... inspection report ........ 88  sanitizing  approved solutions ............................. 176  sample containers ... 174  water...................... 70......... 67  utensils ......................................................32.................................58  rinse solution  clean .... 131........................31  reportable cases  for crew members boarding the vessel................................... 33  reports ................... 95  clean solution .........26–28... 176  planning ............80.........100. 84............................................... 68..................................72  rapid ........ 95  temperature....................... 175  sampling amount ............ 56  locker for potable water equipment ...........42  sample........ 96  temperature......53  microwave oven ...................................... 46–47  whirlpool spas.......... receiving conditions ........................ 88  solution application........................ quarantine............. 53  management ................................................................................170.......................................................................................................................................... 69...31  salad  bar... 69  tableware ............................................................................................. 122–23................... self  self­service..................................54.......... consumer  beverage dispensing.......................................... 129–30  reverse osmosis............................................................ 83................................................................ quarantine.............................................96............................102  pesticides ............... 93  self­draining .........66  retrofits.......................................................... pumped ..........61  employees . 70  scoops........................................................................... manual............. 95  temperature........................................72  knowledge . 182  rodenticides ................................ potable water......................................................................................................................... 175  temperatures ........................................................................................................................... ship construction............................... 175  sanitary pumps...................................................................................................... 48–49  restricted  children in diapers..................................................................23  gastrointestinal illness surveillance .................................................................................. food storage areas .................................................................52  contaminated food................. 178–80  swimming pools ................................

................. 102  manual warewashing......... 179  Substances Generally Recognized as Safe (21 CFR 182)  .... gastrointestinal illness outbreaks  bacteriologic .............................. 130  showers  housekeeping ............................ 56.................................................................. 57.104  spatulas... 65  submerged inlets........ 54..........................................................................173  labeling....................... 62..........................................................61  shellstock...103  safety... 59  tartare ..104  recyclables.... 174  T  table­mounted equipment ................................................................ 46  recirculating........ 35  protection.......................................... 89–91. 52  fecal accident .... 46  anti­entrapment drain............42  utility sink............................. 51  water chemistry ......................... 45  residual halogen ............................ 99  protection.......... 94  standard operating procedures .....................42  signs  handwashing...................... 46  depth markers ....................... 46  symptoms  child­activity centers ..........172  planning........................................173  collection ......... 45  signs and markings......................................................................................................................................... 41  standard operating procedures .........62  receiving condition of.................... 33  taste food ................................56  shipyard................................................ 126  Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and  Wastewater ................... 174–75  bulk ................ utensils.......... 132  steak  source... potable water............................................................... potable water hoses................................................80  shellfish  National Shellfish Sanitation Program Guide for the  Control of Molluscan Shellfish ........................ 94–95..70–71 ......................................................167...................173  viral .....174  transport .................................... receiving condition of.............................87  materials..............................................................................................................................................172  medical staff instructions ................... during use.................................................................... 51  approved floatation device ...... 83  storage  poisonous toxic materials....... 28. 51  backflow prevention..................See equipment............................. food areas.................62  shellstock.............. 59–60  tags .........................62  Shigella spp.........104  insect / rodent resistant ............................................................................................................................................. 53............................................................................................ 56  reuse .......23............................................ 64  shucked ........................................................................................ 170  sushi.......................... potable water ........................................ 24............63...............169  request procedures ........................................ 120  food employee. 24................ 51  diaper...........................................................................62  source ......................................................................53. 101  Surgeon General. 105  potable water protection ........................................ 46  pumps...................................................................... food  tank construction.. food. 46  water quality......... See gastrointestinal illness surveillance  reporting  specimens.....................105  handwashing................................................................................................................ 63  swimming pool  alkalinity.......... 63  single­service and single­use materials ........... 172–73  cross­contamination ...............................................................................172  stool specimens ...................................................................................172  patient instructions ............................ 51  operating manuals ............................................................................ 97  utensils...................... 169.................172  request to passengers ........................ 171–73  storage ................................................................................................................172  parasitic...............................................................117  handwashing.............. 2....... 42  clarity ............................ 46  life saving equipment .....................................................................103  solid waste  container............................................................................................................. gastrointestinal illness outbreaks....87  storage ........................................................................................104  refuse ..............53.......................................................................................174  supplies ....................................... 46  flow­through ....................................................................97  single­use towel........................................................................................42  slacking ............... 54....................................................... 45  halogenation ......................103  sinks  drain lines for .................................... and single­service articles...................68  soap dispenser ................................................. dispenser ...................................... child activity center............................................................................. 63  special report ....................... 70  steam tables...................................................................................................................................................... 43  submission procedures........................................................................................ swimming pools and whirlpool spas .....73  sneeze guard....................................... 173–74  146  Index  sponges .................................................................................................. 46  pH................51  single­service and single­use articles............................................................................................................................................................ 46  flow rate ..................................................................104  container wash facilities................... 46  seawater .........temperature measuring devices...................... 152  survey............................................................. 33  tank sample........................................................ temperature measuring devices........................................................................................... reports....................................................................... 67–68  protection............. 61  cooking ................................................................... 56  gastrointestinal illness..................171  timing.......... linens............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 79  temperature  abuse........................................ 115–16  potable water supply lines to....................................................................................79  monitoring...................................................................................................

..................................................................97....... 119  tracking powder.......................... 72–73  storage of specimens ...........................................................................39) .............................................................54  warewashing...............................84  viewing.........................................................................51  temperature measuring device  ambient.......................................... 54  multiuse material ...................... 102–3...........................................................................81  cleaning ...................... 95–96  whirlpool spas........................................................................................65....................................................................... installation of...................................................................................................................61  reheating .. 65  suitable ........ 87  handles ......................................................87  guidelines for .............................................................................................84  integral or permanently affixed ......................................................................89  procedures..........73  holding......................................................................................... 43  tools.................................80  scale....................... 63.............. 87–88...........................................83  easily readable.. 95  utility service lines and pipes..................................... slacking. 78  multiuse . 90  test kit  chemical sanitizer..................................... thawing .................................................. 131  monitoring ........................... 77  unsanitary conditions........................................ food equipment disassembly......... 69  surface temperature..... food area..............................83  food  accessible for food temperatures ..................... 73–75  equipment capacity ..76  timing  cleaning.....108  three­compartment sink................................65...... 39........................ 81.........84  bains­marie..................................................... gastrointestinal illness surveillance......................................... 117–18  food areas..................................................................................................................... sanitizing .................................. 87  capacity .....106  reports.85  accuracy of .................. 90................ using ....... 68  unsafe food.............................................................49  thawing..................................... See temperature measuring device  tobacco................................................................................................ raw.54............................. 132  conformance ............ 69  unpackaged food......................................... 54  unopened original package... 132  procedures ..................... 95–97  storage.65  toilet facilities  child­activity centers ........................................................................ 73–76  imminent health hazards........... 131 147  ........ 132  hazard analysis ......................................................... 89–95  dispensing................... 127  vacuum toilet....................................... 71  U unadulterated .................................................................................. 2  tuna................46  whirlpool spa......................................89  storage ..................................................................................................................................................................173  transport media................................................................ 132  critical­control points.... imminent health hazard . 108  persons...............................................................63.......... 132  documentation.. 71–72  receiving.................................................................................................. 101  training  food safety ........................................ 101  time as a public health control ........................................................................................................................... See sinks  V vacuum toilet.................................................................109–10  variances .... 106  utility sink .................. 53  for pesticide application ....................................27  specimens..83  for hot or cold holding equipment .........................................................................................................176  frozen. 77  sanitizing........................................83  location ...................................................................83  accuracy ...............73  three­bucket system  alternative manual warewashing.............................................. 110  integrated pest management... 131  USDA ................................................174  warewashing..............58  tofu........................ 57.......................cooling................................ food safety ...........................................68...............................................................................................113  Index  potable water system protection........83  use ............. 65  lead limitations ...... 183  potable water ............................................................................ 91–92..........................................................................92  construction of............................................................................................ 84............................................................................................................. See toilets  variances  approval................................................................................................................ 40  swimming pool ....... 59  unnecessary  articles ........................................................183  TMD ..... 132  VSP seminars .............................................................. 54.........................................127  management......... gastrointestinal illness outbreaks . 97  good repair.............. 60  utensil  cleaning .... 87–88...................................... 132  health hazard .............83  numbers........................... 99  storage..53.............................................. 55  parasite destruction.................... 95  Threshold of Regulation for Substances Used in Food­  Contact Articles (21 CFR 160..................................................................................63...................... 132  HACCP ........................................................................................ 97. 70  for food employees in charge .... 98.. 106  housekeeping ................................................... 131  records....................................................................................................................................54.............174  warewash machine evaluation.............................................. 42  toilets  overflowing. 89–90......................................................................... 80  toys  child­activity center ........................................................................83  good repair and calibration ........................................................................ 53...84  food and water samples ................................................... food.....................................................................................

.. 90  temperatures  sanitizing ........................................ 173–74  visits and tours............................................................................ 91................. 129–30  renovation......................... 185  data plate... 88.............................................................................................................................................................96  CIP equipment ................... 96  equipment................................................................................................... 89  trays...................................................................132  standard operating procedures ................. 91  design and construction.......... 94  chemical sanitizing........................................... potentially hazardous food .......90  drainboards...............132  scientific data .................................................................................................................106  ventilation hood system  design....................................... 71  vending machines............... 95  storing equipment........................... 95  sanitizing temperatures................................................ integrated pest management .......... 95  in­place cleaning .......................94  booster heater................................................................... sanitizing...............................................................89........... 82.................... 96–97............. 88  temperature measuring device ..........................................................88  baskets...................................... 101  chlorine solution............................................... See refrigerated unit  warewashing and warewashing machines  air­dry ............87.................... 102  lighting intensity in .................... 99  cleaning equipment ......................................... 91  water supply line..........60  vomiting  food employees................................................. potable water tank................ 95  pressure gauge .........128  viral diagnosis........................ utensils ............. 63.............................. 42  precleaning .......130  owner ...............................................124  renovation inspections................107  number and capacity .... 87  wet cleaning ...................64  vegetables ....................................95–96  washing....91–92  test kit .............................. 92  racking......................93  construction ............................................................................... 88  accuracy.................................................................................................................. 80......................................91  cleaners... and deckheads in .....................................................................................................90  148  Index  drying......................... 88  hot­water sanitizing pressure .. 89  mechanical................................................................................................... bulkheads................................................. 96  rack.............93  cycle time .............................................................................................................................................................. 92. 96  hot­water sanitizing temperatures..........................................................58  walk­in refrigerated unit .................................................................................................. 95  manual warewashing  alternatives.................. 184  manual hot­water sanitizing.... 88....... 88.................................................................... 105–6  conveyor................................... 95  with an integral heating device . 95  iodine solution ...................................................... food areas.......................................................... 93  pressure......... 95  sanitizer level alert..................................................... 89  irreversible registering temperature indicator ...................................................... 106  ventilation good systems in .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 87–89  detergent foamers ....................................33  vent covers. 95  sinks .......................................................................................... 89  quaternary ammonium compound solution ........................................... 82 .....89–90..............................107  maintenance ..................... 64.......................................................... 94  warewashing areas  decks......... 96  IPS valve..................................... 97  temperature measuring device.................... 92  pH............................................................................................ 192  new ....... food equipment ..................................109  schedule .................. conveyor.......................90–92  evaluation of.......................... 94  unobstructed spray ................................................ 90  three­bucket system .............................................. 94  utensil surface temperature.................. 90.....................................................................90  baffles / curtains.........132  supporting data ........................................................................... 95  clean solutions .....132  training ....................................89  brushes........................................94  use of and equipment ............................................................... 96–97....................................... 90  stationary rack......................................................................................81  W  wait staff ....................................................................................... 95  laundering ........................... 97  EPA­approved label................54  Voluntary Exotic Animal Program (9 CFR 352)...................................................................................................................................... 92–94  cleaning frequency .............. 96  polishing............................ 105  handwashing sinks in. 97  potable water system protection...................84  operation ..................................................................................................................................................... 183  monitoring .......................................... 89  water temperature.................. 88  sanitizing.................................................... 23–24  v­type threads................. maintenance and operation......98  alternative manual warewashing  procedures.................................................................................... 94.................rescinding .................................183–87  final rinse manifold.................. 185  cooking and baking equipment ..................................................... 186  wash and rinse tanks ............................ specimens.......68  vent / overflow.....................90  detergent sprayers ............................. 107  filters and grease extracting equipment................................................................................................................. food equipment..................................................... 88  wash temperatures ............. 95  sanitizing rinse ............132  vegetable washes .. 93  rinsing procedures ............................. 94  sanitizing booster heater ...........................107  vessel  itinerary.........................................................................56  gastrointestinal illness surveillance ......................................................................................................... 97  pumped or recirculated sanitizing rinse......................................................... 166.................................................. 54  multitank......................................... 89  protection of clean items ............ 98  machine data plates ........................................

.............................................................................47–48  halogen analyzer chart recorders ............................... See container 149  ................................................. leaking in food storage.................wash soultion............................................ 48  halogenation .................................... 50  private cabin...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................32  water sprays.................... 51  temperature............................ 52  signs and markings...... location........................ HVAC.......................................51  backflow prevention..................................93  receptacle...................................................................................................... 47  restrictions.................................................................68  water production............................................................. 91–92  washing fruits and vegetables............................................................................ potable system .................................................................... use of . 51  test kit ....... See cloths  wood....103  water chemistry............... 50  public .................................................................................48  data logger.................................................................................................................. 48  wicker .................... 48  filters................................................................................. swimming pools and whirlpool spas 46......42  bromine ...................... 79  wiping cloths .. 51  maintenance ..................... 49  halogen shock................. 48  water lines....................................................................................................................... 79  working container ............. 48  immunocompromised .................................See cleaning fruits and  vegetables  waste  disposal unit...........115  water temperature measuring device See warewashing and  see temperature measuring device  water.........................49  Index  diapers.............................................. See potable water  whirlpool spas  anti­entrapment drain ......................................................................... 49  water quality........48  chlorine........... 52  fecal accident ...........................................................................

.

2  Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance System  13.6  Food Cooking Alternatives  13.7  Warewashing Evaluation  13.5  Disinfection Calculations for Water and Equipment  13.4  Gastrointestinal Illness Outbreak Investigation  13.13.3  Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance System  Reporting  13.8  Inspection Report  13.11  Fecal Accident Plan Annexes  151  .10  Summary of Sanitation Inspections of International  Cruise Ships  13.0  Annexes  13.1  Authority  13.9  Corrective­Action Statement  13.

  (c) Application of regulations to persons entering from  foreign countries  Except as provided in subsection (d) of this section. For purposes of  carrying out and enforcing such regulations.1  Public Health Service Act  CHAPTER 6A­­PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE  SUBCHAPTER II­­GENERAL POWERS AND DUTIES  Part G­­Quarantine and Inspection  Sec. the Surgeon  General may provide for such inspection.  transmission. or spread of communicable diseases from foreign  countries into the States or possessions. 264.  disinfection. or conditional release of  individuals  Regulations prescribed under this section shall not provide for  the apprehension. fumigation. detention.  (b) Apprehension. as in his judgment may be necessary. Regulations to control communicable diseases  (a) Promulgation and enforcement by Surgeon General  The Surgeon General. is  authorized to make and enforce such regulations as in his  judgment are necessary to prevent the introduction. or from one State or  possession into any other State or possession.1. with the approval of the Secretary.  regulations prescribed under this section.1  Authority  13.  transmission. pest extermination.13. or conditional release of individuals  except for the purpose of preventing the introduction. or spread of such communicable diseases as may  be specified from time to time in Executive orders of the  President upon the recommendation of the National Advisory  Health Council and the Surgeon General. and other  measures. destruction of  animals or articles found to be so infected or contaminated as to  be sources of dangerous infection to human beings. detention. sanitation. insofar as they provide 152  Annexes  .

 examination. 94­317. 301(b)(1). Pub. Pub. or conditional  release of individuals. 1960.R. detention. only the District of  Columbia.  67 Stat. L. shall be applicable only to individuals  coming into a State or possession from a foreign country or a  possession. 373. 8. 1944. Plan No. title III. title III. 18 F. Sec. 1. 1953. 86­624. 29(c). Such regulations may provide that if upon examination  any such individual is found to be infected. For purposes of this subsection. 5.) Annexes  153  . Sec. L.  419; June 23. Apr. will be moving from a State to another  State. 1976. 361. 74 Stat. 58 Stat. Secs. 707.  regulations prescribed under this section may provide for the  apprehension and examination of any individual reasonably  believed to be infected with a communicable disease in a  communicable stage and (1) to be moving or about to move from  a State to another State; or (2) to be a probable source of  infection to individuals who. in addition to the several States.  (d) Apprehension and examination of persons reasonably  believed to be infected  On recommendation of the National Advisory Health Council. 631; July 12. 90  Stat. eff. while infected with such disease in a  communicable stage.for the apprehension. 2053.  (July 1. 703; 1953  Reorg. he may be detained  for such time and in such manner as may be reasonably  necessary. Sec. ch. the term ``State''  includes. 11.

 and crews. 154  Annexes  . their cargoes. Duplicate copies of such bills of  health shall be delivered at the time of inspection to quarantine  officers at such port. shall  specify the ports at which a medical officer shall be stationed for  this purpose. such consular or medical officer shall be satisfied that  the matters and things therein stated are true.Sec. applicable to vessels referred to in subsection (a) of  this section for the purpose of preventing the introduction into  the States or possessions of the United States of any  communicable disease by securing the best sanitary condition of  such vessels. passengers. Before granting such duplicate bill  of health. 269.  (b) Collectors of customs to receive originals; duplicate  copies as part of ship's papers  Original bills of health shall be delivered to the collectors of  customs at the port of entry. Bills of Health  (a) Detail of medical officer; conditions precedent to  issuance; consular officer to receive fees  Except as otherwise prescribed in regulations. shall be accepted as evidence of the  statements therein contained in any court of the United States. and when duly  certified to by the proper  consular or other officer of the United States.  (c) Regulations to secure sanitary conditions of vessels  The Surgeon General shall from time to time prescribe  regulations. Such bill of health shall set forth the sanitary  history and condition of said vessel. or other medical officer of the United  States designated by the Surgeon General. The consular  officer shall be entitled to demand and receive the fees for bills  of health and such fees shall be established by regulation. from time to time. over his official  signature and seal. at the port or place  of departure. The President. The bills of health herein prescribed shall  be considered as part of the ship's papers. any vessel at  any foreign port or place clearing or departing for any port or  place in a State or possession shall be required to obtain from  the consular officer of the United States or from the Public  Health Service officer. and shall state that it has in  all respects complied with the regulations prescribed pursuant to  subsection (c) of this section. Such  regulations shall be observed by such vessels prior to departure. in the form prescribed  by the Surgeon General. a bill of health in duplicate.

during the course of the voyage, and also during inspection, 
disinfection, or other quarantine procedure upon arrival at any 
United States quarantine station. 
(d) Vessels from ports near frontier 
The provisions of subsections (a) and (b) of this section shall 
not apply to vessels plying between such foreign ports on or 
near the frontiers of the United States and ports of the United 
States as are designated by treaty. 
(e) Compliance with regulations 
It shall be unlawful for any vessel to enter any port in any 
State or possession of the United States to discharge its cargo, 
or land its passengers, except upon a certificate of the 
quarantine officer that regulations prescribed under subsection 
(c) of this section have in all respects been complied with by 
such officer, the vessel, and its master. The master of every 
such vessel shall deliver such certificate to the collector of 
customs at the port of entry, together with the original bill of 
health and other papers of the vessel. The certificate required by 
this subsection shall be procurable from the quarantine officer, 
upon arrival of the vessel at the quarantine station and 
satisfactory inspection thereof, at any time within which 
quarantine services are performed at such station. 
(July 1, 1944, ch. 373, title III, Sec. 366, 58 Stat. 705.)

Annexes 

155 

Sec. 271. Penalties for violation of quarantine laws 
(a) Penalties for persons violating quarantine laws 
Any person who violates any regulation prescribed 
under sections 264 to 266 of this title, or any provision of 
section 269 of this title or any regulation prescribed 
thereunder, or who enters or departs from the limits of any 
quarantine station, ground, or anchorage in disregard of 
quarantine rules and regulations or without permission of 
the quarantine officer in charge, shall be punished by a 
fine of not more than $1,000 or by imprisonment for not 
more than one year, or both. 
(b) Penalties for vessels violating quarantine laws 
Any vessel which violates section 269 of this title, or any 
regulations thereunder or under section 267 of this title, or 
which enters within or departs from the limits of any 
quarantine station, ground, or anchorage in disregard of 
the quarantine rules and regulations or without permission 
of the officer in charge, shall forfeit to the United States 
not more than $5,000, the amount to be determined by the 
court, which shall be a lien on such vessel, to be 
recovered by proceedings in the proper district court of the 
United States. In all such proceedings the United States 
attorney shall appear on behalf of the United States; and 
all such proceedings shall be conducted in accordance 
with the rules and laws governing cases of seizure of 
vessels for violation of the revenue laws of the United 
States. 
(c) Remittance or mitigation of forfeitures 
With the approval of the Secretary, the Surgeon 
General may, upon application therefore, remit or mitigate 
any forfeiture provided for under subsection (b) of this 
section, and he shall have authority to ascertain the facts 
upon all such applications. 
(July 1, 1944, ch. 373, title III, Sec. 368, 58 Stat. 706; June 
25, 1948, ch. 646, Sec. 1, 62 Stat. 909; 1953 Reorg. Plan 
No. 1, Secs. 5, 8, eff. Apr. 11, 1953, 18 F.R. 2053, 67 Stat. 
631.)
156 

Annexes 

13.1.2 

Title 42 Code of Federal Regulations 
TITLE 42­­PUBLIC HEALTH 
CHAPTER I­­PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, 
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 
PART 71­­FOREIGN QUARANTINE 
Subpart C­­Notice of Communicable Disease Prior to 
Arrival 
71.21 Radio report of death or illness. 
(a) The master of a ship destined for a U.S. port shall 
report immediately to the quarantine station at or nearest 
the port at which the ship will arrive, the occurrence, on 
board, of any death or any ill person among passengers or 
crew (including those who have disembarked or have 
been removed) during the 15­day period preceding the 
date of expected arrival or during the period since 
departure from a U.S. port (whichever period of time is 
shorter). 
(b) The commander of an aircraft destined for a U.S. 
airport shall report immediately to the quarantine station at 
or nearest the airport at which the aircraft will arrive, the 
occurrence, on board, of any death or ill person among 
passengers or crew. 
(c) In addition to paragraph (a) of this section, the master 
of a ship carrying 13 or more passengers must report by 
radio 24 hours before arrival the number of cases 
(including zero) of diarrhea in passengers and crew 
recorded in the ship's medical log during the current 
cruise.  All cases of diarrhea that occur after the 24 hour 
report must also be reported not less than 4 hours before 
arrival. 
(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under 
control number 0920­0134)

Annexes 

157 

Subpart D­­Health Measures at U.S. Ports: 
Communicable Diseases 
Sec. 71.31 General provisions. 
(a) Upon arrival at a U.S. port, a carrier will not undergo 
inspection unless the Director determines that a failure to 
inspect will present a threat of introduction of 
communicable diseases into the United States, as may 
exist when the carrier has on board individual(s) 
reportable in accordance with Sec. 71.21 or meets the 
circumstances described in Sec. 71.42. Carriers not 
subject to inspection under this section will be subject to 
sanitary inspection under Sec. 71.41 of this part. 
(b) The Director may require detention of a carrier until the 
completion of the measures outlined in this part that are 
necessary to prevent the introduction or spread of a 
communicable disease. The Director may issue a 
controlled free pratique to the carrier stipulating what 
measures are to be met, but such issuance does not 
prevent the periodic boarding of a carrier and the 
inspection of persons and records to verify that the 
conditions have been met for granting the pratique. 
Sec. 71.32 Persons, carriers, and things. 
(a) Whenever the Director has reason to believe that any 
arriving person is infected with or has been exposed to 
any of the communicable diseases listed in paragraph (b) 
of this section, he/she may detain, isolate, or place the 
person under surveillance and may order disinfection or 
disinfestation as he/she considers necessary to prevent 
the introduction, transmission, or spread of the listed 
communicable diseases. 
(b) The communicable diseases authorizing the 
application of sanitary, detention, and/or isolation 
measures under paragraph (a) of this section are: cholera 
or suspected cholera, diphtheria, infectious tuberculosis, 
plague, suspected smallpox, yellow fever, or suspected 
viral hemorrhagic fevers (Lassa, Marburg, Ebola, 
Congo­Crimean, and others not yet isolated or named). 
(c) Whenever the Director has reason to believe that any 
arriving carrier or article or thing on board the carrier is or
158 

Annexes 

 or spread of communicable diseases.  (c) Every person who is placed under surveillance by  authority of this subpart shall. inform. the health officer serving the  health jurisdiction from which he/she is departing.  (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under  control number 0920­0134)  [50 FR 1519.  Sec. Jan. 71. 71.  transmission. and report for medical examinations as may  be required;  (2) Upon arrival at any address other than that stated as  the intended destination when placed under surveillance. in person or by telephone. 29. during the period of  surveillance:  (1) Give information relative to his/her health and his/her  intended destination and report. in  person or by telephone. in accordance with  section 322 of the Public Health Service Act.  (a) Carriers belonging to or operated by the military Annexes  159  . fumigation. military services. 11. disinfestation.may be infected or contaminated with a communicable  disease. disinsection.  (d) From time to time the Director may.33 Persons: Isolation and surveillance. enter into  agreements with public or private medical or hospital  facilities for providing care and treatment for persons  detained under this part.  disinfection. 1985; 50 FR 3910. Jan. or other related  measures respecting the carrier or article or thing as he/  she considers necessary to prevent the introduction.  (a) Persons held in isolation under this subpart may be  held in facilities suitable for isolation and treatment.  (b) The Director may require isolation where surveillance  is authorized in this subpart whenever the Director  considers the risk of transmission of infection to be  exceptionally serious.34 Carriers of U.S. he/she may require detention. 1985]  Sec.  or prior to departure from the United States.  to the local health officer having jurisdiction over the areas  to be visited.

 71. and  Coast Guard Commandant Instruction 6210.2.  161­4.2).35 Report of death or illness on carrier during  stay in port.S.  (For applicable regulations of the military services. Secretary of the Navy Instruction 6210.  Sec.  The master of any carrier at a U. Air Force Regulation No. 40­12.  (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under  control number 0920­0134) 160  Annexes  . port shall report  immediately to the quarantine station at or nearest the port  the occurrence. animals or articles on board shall be  required to comply with the applicable requirements of  subpart F of this part. see  Army Regulation No. of any death or any ill person  among passengers or crew.services of the United States may be exempted from  inspection if the Director is satisfied that they have  complied with regulations of the military services which  also meet the requirements of the regulations in this part. on board.  (b) Notwithstanding exemption from inspection of carriers  under this section.

Subpart E­­Requirements Upon Arrival at U.S. Ports: 
Sanitary Inspection 
Sec. 71.41 General provisions. 
Carriers arriving at a U.S. port from a foreign area shall be 
subject to a sanitary inspection to determine whether there 
exists rodent, insect, or other vermin infestation, 
contaminated food or water, or other insanitary conditions 
requiring measures for the prevention of the introduction, 
transmission, or spread of communicable disease. 
Sec. 71.45 Food, potable water, and waste: U.S. 
seaports and airports. 
(a) Every seaport and airport shall be provided with a 
supply of potable water from a watering point approved by 
the Commissioner of Food and Drugs, Food and Drug 
Administration, in accordance with standards established 
in title 21, Code of Federal Regulations, parts 1240 and 
1250. 
(b) All food and potable water taken on board a ship or 
aircraft at any seaport or airport intended for human 
consumption thereon shall be obtained from sources 
approved in accordance with regulations cited in 
paragraph (a) of this section. 
(c) Aircraft inbound or outbound on an international 
voyage shall not discharge over the United States any 
excrement, or waste water or other polluting materials. 
Arriving aircraft shall discharge such matter only at 
servicing areas approved under regulations cited in 
paragraph (a) of this section. 
Sec. 71.48 Carriers in intercoastal and interstate 
traffic. 
Carriers, on an international voyage, which are in traffic 
between U.S. ports, shall be subject to inspection as 
described in Secs. 71.31 and 71.41 when there occurs on 
board, among passengers or crew, any death, or any ill 
person, or when illness is suspected to be caused by 
insanitary conditions.

Annexes 

161 

13.2  Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance System 
13.2.1 
purpose 

The following forms are provided as guides to standardize the 
collection of information required to assess the patterns of 
gastrointestinal illnesses and monitor for outbreaks aboard 
vessels.  These forms are downloadable at the Vessel Sanitation 
Program Web site: http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/vsp. 
13.2.2 

162 

Introduction 

Forms

Annexes 

__/__/__ 

Annexes 

Myalgia 

Req. 

Rec. 

Y/N 

Y/N 

Y/N 

Stool 
specimens 
Headache 

Fever 

of 

Total number of ill crew: 

Y/N 

Vomiting 

°F 

Diarrhea 

Page: 

Reportable case (Y/N) 

To: 

Y/N  Abd. cramps 

Time 

__/__/__ 

Y/N 

Date 

From: 

Total number of crew aboard: 

Blood 
Y/N 

Illness 
Onset 

Y/N 

Pax Meal Seat / Crew Pos. 

(Last, First) 

Cabin No. 

(mm/dd/yy) 

Pax/Crew 

Name 

Total number of ill passengers: 

M/F 

Date 

Age 

Total number of passengers aboard: 

Dates 

Antidiarrheal 
Medications (Y/N) 

Voyage number: 

Y/N 

Vessel Name: 

Underlying 
illness 
(Specify)

163 

Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance 
System Questionnaire 
(To be completed if you experienced gastrointestinal illness) 

Vessel Name: 
Voyage No. : 
Last Name: 
First Name: 
(mm/dd/yyyy) 
(in years) 
Date of Birth: 
Age: 
Cabin Number: 
Total Number of People in Cabin: 
Dining Seating: 
Dining Table Number: 
(mm/dd/yyyy) 
(hh:mm) 
Symptoms Started Date: 
Time: 
Do you know other people ill with the same symptoms? 
If yes, please list their names: 

Did you stay overnight or longer in a boarding city before you joined the vessel? 
If yes, where?  City: 
State: 
Country: 
Was the overnight stay in a hotel/motel/commercial residence? 

Date: 
Sex   M / F 

AM / PM 
Yes / No 

Yes / No 
Yes / No 

If yes, what was the name and address of the hotel, motel/commercial residence 
Name: 
Address: 
City: 
State: 
Country: 
How did you travel to the city where you boarded the ship for this cruise?      Select all that apply. 
[    ]  Airplane 
Airlines: 
Flight No.: 
[    ]  Automobile 
[    ]  Bus/Motorcoach 
[    ]  Train 
[    ]  Other 
Please specify: 
Are you a member of a tour group? 
Yes / No 
Prior to boarding the ship, did you participate in a pre­embarkation tour/package? 
Yes / No 
If yes, which tour(s)/package(s) did you participate in? (list all) 

Prior you your illness, did you go ashore at any of the ports of call? 
If yes, please list the ports of call where you went ashore 

Yes / No 

Did participate in any shore excursions at any port of call? 
If yes, which shore excursions did you participate in? (list all) 

Yes / No 

Did you eat anything while you were ashore at any port of call? 
Yes / No 
Did you drink anything (including drinks with ice) while ashore at any port of call? 
Yes / No 
What did you think is the cause of your illness?: 
PLEASE TURN THIS FORM OVER TO PROVIDE FOOD AND SHIPBOARD ACTIVITIES HISTORY
164 

Annexes 

Last Name  ______________________________________  First Name ______________________  Meals and Activities Aboard Vessel Prior to Illness  Please list the specific vessel locations of the meals you consumed and the vessel activities you participated in before you became ill  Day of illness onset  Day before illness onset  Two days before illness onset  Three days before illness onset  Give Date:__________  Breakfast  Place: _______________  Time: _________  Items eaten/drank  Breakfast  Place: _______________  Time: _________  Items eaten/drank  Breakfast  Place: _______________  Time: _________  Items eaten/drank  Breakfast  Place: _______________  Time: _________  Items eaten/drank  Lunch  Place: _______________  Time: _________  Items eaten/drank  Lunch  Place: _______________  Time: _________  Items eaten/drank  Lunch  Place: _______________  Time: _________  Items eaten/drank  Lunch  Place: _______________  Time: _________  Items eaten/drank  Dinner  Place: _______________  Time: _________  Items eaten/drank  Dinner  Place: _______________  Time: _________  Items eaten/drank  Dinner  Place: _______________  Time: _________  Items eaten/drank  Dinner  Place: _______________  Time: _________  Items eaten/drank  Snack  Place: _______________  Time: _________  Items eaten/drank  Snack  Place: _______________  Time: _________  Items eaten/drank  Snack  Snack  Place: _______________  Place: _______________  Time: _________  Time: _________  Items eaten/drank  Items eaten/drank  Activities  AM  Activities  PM  AM  Activities  PM  AM  Annexes  Activities  PM  AM  PM 165  .

3.S. VI  Philipsburg.3.  Following are some sample itineraries of vessels that may call  upon a U.2 Procedures  13.I.  sample  itineraries  Itinerary A  Itinerary B  Port Everglades. are marked with an Ü. Thomas.3  Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance System Reporting  13. Maarten  at Sea  Nassau.]  166  Annexes  .S. Thomas. AK  Vancouver. U. U.13.S. AK Ü Ketchikan. Bahamas  Port Everglades. FL Ü Ü [Note: The report in this itinerary  includes passengers and crew  members during the 15 days prior  to arrival in St. St. FL  at Sea  St. U.  The ports where the routine gastrointestinal  illness surveillance report is required at least 24 hours before  arrival. Barthélemy. U.S. AK  at Sea  Seward. AK  Sitka. BC  Itinerary C  Itinerary D  Barcelona. Bahamas  Miami. FL  Miami. VI at Sea  Port Everglades.S. French W.  San Juan. Thomas. FL Ü Vancouver.3. FL  at Sea  at Sea  St. Thomas. VI.1  Operations  Manual  Introduction  The details of the Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance data  collection and notification system are contained in the VSP  Operations Manual in Chapter 4. port. PR Ü St. but not more than 36 hours. BC  at Sea  Juneau.1 Introduction  13. Spain  at Sea  at Sea  at Sea  St. VI  at Sea  Freeport.

S. port. electronic mail or website.gov/vsp  A telephone notification to the Vessel Sanitation Program at the  telephone numbers listed above shall accompany a special 2%  report required when the vessel is within 15 days of expected  arrival at a U.3.2 Submission Procedures  telephone  The reports may be submitted as follows:  fax  Telephone:  800­323­2132 or 954­356­6650  e­mail  Fax:  954­356­6671  website  Electronic Mail:  vsp­report@cdc.gov  Website (User ID and Password required):  telephone  call  required  http://wwwn. Annexes  167  .cdc. even when the special 2% report is  submitted via fax.13.

  Since implementation of the cooperative  program between the cruise industry and the VSP.2  Objectives  13. a 2% proportion of illness will not lead to an  investigation aboard the vessel.4.4.3  Outbreak Investigation Procedures  13. meals  and water.  investigation  Outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness aboard cruise ships are relatively  infrequent occurrences.  vigilance  Ongoing vigilance and rapid outbreak detection and response is still  warranted.  special  circumstances  Under special circumstances.  Since implementation of the cooperative  program between the cruise industry and the VSP. when an unusual gastrointestinal illness  pattern or disease characteristic is found. disease can often spread quickly to passengers and crew  members on the vessel and overwhelm the vessel’s medical system.6  Food and Water Samples  13.13.  This will provides an early  opportunity for consultation to potentially avert more illness among  passengers and crew members.5  Gastrointestinal Illness Specimens  13.4.4.  Since so many people share the same environment.1  Introduction  introduction  Outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness aboard cruise ships are relatively  infrequent occurrences.4.4  Gastrointestinal Illness Outbreak Investigation  13. but will provide the opportunity to  discuss and monitor illness patterns. Port.  These special  circumstances may include a high incidence of illness in successive 168  Annexes  . and collaboratively develop  intervention strategies. the  vessel shall submit a special report to VSP.1  Introduction  13. Members of the VSP staff are available at  anytime to discuss disease transmission and intervention questions. if the proper  interventions are not instituted.S. the outbreak rate on  vessels each year has steadily declined. an investigation may be  conducted when the proportion of cases is less than 3%.4. and the vessel is within 15 days of arrival at a U.  The infection can also continue unabated between cruises. the outbreak rate on  vessels each year has steadily declined.4    Report  13.  When the cumulative proportion of reportable cases of  gastrointestinal illness reaches 2% among passengers or 2% among  crew.  consultation  An outbreak of gastrointestinal illness occurs aboard a vessel when the  number of cases are in excess of expected levels for a given time  period.4.  monitoring  In most instances.

 environmental.4.  Recommendations based on the success of the  investigation can then be implemented to prevent a recurrence on the  following cruise.  periodic review  This preliminary preparation will assist the vessel with the necessary  rapid implementation of investigation and response measures before the  arrival of the VSP team.cruises.4.  The outbreak contingency plan should be  periodically reviewed to ensure it will still meet the vessel’s needs in  dealing with an outbreak.  rapid response  Conducting an outbreak investigation aboard a vessel demands a rapid.3  Outbreak Investigation Procedures  contingency  plan  The early stages of an investigation are usually coordinated aboard the  vessel by the vessel’s medical staff in cooperation with engineering staff  and hotel staff. and comprehensive response.  organized. therefore.  13.  An  organized plan drafted between the organizations and individuals  involved.  13.  Because of the turnover of  passengers.  The proper materials  and techniques for collection and preservation are a part of the planning. the  passengers and crew members aboard the vessel.  collaboration  The investigation is a collaborative effort between the cruise line.  It is important to have a coordinated contingency plan in  place on board the vessel before the need for plan implementation.2  Objectives  objectives  The objectives of an investigation are to:  (1) Determine the extent of the gastrointestinal illness among  passengers and crew;  (2) Identify the agent causing the illness;  (3) Identify risk factors associated with the illness;  and  (4) Formulate control measures to prevent the spread of the illness.  All  staff with a potential for involvement investigation should be familiar with  the contingency plan. and sometimes the crew members. a  comprehensive effort that includes epidemiologic. or a large  number of persons reporting the illness over a brief period of time. and  laboratory studies. Annexes  169  . the investigation must  be rapid to be able to collect data needed to identify the cause. unusual severity of illnesses or complications. and CDC. is crucial in conducting a successful investigation.  specimens  and samples  Timely collection of medical specimens and food and water samples are  important in the disease investigative process.

 the VSP may request the following items:  (1) the gastrointestinal illness surveillance log  for the duration of the current cruise;  (2) self­administered 72 hour food and activity questionnaires completed  by cases;  (3) daily newsletters distributed to passengers;  (4) a complete list of food items and menus served to both crew and  passengers for the 72 hour period before the peak onset of illness date  of most cases; and  (5) a complete list of ship and shore activities of passengers for the  cruise.4  Report  preliminary  report  170  Following an outbreak investigation.5 and 13. VSP may request distribution of a survey to all passengers  and crew members.4.  Vessels.  interviews  Interviews with cases may also be useful for identifying the etiology and  associated risk factors of an outbreak. environmental  inspection reports of the investigation.  useful  information  In order to assist in the rapid evaluation of the extent of illness among  passengers and crew.  will be presented to the master of the vessel. may be requested from the cruise line or the vessel and Annexes  . a preliminary report of findings  based on available clinical and epidemiologic information. and interim recommendations. with no medical staff  aboard may choose to stock items 1­9 only unless there is a qualified  staff member aboard.  Based on preliminary  findings.  survey  Additionally. including additional passenger and crew  information.4. to identify the causative pathogen and associated  risk factors.  VSP will provide this survey to the vessel. additional materials.6 of this annex. capable of performing venipuncture for collection  of serum specimens.  the medical staff should advise the cases that interviews may be  requested when VSP arrives at the vessel.  When distributing the surveys.  Completed surveys should be held in the infirmary until collection by  VSP staff for epidemiologic analysis.4.It is important to periodically review these to make sure they are on  hand and ready to use in the event they are needed.  ready to use  A list of recommended medical specimen and food sample collection  supplies for investigating gastrointestinal outbreaks may be found in  sections 13.  13.

  final report  The report presented to the master of the vessel will remain preliminary  until more extensive epidemiologic and laboratory studies have been  completed. syringes.follow­up studies may be undertaken. and a final report containing summary recommendations has  been distributed.  13. Cary­Blair);  (6) Sterile swabs;  (7) Rectal swabs;  (8) Stool preservative medium for parasites;  (9) A large commercial roll of plastic wrap;  (10) Sterile phlebotomy supplies for obtaining serum specimens  (needles. swabs);  (11) Sterile pipettes;  (12) 20 serum separator tubes (containing no anticoagulant [red tops]);  (13) 20 nunc tubes for serum separation;  (14) Shipping containers (for diagnostic specimens) and;  (15)  Shipping container labels and markings (as required by current  shipping regulations for diagnostic specimens).g. Annexes  171  ..5  Gastrointestinal Illness Specimens  Gastrointestinal Illness Specimen Supplies  specimen  supplies  (1) 20­50 wide­mouth plastic jars or specimen cups with screw caps for  stool specimens;  (2) 20 plastic bags for storing specimen cups;  (3) Disposable medical gloves;  (4) Plastic disposable spoons for collecting stool  (5) 20 sterile bottles or tubes containing bacterial preservative and  transport medium (e.4. to address specific suspicions or  concerns.

 2  specimen cups.  Place sheets of plastic wrap over the toilet bowl. and plastic wrap. 172  Annexes  .  leaving a slight dip in the center. slimy or whitish areas of  the stool into the container first. a disposable spoon.  Timely notification of the vessel as to what  samples and information will be required is essential.  Pass some  stool onto the plastic wrap. place bloody.  (6)  Wash hands.  Individuals asked to  provide specimens should each be provided with disposable gloves.  The following is  suggested language for a letter to passengers for request of stool  specimens as well as instructions to passengers and crew for collection  of stool:  Request to Passengers for Stool Specimens  specimen  request  The [U.  (3)  Lift the toilet seat. or subsequent to infirmary visits by  direct contact with or letter from medical staff.  (2)  Wash and dry hands.  Fill the cup at least 2/3 full.  (5) Tighten the cap. if possible.S.  Do not let urine (if possible) or water touch  the stool specimen.  (4)  Using the spoon given to you.  request  procedures  It is recommended that specimens be requested from patients during  clinical evaluation in the infirmary.  Patient Instructions  patient  instructions  (1)  Urinate into the toilet (if you feel the need). bacteria or parasites may be  recommended depending upon the likely etiology of disease.Specimen Collection  specimen  collection  It may be advisable to collect clinical specimens of stool.  Put your next bowel movement into the cup and return the cup  to the hospital as soon possible so it can be refrigerated.  Please give one  cup to a friend who has recently become ill and use the other cup for  yourself.  Collection of  specimens for analysis for viruses. vomitus or  serum from passengers and crew members with reportable cases of  gastrointestinal illness.  Place the toilet seat down. Public Health Service /Name of Cruise Line/ Medical  Department] is requesting stool specimens from some people who  became ill with gastrointestinal illness on the cruise.

  Transport of specimens will be arranged in collaboration with VSP.  collection.  Rectal swabs are of little or no value in viral  detection.  If  information gathered subsequently indicates that a viral etiology is  unlikely.)  Stool for Viral Diagnosis  first 48 hours  (1)  Collect stool specimens in the first 48 hours. high­volume diarrhea are particularly  useful.  bacterial and parasite analysis are listed below. if possible.  Medical Staff Instructions  specimen  labeling  Please ensure that each specimen is properly labeled with:  (1)  Date of collection;  (2)  Passenger or crew member name and date of birth (or a unique  identifying number with a separate log linked to name and date of birth);  and  (3)  Notation on use of antidiarrheal or antibiotic medication. Annexes  173  .  bulk specimens  (2)  Collect 10 diarrhea bulk specimens.  storage  temperature  (3)  Store specimens at 4°C (40°F).  The diagnostic  yield is low when specimens from <10 persons are submitted. frequent.  Freezing may destroy the  characteristic viral morphology that permits a diagnosis by electron  microscopy.  Bulk specimens.  Guidelines for Collecting Fecal Specimens for Viral Diagnosis  (Modified from MMWR. the date.  Specimen collection  should not await the results of epidemiologic and other investigations  because delay will almost certainly preclude a viral diagnosis. and  transport  Complete guidelines for collection and storage of specimens for viral.  Specimens from at least 10 ill persons should be collected to  maximize the chance that a diagnosis can be made. although it may not be  necessary to implement all procedures during each investigation. [RR­5];19. and your cabin  number. 1990; 39. the  lower the diagnostic yield.  The smaller the specimen and the more formed the stool.  enough to fill a large stool cup. the specimens can be discarded.(7)  Label the specimen jar with your name. are preferred. Serial specimens from  persons with acute.  prevent cross­  contamination  (4)  Special care must be taken to prevent cross­contamination of  specimens during collection and transport because new amplification  techniques are exquisitely sensitive.  storage.

  quantity  (3) Serum specimens from adults should be 10 mL and serum  specimens from children should be 3 mL. label.  food. then refrigerate.  red top tubes  (4)  Storage tubes containing no anticoagulant (tubes with red tops)  should be used for collection. it should normally be chilled for 1 to 2 hours by  refrigeration before use. gently rotated.  These should be collected and sent  using same methodology as for stool specimens. food.  Do  not freeze.  The convalescent­period serum specimen should be  collected during the third to sixth week after illness.  storage  (6)  Place the serum into an empty nunc tube.  rectal swabs  (2)  At least 2 rectal swabs or swabs of fresh stools should normally be  collected for bacterial analysis and placed in refrigerated Cary­Blair  transport media. the  blood specimens can sit in a refrigerator until a clot has formed; remove  the serum using pipettes. as above.  Guidelines for Collecting Fecal Specimens for Bacteriologic  Diagnosis  media  temperature  (1)  Before use. the transport media should be stored in a refrigerator or  at room temperature.Paired Serum Specimens for Viral Diagnosis  timing  (1)  Acute­period serum specimens should be collected during the first 5  days of symptoms. and removed for insertion individually into the  same tube of transport media. 174  Annexes  . or environmental samples.  Other Specimens for Viral Diagnosis  water.  number  (2)  Collect 10 pairs from ill persons (the same persons submitting stool  specimens) and 10 pairs from well persons. centrifuge the specimen for 10 minutes  and remove the serum using a pipette.  If the transport media is stored at room  temperature.  processing  (5)  If a centrifuge is available.  methodology  (3)  It is recommended that the swabs be inserted initially into the  transport media to moisten.  If no centrifuge is available.  and  environmental  samples  Viruses causing gastroenteritis cannot routinely be detected in water.  Viruses have been successfully  detected in vomitus specimens. then inserted about 1 to 1­1/2 inches into  the rectum.

htm.6  Food and Water Samples  Food and Water Sample Collection Kit  food sample kit  A recommended food and water sampling kit would include:  sample  containers  (1)  Sterile sampling containers (15 or more sealable plastic bags and  wide­mouth screw top jars; 15 water sample bottles with sodium  thiosulfate solution to provide concentration of 100 mg per mL of sample  volume; foil or heavy wrapping paper);  collection tools  (2)  Sterile specimen collection devices (spoons.visible fecal  material  (4)  If possible. tongs. water­proof marking pen for sample identification; roll of  adhesive or masking tape; labels; waterproof cardboard tags with ties;  insulated ice chests; frozen refrigerant packs).  scissors. knife. scoop. there should be visible fecal material on the swabs. Annexes  175  . 95% ethyl alcohol and  propane torch); and  support  equipment  (4)  Support equipment (plastic gloves. plastic container liners for iced  samples.  The specimens shall  never be frozen during storage or transport. viruses and parasites is available at  http://www.  Guidelines for Collecting Fecal Specimens for Parasite Diagnosis  parasite  specimens  In the event a disease of parasitic etiology is suspected.  place both in  same tube  (5)  Both swabs should be inserted into the same tube of media and the  swabs pushed completely to the bottom of the tube.  break off stick  (6)  The top portion of the stick touching the fingers should be broken off  and discarded.  A summary table with instructions for collecting clinical specimens  during outbreaks to test for bacteria.  refrigerate  specimens  (7)  Refrigeration during transport may be accomplished by shipping in  an insulated box with frozen refrigerant packs.4. arrangements  for shipment of appropriate specimen containers containing 10%  formalin and PVA (polyvinyl­alcohol) will be made.  13.gov/foodborneoutbreaks/guide_sc. swabs and pipettes);  disinfection  agents  (3)  Disinfection agents (sanitizing solution.cdc.

 time.  sample  temperatures  Food and water samples should be held below 5°C (41°F).  sample amount  Approximately 200 grams or 200 mL of sample will usually suffice for the  laboratory analytical requirements. and location of collection.  Carefully squeeze most of the air  out of bag before sealing food samples.Food and Water Sampling Procedures  sample plan  Environmental sampling should be directed towards suspect food and  sources identified by the preliminary epidemiologic investigation.  aseptic  techniques  Food and water samples should be collected using aseptic techniques.  Washed and gloved hands and sterile sampling utensils and containers  protect the integrity of the sample during collection. codes. storage conditions and temperatures for  each sample should be recorded on the sample log. but not  frozen.  sample  identification  Sample numbers should be assigned on each collection container and  recorded on a sample log that will accompany samples to the laboratory.  product information.  Sufficient frozen refrigerant packs should be used to maintain  cold sample temperatures during transport to the laboratory.  Information that identifies the date.  Include contact  information for the person in charge of collecting the samples on the  vessel.  Water taps used  for collection of water should be sterilized with heat or chemicals and  then sample should be collected after a minute of flow time. 176  Annexes  .

 swimming  pools.3  Equipment Disinfection  13.5.5.5.  For example.  Requirements varying from those shown in the  table. for example metric tons of water. may be  extrapolated.  13. potable water tanks or fresh water tanks shall be  superchlorinated to at least  50 mg/L (ppm) available chlorine  when samples taken from these tanks indicate potential  contamination with fecal coliform bacteria.2  Water Chlorination  Tables 1 and 2 are for calculating the amount of chlorine to be  used in the disinfection of potable water systems. available chlorine  compounds.5.13. and  whirlpool spas on a vessel may need to be disinfected when  there is a possibility of contamination and as a routine part of  maintenance. and whirlpool spas.2  Water Chlorination  13. swimming pools.1  Introduction  Potable water systems and equipment.  The following example illustrates how to use the  tables: Annexes  177  . and equipment.  The “Chlorine Compound” column in Tables 1 and 2 refers to the  amount of available chlorine in the compound as stated on the  product label.  The total amount of 70% chlorine compound required to obtain  50 mg/L (ppm) in 166 metric tons of water is calculated in  Example 1.  Amounts of chlorine compound shown in:  Table 1 are in GRAMS  Table 2 are in KILOGRAMS.5. or final chlorine concentrations.5  Disinfection Calculations for Water and Equipment  13.4  Tables  13.  This annex provides tables for calculating the  amount of chlorine to be used in emergency chlorination of  potable water and for the routine disinfection of potable water  systems and equipment.1  Introduction  13. swimming pools.5.

0  10  715.150 grams.150.869.The capacity of a potable tank from which a coliform­  positive sample was obtained is 166 metric tons.  Example 1.0  5  357. the amount of chlorine  required for 50 ppm is determined as follows:  Follow the “Metric Tons” column stopping at 100 and then  proceed across this row until you reach the “50 ppm” column.5  166  11. 10.0  Total Weight  Water  grams  Annexes  or 11.  Now total each column.5  1  71.  The amount of chlorine required for 100 tons of water at 50 ppm  is 7.0  50  3. 5.87 kilograms .  Amount of 70% chlorine compound required for 166  tons of water at 50 parts per million  Metric Tons  of Water  Grams Required 70%  Available Chlorine  Solution  50 ppm column  from Table 1  178  100  7.575.  Using the 70% column in Table 1.  The  vessel has a compound on board containing 70%  available chlorine.  detailed in Example 1 below. and 1 metric tons.  Do the same for 50.

  Figure 1.0  5%  2.5.  The 100 ppm chlorine  solution should be applied as outlined in this manual.154  25%  0.3  Equipment Disinfection  Figure 1 lists the various chlorine compounds and the amount of  the compound required in grams per liter of water to produce a  solution containing 100 ppm of chlorine.0 Annexes  179  . Available chlorine in compounds  Grams per  Liter of  Available  Chlorine  Grams per Liter  for 100 ppm  70%  0.13.143  65%  0.7  10%  1.4  15%  0.

00 40.007  0.00  2.00 2.08  7.00  65%  1  1.00  70.00  286.00  100  143.00  0.50  715.00  2.00  10.00  50  71.10  0.50  1.50  1.00  20.00  10%  1  5  10  50  100  0.00  385.00  770.430.43  2.000.00  715.00  35.00  10.5.300.00  50.50  2.00 2.00  1.17  0.00  50  77.40  38.00  Table  2.00  25.40  30.000.07  0.35  0.350  0.00  3.00  7.000.70  3.00  20.25  0.00  5  7.86  7.000.05  0.00  10.00  100  400.00 20.07  0.00  0.30  0.000.00 4.540.15  14.070  0.00  770.40  17.00  10  40.00  154.00  50.02  0.00  34.540.05  0.00  100.00  0.00  5.00  200.000.430.000.00  5.00  5.50  143.00  400.00  770.00 1.13  0.50  7.00  770.  Amount  of  Chlorine  Required  in  KILOGRAMS  to  Produce  Desired PPM (mg/L)  Chlorine  Metric  Compound  Tons  PPM  Desired  of  Water  1  2  5  10  50  100  180  15%  1  5  10  50  100  0.00  0.13.00  1.00  10  14.00  100  154.00  200.00  200.00  4.40  77.00  2.00  100.00 15.000.000.00  100.00  50  200.00  50.00  10.575.400.00  7.00  0.00 20.10  0.50  715.00  80.00  2.4  Tables  Table 1.20  1.20  1.00  40.75  71.54  3.00  2.00  0.50  143.00  7.00  400.00  2.00  5  7.20  1.00  308.50  2.00 1.00  200.02  0.20  0.01  0.00  154.80  77.00  25%  1  4.00  0.50  357.01  0.00 Annexes  .03  0.70  3.00  715.00  0.00  385.50  5.00  10.10  0.00 1.04  0.00  800.65  1.00  3.150.15  14.40  2.   Amount of Chlorine Required in GRAMS to Produce Desired  PPM (mg/L)  Chlorine  Metric  Compound  Tons  PPM  Desired  of  Water  1  2  5  10  50  100  70%  1  1.30  28.00  20.000.00  400.70  15.34  1.00 14.70  0.70  3.00  100.40  0.00  40.00  4.00  10  15.00  0.700.00  10.50  5.00  154.00  7.60  71.000.50  143.150.10  0.34  1.50  7.00  357.00  1.035  0.30  71.50  77.00  5.10  0.000.50  1.00  5  20.00 10.00  8.30  35.70  3.00  1.850.00  5%  1  5  10  50  100  0.00  1.70  15.700.

2 Temperature­Time Alternatives  13.  Heat penetrates into different  foods at different rates. food must be held at a sufficient temperature for the specified time.6.  The temperature and time combination criteria specified in Part 3­4 of this Code is based on the  destruction of Salmonellae. fish.  Cooking requirements are based in part on the biology of pathogens.  To kill microorganisms.1 Introduction  13.  Food characteristics also affect the lethality of cooking temperatures.  This Part includes temperature and time parameters that provide "D"  values (decimal log reduction values) that may surpass 7D.  Heating a large roast too quickly with a high oven temperature may char or dry the outside. including commercially raised  game animal meat. Annexes  181  .  For example. a time  span of 15 seconds will provide a 3D reduction of Salmonella enteritidis in eggs. to be effective in eliminating pathogens. or worm egg). the trophozoite of protozoa.  Other foods.6  Food Cooking Temperature Alternatives  13.1  Introduction  Cooking.6. if  present in raw shell eggs. at 63°C (145°F).6. the microbial lethality achieved at 121  minutes after it has reached 54°C (130°F) is the same lethality attained as if it were cooked for 3  minutes after it has reached 63°C (145°F).  Other factors to be considered include post cooking heat rise and the time the food must be held at a  specified internal temperature. or the larval form of worms) is less resistant than the same  organism's survival form (the bacterial spore. the initial temperature of the  food.  For example.  The parameters are expected to provide  destruction of the surface contaminants on these foods. creating a  layer of insulation that shields the inside from efficient heat penetration. the growing stage of a species (such as the vegetative cell of  bacteria. and the food's bulk. must be adjusted to a number of factors.  To kill all pathogens in food. which affects the time to achieve the needed internal product temperature.  This organism.  Different species of microorganisms have  different susceptibilities to heat. and meats that have not been ground or minced.  cooking must bring all parts of the food up to the required temperatures for the correct length of time.  These  include the anticipated level of pathogenic bacteria in the raw product.  High fat content in food reduces the effective lethality of heat. protozoan cyst.  High humidity  within the cooking vessel and the moisture content of food aids thermal destruction. specified as acceptable for cooking at this temperature and time parameter.  The thermal destruction of a  microorganism is determined by its ability to survive heat.  Cooking  is a scheduled process in which each of a series of continuous time/temperature combinations can be  equally effective.  Also. is generally found in relatively low numbers. in cooking a beef roast.13. are  expected to have a low level of internal contamination.

1; or a variance is granted as specified in  11.6. Fish.2  Temperature­Time Alternatives  Chart 1 ­ Alternative Temperature Times for 68°C (155°F)  Minimum  Time  3 minutes  1 minute  < 1 second (instantaneous)  Temperature °C  (°F)  63 (145)  66 (150)  70 (158)  Chart 2 ­ Oven Type / Roasting Temperature  Oven Type  Still Dry  Convection  High Humidity 1  Oven Temperature  Based on Roast Weight  177°C (350°F) or more  121°C (250°F) or more  163°C (325°F) or more  121°C (250°F) or more  121°C (250°F)  121°C (250°F)  1. Relative humidity greater than 90% for at least 1 hour as measured in the cooking  chamber or exit of the oven; or in a moisture­impermeable bag that provides  100% humidity. 1999. and Other  Meats  Consumer information is provided as specified in  7.1.13 of the VSP Operations Manual. Molluscan  Shellfish.  Eggs.6. 182  Annexes  .3. Intact  Steak is cooked on top and bottom to a surface  temperature of 63°C (145°F) or above and color  change is achieved on all surfaces.  Chart 3 ­ Internal Roast Temperature and Holding Time  Temperature  Temperature Time in  Minutes °C °F  °C °F  54  130  121  60  140  56  132  77  61  142  57  134  47  62  144  58  136  32  63  145  59  138  19  1  Holding time may include postoven heat rise  Time in  Minutes 1  12  8  5  3  Chart 4 ­ Cooking Exemptions  Food  Provisions  Beef Steak ­­ Whole­  Muscle.  Extracted from Food Code.13. Recommendations of the United States Public Health Service.

2  Recommended Evaluation Equipment  TMD  The following equipment to conduct warewashing evaluations is  recommended:  maximum  registering  (1) Thermocouple or thermistor temperature­measuring device for  warewasher operational temperatures;  wax crayons  (2) Maximum registering temperature­measuring device or  temperature­sensitive tapes for verifying hot water warewasher final  rinse temperature. for determining in­line pressure of  hot water at injection point of warewasher in the 100­170 kilopascals  (15­25 pounds per square inch) range;  chemical test  kit  (5) Chemical test kits for different chemical sanitizer types used on  the vessel;  flashlight  (6)  Flashlight;  tape measure  (7)  Tape measure; and Annexes  183  .7.7.13.3  13.7. and Food Code.7.7  Warewashing Evaluation  13.4  Introduction  Machine Data Plates  Evaluation Procedures  Routine Monitoring  13. as applicable.1  13. 1999.2  13.1.1.1  Introduction  13. Commercial Spray­Type Dishwashing and Glasswashing  Machines and the CDC / VSP Operations Manual should be  consulted for recommended construction and operational  parameters.  13.7.  ANSI/NSF 3­  1996.7.1  Methodology Source  resources  The following warewashing machine evaluation procedure was  compiled from the NSF International (NSF) brochure Food Service:  Recommended Field Evaluation Procedures for Spray­Type  Dishwashing Machines. 73̊  C (160̊  F);  (3) Optional:  Calibrated melting temperature wax crayons with melt  points set at 82̊  C (180̊  F) and another at 91̊  C (195̊  F);  pressure gauge  (4) Pressure gauge.7. 1991.

  The chemical test kits and temperature sensitive tapes  shall be maintained as specified by their manufacturer to ensure  accuracy.  mercury spills  Mercury­filled maximum registering temperature­measuring devices  are subject to breakage and shall be carefully used during the  evaluations.  Differences will be noted on  the tank temperatures when the pumps are activated and when they  are not. evidence  shall be furnished that they at least conform to the minimum  equivalent standards of ANSI/NSF 3­1996.2  Watch or stop watch. a through clean­up shall be performed  before warewashing operations resume.  If they break.  13. the  machine is not required to have a gauge or a gauge valve.timing device  (8)  calibrated  The temperature­measuring devices and pressure gauges shall be  calibrated against standards to ensure reliable warewasher  evaluations.7.  temperature  requirements  The temperatures stated on the warewash machine data plate shall  be considered minimums.  For  those manufactured to different temperature standards.  If data plate indicates a flow pressure.  Machines Data Plates  data plate  required  The required manufacturer’s data plate shall be studied for correct  operating parameters. 184  Annexes  . Commercial Spray­Type  Dishwashing and Glasswashing Machines.  conform to  ANSI / NSF 3 ­  1996  The warewash machine temperatures shall conform to those  specified in these guidelines for the specific type of machine.  Except for chemical sanitizing machines. the  machine shall have a gauge or a gauge valve to measure it.  If  manufacturer’s data plate does not state a flow pressure.  the machine should not heat to more than 9°C (15°F) above its  minimum temperatures to reduce steam buildup and baking food  particles on the articles being washed.

  conveyor  speed  (4)  The conveyor speed and cycle times shall be set according to  manufacturer’s specifications.  heating  elements  (9)  The heating elements used in tanks shall not have mineral or  other deposits on them.  pressure  regulator  (12)  The pressure regulator shall be functioning properly.  TMDs accurate  (11)  The wash and rinse tanks. and final rinse manifold temperature­  measuring devices shall be accurate to ±1.7.  curtains /  baffles  (3)  The curtains and baffles on conveyor type machines shall be  intact and in their proper position.3  Evaluation Procedures  13.3.2  Temperature Evaluation  manufacturer’s  instructions  (1)  The machine shall be installed and operated in accordance to  the manufacturer’s instructions.1  Operating Procedures  prescraped /  racked  (1)  Dishes shall be properly prescraped and racked.  strainer clear  (10)  The rinse supply line strainer shall be clear of debris. and end caps installed.5 °C (± 3 °F).7.  nozzles aligned  (6)  The wash and rinse nozzles shall be properly aligned and  provide a uniform spray pattern. not blocked or leaking.  flow pressure  (13)  The flow pressure shall be 100­170 kilopascals (15­25 pounds  per square inch). properly  installed in the machine.7.  scrap trays  (2)  The machine prewash “scrap trays” shall be clear of excessive  soil and debris.  overflow  (5)  The overflow standpipe shall be installed. Annexes  185  .  13.  nozzles clear  (7)  The wash and rinse nozzles shall be clear of obstructions.3.13.  manifolds  repair  (8)  The wash and rinse manifolds shall be in good repair.

  On conveyor machines. 74 °C  (165 °F); or  (B)  For all other machines.warm­up  (2)  The machine shall be run through at least two complete cycles  before testing unless it has been operating just before the evaluation.  (7)  The effect of the temperatures of the wash water and pumped  rinse shall be factored into the evaluation. or less than:  (A)  For a stationary rack.  (8) Effective sanitization shall be evaluated by noting one of the  following:  In a mechanical operation. if higher temperatures are possible. 186  Annexes  .  The  nonreversible thermo­labels shall be attached to the center of a dry  ceramic plate. single temperature machine. remote  sensing thermocouple or nonreversible thermo­labels such as paper  temperature­measuring devices that turn from silver to black or  similar device shall be used to confirm the effectiveness of heat  sanitization.  sanitizing rinse  TMDs  rinse exposure  high wash /  rinse  temperature  factor  effective  sanitization  (5)  A maximum registering temperature­measuring device.  (6)  The maximum registering temperature­measuring device shall  be attached in a vertical position in a rack that is exposed to the final  sanitizing rinse spray at the approximate level of a plate. the temperature of the fresh hot water  sanitizing rinse as it enters the manifold may not be more than 90 °C  (194 °F). if the tank thermometers  indicate they are above 74°C (165°F).  tank  thermometer  calibration  (4)  Temperatures of the wash water and pumped rinse shall be  taken directly from the tanks of the machines and compared against  the machine mounted temperature­measuring devices. additional pre­evaluation  cycles may be run to determine. if possible. 82 °C (180 °F).  additional  warm­up  (3)  When minimum temperatures are not indicated on the machine­  mounted temperature­measuring devices.  The maximum­registering  TMD may also be checked at the end of each part of the cycle to  verify that the wash and rinse temperatures have not been in excess  of 71°C (160°F). this is accomplished by running at least two  racks through the machine.  The  evaluation temperature­measuring device probe shall be placed in  the tank near the machine mounted temperature­measuring device  probe.

7.  Periodic management  checks of the warewashing process during operation verify that the  machines are operating properly and the utensils processed are  indeed clean and sanitized.  Periodic operation and temperature checks by the warewashing crew  during the warewashing time should detect problems soon after they  occur.  Following the manufacturer’s  recommendations for maintenance and operation will ensure the  warewashing machines continue to meet the criteria of these  guidelines and standards of ANSI/NSF 3­1996. the proper setup and  operation of the equipment should be verified with basic checks.  Proper operating  temperatures should be verified to meet the minimum required  temperatures during the start­up.  A mark is  made on a dry portion of the final sanitizing rinse manifold or supply  line with a crayon that melts at 82 °C (180 °F) and another that melts  at 91 °C (195 °F).  start­up  evaluations  During each warewashing machine’s startup.7. Commercial Spray­  Type Dishwashing and Glasswashing Machines.  indirect  methods  (9)  The final rinse spray temperature may be indirectly evaluated by  using a non­reversible thermo­labels attached to manifold or by  using a calibrated melting temperature wax crayons.  The procedures provided in this annex may assist the  vessel crew in periodically verifying the proper operation of its  warewashing machines. manifold.4  Routine Monitoring  periodic  detailed  evaluations  Proper warewashing is critical to protecting the health of a vessel’s  passengers. and  use a sanitizer test kit to confirm sanitizer level is at minimum  specified on machine data plate and in these guidelines.(C)  A utensil surface temperature of 71 °C (160 °F) as  measured by an irreversible registering temperature indicator  shall be achieved.  routine  operation  evaluations  simple records  Simple records can assist in the warewash machine monitoring  process.  These would include checks of the tank.  The person removing the clean and sanitized ware must  examine each piece to determine if it is clean.3  Chemical Sanitizing Evaluation  chemical  sanitizing  Obtain sample at end of the final chemical sanitizing rinse cycle.  13. Annexes  187  .3.  13.  A review of these records can ensure proper monitoring is  being conducted and assist in determining a gradual or severe  malfunction of the machine. and curtain  assemblies to ensure they are properly installed.

 an electronic  version of this form will also be used. 188  Annexes  .  Copies of the electronic version will be  returned to the cruise line by electronic mail.1  Report Form  The copy of the VSP Inspection Report form follows on the next pages  During the implementation of the VSP Operation Manual.8  Inspection Report  13.8.13.

 hair.  /  Point Value  /  Description  No.  CDC80. records  System protection cross­connections. knowledge.15 11/2000  Annexes  189  . cleaning equipment; Unauthorized  personnel  FOOD  15  5  Food source. communicable diseases  12  4  Hands washed; Hygienic practices  13  3  Management. maintenance  TOILET AND HANDWASHING FACILITIES  SWIMMING POOLS. sound condition; Food re­service  16  5  Potentially hazardous food temperatures  17  2  Temperature practices; Thawing  18  3  Cross­contamination  19  2  Food protection; Original containers; labeling; In­use  food dispensing. operation. valves; System construction. waste receptacles. caps.  /  Point Value  /  Description  Bold = Critical Item  DISEASE REPORTING  EQUIPMENT  01  4  Disease reporting  20  2  PHF temperature maintenance facilities; Food­contact  surfaces; Food TMD’s  02  1  Medical logs maintenance  21  1  Nonfood­contact surfaces; Ambient TMD’s  22  2  Warewashing facilities; TMD’s; Test kits  23  2  Pre­wash; Wash and rinse solutions  24  3  Sanitizing rinse  25  1  Wiping cloths / chef’s towels  26  3  Food­contact surfaces equipment / utensils clean; Safe  materials  27  1  Non­food contact surfaces equipment / utensils clean  28  2  Equipment / utensil / linen / single / service storage handling  dispensing ; Cleaning frequency  POTABLE WATER  03  5  Bunker / production source; Halogen residual  04  5  Distribution system halogen residual  05  5  Distribution system halogen analyzer calibrated  06  2  07  3  08  1  Halogen analyzer chart recorder maintenance. accessible.  2. Crew  Bold = Critical Item  Score:  Item No. connections.V E S S E L  S A N IT A T IO N  IN S P E C T IO N  R E P O R T  Vessel Name  Inspection Date  Port  Results Presented to  Cruise Line  No. preparation utensils  ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH  39  3  IPM program effective; Approved pesticide application  40  1  IPM procedures; Outer openings protection  41  2  Housekeeping; Child­Activity Centers  MEDICAL LOG REVIEW  Cruise –  Start   /   End   /   Port  /   PAX   /   ILL   /   CREW   /   ILL  Comments: 1.  3.  4. sanitary towels. hand sanitizers  32  1  Solid waste containers  33  1  Decks / bulkheads / deckheads  34  1  Plumbing fixtures / supply lines / drain lines / drains  35  2  Liquid waste disposal  36  1  Lighting  37  1  Rooms / equipment venting  38  1  Unnecessary articles. SPAS  09  3  Swimming pools / spas halogen residuals  10  1  Swimming pools / spas maintenance.  Handwashing signs; Maintenance  TOXIC SUBSTANCES  FOOD SAFETY  31  5  Toxic Items  PERSONNEL  FACILITIES  11  5  Food handlers infections. procedures; Sample  records. backflow;  Disinfection  Filling hoses.  records; Micro sampling. installation  30  1  Hand cleanser.  5. safety equipment  29  3  Facilities convenient.  Inspection Type  Inspected by  Item No. Pax. design. monitoring  14  1  Outer clothing clean; Jewelry.

  critical item  monitoring  The corrective action statement.  The corrective action statement may be submitted to VSP by  electronic mail.9. corrective action statement and inspection  date on the message subject line.9. Lauderdale.   Please send it to vsp@cdc.  A signed corrective action statement  shall not affect the inspection score.9.  The public health goal of the inspection  is to prevent the recurrence of the critical deficiency in the  specific instance where it was found and generally in future  similar operations aboard the vessel.13.2 Format  13.  The corrective­action statement may also be mailed to:  CDC / Vessel Sanitation Program  1850 Eller Drive ­ Suite 101  Ft. if  requested. particularly for critical items.  publicly  available  e­mail  submission  mail  submission  The corrective action statement shall be appended to the final  inspection report for future reference and public distribution.gov and include  your vessel name. FL  33316  USA 190  Annexes  .  It is preferable that the  corrective action statement be submitted as an attached word  processing format file.1  Introduction  purpose  VSP has established a procedure for post­inspection reporting of  corrective action to encourage the correction of deficiencies  noted during an inspection.  should include a management monitoring plan to ensure that the  procedure or process found out of control will be monitored and  controlled in the future.1 Introduction  13.9  Corrective Action Statement  13.

  (Continue list until all violations have been listed.9.  2.13.2 Format  example  statement  Date  CDC / Vessel Sanitation Program  1850 Eller Drive ­ Suite 101  Ft.)  Sincerely.  3. at (Port). FL  33316  USA  Dear Sir:  The following actions have been taken to correct each of the  deficiencies noted during the inspection of (Name of Vessel) on  (Date).  (Signature)  Name  Title  Company Annexes  191  . Lauderdale.  Item Number  Deficiency  / Corrective Action  1.

  The score and the complete inspection report for each inspection are  published on the CDC website. 192  Annexes  .10  Summary of Sanitation Inspections of International Cruise Ships  13.13.  The website address for these scores and inspection reports is:  http://www.10.3  Contact Information  13.2  Format  13.1  Introduction  13.gov/nceh/vsp.10. to  re­inspection by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  The ship's level of sanitation is acceptable to CDC if its score on the  inspection is 86 or higher. when necessary.2  Format  online  information  The VSP website has a searchable database of inspection report  summaries and lists.  13.1  Introduction  introduction  Every vessel that has a foreign itinerary and that carries 13 or more  passengers is subject to twice­yearly inspections and.10.10.10.  lists  Lists  Some of the lists available on the VSP website include:  ­  Summary of Most Recent Ships Inspected;  ­  Ships Inspected within Past 2 Months;  ­  Ships with Not Satisfactory Scores (under 86); and  ­  Summary of Inspection Scores (Green Sheet) . cruise ships must meet the  criteria established by CDC.  To  ensure a clean and healthful environment.  The complete inspection report information is also  retrievable.cdc.

These lists show the data by:  ­  Ship Name;  ­  Inspection  Date; and  complete  report  available  ­  Score. Annexes  193  .  This report provides a categorical review of the deficiencies noted  along with the number of points deducted for that category and the  numerical score for the inspection. including all scores  for that ship and a inspection report preview.  Score Categories include:  ­ All;  ­ 86 or higher ­­ Satisfactory Scores; and  ­ 85 or lower ­­ Not Satisfactory Scores.  Further information can be obtained on a particular ship.  The details of the inspection with the specific deficiencies and  recommendations are also accessible from this page.  Search  search  possibilities  The inspection report data is also searchable from this database within the  following search categories:  ­ Ship Name;  ­ Inspection Date;  ­ Most Recent Date;  ­ All Dates;  ­ Range of Dates; and  ­ Score.  The Summary of Inspections with Violations is provided on the VSP  website.

cdc.  13. by telephone at 800­323­2132.search result  sorts  The search results may be sorted by:  ­ Inspection Date (most recent first);  ­ Ship Name (alphabetical);  ­ Score (high­low); and  ­ Score (low ­high).  . Annexes  .3  Contact Information  further  information  194  Further information on the Vessel Sanitation Program and the inspection  results and the vessel’s corrective action statements maybe obtained  through electronic mail at: vsp@cdc.  via fax at 770­488­4127 or on the VSP Web site at www.gov.10.gov/nceh/vsp.

5)  96 (1.  Take  Annexes  samples from inside pool/spa at three locations to  ensure proper mixing.  Rinse and Refill  Pool/Spa  Follow normal pool operational procedures.  Clean and Scrub Surfaces of Pool/Spa  Time  Minutes  25  NOTE:  Maintain pH of 7.  If in port hold until 12­  mile mark.  195  .  Record fecal accidents in maintenance logs.11  Fecal Accident Plan  Sample Fecal Accident Procedure Pool  (Sea­to­Sea Mode)  Pool or Whirlpool Spa  (Recirculation Mode)  Close Pool­Remove Patrons from Pool  Close Pool­Remove Patrons from  Pool  Scoop Out Feces (Stool) and  Dispose of in Toilet  Clean and  Disinfect  Scoop  Drain Pool  Scoop out Feces (Stool) and  Dispose of in Toilet  Clean.2­7.13.5)  Residual and Contact Time Table Formed Stool  Chlorine Residual  mg/l or PPM  2  Backwash Filters or Change Filter Media  Discharge water.5 during contact time. rinse and disinfect pool  (50­100 ppm halogen solution)  Increase Halogen Residual as Appropriate Depending  on Whether Feces Were Loose or Formed to:  Rinse Pool and Refill  Follow Normal Operational Procedures for  Sea­to Sea Mode  (Unless within 12 mile limit)  ____ PPM and Circulate for _____ Minutes  (See tables)  Residual and Contact Time Table Loose Stool  Chlorine Residual  mg/l or PPM  10  20  50  100  Time  Minutes (Hours)  960 (16)  480 (8)  192 (3.

.

  Persons. Whirlpool Spas and Hot Tubs  14.  Health Measures at U. 1999. 1999.  14.32. NCEH. Vessel Sanitation Program  Operations Manual.S.41.5  Potable Water  14.  Quarantine and Inspection ­  Regulations to control communicable diseases.S.2  Authority  14. Ports:  Communicable Diseases.  http://www. Section 269.6  Swimming Pools.  14.7  Food Safety  14. Ports:  Communicable Diseases.3  Definitions  14. NCEH.4  Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance  14.  Code of Federal Regulations 42 CFR 71. Ports: Sanitary Inspection. Food Code. carriers. Bibliography  197  .C.  The Public Health Service Act.  Code of Federal Regulations 42 CFR Section 71. 42 U.  Foreign  Quarantine ­ Requirements Upon Arrival at U.S. 1989.S.9  Housekeeping  14.0  Bibliography  14.2  Authority  The Public Health Service Act.14.  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vessel Sanitation  Program: Charting a Healthier Course.31. Section 264.cdc.  General Provisions.3  Definitions  Food and Drug Administration.  Health Measures at U.  Code of Federal Regulations 42 CFR 71.1  Introduction  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.C.gov/nceh/vsp.  General provisions.1  Introduction  14.11  Administrative Guidelines  14.  Quarantine and Inspection ­  Bills of health. 42 U. and things. 1999. Recommendations of the United  States Public Health Service.  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.8  Integrated Pest Management  14. NCEH.10  Child­Activity Centers  14.S.

  Disease Surveillance and Outbreak Investigation..  181:1491­5.L. Cox K..  72:484­8. Mintz..  Oct 21;2(8669):961­5. W. Wells.  Taylor P.  Outbreaks of diarrhoeal  illness on passenger cruise ships.B. 1972.F.  J. Yashuk.W. Characterization of a variant strain of Norwalk  virus from a food­borne outbreak of gastroenteritis on a cruise ship in Hawaii. J... Blake P... Karpati.. U..  <http://www. Caul. S.A..  Dannenberg.  Journal of Infectious Disease.  Dalton.G.V. Humphrey..1989. Recommendations for collection of  laboratory specimens associated with outbreaks of gastroenteritis. Glass. Feldman.R..D. 1975­1978.  Pon.  Epidemiology & Infection. Wells. 1999. Srivastava. Pinsky.  Outbreaks of  enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection in American adults: a clinical and  epidemiologic profile. J. Nicholas A. Quick.. J. Mintz... Madore.A.  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 1982..  Can Med Assoc. 1994. A. 1980. Stine..4  Gastrointestinal Illness Surveillance  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Lew.  Davies J. Moe C. 198  Bibliography  . D. Neimann...L.htm>  Daniels. R. MMWR.. 1999. R. R. Lewis. Gary G.I.  Ashley.. 1990. C. Simon W.D. C.E... Wells.  Traveler’s  Diarrhea at Sea: Three Outbreaks of Waterborne Enterotoxigenic Escherichia  coli on Cruise Ships.J. Lancet.C. Gastrointestinal illness on  passenger cruise ships. S. Viral gastroenteritis aboard a cruise ship.S. D.S. J  Clin Microbiol.I.....  Herwaldt. 2000.R. NCEH. Bowmer E. Tauxe. E..  103(1):63­72.D.P.  4:861­6. Epidemiology and Infection. Clapp D. Yashuk J.  39  RR­14. Terranova. E.. Greene.gov/nceh/programs/sanit/vsp/surv/surv.A.. R. Parashar.W.. A.cdc.A. Am J Epidemiol. Yashuk J.A. M.. E.. J.. C.S.. Cubitt.  106:877­83.  Addiss D. Tauxe.  123:9­16.  1122:820­7. A. Bopp.O... Greenberg H.F.. Am J Public Health. E. Monroe.C. Mallory A. 1975­85.  J.  Ho... R..D.G....G.G.. Glass R.L.14. Monroe.D..A..  Typhoid at sea:  epidemic aboard an ocean liner. B...  Norwalk virus gastroenteritis aboard a  cruise ship: an outbreak of five consecutive cruises. K.G.. 1989.  Gunn R. P. Feldman. S... H.C.W. R. C.V.

. D.S. Wood B. L.H... D.C. 1991. J.L.  101:165­75.B.  7:545­7. O’Toole T.J.  Nguyen.. 1987. Gillenwater. L. D.. Kaplan.  IAMFES.  Schonberger. IA. et al.B.D.  A cost­effectiveness analysis of the  Vessel Sanitation Program.  Gastrointestinal illness on passenger cruise ships. 1999. C.  Privacy Act ­  Records  maintained on individuals. Murphy.E. K.O. Chacon.K. Glass.. Iskander. IA.....S. R.A.  IAMFES. Brunton. Lawrence D.. J.L... R.  Public Health Service; Atlanta.. 1975. Yashuk J.E..  Food­ and waterborne disease outbreaks on passenger cruise vessels  and aircraft.  X.  Sawyer.J. Qualls N. Maloney K. C. C. C..  2:318­22. A. Section 552a. Schonberger..... Forward.C.. Hughes J.. 1989. Yashuk J.  Freedom of Information Act.  Epidemiology of diarrheal disease outbreaks  on cruise ships. D'Agnese J.. Goldman. Tauxe R.H... D.  JAMA. S.  American Journal of Epidemiology. Fralick..K. GA...H. P.G. Bibliography  199  ..J.  Khan.  Shigellosis at sea: an outbreak  aboard a passenger cruise ship.  134(4):413­20. Meyers J. M. American Journal of Epidemiology.. Pon. Wells J.  JAMA.G. 1986 through 1993. J.E.  Des  Moines. Wells J. Dance..G. Griffin.M. Phillips... C..  Procedures to Investigate Foodborne Illness.. M.H.  Procedures to Investigate Waterborne Illness.  1976. Bopp.M.I. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  127:1261­71.. J.  R.... Glass.  Merson M. Walmsley. U. L..H.  Lew. E. American Journal of Epidemiology. 5th Edition. 1996. Swerdlow.  5 U.  Merson M. Chapman. Humphrey.A.F.. Gary.  39:285­8.  Norwalk  virus­associated gastroenteritis traced to ice consumption aboard a cruise ship  in Hawaii: comparison and application of molecular method­based assays.L.. Glass R.. 1996. S.. Monroe. A.. Moe.Koo. 2nd Edition.T.I. Estes. Hughes J..F.  25­ to 30­nm  virus particle associated with a hospital outbreak of acute gastroenteritis with  evidence for airborne transmission.  231:723­7.K..M. W.A. Des  Moines.E...D.. Tenney J.. L.S. Jiang.  Mercatante T.I. J..N.. 1994. M.  Merson M.  An outbreak of shigellosis aboard a cruise  ship caused by a multiple­antibiotic­resistant strain of Shigella flexneri.. Carter..S. 1988.C. Low. Journal of Milk and Food Technology. Pinsky. P. A. J  Clin Microbiol.

  Electrodialysis and Electrodialysis  Reversal.  American Water Works Association. Second  edition. 1993. Second edition. 1997.S. and proceedings.  Ann Arbor.  Geneva.Freedom of Information Act. (2nd Edition).  World Health Organization. 1995.  Denver. 1998.  Water Distribution Operator Training  Handbook.  Administrative Procedure ­ Public  information; agency rules.  Guidelines for Drinking­water Quality.  Geneva.  Reverse Osmosis and Nanofiltration. CO.  5 U. 1999. Volume 1:  Recommendations.  Guidelines for Drinking­water Quality.  Denver. Addendum to Volume 1: Recommendations. Section 552.  Guidelines for Drinking­water Quality.  ANSI/NSF Standard 61­1999a Drinking Water System  Components ­ Health Effects.   ANSI/NSF Standard 60­1999 Drinking Water Treatment  Chemicals ­  Health Effects.  Geneva.  Code of Federal Regulations.  Denver. World Health  Organization.  NSF International. CO. Switzerland.  Switzerland. Ann Arbor. Second edition.  Water Chlorination Principles and  Practices. 1998.  NSF International.  American Water Works Association. MI.  World Health Organization. 200  Bibliography  . 1998. Addendum to Volume 2: Health Criteria and Other Supporting  Information. Volume 3: Surveillance and Control of Community Water  Supplies. records. Second edition. Switzerland. Guidelines for Drinking­water Quality. Volume 2:  Health Criteria and Other Supporting Information. 1996. Second  edition. 1999.  American Water Works Association.  Geneva.C. opinions. Switzerland.  American Water Works Association.  Denver.  World Health Organization. orders. Geneva. CO. 2000. 1973.5  Potable Water  World Health Organization. CO.  World Health Organization.  14. Title 40 Section 141 National Primary Drinking Water  Regulations. MI.  Guidelines for Drinking­water Quality. Switzerland.

 OH.  American Water Works Association.  American Water Works Association.  Denver. 1995. 1995. CO.  American Water Works Association.   ANSI/ASSE #1011 ­ 1995. 1997. Greenberg.. Bibliography  201  . American Public  Health Association. Standard Methods  for the Examination of Water and Wastewater (20th Edition).  ANSI/ASSE #1009 ­ 1990. OH.  ASSE #1013 ­ 1993. Hose  Connection Vacuum Breakers. Washington.  Westlake.   Westlake. CO. CO.  U.  Denver. Simplified Procedures for Water  Examination.  American Society of Sanitary  Engineering.  American Society of Sanitary Engineering.   ANSI/AWWA C653­97:  Disinfection of  Water Treatment Plants. OH.  American Society of Sanitary Engineering. Westlake.  Commercial Food Waste Grinder Units. 1995.  Denver.Clesceri.  Emergency Planning for Water Utility  Management. OH.  ASSE #1014 ­ 1990. CO.  American Society of Sanitary Engineering.  Commercial Dishwashing Machines.  American Society of Sanitary Engineering. 1990. American Water Works Association and Water  Environment Federation.  ANSI/ASSE #1012 ­ 1995.S.  Reduced Pressure Principle Backflow Preventers. 1990. OH. eds. Cross­Connection Control Manual. Andrew D. 1994. Arnold E. Backflow Preventer with Intermediate Atmospheric  Vent. 1992. 1990. 1989. OH.  Denver. 1993.  Denver.  ANSI/ASSE #1004 ­ 1990.  Denver.  American Society of Sanitary Engineering. Hand­  Held Showers. 1998. Eaton.  American Water Works Association. CO.  Westlake. Lenore S. CO.   ANSI/AWWA C651­92: Disinfecting  Water Mains. 1997.  American Water Works Association.  ANSI/AWWA C652­92:  Disinfection of  Water­Storage Facilities.  American Water Works Association. Environmental Protection Agency.  Westlake. 1992. Westlake.  Recommended Practice for Backflow  Prevention and Cross­Connection Control. DC.

  American Society of Sanitary Engineering.  Hose Connection Backflow Preventers. 202  Bibliography  . 1980. OH. 1997.  ANSI/ASSE #1048 ­ 1995.  Westlake.  ASSE #1015 ­1993. American Society of Sanitary Engineering. 1998.  ANSI/ASSE #1052 ­ 1994. 1999. Double  Check Backflow Prevention Assembly.  Westlake. 1995.  Westlake. 1995.  Westlake. Westlake.  ANSI/ASSE #1024 ­ 1998.  ANSI/ASSE #1022 ­ 1998.  Westlake.  ASSE #1020 ­ 1998.  Back Siphonage Vacuum Breakers.  National Pool and Spa Institute.  Reduced Pressure Detector Backflow Preventer.  Final Recommendations to  Minimize Transmission of Legionnaires’ Disease from Whirlpool Spas on  Cruise Ships.  American Society of Sanitary Engineering.  Alexandria. OH. VA.  |  American Society of Sanitary Engineering.  ANSI/ASSE #1056 ­ 1995.  ASSE #1032 ­ 1980.   ASSE#1055 ­ 1997.  Alexandria.  Dual Check Valve Type Backflow Preventers.  American Society of Sanitary Engineering.  ANSI/NSPI­ 2 1999 Standard for Public Spas. 1998.  14. OH.  ANSI/NSPI­ 1 1991 Standard for Public  Swimming Pools.  Pressure Vacuum Breaker Assembly.  ANSI/ASSE #1047 – 1995. OH. OH. Double  Check Detector Assembly Backflow Preventer.  American Society of Sanitary Engineering.  Chemical Dispensing Systems.  American Society of Sanitary Engineering.  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.6  Swimming Pools. VA.  American Society of Sanitary Engineering. 1991. Whirlpool Spas and Hot Tubs  National Pool and Spa Institute. Westlake. 1995. 1997.  American Society of Sanitary Engineering. OH.  Westlake. 1993. Westlake. OH. Backflow Preventer for Carbonated Beverage  Machines.American Society of Sanitary Engineering. 1994. Westlake. OH. OH. OH. Dual  Check Valve Type Backflow Preventers.

  Alexandria. 1997. J. Spas.  Disinfection of Public Pools and Management of Fecal  Accidents.  Ann  Arbor.  Ann Arbor. 1989..  ASME/ANSI A112.  NSF International.  Lemmon.  Entrapment & Eviseration Study.apgea. VA.  Alexandria.1:8. J.  NSF International.  ANSI/NSF Standard 14­ 1999 Plastics Piping System  Components and Related Materials.  National Swimming Pool  Foundation.  Notice to Readers:  Responding to fecal accidents in disinfected swimming venues.  Rennell. and Bawden­Smith. 416­7):  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. VA. 1996. MI.  ANSI/NSF Standard 50­ 1996 Circulation System  Components and Related Materials for Swimming Pools.  Controlling Contamination from Fecal Accidents in  Swimming Pools. 1987. Wading Pools.  Outbreak of  cryptosporidiosis linked to an indoor swimming pool.army. MI. William.  National Pool and Spa Institute. MI. McAnulty. Medical Journal of  Australia. New York. Diane S. 1999. Ann Arbor. and Whirlpool Bathtub  Appliances (Reaffirmed 1996).(Editor). Alexandria. 1996. 1996.  ANSI/NSF Standard 60­ 1999 Drinking Water Treatment  Chemicals ­ Health Effects. CHPPM.  <http://chppm­www.  Kebabjian. 1996.  Symposium on Water Chemistry and  Disinfection 1996. 165: 613.NSF International.  ASME International.html>.19. M.  U. Spas/Hot Tubs.  May 25. M. Division of Parasitic Diseases.  Chemical Dynamics within the Pool and Spa  Environment 1997. Army.  ANSI/NSF Standard 61­ 1999a Drinking Water System  Components ­ Health Effects.  Rowley.  58.  Merrick. 1999.S.mil/dwater/microbiological/controlling_contami  nation_from_fecal_accidents_in_swimming_pools.  National Spa &  Pool Institute. 2001 MMWR 2001; 50/20 (No. Richard. J. 1995. Hot Tubs.8M Suction Fittings for Use in  Swimming Pools.  NSF International. 1999.  Ann Arbor. 1999. MI. Bibliography  203  ..  National Pool and Spa Institute. VA.  Basic Pool and Spa Technology.  Journal of Environmental Health. NY.

 Recommendations of the  United States Public Health Service.  The following references were used by USPHS / FDA for Food Code.7:11. Hudson PJ. E. and congressional district. NW  Washington. 1999 & 2001. Food Safety:  The Food Code makes frequent reference to federal statutes contained in the United  States Code (USC) and the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR).  A  Directory of U.  The CFR are 204  Bibliography  .  which  was the basis of CDC VSP Operations Manual.  Gallagher.  This publication lists all depository libraries by state. Ann Intern Med.. Government Printing Office  North Capitol & H Streets.S. 1999. FAX (202) 512­1432  (2) Internet World Wide Web Information System. Orciari L.  Copies of the  USC and CFR can be viewed and copied at government depository libraries or  may be purchased as follows.  Persons may also obtain information about the location of the depository library  nearest to them by contacting:  Library Programs Service.gov/ncidod/dpd/parasites/cryptosporidiosis/crypto_swim_pool  _oper. Heun EM. 1987 Legionnaires' disease  and a whirlpool spa (Letter).7  Food Safety  Food and Drug Administration.  14.  city.cdc.S. DC 20401  (202) 512­1114. T.S.htm>.  (A) Viewing and Copying the USC or CFR  (1) Government Depository Library  The USC and CFR are widely available for reference and viewing in some  1400 "depository libraries" located throughout the United States.  Vogt RL. Chapter 7.  Journal of Environmental Health. Government  Printing Office.  58. Woods TC. U. SL  U.  Food Code. Government Depository Libraries is published by the  Joint Committee on Printing of the United States Congress and is  available through the Superintendent of Documents. 107:596. 1996.  Comprehensive Water Quality Testing of High­Use Public  Spas.  <http://www.Information for Swimming Pool Operators: Prevention of Cryptosporidiosis.

.  2.gpo. National Academy of Sciences.  5. 21 U.  3. IA. 48:887­894. Two sources are:  (a) The National Archives and Records Administration  Copies of Federal Regulations ­ Retrieve CFR by Citation  Provided through the Government Printing Office Web Site ­ GPO Inet  Services  <http://www. 1985. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Task Force Report No. Wkly. Section 704.C. 1994. Rep. Washington. Government Printing Office  P. 1683.  5­year Summary. 122.O. 87  pp.L.S.gov/cfr. Federal Food. D.house. NRC  Pub. Food Prot. Ames. Council for Agricultural Science and Technology. Mortal.gov/nara/cfr/cfr­retrieve. Morb.  Factory Inspection. House of Representatives  Internet Law Library Code of Federal Regulations (Searchable)  <http://law. Bibliography  205  . 1969. CAST.S.E. Committee on Salmonella.  An Evaluation of the Salmonella Problem. Drug and Cosmetic Act.html#page1>  (b) The U.  Foodborne Pathogens:  Risks and Consequences.available on­line in downloadable form through the Internet World Wide  Web information system. Box 371954  Pittsburgh.S. 39(SS­1):15­57. Archer. DC. Incidence and cost of foodborne diarrheal  disease in the United States. 207 pp. General Authority. Kvenberg. J. 1983­1987.access.  4. 1990. and J. Foodborne Disease Outbreaks.htm>  (B) Purchasing Portions of the USC or CFR  Persons wishing to purchase relevant portions of the USC or CFR may do so by  writing or by calling:  Superintendent of Documents (New Orders)  U. PA 15250­7954  (202) 512­1800  Preface  1.

  18.  8.  13.6. and G. P. Metric Program. 89 Stat.B. MD.  Directory of State Officials. S.  12. Research Triangle Institute.J. Public Health Rep.  16. Recommended Agency Procedures for  Implementing Federal Metric Policy. Rockville. 2nd Ed.E. McCracken. 42 U. Cincinnati. Metric Systems of Measurement; Interpretation of the International System of  Units for the United States. FDA Contract No. Technology  Administration. 206  Bibliography  . Drafting Federal Law.L. Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988... 1991.  11. Transmittal 96­1. House of Representatives. 55 FR 52242­52245.S. 1994. 1989. 58 pp. 63 FR 40334­  40340.. 1990. Maryland Office of the Secretary of State. The Public Health Service Act. 1988.  10. MD.  General Grant of Authority  for Cooperation. 41:77­98. of State Documents. 94­168 Amended.  14. P. U. 1998.E. Hirsch.L. Annapolis.P Carver. J. D. 1992.E. 17  pp. 1996. 1987. Section 243. Garthright. Food and Drug Administration.  This Federal Register notice supercedes the previous interpretation  published on December 20. Department of  Commerce. 233­86­2098. Technology Services.C. Washington. NISTIR 4855. DC. Economic impact of colonization control on  foodborne disease. 1007; 15 U.L. Gaithersburg MD. Archer. Archer and J.  Preliminary Regulatory Impact  Analysis of the Proposed Regulations to Establish Procedures for the Safe  Processing and Importing of Fish and Fishery Products.  17. National Institute of Standards and Technology.S.  103:107­115.  Division of Federal­State Relations. W. D. January 24.  9. and D. 155 pp.. 1988.  §205a et seq. University  of Cincinnati. Metric Conversion Act of 1975. Drafting Legislation and Rules in Plain English. OH. Style Manual for Maryland  Regulations. Food and Drug Administration. Martineau. Estimates of incidence and  costs of intestinal infectious disease in the United States.  U.L.  15.  7. 1991.  Estimating the Value of Consumer's Loss from  Foods Violating the FD&C Act.  Notice published July 28. 100­418. 122 pp.C.S. J. Kvenberg. Office of the Legislative Counsel. Food Technol. Kvenberg. Div. R.

 Food and Drug Administration. Code of Federal Regulations. Title 50. Part 152. Section 362. Department of Health and Human Services.S. 21 U. Part 17 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife  and Plants.  3.T. Public Health Service.Chapter 1 Purpose and Definitions  1­201.C. Subchapter A ­ Mandatory Meat Inspection.1 Animals and Animal Products.C.  4.C. Food and Drug Administration.  A research report.1 Animal and Animal Products. Part 381. Code of Federal Regulations.  6. Title 40.  9.10  Statement of Application and Listing of Terms  1. 1997. 201(t) and Code of Federal  Regulations.  and Title 21 Part 170 Food Additive. Doerry. page 4. Drug and Cosmetic Act.S.  Shelf­Stable Pumpkin Pies.  12.  Grade "A" Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. Title 9.  14.S. W. Bibliography  207  . Section 354.  National Shellfish Sanitation Program  Guide for the Control of Molluscan Shellfish. Title 9. Code of Federal Regulations. Federal Food. Part 141 National Primary Drinking Water  Regulations. 21 U.  10.S. Manhattan. 706 When Color Additives  Deemed Unsafe. 1996.  8..C. Public Health Service. Drug and Cosmetic Act. D. and Title 21 Part 70 Color Additive. Code of Federal Regulations. 21 U. Code of Federal Regulations. Subchapter C ­ Mandatory Poultry Products  Inspection.. Title 9. 201(s) and Code of Federal  Regulations.  Part 1 and Part 301. Drug and Cosmetic Act. Title 9. Title 40. Code of Federal Regulations.  Washington.  Definitions. American  Institute of Baking. 402 Adulterated. Federal Food.  11. 1995.C. Federal Food. Drug and Cosmetic Act. Code of Federal Regulations.  5.  13.  2.  U.  7.175 Pesticides classified for  restricted use. Federal Food. KS. 21 U.S.

 and P. 1990. A. 58­62. N.C. Blake. National Standard for Unit Manager Food  Safety Knowledge.L. Training.  Chapter 2 Management and Personnel  2­102. as Amended. D.)..*  2­201. 1988a.  7..C. 1988b. WHO.*  1. 500 + pp. Food Microbiol. J.  8. 12:289­302. procedures and processes that lead to  outbreaks of foodborne diseases. Risks of practices.  American Public Health Association.  Int.  5. R.P. National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods.  Geneva. 1990. 16th Ed.  15. (Ed.  Hazard  Analysis and Critical Control Point System.  Food Microbiol. F. Bryan. J.  2.  13  pp. Technical Report Series 785. Benenson. J. 51(6):498­508..L. 1989.  2. 1992. Food Prot. Liston. 1991. Escherichia coli O157:H7 and its significance in foods.. vehicles. Food Prot.12  Exclusions and Restrictions. 1995.L. 53:804­817.  6. F. J.A.M. 1973­1987: pathogens.*  1. Health Surveillance and Management  Procedures for Food­handling Personnel.  4.11  Responsibility of the Person in Charge to Require Reporting by  Food Employees and Applicants. World Health Organization. and trends. 42 U. 1978. Bryan. F.  3.H. Testing and Certification Committee Report. Washington. M.  Foodborne disease outbreaks in the United  States.   Epidemiology of common­source 208  Bibliography  . 51(8): 663­673. Health 41:198­206. G. Microbial hazards of seafood consumption.  2­201. Int. Bean.S.S. Food Technol. J.F. Switzerland. Bryan. Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.. Prevention of foodborne diseases in food service  establishments. page 7. 50 pp.. Graun and P. Doyle. Griffin.11  Demonstration. 1979.. DC. J. Environ. Conference for Food Protection.Washington.E. J. Risks associated with vehicles of foodborne pathogens and  toxins. 12111 et seq. Black.  44(12):56. Food Prot. 1992.  Control of Communicable Diseases Manual. 16:1­23..  3.

 1986.  57(174) FR 40917 (August 15. Blake. Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens.Y. Bull. Department of Health and Human Services. S. Marcel Dekker.  6. 139(1):124­126. R.E. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. R. 13:60­98..M. 1990. Mandel.  U. et al. E. Centers for Disease Control Prevention.  5.D. C. F.  15.  Lemon and H. Public Health 76(6):627­630. Helgerson and P.outbreaks of shigellosis in the United States.C. 1991. Infect. Department of Health and Human  Services. (Ed. and R. P. U. 1975 and  1976. Code of Federal Regulations. 1993.M.. Williams & Wilkins. Margolis (Eds. December. Epidemiol. Am. Blake. Boase. J. Colorado Department of Health. other enterohemorrhagic E. and the  associated hemolytic uremic syndrome. Soper..S. Acad Med. 143 pp. 71­76.  Health Information for  International Travel. 1939.  11. Diseases Transmitted Through the  Food Supply.  Washington DC. Infect.J.  4. Division of Quarantine. Epidemiology of hepatitis A in  the United States. pp. Griffin.V. Wells. Hargrett­Bean and P. N.G. Shaw. New  York. Tauxe. Rev. 1996. Baltimore MD..A..  9. DHHS Pub. 1979. 1961­1975. J.  Control of day care shigellosis: A trial of convalescent day care in isolation. Title 29.D. 1990. M.  Antimicrobial resistance of Shigella isolates in the USA: The importance of  international travelers. Shapiro. R.  The curious career of Typhoid Mary.P. Part 1630 Regulations to Implement the  Equal Employment Provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Blake.E.B.V. Dis. Puhr. Public Health Service. Hollinger. coli.).  10. K.).  Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention  Objectives ­ full report with commentary.A.A.  14.S. F.W.  15:698­712. Dis. Georgia. Tauxe. 1991.  7.  165­176.  13.  Am. 1989.. In: Viral Hepatitis and Liver Disease. Tauxe. Public Health Handbook For Management Bibliography  209  . No.. 796 pp. 162:1107­1111. Ryder.  8. N. and P. 1996­97.  Typhoid fever in the United States. J.  12.  Atlanta.A. National Center for Infectious Diseases. J.  The epidemiology of infections caused by  Escherichia coli O157:H7.V. Johnson. Doyle. (PHS) 91­50212. N.N.  108:47­52. J. G. Epidemiol. 1996). J. S. Inc.

 Dis. Environ. (Handwashing)*  1. and M.Of Acute Hepatitis A. Denver. 1991. 139:124­126.A. 4th Ed. A. shall be excluded from any  operations which may be expected to result in contamination.. Center for Infectious  Diseases.  Infect.  4. Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. DC. 1990. 500+ pp. 1990.10 Personnel.J. 164:894­900. Garner.  1. 1979. by medical examination or supervisory observation is shown  to have. Minnesota  Department of Health. J.  3.S. CDC. 1985.V. Guidelines for  Investigation and Control of Hepatitis A. Dis. 7­9.. or appears to have. Part 110.N. Personnel shall  be instructed to report such health conditions to their supervisors. M. 12(10):615­618.S. Control of Communicable Diseases Manual. 27  pp.  16. Sanit. Ryder.  Hyperendemic  Shigellosis in the United States: A review of surveillance data for 1967­1988.  American Public Health Association. 2 pp. Paulson. Dairy Food Environ. 1992.  " Any person who. 1992. Infect. Blake. C..  2. Washington. John Wiley & Sons. Practical Guide on Rationale and Testing 210  Bibliography  . 4 pp. GA. Tauxe. Baltimore. The Safe  Foodhandler.. Benenson.). 1991. N. pp. Hargrett­Bean and R. L. Health. J. Guidelines for Handwashing and Hospital  Environmental Control. Minnesota Department of Health. pp 60­76. 201 West Preston Street.  2.S. R.S.  2­301. CO 80222­1530. Educational Foundation of the National Restaurant Association. Division of Disease Control and Environmental  Epidemiology.. Title 21. 4300 Cherry Creek Drive South. MN.  5.. Hospital Infections Program. Evaluation of three handwashing modalities commonly  employed in the food processing industry. Epidemiology and Disease Control  Program. an illness. MD 21201. Code of Federal Regulations. and P. Shapiro. 16th Ed.A."  3. in Applied Foodservice Sanitation.  New York. 1975 and  1976.13  Removal of Exclusions and Restrictions.12  Cleaning Procedure. G.  2­201. Lee.W. Div. (a) Disease Control. ..  Typhoid fever in the United States.A. D.. Atlanta. 1995. (Ed.  4. Rotter. Guidelines for the Prevention of the  Transmission of Viral Hepatitis. Type A in the Food Service Area.L.. Favero. Minneapolis. Ayliffe. J.

O. M. Effectiveness of handwashing and disinfection methods in  removing transient bacteria after patient nursing. Camb. 1991.11  Prohibition. Parts 110. J. Establishment Inspection. J.14  When to Wash. J.11  2­304. 50(4): 289­294. Code of Federal Regulations.. Title 21. 27:56­71. Sheena. Rev.. 1971. or Using Tobacco.  Investigations Operations Manual. J. Pottinger. The survival of salmonellas on finger­tips and  transfer of the organisms to foods. World Health Organization.. Drinking. (Jewelry)  Clean Condition. (Outer Clothing)  Eating. G. J..  Bacterial carriage by artificial versus  natural nails.11  2­402. Part 178.10 Personnel. Infect. Pether.S. Camb. KY.  2­301.  3.E. Food Prot.1010 Sanitizing Solutions. Healthy carriage of Staphylococcus aureus: Its  prevalence and importance. Title 21. 1980. Bacteriol. January..Procedures for Disinfection of Hands.*  Reserved.  2. 17(6):340­344.. Bibliography  211  . 57 pp. 2 pp. Hyg." (4) "Removing all unsecured  jewelry.  7. Lexington. Control.  Equipment and Utensils.  6. R.11  Maintenance. in an effective manner. S.13  Special Handwashing Procedures. J. (Hair Restraints)  1.A. Williams. Subchapter 530. Burns...*  1. Code of Federal Regulations.*  Effectiveness. and C.  2­301. and A." (6) "Wearing. Lexington Board of Health. 85:193­203. Efficacy of germicidal hand wash agents in  use in a meat processing plant. (Fingernails)  1. Food Section 534. Food and Drug Administration. 1989. hair nets. 1999.  Chapter 5.  2­303.16  Hand Sanitizers. Handwashing et cetera.  2­301.11  2­401. (b) (1) "Wearing  outer garments suitable to the operation. Hyg. Gilbert.J. Stiles. Manake. and R.  1.V. Smith..Z. J. 1987. Ojajarvi.  2­302. where appropriate. Jr. 69:673­681..  2.E.  Am. 1963. Personal  Hygiene Sanitation Programs.

 Parts 108 ­ Emergency Permit Control. Feldman.  3­201.11  Compliance with Food Law.. Medvesky.. Shaygani.*  1. 212  Bibliography  .A.  Washington.. Title 21. K. 1984. 298:76­79. beard covers.  Bacteriol. The occurrence and  survival of coliforms and salmonellas in apple juice and cider."  and (9) "Taking other necessary precautions. M. Fate of enterohemorrhagic  Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple cider with and without preservatives. Med.. M. 1987.  2. R. A. J.E. Lewis. R. N. J. McMillan.A. 46:521­530. Hobbs and R.E. Jr.I. Rep.G.P.*  1..S. T. J.  3­201.C. Public Health Service. Engleberg. or other effective hair restraints. M. Am. Black.. drinking beverages or using tobbaco. Code of Federal Regulations.. Besser.  Unpasteurized  milk: The hazards of a health fetish. Wakelee. 1979. Shannon.  Environ. J. N. J. Med. Morb. P. Feely.E. 1993. Code of Federal Regulations. Blake and R.P.P.. and 114 ­ Acidified Foods. Part 123 Fish and Fishery Products..F. Grade "A" Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. Engl. T. Doyle and R. Goverd. DC. 36:812­813. Beech.  salted whitefish.  MacLeod and A." (8)  "Confining. M.  Department of Health and Human Services. Kauffmann.eating food.  3.J. Centers for Disease Control. Morris.  3­201.C.. Title 21.  2.13  Fluid Milk and Milk Products. Jackson. 59(8): 2526­2530.*  1.. F. Food and Drug Administration.. J.. Epidemic Yersinia enterocolitica infection  due to contaminated chocolate milk.  3.  2.14  Fish.  U. chewing gum. Mortal. Microbiol.  113 ­ Thermally Processed Low­acid Foods Packaged in Hermetically Sealed  Containers. Potter.A. Tsai.12  Food in a Hermetically Sealed Container. Appl..E. Wkly. 252:2048­2052. Zhao."  Chapter 3 Food  3­201. J. Pollard and P. Assoc. R. R.M. caps. International outbreak associated with ungutted.head bands.W. K.*  1. 1978. 1995.A. Appl.A.

Blake. DC. Intern.  3­201.. The Biology and Cultivation of Edible  Mushrooms. J. Bibliography  213  . Ray and M.C. and W. 1978. 1990.J. Public Health Service. Food and Drug Administration. Morris.  44(12):56. and S. J. Baltimore Sun Newspaper via Associated Press. J. 109:261­263. J.  3. S. S.  Med. National Shellfish Sanitation Program Guide  for the Control of Molluscan Shellfish. Food Prot. 1986. January 16.F. 43:111­  128.. 98:336­337.D. Morse. Intern. 1983.  4.C.  2. Toxicol.  3. Hayes. 17:91­128.R. Sources of shellfish in outbreaks of probable  viral gastroenteritis: Implications for control. Rev. February 9.  Retail Food Protection Program Information Manual. J.  5.  Occurrence of enteric bacteria and viruses in oysters. 1986. Food and Drug Administration.  6. Food Supplies ­ Wild mushrooms (6/11/87). Vibrio vulnificus: A new monster of the deep? Ann. Associated Press. Toxic mushroom contamination of wild  mushrooms in commercial distribution. R. J.16  Wild Mushrooms. Academic Press. Cichowicz.*  1. Ann.  3­201. 819 pp. 1988. Washington. Carrick.15  Molluscan Shellfish. Ciguatera fish poisioning: a major common source outbreak in the  U. C.R. 1980. Sobsey.. 49:389­394. Virgin Islands. 1997. 1987. B.  5. Crit.  3.L.  2. Speck. Food Prot.M. Microbial hazards of seafood consumption.T. Med. Gecan. J. Liston. Hackney.G.L. 1997. Poisonous Mushrooms of the Northern United States  and Canada. Jr. Minneapolis. Food Technol.A.S. 1993.  4. Chang. MN.  C.J. 1985.*  1. Food Prot.S. Guzewich.. J. Ammirati. M. Taylor. 1996 report on girl  who picked deadly mushrooms with family gets liver transplant. et al. University of Minnesota Press. Inc. 1997 Cable News Network. 56(8):730­734.  CNN report:  poisonous  mushrooms kill Sebastiani wine family member. Histamine food poisioning: Toxicology and clinical aspects. and D. New York. 58­62.

 Codex Alimentarius Commission.  J.  Poultry Products Inspection Act. Dis.  8. pp. 21 U. A. J.  Tauxe.W.  Bereron. and K.  Contamination of egg shell and contents with Salmonella  enteriditis: a review. Hoard. Rosenow. Appendix IV. Part 17 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife  and Plants.O. 164 pp. 21 U. 63  (166): 45663­45675)  2. L. 201 et seq. 1985­1991. F.*  1. 2nd Ed. Blake.S.*  1. G. Growth of Listeria  monocytogenes in  skim.S. NY.  Homestead Books.21 and 214  Bibliography  .D.17  Game Animals. and D.  (Currently printed in the Federal Register. Humphrey. Lincoff.C. Federal Meat Inspection Act. 56(2): 110­113. 21(1994) 31­  40.H. R. 1993. Title 7. Martin.Mishu. 1994. Code of Federal Regulations... 601 et seq. D. M. 1993. B.  3. Federal Food. Title 50. Lee. 267 pp.  Bacteria on beef  briskets and ground beef: correlation with slaughter volume and antemortem  condemnation.  Van Nostrand Reinhold Company.8. Dreesen.  4. as Amended. E. Marth. Hogue. and Cosmetic Act. A. D. Poisonous Hallucinogenic Mushrooms. J.A.  1994. Pratt. E. 1977. 169:547­552. Hoard.7. 451 et seq. 1980.  3. Rodrigue. and E. P.13. Brookfield. and R. 119. Part 59. Food Prot. Mitchel. Cook.S. 119­149. Koehler. Greene.  Draft Revised Code of Hygienic Practice  for Game (April 1993).  Outbreaks of Salmonella enteritidis infections in the United  States.  3­202.  International Journal of Food Microbiology.  Refrigeration and Labeling  Requirements for Shell Eggs.C. James.M.J. and D..R. Code of Federal Regulations.  Alinorm 93/16A. New York.  2. whole and chocolate milk. and in whipping cream during incubation at  4.  5. Drug. W.11  Temperature. Ragland.D. Infect.T.  6. L. S. 1987.V. T.  4.C.S. Toxic and Hallucinogenic Mushroom Poisoning. Hickman Brenner. 21 U..  3­201.

 Avian Dis. Food and Drug Administration... D. 1990.B.*  1. Tauxe.A.A. Growth of  Salmonella enteritidis in yolk of shell eggs from normal and seropositive  hens. Production of Salmonella enteritidis ­  contaminated eggs by experimentally infected hens. 50:452­259. Gast. J.E. Rinkle.M. The emergence of Grade A  eggs as a major source of Salmonella enteritidis infections: New implications  for the control of salmonellosis. Potter. 1982. Barlett. and D. The emergence of Grade A eggs as a major source of  Salmonella enteritidis infections.G. and Weight Classes for Shell Eggs.35° C. Blake.A. Food Prot. Halvorson. Title 7..L. Potter. Morb.. 97:258­260. Med. 1990. E. K.  and P. Rep. Bradshaw.  5. Nagaraja..  Update: Salmonella enteritidis infections and  Grade A shell eggs ­ United States. Part 59. Foodborne illness associated  with niacin: Report of an outbreak linked to excessive niacin in enriched  cornmeal. Spengler.  3­202. Am. Morrie.  3­202. M.  7. C. Public Health Rep.G. J.  Retail Food Protection Program  Information Manual. Louis.V. D. Food Prot. Kim. Emery.A. J. Shah. Jr. J. Madden. and J. Louis. Med.  6. Centers for Disease Control.S.K. Avian Dis. Assoc.L. T.  5. and J.* Bibliography  215  . Morse.J. Am. et al. Mortal.W. M. St. Part 56. Guzewich. R. H. Grades. Wkly. Pasteurized. 53 (12):1033­1036. Regulations Governing the Grading  of Shell Eggs and U.E. Code of Federal Regulations.. D.J. Forney.14  Eggs and Milk Products.  3­202. 259:2103­2107. Food Supplies ­ Sulfiting agents on food in  retail food establishments (9/10/87).. 1988.12  Additives.  2. St.  3. Title 7.E.  J. J. P.  4. Standards. 1989. J. 33:735­742.M. Regulations Governing the  Inspection of Eggs and Egg Products. Assoc. E. 259:2103­2107. R.V. M. 34:438­446. 1987. 1988. Code of Federal Regulations. Beard.*  1. DeMelfi.  37:490­496. Morse. 1988. D. and C. Effect  of time and temperature on growth of Salmonella enteritidis in experimentally  inoculated eggs.13  Shell Eggs.  2.

J. Survival of Listeria  monocytogenes during the manufacture and storage of nonfat dry milk. Part 59.17  Shucked Shellfish. Cliver. 2nd  Ed.  Food Prot. Condition.M. Public Health Service. Baker. 1988.   Food  Technol. G.  Food Technol. R.C. 1985. 1997. Hogarty. Parasitic protozoa and worms relevant to the U.  1.S. J.L. An outbreak of  multiple­drug­resistant Salmonella Enteritis from raw milk. C. and O. Food and Drug Administration. CT.  Public Health Service.*  Shellstock. Grade "A" Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. 1997.1. Poon et al. D. Stadelman. Marth.L. Cotterill (Eds.  3­202. S. Survival of Salmonella  typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus in eggs cooked by different  methods. Washington DC... 62:1211­1216. 1985. Am.  1. Washington. 216  Bibliography  .B.  6.E. D. W. J. 1983.18  3­202. Dominguez. 161­186.  3­202. 42(10):241­248. Food and Drug Administration. Egg pasteurization. 48(9):740. Code of Federal Regulations. Cunningham.  4.*  1.  5. 1990. Food and Drug Administration.. Med.. J. 44(5):106­112. Doyle. 253:2058­2060. Public  Health Service.  National Shellfish Sanitation Program Guide  for the Control of Molluscan Shellfish.  3. F. DC. National Shellfish Sanitation Program Guide  for the Control of Molluscan Shellfish.. in Egg Science and Technology. M.. Control of Communicable  Disease. Code of Federal Regulations. Regulations Governing the  Inspection of Eggs and Egg Products. AVI Publishing Company.. Packaging and Identification.O.P. Inc.  Westport. Part 1240. 1977. L..19  Shellstock Identification.  2.).H..C. Cohen. Fisher and M. Tacket.16  Ice. Poultry Sci.  3­202. pp.  2. L. Title 21. Washington.O. Title 7. Virus transmission via foods; A scientific status summary by the  Institute of Food Technologists' Expert Panel on Food Safety and Nutrition.  Assoc. 1995. H.J.  2. Meske and E. Jackson.

 R.S. S. Med.C.F. R. Black.  82 pp.J. Maintaining Identification. 1965. Jijina. Guzewich.A. H.A. 1981. D. Wekell. and J. Crisley. Shellfish Res.3. and K. Grabau. Microbiological quality of oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and water  of live holding tanks in Seattle. Syndromes of Vibrio vulnificus infections: clinical and epidemiological  features in Florida cases 1981­1987. Hanrahan.. J.11  Molluscan Shellfish.. Foter. Epidemiol.L.  6. M. Kaysner. Med.M.*  1. G.R. L.  3­301.E. N. Deible. Intern. J.  7. S.C.J.E. Food and Drug Administration.R. J. 1986.. Shellfish Res. Nishitani. 7:695­701.A. Schreider. 1988. Ann. 1988. Cukor and N.  Office of Seafood.  3­203. Blacklow.  1988. Food Supplies ­ Special requirements for  retaining shell­stock "tags". J.  5. Stricot. 1983. M.  U.12  Shellstock. Colburn. Matches. Dykes. Klontz. Abeyta. and R.. 109:318­323.  Hand washing to prevent  diarrhea in day care centers. Rippey. Food and Drug Administration. Janowski. 1994. R.  Widespread outbreaks of clam and oyster associated gastroenteritis: Role of  Norwalk virus. F. 314:678­681. D.E. Am.D.C.R. A. 52(2):100­104. The use of antimicrobial soaps and detergents Bibliography  217  .G. J. Lieb. Gunn. Baldy and R. 1989. Nowak.Department of Health  & Human Services. Potential hazards of Dinophysis to  consumers and shellfisheries. J. Washington. Public Health Service. M. Engl.R. Food and Drug Administration. J. A. Food Prot.P. Original Container.L.11  Preventing Contamination from Hands. Chew.  (3/29/83). Morse. 1:653­669. C.  3­203. K. Herrman.C.  4. Jr. L.  1.. 1997. N. C.  2.M. Retail Food Protection Program  Information Manual.. K.  J. Shayegani. Seafood Borne Disease Outbreaks. PSP toxins in Pacific Coast states: monitoring  programs and effects on bivalve industries. Anderson et al. and M. J.*  1.  2. J. 113:445­451.T.  Stott. K. WA markets.  National Shellfish Sanitation Program Guide  for the Control of Molluscan Shellfish. Freudenthal.

 Microbiol.. H. M. Hyg. Horwood. Evaluation of three handwashing modalities commonly  employed in the food processing industry. and V. 69:673­681. 48(7):595­599.A.  3­302. The survival of salmonellas on finger­tips and  transfer of the organisms to foods. 16:133­136. 1964. R. Milk Food Technol. 1971.P. Appl.P. N.  6. and  Segregation. Dairy Food Environ. Deibel.E.O.V. Lilly and J. Lowbury. Doors.J. Minch. 53:2394­2396. The numbers and types of bacteria found on  the hands of food handlers.12  Food Storage Containers. Hernandez. Disinfection of hands: Removal of  transient organisms. Martin. Healthy carriage of Staphylococcus aureus: Its  prevalence and importance. Camb.N. Food Safety  10:165­174. 2:230­233.  3.* 218  Bibliography  . J. L. Isolation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from  retail fresh meats and poultry.  Epidemiol.. D.  3­302.  3. 27:56­71.L. K...  J.for hand washing in food service establishments. Sofos. Doyle. and R. 28:278­  284.  3­302. 1992. 1985.  4.  7.J. Packaging.. Sveum and D. Dickson. Blankenship.  5.J.D. T. Food Prot. M. Pierson. Pether.  8. Paulson. Bull. Substitute for Raw Shell Eggs for Certain  Recipes. Title 21. J. 1951. Environ.E.  Contamination of hands  and work surfaces with Salmonella enteritidis PT4 during the preparation of  egg dishes.A. Code of Federal Regulations.. Sanit. M. M.  4.  12(10):615­618. J.13  Pasteurized Eggs.L. Brit. Stern.  1994.W.11  Packaged and Unpackaged Food ­ Separation. Humphrey. Unavoidable Contaminants in  Food for Human Consumption and Food­Packaging Material.P. E.S. 113: 403­409.  Ng. Infect. 1987. and A. 1990. and J. Westhoff. H. Bacteriol. M. J.*  1. J.S. Rev. Gilbert. Doyle. J. Food Res. K. Survival and growth of Listeria monocytogenes on beef  tissue surfaces as affected by simulated processing conditions.  2.S.J. Schoeni.P. 1963. Williams. Med. Prevalence  and distribution of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in retail  meats.C.P. J. H. S. Whitehead. Part 109. Identifed with Common Name of Food.

 Fecal contamination of fruits and  vegtables during cultivation and processing for market.11  Food Contact with Equipment and Utensils. Food Sci. J. Prohibited as Ingredient. Romero.  34:184­195. Geldreich.. R..L.L. Wagner. Appl. Food Prot. Food Prot.*  Washing Fruits and Vegetables.  3­302. Lin.. J.1. 1977. 1988.R.. M. J.  2. Lin. USDA/ARS Albany. 1992. Wilson. Cotterill (Eds. 55(8):1925­1927. Nierman and J..B. Peeler. 1989. 1971. 1997. C. Poelma and A. pp 161­186. 51:596­599.  3­303. W. J. Madden.  3. Cheng­I Wei*.B. Environ.E.  Storage or Display of Food in Contact with Water or Ice. Cunningham.E. Beuchat.  CA 94710.  4.M. L.  2.S.  1998. Bibliography  219  . E. USDA/ARS. 53:558­562.12  Ice Used as Exterior Coolant.H. Liewen.  J. 55(10):821­823.  World Health Organization. Bordner. F.  3­304. Stevenson. 60(7): 858­863. Cheng­I Wei*. P. Food Prot. CT. Steinbrugge. 1990. 2nd  Ed..*  1. Satchell.  42:359­364. J.  Food Safety Issues. W. 47 pp. Heisick.  Egg Pasteurization Manual (ARS 74­48).  1.B.15  Protection from Unapproved Additives. L. F.  42 pp.  Transfer of Salmonella montevideo onto the  Interior Surfaces of Tomatoes by Cutting. Stadelman. and R.E. J. Food Prot. Bacteriological  survey of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus at the retail level.  5. Maxcy and M.  Surface Decontamination of Fruits and  Vegetables Eaten Raw: A Review.  found in fresh market produce. D. Estela and G.  J. AVI Publishing Company. Microbial pathogens in fresh produce ­ the regulatory  perspective.T.J. Andrews.  J. Microbiol. E.  7.  Transfer of Salmonella montevideo onto the  Interior Surfaces of Tomatoes by Cutting. Chia­Min. 1969. 60(7): 858­863.).  Westport. and O.H.. 1997. The  survival of Shigella sonnei in shredded cabbage..14  3­302. in Egg Science and Technology.  6.H. Listeria spp.E. Inc. Chia­Min. Milk Food Technol.  J. Allen. 1977. Egg pasteurization. Andrews. Fate of Listeria  monocytogenes on ready­to­serve lettuce. P.  1.11  3­303. Food Prot.

S. and Sally F. 69:2791­2796.  3. 1971. and Utensils. Appl. 113: 403­409. T. Infect. Humphrey. 34:12­15. Para.F. Escartin. H. Pohls.  Contamination of hands  and work surfaces with Salmonella enteritidis PT4 during the preparation of  egg dishes. Infect.. Wolff. Aleksic.U. H. J.  2. Elizabeth and Sally F. Food Prot.  8. drying and chemical disinfection on contamination of  cleaning cloths.  Investigations of the effectiveness  of detergent washing. Occurrence of Bacillus cereus in selected dry  food products.  4. Rhodehamel and D. Goepfert. and J. 52(7):471­472. Karch. 1986.14  Wiping Cloths. H.  1990. Dairy Sci. Scott. P..  6. Bacteriol..W. Kim.  J. M.  1994. K.  Scott. Bockemuh.A. Whitehead. Appl. Med. Lozano. Micro. J.  3­304.J.  An Outbreak Due to Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia  coli O157/H7 in a Children Day­Care­Center Characterized by Person­to­  Person Transmission and Environmental Contamination. Elizabeth.  Epidemiol.  in cantaloupe.  The Survival and Transfer of  Microbial Contamination via Cloths. Hands and Utensils.J. 28(4): 534­  543.M. 68: 279­283. Bloomfield. Vir. Martin. W. J. Scott. Appl.  J. Food and Drug Administration. Bloomfield. 1993.  1994. Bloomfield. J. Between­Use Storage. 220  Bibliography  .  Zentralblatt Fur  Bakteriologie­International. Golden.A. and A. J. J. Hands.  1.  J.W.A. Lopes. Evaluation of dairy and food plant sanitizers against Salmonella  typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes. watermelon.. Ayala and J. E. Reida. 56(3):194­196. Dis.C. G. S. Elizabeth and Sally F.  3­304.12  In­Use Utensils.  1990. Milk Food Technol.  1.  J. Legnacher. Food Preparation ­ Between­use storage of  food preparation utensils (5/14/84).  7. A. Bacteriol. Growth of Salmonella  spp.2.  5. Int. Kautter.  1990.. Kuhlmann. Survival and growth of  Salmonella and Shigella on sliced fresh fruit. E. 1984.  Retail Food Protection Program  Information Manual. A.  The Survival and Transfer of  Microbial Contamination via Cloths. Limitation. and honeydew melons. Bacteriol. Food Prot. 68:  271­278. 1989.  68: 271­278.

 Immunol.  Hazard analysis and control of roast beef  preparation in foodservice establishments. Bibliography  221  . Donald H.. Schwartz. M. 1995. and S.  3­304. Food Protection ­ Refilling of take­home  beverage containers (8/29/85). 10(5):273­  275. A. J.  93(4): 751­758.  The  Transfer of Protein Allergens From Latex Gloves. 59(3): 605­613. 1990.. Howard J. Anthony Lamanna. Baker.  April. Allergy Clin.  Cornstarch  Powder on Latex Products is an Allergen Carrier.E. Bryan. and Jeffrey Wiseman. Castellani. 1998. Beezhold.  March 1994.  Retail Food Protection Program Information Manual. L. J.E.  Franklin N. 1985.  Survival of Salmonella enteritidis on and in shelled eggs.  Am.L. Meisner.  1. R.  AORN J. Craven. Phys.11  Raw Animal Foods.  liquid eggs. Kostyal. Allergy Clin.  4. 95: 139­140.  January 1. McKinley.W..  4.R. Latex: A potential hidden “food” allergen in fast food  restaurants. Immunol. Use Limitation. 1979. 57(1): 93­  100.  3­401. Sumana. Adkinson. Shampaine.3­304. Environ.  1.15  Gloves.13  Consumer Self­Service Operations.  3.C. M. Roasting time  and temperature required to kill food poisoning microorganisms introduced  experimentally into stuffing in turkeys.  2. Hamilton. R. Tomazic. Food and Drug Administration. Food and Drug Administration.*  1. F.  3. 1952.17  Refilling Returnables. 42(1):4­18. Gibson and D.  Dairy Food Environ. 1994. and T.G. Fod Prot. Food Res. 1982. Fam. Sanit.I. Microbiol.  Latex Allergy. Food Protection ­ Customer self­service of  bulk food (4/16/84).. Blankenship. F.  3­306.. Campylobacter jejuni survival in  chicken meat as a function of temperature. Clark.D. Reddy. Vesna J. and Robert G. Thomas J.  Retail Food Protection Program Information  Manual. 44(1):88­  92. David A. 1984. Withrow.  J. Jr. Appl. Eric L.. and cooked egg products.  2. 18:131­138.*  1.

 Kotula. Title 9.  48 (4):855­856.  12.  Morb. Shah. Warren.L.  J.  Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts Survival under Defined  Temperatures. Food Sci. A. Stroda. Bradshaw and J. 1991. Goodfellow.L.10. Martin. Part 318..H.E.  Update: Multistate outbreak of Escherichia  coli O157:H7 infections from hamburgers ­ western United States. 1992.  Lethality of heat to Escherichia coli O157:H7: D­  value and Z­value determinations in ground beef. 54 (10):62­  766. and  D.R.  10.D. 84(4):862­865. J. R. K. J. A. Doyle.S. 1994. 1992.W.. K. Brown. Trichinella  spiralis: Effect of high temperature on infectivity in pork.G. L. Fain.. 1993. J. Wkly.L. and  Expressible Juice Color Relationships in Ground Beef Patties.  14... Dubey.  15.E..L. A. 42 (14):258­263.T. and W.  8..P.. Sharar. Food Prot. Exp. Lechowich. J. Parasitol. Food Prot. 57(9): 831­  844. Food Sci. J.V. Murell. Jr.  13.  9. Fate of Salmonella inoculated into beef  for cooking. 1991. Line. Thermal resistance of egg­  associated epidemic strains of Salmonella enteritidis. 76 (2):201­204. 1998.  Taenia solium neurocysticercosis.  11. S. Andrews.B.E. Internal Cooked Color. Food Prot. Carosella  and W. J. Lindsay.  59(3):465­470.  16. and J..P.L. 1978.5. Peeler. Sanit.  Survival and growth characteristics of  Escherichia coli associated with hemorrhagic colitis. Code of Federal Regulations.J. 1990. Centers for Disease Control. S.P. 12(6):341­345.B. Brown. 1994.C. 41(8):598­605.D. Smith. C.W. Kastner. M.  7. M.L. C.M. D.. D.  Effect  of high temperature on infectivity of Toxoplasma gondii tissue cysts in pork. 222  Bibliography  .L. 1993.A. 56:391­  393. Lamb. J. Smith. Acosta­Stein and L. Kropf. Endpoint Temperature. Microbiol. Mortal.  6. Hague. Schoeni.  J. J. 1984. J. 1983. Environ. Rep. Prescribed Treatment of Pork  and Products Containing Pork to Destroy Trichinae. A. Moran. A. M. Parasitol. Johnson. and D. Parasitol. Toxoplasma gondii in meats ­ a matter of concern? Dairy  Food Environ.M.  J.  J. J.  Appl. Dubey. 56:15­  19. L. Hunt. Kotula.

  Destruction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in food and  Non­Food Systems by Microwaves. R.B. J. S.A. R.G.R. New York. 19:209­212. J. Van  Nostrand Reinhold. Anantheswaran. 1984.  1996.S. J. 1974.  Food Prot.  J.  Viability  Loss of Salmonella Species.S. K. C. 49(3):972­973. Biglari.A.W. Milk Food Technol. potatoes and frozen and canned green beans after microwave  heating in a simulated cook/chill hospital food service system.. Post­processing temperature rise in foods: Hot air and  microwave ovens. J. 57(11)1025­1037. Food  Prot. J.  Factors Affecting Microwave Heating of  Foods and Microwave Induced Destruction of Food Pathogens ­ A Review. Jamesen and D.  J. Staphylococcus aureus. Matthews and E. Bier. Esselen.  241 pages. Heddleson.  18. 1980. 1985. C. Thermal resistance of food poisioning  microorganisms in poultry stuffing. Food Prot.17. Craven. 39:211­212.A.C. B. Swaminathan. Food Sci. Webster. Lillard. Destruction of  pathogenic bacteria in turkeys roasted in microwave ovens.A. S. and Listeria  monocytogenes in Complex Foods Heated by Microwave Energy. 1993.A. Ward. and C.  50:873­875. Hackney.12  Microwave Cooking.*  1. 1991. 59(8)813­818. 1993. Effect of microwave heating of precooked  chicken on Clostridium perfringens.  6. 1985.  5.E. Aleixa.11  Parasite Destruction. Dahl.  43:916­923. Czechowicz.  3­402. Sawyer.  University of Minnesota.E. S. Heddleson.  2. J. Food Sci.*  1.  3­401.E.  Experimental Anisakiasis: Cultivation and Temperaturre Bibliography  223  . and H. S. 1976.  7.. and S. Marth. 1956. Fate of Staphylococcus aureus  in beef loaf. 48(5):429­434. Thompson.D. J. Pratt.. Doores. J. Doores. R. 880. R.H.  Ph.  4. Kuhn.  8. Internal end temperature  and survival of bacteria on meats with and without a polyvinylidene chloride  wrap during microwave cooking.M.  Microbiology of Marine Food Products. D.D. Food Sci.C.. M. Food Prot. 212 pp. C.A.  3.A. and S.. and W. Sawyer. and G.S. Thesis.R.

 Kaneko.L. J.  11. 39:132­137. 1970. Parasitol. 276 pp. Office of Seafood.I. Gustafson. and P. J. Behavior and viability of  third stage larvae of Terranova (HA) and Anasakis simplex (Type 1) under  coolant conditions. and Retention. P.L. Serodiagnosis and Control. Jackson.R.  Retail Food Protection Program Information  Manual (8/21/87)... Can. and R. Food and Drug Administration. T. 39(3):69­74.  3­402. Netherlands.. The effect of freezing on encysted Anisakis larvae. Parasitic protozoa and worms relevant to the U.. 1986. Bennett. 1994. 224  Bibliography  . E.  Parasitol.  10. R.L.W.  9. R.  University of Utrecht.. U. 52:416­418.S. J. 1987. 138 pp.  74:233­250. The effects of physical stimuli on larval stages of Terranova  decipiens. Throm. 44(5):106­112. Deardorff.  2. Milk Food Technol. J. 1998. 1987. Food and Drug Administration in  response to the proposed FDA HACCP program for seafood.12  3­403. K. J. 1960. Bartram. 38:623­642. R.  3. Food Preparation ­ Raw. and M. Serological activity and in vitro toxicity of  Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins A and D in selected canned foods. G. Commercial blast­freezing kills third stage  larvae of Anisakis simplex encapsulated in salmon and rockfish.V. Food and Drug Administration. G. J.Tolerance Determinations.  6.. Ruitenberg. 1994 submitted  to Dockets Management Branch.S. Foodborne parasites transmitted to man from fish and other  aquatic foods.  4. Food Technol.  See Part 4:  Critical Review of FDA Position on Parasite Hazards in Tuna. Raybourne.11  Records.Food Prot.*  1.  Fish and Fishery Products Hazards and  Controls Guide. Food  Technol. Zool. Deardorff. Creation. 1990. J.  A position paper dated May 25.  8. 1953.S.  Food Sci. 47:49­52.  7. Ronald. 1985. Anisakiasis: Pathogenesis. 39:585­588.  5. Desowitz.B. Haigashi.J.  Reheating for Hot Holding. T. 1988. marinated or  partially cooked fishery products. Berry.

  8. M.  Determination of unsatisfactory temperature  distributions within foods heated in microwave ovens. Woodburn. and F in some foods and buffers.  Viability  Loss of Salmonella Species.J. Craven. and T. 44(6):1653­1657. 44:1658­1661.A.. Thermal inactivation of  Clostridium perfringens after growth at several constant and linearly rising  temperatures. Food Refrigeration & Process Engineering Research Centre.  4.J. R. Thermal inactivation of  Clostridium botulinum toxins types A and B in buffer. Busta and D. E. 46:1586­1591. Kuhn. J.  Food Technol.L.  5.  3. J.11  3­501. Johnson. cooking.D.T.J. 1979. Slacking.  J. B. 1974. Busta. Food Sci.E. J.A.  Potentially Hazardous Food.  Food Sci. and beef and  mushroom patties. Growth and sporulation of Clostridium perfringens in foods. 34(4):80­87.R.  Microbiol. F. J.  7. 37:420­429... Doores. University of Bristol. Heddleson.14  Cooling. 1979. contract number MATI­CT  940014.A.. 1983. E. J. Food Sci.  Measurement and  Testing Programme (MTP). Nickerson and S. S. 1980. J.M.. R. K.L. Part 2.F. and Listeria  monocytogenes in Complex Foods Heated by Microwave Energy. R. Food  Prot. 1981. Staphylococcus aureus.R. Roy. C. Heat  inactivation rates of botulism toxin A. 15(2):344­349. Bryan.13  Frozen Food. Influence of temperature on  germination and growth of spores of emetic and diarrheal strains of Bacillus  cereus in growth medium and in rice. S.12  3­501.W. J. 48:286­287.T. Bradshaw. Food Sci.F. 1967. Prevention of foodborne illness by time­  temperature control of thawing. UK. Anantheswaran.J.  9.  6.  3­501. Twedt. Ribich.G. reporting period 1  March 95 to 1 August 96.* Bibliography  225  . C. Goldblith.. Rodriguez and E. 1993. Somers. McKinley. Appl. Licciardello.M.  Thawing. Schantz. 59(8)813­818. Nelson and F. Peeler and R. J.C. F. Milk Food Technol.  1. J. Thompson.2.. and G. J. chilling and reheating of turkeys in  school lunch kitchens. Kinetics of  the thermal inactivation of type E Clostridium botulinum toxin.  3­501. Framework 3.

1.16  Potentially Hazardous Food.  J. 45(7):7077. J. Behavior in warm holding  temperatures.  Prevention of Foodborne Diseases in Food Service  Establishments. Environ. Bains. Ammar.L. Assoc. Public Health 51:76­88. R. Microbiol. F. Beauchat and M. 1979. Leffler and C. Lewis. Matthews. Foter and K..L.  2. Cook­chill foodservice systems: Temperature  histories of a cooked beef product during the chilling process. Appl. 36(3):167­171. Diet. Appl. 1955.  40:782­784. S. Assessment of the sanitary effectiveness of  holding temperatures on beef cooked at low temperature. Health 36(6):537­540.  Appl. F.15  Cooling Methods.  31:124­132. 1972.M. Blankenship. J. Angelotti.C. Milk Food  Technol.C. and R.F..E.  2. Bryan. Am.. and temperature. N. Environ. Hot and Cold Holding. J. K. J. 59(8):2364­2368. M.  1988. J.  6.E. Brown.P. Foster.B. Custer.G. D. 1977. Diet. 1974.*  1.. Survival and growth of  Escherichia coli:O157:H7 in ground roasted beef as affected by pH. U. Cooling rates and bacterial growth in food  prepared and stored in quantity. Fate of Salmonella 226  Bibliography  . L. M. 1961.  4. Bacterial growth in chicken  salad. Craven. Read. Broth and white sauce.  Microbiol. 24:  599­603. White. II. I. M.L. Bryan. R. Lewis. Application of HACCP to ready­to­eat chilled foods..L.  5. Food  Technol.L.J. Time­temperature effects on  Salmonellae and Staphylococci in foods.W. Doyle.  3­501. J. Weisner and A. Abdul­Raouf. Bryan. Environ. Am.J.  2. Longrée. and R. F.H.L.  4.  3. 1953.M.R. and J. Growth of  Clostridium perfringens in cooked chili during cooling. Food Prot. 1990. Dickerson.  J. Jr.  3­501. Schoeni and E. and M. 1973... 1993. Rollin. Health 41(4):198­206. Am.M. Microbiol.  3.S.. J.  acidulants. Jr. H.R. 29:1094­1099. Winter.N.  1. Twedt. Assoc..  Identifying Foodborne Disease Hazards in Food Service  Establishments.. Environ. Cooling rates of foods. R. L. 1982. 54(5):1104­1108.

 1988. Influence of temperature on  germination and growth of spores of emetic and diarrheal strains of Bacillus  cereus in growth medium and in rice.  15:1172­1177. 49(12):1003­1009. Am.  2. Survival of Escherichia coli in food at hot­  holding temperatures. J. 51(11):862­  865.. S. Food Prot. C. Busta. Growth and toxin production by Bibliography  227  . Makukutu. and N. Willardsen.E.  Microbial Food Safety Research Unit.B. J. 59:944­949. 51:596­599. Is refrigeration enough to restrain foodborne pathogens? J.*  1. Bajard.. T. Kautter. J..  3­501. Maxcy and M.  3. 1986. 1967.  9. Food Prot. 1994. 1996. K.  Food Prot.P.A. and R. Potentially Hazardous Food. 1986.D. Growth and survival  of Clostridium perfringens during constantly rising temperatures.*  Ready­to­Eat. Kautter. Solomon. Johnson. Lahellec.  3­501. F.R. P. J. Palumbo. Guthrie.  6.B. J. Rosso.18  Ready­to­Eat. 1978..E. Outgrowth and toxin production by  Clostridium botulinum in bottles of chopped garlic. Edell et al. Busta. 45:152­156. Effect of cooking and holding on hams and  turkey rolls contaminated with Clostridium perfringens.  2. Fournaud.  Version 4. Microbiol.. L.  Differential Growth of Listeria monocytogenes at 4 and 8°C: Consequences for  the Shelf Life of Chilled Products. Ripp. Flandrois. and D.F. Food Prot. Appl. C. Snyder. E. Food Prot. and D.M. Epidemiol.H.M.. Disposition. Strong. Food Prot. S. 1981.19  Time as a Public Health Control. 113:436­444. J. Solomon. J.0. C. Potentially Hazardous Food. Smith. 1988..  43:470­475. Pathogen Modeling Program. H. R.  4.B. 1986.*  1. 1983. C.D. Steinbruegge. J. 48:286­287. Seals.  5. and Veit. D. Nelson and F. USDA ARS Eastern Regional Research Center. Date Marking.. Allen and L. R.. Fate of Listeria  monocytogenes on ready to serve lettuce.M.typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus in meat salads prepared with  mayonnaise.K.A.A. J. Liewen. Food Sci.  7. J.M.F. J.A.17  3­501. Food Sci. H.A. Philadelphia. J. Restaurant associated botulism:  transmission by potato salad.  8. PA.L. 49(7):496­499.

 Outgrowth and toxin production by  Clostridium botulinum in bottled chopped garlic. Foodservice  Systems 4:125­131. Food Technol. 1988. Dickerson. Barber.) 1992. 1973. Food Technol. Influence of food environments on growth of Staphylococcus  aureus and production of various enterotoxins. 1972. and R. 1985.  8. 24:891­898. J. Food Microbiol.P. Solomon..  HACCP Principles and  Applications.  3. Tatini. J.  3­502. 36(11):559­563.11  Variance Requirement. and R. Vet.R. 51(11):862­  865. 49(10):618­620...  4.D.A. Kautter. National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods. Troller. N. J. and D.W. Cooling rates in foods. Appl. T. 1986. O. S.. Deibel. 36(3):167­171. Calculations and measurement of heat  transfer in foods.  5. Effect of pH and oxygen tension on  Staphylococcal growth and enterotoxin formation in fermented sausage. Sperber. 1968. Milk Food  Technol.B. Dickerson. 212 pp.  9. 16:1­23. 24(3):440­443. Int. Van Nostrand Reinhold. Jpn. J. Nakagami and S.  Food Prot.  10. Read. Food Prot. Requirements of Clostridium botulinum for growth and  toxin production.E. M. 1992. Hazard  analysis and critical control point system. H.H. New York. R. Milk Food Technol.  7.  4. 36(12):89­94. Challenge of pasteurized process cheese spreads with  Clostridium botulinum using in­process and post­process inoculation. Sci.  3.  2.. (Eds.Clostridium botulinum in sauteed onions. J. Influence of heating and cooling  rates on spore germination and growth of Clostridium perfringens in media  and in roast beef.. and R. 1972. Food Prot. J. A. Microbiol. R. J. Tanaka. 228  Bibliography  .W. and D.B.A.  6. 1982. Jr. Taji. Effect of water activity on enterotoxin A production and growth  of Staphylococcus aureus.M. W. T. Read.H.  Microbiol. Applying the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points  system in foodservice and foodborne illness prevention. Appl. J. 1973. Snyder. Shigehisa. Corlett Jr. 45:1044­1050. 47(2):259.*  1.. J. 22:1533. F. 1982. Pierson.

O. D. Gill. Food Safety  10:131­153. C. Part 318. 1990.  4.12  Reduced Oxygen Packaging. 1998.. J. Vanderline. Food Drug Offic. R.E.  3. Conner.147.7. Taylor. Growth of Escherichia coli and Salmonella  typhimurium on high­pH beef packaged under vacuum or carbon dioxide. Jr.. A shigellosis outbreak traced to  commercially distributed shredded lettuce.A. Int. J. Perdue.. Humphreys. Bennett.R.  6. J.  J. Food Microbiol.T.  11. Am. Food Prot. Epidemiol.  J. Staphylococcus aureus growth and toxin  production in nitrogen packed sandwiches. 1989.E.. Bibliography  229  . J. and W. R. 1982.M. V. Marth.  Roundtree III. Sapers. Brackett and L.  Control of Listeria  monocytogenes in Vacuum­Packaged Pre­Peeled Potatoes.  10.. J. Beuchat. Assoc. 53:739­741. Association of Food and Drug Officials. Retail guidelines ­ Refrigerated foods  in reduced oxygen packages. Food Prot. 128(6):1312­  1321. Stelma. Kautter. G. Part 381.H. and K. Elmer H. 1991. D. J. 13:21­30. D. Food Science  63(5):911­914. Martin and Gerald M. 1989. and K. 1964. Clostridium botulinum type E in smoked fish. Greene. Code of Federal Regulations. 1998.  29:843­849. J. Kautter.  9.  12.  8. Davis.A.D. Growth of Listeria monocytogenes on  vacuum packaged beef. 52:702­705. J. Berrang. Criteria. and P. 1990. Food Sci. R.N.E. 54(5):80­84.*  1.. Juneja. Food  Prot.  7.P. J.B. Scott. Title 9.W. Vijay.  5.  2. Bernard and D. Grau. Delacy.  Extended Shelf Life Refrigerated Foods: Microbiological  Quality and Safety. Jr.. Growth of Listeria  monocytogenes on fresh vegetables under controlled atmosphere. Stefan T. J. 45(2):157­161. Approval of substances for use in  the preparation of products.T. H. F. Restrictions on the use of  substances in poultry products.N. Title 9.M. Amos. Code of Federal Regulations. 1988. M.N. 746.3­502.  Food Technology 5(2):57­62. Potential  Clostridium botulinum hazards associated with extended shelf­life  refrigerated foods: A review.

 Webber.1993.11  Pasteurized Foods. Wells. P.*  1. J. 230  Bibliography  . 1985. Update: Multistate outbreak of Escherichia coli  O157:H7 infections from hamburgers ­ western United States. Besser.  Consumption of Raw or Undercooked Animal Foods. Nolan. 8(6):288­291. 1988. NY 12235.L.G. Intern. R.O. Rep. 1988. Cohen..A. Med.. 253:2058­2060. D..  4. Refrigerated Foods and Microbiological Criteria Committee of the National Food  Processors Association. M. Troller.. Kauffmann. 8(1):5­7. 1988. Centers for Disease Control.  3­601.M. The emergence of Grade A eggs as a major source of  Salmonella enteritidis infections. H. Guidelines for Reduced  Oxygen Packaging at Retail. Assoc. L.  Med. An outbreak of  multiple­drug­resistant Salmonella enteritidis from raw milk. J.E.T. Am. Mortal.  Assoc. M.F. J. Med.A.  Dairy and  Food Sanitation.C. Am. D.12  3­603.  Refrigerated Foods and Microbiological Criteria Committee of the National Food  Processors Association.A. Morris.  Unpasteurized  milk: The hazards of a health fetish.  2. Med. Am. Minimal water activity for  growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua. 2 pp.B. Jr. Feldman. Barrett.*  1.  14. et al. C. 109:261­263..11  Standards of Identity.13.11  3­601. 252:2048­2052.  3. Prohibited Reservice.M. Int. 1992.E.J. Albany.11  3­602.  Morb. Dominguez. Vibrio vulnificus: A new monster of the deep? Ann. J.  Honestly Presented. 1984. Blake and R. 1993.G. 1 Winners  Circle. Chamblin.  15. 42(14):258­263. Tacket. M. and P. Doyle.  5.  Food Microbiol..  Other Forms of Information. St. New York Department of Agriculture and Markets.  16. Louis. Wkly. S. Potter. and M. J. and Prohibited  Food. Lett.  Dairy and Food Sanitation. 16:323­335.J. T.  3­801. and J. Assoc. Fisher. 1993.A. Division of Food Safety and Inspection.12  3­602. 1992. J.P.  Food Labels. 259:2103­2107.  Factors to be Considered in Establishing Good  Manufacturing Practices for the Production of Refrigerated Foods. 1988. J. A.  Safety Considerations for New Generation  Refrigerated Foods.

 Inc. D.  269(17):2217­2220..  pp.  Contamination of hands  and work surfaces with Salmonella enteritidis PT4 during the preparation of  egg dishes.  Bacteriological Survey of Used Cellulose Sponges and Cotton  Dishcloths from Domestic Kitchens. 113: 403­409.S. C. 382­385. Gerba. B. T.  2.W.  Microbiology of Food Fermentation. Doyle and R. Bartley. 59(8): 2526­2530. 1993. Besser. 1979. Martin. 2nd Ed.E. 1996. Microbiol. January.  Applied and Environmental Microbiology.  NSF. K.E. and C. 46:521­530. 57(6):460­464. Whitehead. R.  1.  J. Beech. Appl. Utensils.  Chapter 4 Equipment.  An Outbreak of Diarrhea and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome From  Escherichia coli O157H:7 in Fresh­Pressed Apple Cider.. Peterson.W. Food Pro. Appl. T. Conner.  3. Kotrola.  Bacteriol. and C.  FINAL REPORT ­ A STUDY ON  BACKFLOW PREVENTION ASSOCIATED WITH CARBONATORS. F. 288­293.  Growth and Survival of Escherichia coli O157H:7  under Acidic Conditions. D. Low.16  Sponges.  International.  J. 1979. Westport. and Linens  4­101. Zhao. and J. Kaspar. 1994.  Annual Book of ASTM Bibliography  231  .. and A. Shannon.. 1993.M.  The occurrence  and survival of coliforms and salmonellas in apple juice and cider. 18­20. Use Limitation.  1995. Am.. Assoc.A.. pp.W. J.P.  4.S.Griffin. Enriquez. MI. Donahue.J.  Environ.  6. January. and C. Connecticut. L. Ann Arbor.  Epidemiol. Use Limitation. Kennedy. Goverd. Food and Environmental  Sanitation.  AVI Publishing  Co. Humphrey... Miller.P. Med. K.G.  5.  Escherichia coli O157:H7 Acid Tolerance  and Survival in Apple Cider.  1.E.  2.  J..B. C. American Society for Testing and Materials. 1992.14  Copper.A..  4­101. Use Limitation.  4­101. Hobbs and R. Pages 20­24. Enriquez­Gordillo. 17. Vol. Fate of enterohemorrhagic  Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple cider with and without preservatives.*  1. pp.I. R.P.  1994. No.  1997.17  Lead in Pewter Alloys. Infect. M. 1.  Dairy..

 9013­  092­108­H0620­101; Booz.B. Department of Agriculture. 1990. Division of  Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases. MI.  Bacterial  Adherence and Viability on Cutting Board Surfaces.  National Sanitation  Foundation.  Department of  Microbiology... T. memo dated January 10. M. Chief. 1996 re:  "Bacterial Contamination of Iced Tea. Principal Investigator. U. 223­80­2295. 56­57.  Journal of Food Safety 14 (1994) 153­172. Allen & Hamilton.  Report on the  Bacterial Effectiveness of a Chlorine Sanitizing Solution at Contact Times of  Less than Ten Seconds.Standards Volume 02. Philadelphia. Bruursema.S.  4­602. Inc. Shah.  4­501.* Bibliography  . 9013­092­108­H0620­101; Booz." to State and Territorial Epidemiologists  and State and Territorial Public Health Laboratory Directors. Miller. M. MI.  ARS Affirms Plastic  Cutting Board Policies.114  Manual and Mechanical Warewashing Equipment.  4­101.  Purchase Order #FDA 665531­00­90­RB.  4­603.J. pp. P. MI..P.  2. NSF International.11  Equipment Food­Contact Surfaces and Utensils. contract No.04. B. D..*  1.  Addendum to Final  Report. 1993.  2.H. ASTM. Foodborne and Diarrheal Diseases Branch. Cohen.. National Center for Infectious Disease and  M. Ann Arbor. contract No. U.A. Use Limitation. Principal Investigator. subcontract No.D. Ann Arbor. Ann Arbor. M.  November. pH. Agricultural Research Service. and  Hardness.S. Allen &  Hamilton. Epstein and D. Inc.  Memo includes  two fact sheets by the Tea Association of the U.V. Division of Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases.P.17  232  Returnables.D. December 6.  414­416.  Food Chemical News.. 1984.  3. Food and Drug  Administration. Miller.. M. Tall.  Relationship of Factors Affecting  Bactericidal Effectiveness of Chlorine Sanitizing Solutions.. Concentration. R.. 223­80­2295. Inc.  Final Report. 1985.  Relationship of Factors Affecting  Bactericidal Effectiveness of Chlorine Sanitizing Solutions.L.19  Wood. Washington. Ann Arbor. Abrishami. Tauxe. S. Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition.  National Sanitation Foundation. Cleaning for Refilling. subcontract No.S. MI and Division of Microbiological  Studies. PA. Chemical  Sanitization ­ Temperature.*  1.  National Center for Infectious Diseases. Director.  1. National Sanitation Foundation.S.C.D.

  International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials.  Building Officials and Code Administrators International. Inc.*  1.  Relationship of Factors Affecting  Bactericidal Effectiveness of Chlorine Sanitizing Solutions. Ann Arbor. Allen & Hamilton.  Addendum to Final  Report.15  Outer Openings. Ann Arbor. IL.  Final Report.  Southern Building Code Congress International.. 1994 Edition. Principal Investigator. Inc.  441pp.11  Hot Water and Chemical.  2.  439pp. CA.”  2. “NFPA 101® Code for Safety to Life from Fire  in Buildings and Structures..  3. subcontract No.  Purchase Order #FDA 665531­00­90­RB. MI. National Fire Protection Association. Walnut.11  Intensity. Plumbing and Waste  1.  4­703. Miller. 223­80­2295.  4. Country Club Hills. Falls Church.  Retail Food Protection Program Information  Manual.  National Association of Plumbing­Heating­Cooling Contractors. Birmingham. MI.  Food and Drug Administration.  1994 Standard Plumbing  Code and 1995 Revisions. Bibliography  233  . 1985. M.  Uniform Plumbing  Code.  3. 9013­  092­108­H0620­101; Booz. “Handbook to the NFPA 101® Code for  Safety to Life from Fire in Buildings and Structures.  2. 223­80­2295. 1994 Edition.  National Sanitation Foundation.  National Sanitation Foundation. M.”  6­303. Inc.  The BOCA National  Plumbing Code/1993. Protected.. National Sanitation Foundation. subcontract No.P. Food Protection ­ Refilling of take­home  beverage containers (8/29/85).  296pp. Miller.1. 1990. VA.  1993 National  Standard Plumbing Code ­ Illustrated.P.  Report on the  Bacterial Effectiveness of a Chlorine Sanitizing Solution at Contact Times of  Less than Ten Seconds. 1994 Edition. Ann Arbor.  6­202.  Chapter 5  Water. 1985. Principal Investigator.  110pp. AL.  Relationship of Factors Affecting  Bactericidal Effectiveness of Chlorine Sanitizing Solutions.  1. National Fire Protection Association.  November.. contract no. 9013­092­  108­H0620­101; Booz. Inc. MI. Allen & Hamilton. 1984. contract No.

 Commercial Refrigerators and 234  Bibliography  . >  Guzewich. 1992.cdc.  ANSI/NSF 7­1997.  ANSI/NSF 2­1996. Slutsker.  NSF International.  Larson. Ann Arbor.  Illuminating Engineering Society of North America. 1983..  NSF International. 1999. No. Joseph  S.  ANSI/NSF 4­1999. 1996. Commercial Spray­Type Dishwashing  and Glasswashing Machines. Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. 1996.  NSF International.  Evaluation of Risks Related to  Microbiological Contamination of Ready­to­eat Food by Food Preparation  Workers and the Effectiveness of Interventions to Minimize Those Risks. MI. 1995. Lighting Handbook. 8th  Ed. NY. MI.cfsan. Jack.  NSF International. Vance.  Foodborne Pathogenic Microorganisms and Natural Toxins Handbook:  The  "Bad Bug Book".  NSF International.1.fda. Laurence. Shapiro.gov. 5. Griffin. and Tauxe.  Ann Arbor. 900+pp. Robert V. 1999. Craig. 2000. MI. Food Equipment.   Ann Arbor.. Water Heaters. Paul S.  <http://www.  NSF 5­1992. Dietz. Marianne P.  Food­Related Illness and Death in the United States.    <http:www. 1996. Ross.gov. E.  and Powered Hot Food Holding and Transport Equipment. McCaig.. 1997. New York.  Additional Chapter 7. 2000.  CFP 2000 Backgrounder:  No Bare Hand Contact.cfsan.htm>  Food and Drug Administration. Special Equipment and/or Devices (Food  Service Equipment). >  Food and Drug Administration.  Ann Arbor. and  Heat Recovery Equipment. MI. MI..  NSF International. 23:251­69. September–October Vol..  ANSI/NSF 6­1996. Rethermalization. 1998. IESNA Publications Dept. Dispensing Freezers (for Dairy  Dessert­Type Products). 1999.  NSF International.  Ann Arbor.. MI. Emerg Infect Dis [serial  online].  March 30.  APIC Guidelines for Handwashing and Hand Antisepsis in  Healthcare Settings. Commercial Cooking.fda. Bresee.  Ann Arbor.. 5.  ANSI/NSF 3­1996.  Food  and Drug Administration.gov/ncidod/EID/eid..0 Food Safety References:  Mead.. 1993. Patricia M. Linda F. Hot Water Supply Boilers.  NSF C2­1983. Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. American Journal of Infection Control.  <http:www.

  ANSI/NSF 59­1997.  Ann Arbor. Food Equipment Materials. 1997. Commercial Powered Food  Preparation Equipment. MI. MI.  Ann Arbor. 1998.  Ann Arbor.  Ann Arbor.  NSF International. MI. MI. MI. Dinnerware.  Ann  Arbor.  NSF International.  NSF International.  Ann Arbor. 1992.  Ann Arbor. MI.  ANSI/NSF 8­1992.  NSF International. 1992. and Utensil Commercial  Spray­Type Washing Machines. MI.  Ann Arbor. 1992.  ANSI/NSF 21­1996. Mobile Food Carts.  MI. MI. MI.  ANSI/NSF 52­1992.  NSF International.  ANSI/NSF 36­1996. Supplemental Flooring. 1992. MI. Commercial Bulk Milk Dispensing  Equipment. Vending Machines for Food and  Beverages. MI.  ANSI/NSF 29­1992. 1996.  ANSI/NSF 13­1992. Detergent and Chemical  Feeders for Commercial Spray­Type Dishwashing Machines.  Ann Arbor.  ANSI/NSF 12­1992.  ANSI/NSF 35­1991.  Ann Arbor. MI. Pan. Refuse Compactors and  Compactor Systems.  Ann Arbor.  Ann Arbor.  ANSI/NSF 18­1996.  NSF International. Thermoplastic Refuse  Containers.  NSF International. MI.  Ann Arbor.  ANSI/NSF 25­1997. Manual Food and Beverage  Dispensing Equipment.  NSF International. Laminated Plastics for Surfacing Food  Service Equipment.   Ann Arbor.  NSF International.  Ann Arbor. MI.  NSF International.  ANSI/NSF 51­1997. MI.1996. Pot.  NSF International.  NSF International. 1980.  NSF International.  ANSI/NSF 37­1992.  ANSI/NSF 20­1998. 1991. Air Curtains for Entranceways in Food  and Food Service Establishments. 1997. Automatic Ice Making Equipment. 1992.  NSF International.  Ann Arbor. 1997. 1996.Storage Freezers. 1992. Bibliography  235  .  NSF 26­1980.  NSF International.

apgea. Gerard. 1981. and Nester.1996.  Microbiology:  Principles & Application.  <http://chppm­www.  Philadelphia.  Washington.  Armed Forces Pest Management Board.  ServSafe®.  14.  Integrated Pest Management in and Around Buildings. PA.  Prentice Hall. 1997. MA.  McGraw Hill.  Bantam Books. 1994.H.  Disinfection. Society for Applied Bacteriology.  Pest Management in Restaurants. 3rd Edition. New York. (Editor). 1999.  Defense Pest  Management Information Analysis Center.   Microbiology:  An Introduction.  Washington. FL.  Federal Insecticide. NY.8  Integrated Pest Management  U.  Reading. Martha. Cruise Ship Consultation Service. IL. 1995..  Housekeeping. Eugene. Parts 152­186.  Addison­  Wesley. The Educational Foundation of the National Restaurant  Association.   Academic Press.  National Restaurant Association.  Cockroach IPM:  Installation Integrated Pest Management  Program For German Cockroach Control. DC.   Disinfectants:  Their Use & Evaluation of Effectiveness. 4th Edition. 1992.  DC. S.  Integrated Pest Management System Guide for Cruise Ships.  Nester. CA.  1991.  Robinson.  D’Agnese. New York. 4th Ed.  Williams &  Wilkins.14.  New York.9  Housekeeping  Collins. 236  Bibliography  . 29. Sterilization & Preservation. Fungicide.  Educational Foundation of the National Restaurant Association. Fernandina Beach. Applied  Foodservice Sanitation.  Black.G.  Technical Information Memorandum  No. NY. S.  and Rodenticide Act.. Army. 2nd  Edition. Title 40.mil/ento/roachipm. C.htm#A> .. 1997. Chicago. J. 1996.  Microbiology:  A Human Perspective.  Technical Series No 16. S. 1998. 6th Edition. Marilynne.  Block.army. John Wiley & Sons. J.  4th Ed.  San Diego. J.  Code of Federal Regulations.  Tortora.

 NJ.edu/national/index. DC.  Aerosols Containing  'Legionella pneumophila' Generated by Shower Heads and Hot­Water Faucets.W.Upper Saddle River.). Matthew R.  Minimizing the Risk of Legionella in Cooling Towers and  Other HVAC Equipment. R.  Ohio State Univ.. B.  Rutala.. J. 1989.  Handbook of Infection Control (Second Edition). Louis. In:  Program  and abstracts of the 89th Annual Meeting of the American Society for  Microbiology. 1996.  Young.  National Resource Center for Health & Safety in Child Care.. F.  Health Effects  Research Lab.  Caring for Our Children: National Health & Safety Performance Standards. Div. IN.  Breiman. IN.. Fields.   Legionellae  Control in Health Care Facilities:  Minimizing Risk.html> . R. Bibliography  237  . B.  American Journal of Infection Control.. of Infectious Diseases. 1989.  <http://nrc. 1996.  HC Information Resources.  Mosby. J.  Freije.W. Cleanliness Is a Must.  Definitive association of shower use  with Legionnaires' disease: possible role of amoebae (Abstract). R. Para. VA.  American Journal of Infection Control. Volmer. NC.. S. Barbaree.  14..  1996. Hackman.. 1996.. L. MO. G... R. M.   In Day­Care Centers.  HC Information  Resources.  Bollin.. and Olsen.  APIC Guidelines for Selection and Use of Disinfectants. M. 1992. Food and Drug Administration. (Ed.  FDA  Consumer. Frank E. F.  NTIS. St. DC. E.  Indianapolis. (Ed. DC.10  Child­Activity Centers  American Academy of Pediatrics & American Public Health Association Staff. 24:13­42.  Freije. Columbus. 1985.uchsc. 1998.  Washington. R.   APIC Guidelines for Selection and Use of Disinfectants.  APIC.. et al.  American Society for Microbiology. 24:13­42..  Rutala. Springfield. 1989:126.   Indianapolis.). Plouffe.. N.  Washington. U. Association for  Professionals in Infection Control & Epidemiology. Research Triangle Park. M.  Washington.

 2001.gov/nceh/vsp.14.  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Ports. 238  Bibliography  .S.   Summary of Sanitation Inspections of  International Cruise Ships.  www.   Recommended Shipbuilding  Construction Guidelines for Passenger Vessels Destined to Call on U.11  Administrative Guidelines  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.cdc.