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CHAPTER-1

INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRY:

In the year 1769, a French engineer by the name of Nicolas J. Cugnot invented the first
automobile to run on roads. This automobile, in fact, was a self-powered, threewheeled, military
tractor that made the use of a steam engine. The range of the automobile, however, was very
brief and at the most, it could only run at a stretch for fifteen minutes. In addition, these
automobiles were not fit for the roads as the steam engines made them very heavy and large, and
required ample starting time. Oliver Evans was the first to design a steam engine driven
automobile in the U.S.
A Scotsman, Robert Anderson, was the first to invent an electric carriage between 1832
and 1839. However, Thomas Davenport of the U.S.A. and Scotsman Robert Davidson were
amongst the first to invent more applicable automobiles, making use of non-rechargeable electric
batteries in 1842. Development of roads made travelling comfortable and as a result, the short
ranged, electric battery driven automobiles were no more the best option for travelling over
longer distances.
The Automobile Industry finally came of age with Henry Ford in 1914 for the bulk
production of cars. This lead to the development of the industry and it first begun in the assembly
lines of his car factory. The several methods adopted by Ford, made the new invention (that is,
the car) popular amongst the rich as well as the masses.
According the History of Automobile Industry US, dominated the automobile markets
around the globe with no notable competitors. However, after the end of the Second World War
in 1945, the Automobile Industry of other technologically advanced nations such as Japan and
certain European nations gained momentum and within a very short period, beginning in the
early 1980s, the U.S Automobile Industry was flooded with foreign automobile companies,
especially those of Japan and Germany.
The current trends of the Global Automobile Industry reveal that in the developed
countries the Automobile Industries are stagnating as a result of the drooping car markets,
whereas the Automobile Industry in the developing nations, such as, India and Brazil, have been
consistently registering higher growth rates every passing year for their flourishing domestic
automobile markets.

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World auto industry is turned to developing markets:
With developed markets almost saturated, world auto industry is now focused on
developing markets of South America and Asia, and Eastern Europe with special emphasis on
BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, and China).
As per reports of International Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers or OICA(the
association of the companies involved in World auto Industry), for fiscal end in 2006, auto
manufacturers in U.S. have been overtaken by those in Japan, in terms of total volume of auto
units manufactured worldwide.
However, struggling General Motors of U.S. still remain worldwide leaders of world auto
industry, ahead of rapidly growing Toyota Motor Corporation of Japan, by a substantial margin.
Measures to be adopted by global leaders of world auto industry:
Several significant economic measures are being considered by major players of world auto
industry in order to make a smooth entry into markets of developing countries, and to make a
name for them. Effective measures include:
• Reducing selling prices of cars manufactured in their factories.
• Improving levels of after-sales services to keep customers satisfied.
• Opening manufacturing factories in developing nations, to reduce effective costs of
production as well as saving shipping charges, and enhancing prompt delivery of auto
units.
Auto Industry Trends:
In keeping with auto industry trends, leading automobile manufacturers are turning to
Asian markets that appear set to grow immensely over next decade. Auto markets in U.S.,
Europe and Japan have almost matured as a result of saturation and appear set to decline through
next decade. In contrast, auto markets spread over entire Asian continent (with exception of
Japan), are constantly increasing in size and will be destination for most of globally leading auto
manufacturers.
Auto industry trends reveal that emerging markets of developing nations of Asia
especially China, and India are backed by their huge population growth rate, to add growing
national economy of these two nations.
Rapid growth of national economy of BRIC countries (including Brazil, Russia, India, and
China) has enabled a growing section of population of these countries to purchase cars. Global
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surveys conducted recently reveal that within next ten years, these emerging auto markets will
account for nearly a whooping 90% of the total auto sales growth.
As a result of this, leading auto manufacturers of world are setting up factories in emerging
markets, in order to serve potential consumers better as well as reduce manufacturing and
shipping costs. In addition, these arrangements are enabling leading global auto manufacturers to
compete with local auto manufacturers that were flourishing in absence of quality competition.
Prosperity of national economy is reflected in rising per capita income of developing
nations. Therefore, increasing gross domestic product and per capita income have raised
purchasing ability of population that constitutes these emergingmarkets.
As a growing percentage of population in developed nations age rapidly, in comparison to
rest of world, these aging numbers necessitate cars to fit physiological change of world
population.
EmergingIndiaAutomarket:
India auto market is a promising industrial sector that is growing immensely every passing
year. Passenger cars are referred to, through use of word "automobile."Whooping growth
experienced by Indian auto market in last financial year itself that is financial year end in
February, 2007 was very close to a 18 percent over previous fiscal. This statistical fact is a
glittering example of potential of growing auto industry in India.
As per survey conducted by Society of Indian Auto Manufacturers, total number of
automobiles manufactured by auto industry in India, throughout financial year 2006-07, was very
close to 15.5 lakh (1.5 million) margins. Huge of number of automobiles manufactured by auto
industry in India was an enormous growth upon number of autos manufactured during previous
fiscal, that ended in 2006.
Total number of cars that were exported from India were very close to 2.0 lakh (2.0
hundred thousand) margin, an encouraging sign for auto industry in India. Export of cars
manufactured in India comprised nearly 13 percent of total number of cars manufactured
domestically by autoindustry in India.
India auto market looks set to prosper, largely due to growing market for automobiles that
is developing in India. In financial year that ended in February, 2004,Indian automarkets were
fastest growing in world, with registered growth rate touching nearly 20percent.

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Auto industry in India mainly comprises of small car section, which enjoys nearly a 2/3rd
market share of entire market for autos in India. In this respect, Indian markets are largest in
world for smallcars, behind Japan. Indian passenger car market which ranks amongst largest in
world, is poised to become even more larger and enter top five passenger car markets in world in
next decade.

INTRODUCTION TO THE ORGANISATION:

About HMIL:

Established in 1967, Hyundai Motor Co. has grown into the Hyundai-Kia Automotive
Group which was ranked as the world’s fifth-largest automaker in 2007 and includes over two
dozen auto-related subsidiaries and affiliates. Employing over 75,000 people worldwide,
Hyundai Motor posted sales of US$74.9 billion in 2007 on a consolidated-basis and US$32.8
billion on a non-consolidated basis (using the average currency exchange of 929 won per US
dollar).

Hyundai vehicles are sold in 193 countries through some 6,000 dealerships and
showrooms. Hyundai Motor India Limited (HMIL) is a wholly owned subsidiary of Hyundai
Motor Company, South Korea and is the second largest car manufacturer and the largest
passenger car exporter from India. HMIL presently markets 54 variants of passenger cars across
segments. The Santro in the B segment, the Getz Prime, i10 and the Premium hatchback i20 in
the B+ segment, the Accent and the Verna in the C segment, the Sonata Embera in the E segment
and the Tucson in the SUV segment.

Hyundai Motor India Ltd, continuing with its tradition of being the fastest growing
passenger car manufacturer, registered total sales of 489,328 vehicles in the calendar year (CY)
2008, an increase of 49.6 percent over CY 2007. In the domestic market it clocked a growth of
22.4 percent with 245387 units in 2008, while overseas sales grew by 92.5 percent, with exports
accounting for 243,931 units in 2008.

HMIL's fully integrated state-of-the-art manufacturing plant near Chennai boasts of the
most advanced production, quality and testing capabilities in the country. In continuation of its

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commitment to provide the Indian customer with global technology, HMIL commissioned its
second plant in February 2008 which produces an additional 300,000 units per annum, raising
HMIL's total production capacity to 600,000 units per annum. HMIL has invested to expand
capacity in line with its positioning as HMC's global export hub for compact cars. Apart from the
expansion of production capacity, HMIL currently has 272 strong dealer networks across India,
which will be further bolstered in 2009.

In 2008, HMIL also successfully completed 10 glorious years of operations in India and
to commemorate its achievements, initiated a unique trans-continental drive from Delhi to Paris
in two of its hugely popular i10 Kappa cars. The drive created automobile history by completing
a distance of 10,000km in just 17 days after which the i10s were showcased at the Paris Motor
Show in October. In fact it was at the Paris Motor Show that HMIL first unveiled the Hyundai
i20 and the car received a phenomenal response from the auto enthusiasts across the world.
Hyundai Motor India also accomplished the landmark of producing the fastest 20th lakh cars in
India in 2008.

Like 2008, the year 2007 had also been a significant year for Hyundai Motor India. It
achieved a significant milestone by rolling out the fastest 400,000th export car. Hyundai
exported to over 95 countries globally; even as it plans to continue its thrust in existing export
markets, it is gearing up to step up its foray into new markets. 2007 also saw the launch of the
i10 and yet another path-breaking record in its young journey by rolling out the fastest
1,500,000th car.

Hyundai's new model i10 made a clean sweep of all the 'Car of the Year 2008' awards
from the leading automotive magazines and TV channels like BS Motoring, CNBC-TV18 Auto
Car, NDTV Profit Car & Bike India and Overdrive magazine. The i10 was also the choice of the
discerning automotive media of the country as they conferred the prestigious 'Indian Car of the
Year' (ICOTY) award to the i10 as well.

The Santro and the Accent also received the 'TNS Voice of the Customer - 2008' award
for the Premium Compact Car (Santro) and the Entry Mid size Car (Accent). In March 2008 it
achieved yet another milestone by rolling out the fastest 500,000th export car. In 2007, the

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Hyundai Verna had also bagged some of the most prestigious awards starting with the Overdrive
magazine’s ‘Car of the Year 2007’, the ‘Best Mid-size Car of the Year’ award from NDTV
Profit Car & Bike India, the ‘Best Value for Money Car’ from CNBC Auto car and
'Performance Car of the Year' from Business Standard Motoring. Hyundai cars have been a
favorite at all awards ceremonies and has won many awards. The Sonata Embera won the
'Executive Car of The Year 2006' award from Business Standard Motoring magazine and NDTV
Profit Car & Bike India had declared the Tucson as the 'SUV of The Year 2006'.

Management philosophy:

The spirit of creative challenge has been a driving force in leading HMC to where it is
today. It is the permanent key factor for HMC to actively respond to change in the management
system and seek creative and self–innovative system. With the spirit of creative challenge, we
create profits, the primary objective of a private enterprise. Furthermore, we take responsibility
for the environment and society we belong to, and offer sustainable mobility in order to
implement our corporate philosophy and provide benefits to all stakeholders including
shareholders, customers, executives, employees, suppliers, and communities.

Words of appreciation:

H = Hyundai is having a Hercules like fame.

YUN = It retains its yearlong universal name.

DA = its durability and ability are inseparable.

I = It possess the sixth rank at the international.

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The Hyundai logo:

 The symbol represents an image of car company that produces refined cars with cutting
edge technology.
 Expresses the will of the management for harmony and stability.
 The overall shape symbolizes the earth to express the global nature of HMC car.
 The H logo stands fort the first letter of Hyundai Motor Company.
 The slanted shape of the H represent progress and a company that will successfully face
future challenges as it continues to raise its standard of quality.

HMIL vision:
 Dream
 Strive
 Achieve together

HMIL mission:
 “ Innovation For Humanity ”

Our mission is to devote our talents and collective efforts to maximize customer satisfaction
and to provide quality products at competitive price for our very special customers who have

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been supporting us to the present day. HMIL Power continues to strive for maintaining product
excellence and providing win-win solutions for our partners, contractors, employees, and
finally the society as whole.

Basic objectives of HMIL:

• Best customers service.


• Best technology.
• Best quality products.
• Best value for people.

Goals of HMIL:

• Focus on developing advanced technology.


• Hyundai cars known as world-class cars.
• The ultimate goal is to join the ranks of the world’s top 10 automakers.Concentrating on
building cars that are more environments conscious and further improving the quality of

life for everyone in further.

MANAGEMENT POLICIES:

Based on a respect for human dignity, we make efforts to meet the expectations of all
stakeholders including customers and business partners by building a constructive relationship
amongst management, labor, executives and employees. Also, we focus on communicating our
corporate values both internally and externally, and gaining confidence from all stakeholders.

Trust-based Management:

• Trustworthiness
• Trust-based management-labor, superior-subordinate and company-customer
relationship.

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Site-Intensive Management:

• Competency building and raising the morale


• Site-intensive management solution
• Site-oriented management and R&D strategy
• Real-time communication

Transparent job specifications:

• Transparency in transaction and fair trade


• Enhancing ethics management system

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ORGANIZATION CHART :

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HMIL Exports:
Hyundai Motor India, the global compact cars export hub of the US$47 bn Hyundai
Motor Group, started export shipment to Europe with a consignment of 1,500 units of its,
flagship 'Santro' bound for Italy, Spain and Netherlands.

The first export shipment to Europe since the announcement of HMI as the global
export hub for Hyundai compact cars, this consignment will carry 1,500 units of the New AtoS
Prime, as the Santro is badged in Europe. This included 710 units bound for Italy, 690 for Spain
and 100 units for Netherlands.

Western Europe is globally the largest consumer of small / compact cars with the largest
markets being Italy, Spain, Greece, Netherlands and Belgium. The company has scaled up its
export target from 8,966 units in FY 03 to 30,000 units in FY 04. The company has already
exported 6,740 units YTD. Algeria, Morocco, Indonesia, Colombia, Nepal and Sri Lanka are
currently some of the biggest export markets for Hyundai Motor India.

HMIL is India's second largest carmaker and a clear leader in the B, C and E passenger
car segments, which together account for over 70% of the Indian passenger car industry. The
company has announced aggressive plans to emerge as India's leading exporter of passenger cars
by CY 2004 Executives:
Manpower: [Category wise] Mgmt. Trainee / Grad. Engr. Trainee
Asst. Mgr / Dy. Mgr

309 Mgr / Sr. Mgr / AGM / DGM / GM


6 Sr.GM / VP / Sr.VP / President
E
m Jr.Executives:
pl 1280
oy 95 Engineer / Officer
ee 9 Technical / Business Associate
s
Technical /Business Associate Trainees

Non - Executives:

Technician / Workman / Trainee


Executives Jr. Executives Non Executives

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Unique HR initiatives:

 Morning Department Standing Meeting – done by all


 My Machine and My Station concept
 Music Extravaganza in the Plant – once a year at Founders day
 Free Help Line services to serve employees
 Employees Family Visit Program – Gift from Management thanking the family
 Publicity for Outstanding Work
 By display of achievement and Photograph in Department Notice Board
 By distribution of Prizes in meetings attended by all employees
 Annual Picnics to promote “ ONENESS ”
 Birthday Greeting with flower bouquet & Plantation of trees named after them
 Marriage Gift to newly married employees
 Welfare benefits over and above what is prescribed by law
 Meditation for Managers – and follow up
 Tax Saving Gift vouchers / Gift Credit Card on Festive occasions

The Challenges were…

To manufacture and sell a global technology, global quality car reflecting Indian
consumer needs at an appropriate price and attain profitability.

What Hyundai Provide:

 A highly Energized & Stimulating work environment


 High Levels of Motivation, Empowerment & Recognition
 Emphasis on Competence, Creativity and Challenge
 Proactively unleashing People’s Potential that will build the future
 Encourage Innovation and allow the freedom to learn from mistakes
 A culture of Continuous Change & Improvement

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Health:

 Regular Health Camps (Eye, Cardiac and Wellness) at the adopted villages
 Donated Ultra Sound Machines and Auto Refractometer to Primary Health Center

Infrastructure:

 Construction of Cement Roads at Keevalur


 Deepening of Ponds in Thandalam & Kattarambakkam
 Drinking Water Tank construction at Irrungattukottai

Education:
 Construction of High School at Thandalam (Common for Four villages)
 Infrastructure Facilities like Fans, Benches for the Schools of nearest 4 villages
 Distribution of Note Books and Stationery items to School Children
 Picnics for all the 4 school children once a year
Social Needs & Contingency Support:

 Joint participation in Social Welfare Programmes with the District Adminisitration


 Support during natural calamities like Flood
 Artificial Limbs, Wheel chair and Tricycles for Physically Disabled
Persons in the adopted villages
 Contribution for setting up Night Schools
 Support being extended for functioning of Vidya Prakasam – Society for Well-being of
Spastic Children

Employment:

 Provided employment for all those eligible land displaced people of the 4 villages
 Provided job oriented technical training to the Unemployed youth of the villages

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INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY

Absenteeism is a serious workplace problem and an expensive occurrence for both


employers and employees seemingly unpredictable in nature. A satisfactory level of attendance
by employees at work is necessary to allow the achievement of objectives and targets by a
department. Employee Absenteeism is the absence of an employee from work. It is a major
problem faced by almost all employers of today. Employees are absent from work and thus the
work suffers. Absenteeism of employees from work leads to back logs, piling of work and thus
work delay.

Absenteeism is of two types -

Innocent absenteeism - Is one in which the employee is absent from work due to genuine
cause or reason. It may be due to his illness or personal family problem or any other real
reason

Culpable Absenteeism - is one in which a person is absent from work without any genuine
reason or cause. He may be pretending to be ill or just wanted a holiday and stay at home.

Many employees will, on occasions, need a few days off work because of illness, however,
when absences become more frequent or long term and reach an unacceptable level, action by
management is necessary. Absence from work can be expensive in both monetary and human
terms. The costs incurred when an employee is absent from work may include:

(i) Replacing the employee or requiring other staff to cover the absence;

(ii) Inability to provide services, or achieve section and departmental objectives.

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2.1 Objectives of the study
Primary objective:

 To reduce the absenteeism.

Secondary objective:

 To provide better work environment.

 To identify the motivational factors that leads employees towards job.

 To utilize the maximum efficiency of the employees.

2.2. Need of the study

To increase the production.

To identify the factors that causes absenteeism. .

2.3. Scope of the study

The study focuses on identifying the causes of absenteeism. The scope of the study
has been extended to all the departments in this organization The survey of nature depends on
employees for their views.

To obtain the opinion of the employees, identifying the limitations and suggesting
various possible measures to control absenteeism in the organization to the extent possible.

2.4. Limitations of the study

 Due to the time constraint the study is made only among 50 respondents

 There is a chance of personal bias which affects the original data.

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CHAPTER-2

REVIEW OF LITERATURE:

Absenteeism is "nonattendance of employees for scheduled work. when they are


expected to attend" (Huczynski and Fitzpatrick, 1989.Because absenteeism involves
nonattendance from scheduled work in terms of hours and days rather than minutes, it is
distinguishable from being late to work (Rhodes and Steers, 1990). There are different reasons
why workers are absent from work, such as an illness, family emergency or just taking a day off.
These different reasons can be categorized into unavoidable and avoidable absenteeism (also
called involuntary and voluntary absenteeism) (Steers and Rhodes, 1978).
Unavoidable absences are the result of conditions that are usually not under the control of
the worker, such as illness, injury, transportation problems or the need to care for a sick family
member. Avoidable absenteeism occurs because the employee decides to be absent from work
for reasons that most employers would view as inappropriate or even illegitimate, such as to have
a day off, to attend a social event, to sleep in or to recover from a hangover.
For the typical U.S. worker, Klein (1986) estimated that 55 percent of absences fell into
the category of unavoidable and 45 percent could be classified as avoidable. In a survey of U.S.
workers, it was found that 42 percent of wealthy households, 41 percent of college-educated
workers and 43 percent of those younger than 24 years old admitted that they had pretended to
be sick in order to avoid work.
(Lach,1999). The major reason given in the survey was that they just wanted a day off,
followed closely by the need for a "mental health day." Therefore,roughly half of all absences are
unavoidable, while the other half are avoidable (Brooke, 1986). Absenteeism costs correctional
organizations both directly and indirectly. Direct costs include sick pay, fringe benefits that still
must be paid, overstaffing (scheduling additional workers to fill in for those employees who are
absent) and overtime to fill the position.
There are many positions in correctional facilities that cannot be vacated when an
employee calls in sick. This means that a person may be paid overtime to cover the position of
the absent individual. The administration must spend time and effort to alter employee
assignments to deal with the absence. Indirect costs include disruptions, reduced productivity,
loss of expertise and experience, costs to monitor and administer the absence program, and

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resentment and decreased morale of other employees (Lambert et al., 2005). Absenteeism often
creates a hardship for other employees, including working mandatory overtime and doing extra
work because of the missing person.
Absences can also result in resentment among attending employees who are shifted from
one job to another, including to assignments that are less desirable or unfamiliar (Huczynski and
Fitzpatrick, 1989). Even if the position is left vacant, the absence means that there will be one
fewer staff member able to monitor inmates and respond to emergencies (Farkas, 1990). High
levels of absenteeism can cause morale among employees to suffer, while also being costly and
disruptive for the correctionalinstitution..In summary, absenteeism, particularly if it becomes
commonplace, is harmful to the overall health of a correctional organization.
While the issue of absenteeism should be of concern in the field of corrections, only a
handful of studies have been done on the subject. In a study ofcorrectional stress, Gross et al.
(1994) found that female correctional officers used more sick leave than male correctional
officers. Among correctional officers at a New York State prison, Lombardo (1981) reported that
job dissatisfaction was related to absenteeism, but only briefly discussed the matter.
Venne (1997) explored the impact of 12-hour shifts on Canadian correctional officers and
concluded that the shifts increased absenteeism. Lambert (2001) theorized about the importance
of researching correctional staff absenteeism and postulated that job stress, job satisfaction and
organizational commitment would be linked with correctional staff absenteeism. He also argued
that it was important to determine how employees viewed the use of sick leave and how they
viewed the use and impact of sick leave in their particular work areas.
In a study of federal correctional staff, Lambert et al. (2005) observed that job stress, job
satisfaction and organizational commitment were associated with the use of sick leave. Federal
correctional staff who reported higher stress levels were more likely to be absent. Staff who were
satisfied with their jobs and staff with greater commitment to the Federal Bureau of Prisons used
fewer sick leave hours. There is a need for more research on correctional staff absenteeism.
Without relevant studies, it is difficult to understand the correlates of correctional employee
absenteeism and to develop possible ways to reduce it.

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CHAPTER 3

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
3.1 RESEARCH DESIGN
The Research design used in the study was descriptive research design. It includes surveys
and fact-finding requires of different kinds. The major purpose of description research designs,
as it exits at present. The main characteristic of this method is that the researcher has no control
over the variables; he can report only what has happened or what is happening.

3.2. SAMPLING TECHNIQUE


3.2.1. Sampling Method

In this study stratified sampling method was used in selecting the samples. The samples
are selected based on the grade which is followed in the company.

3.2.2 Population

The population comprises of 87 employees.

3.2.3 Frame

The Frame comprises the permanent employees of Hyundai.

3.2.4. Sample Size

The universe of the study includes permanent workers above. In Hyundai the total
number of employee are 87. Out of 87 employees 50 are selected for the study.

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3.3 DATA COLLECTION METHOD

Primary data collection was done through structured questionnaire. Secondary data was
collected from company records.The instrument used for the collecting data was a structured
questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of 22 questions, with a combination of open – ended
and close –ended questions.

3.4 STATISTICAL TOOLS USED


This researcher has used the following statistical tools:
1. Chi – square.
2. Weighted Average Method

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CHAPTER 4
ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATIONS
TABLE – 4.1

GENDER WISE CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS

S. No Gender No. of respondents

1. Male 45

2. Female 5

Total 50

Figure-4.1
Gender wise classification of the respondents
50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
1 2 3 4 5 6

Interpretation:

It is inferred from the above table that 45% respondents are male and only 5% are
female. It indicates that most of the respondents are male.

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TABLE – 4.2
AGE WISE CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS

S. No Age No. of
respondents
1. 20-25 5

2. 26-35 15

3. 36-45 19

4. > 45 11

Total 50

Figure-4.2
Age wise classification of the respondent

Interpretation :

It is inferred that 38% of respondents fall in the age group of 36-45, and 30%
respondents are in the age group of 26-35 and so majority are in between the age of 36-45.

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TABLE – 4.3

POSITION CATEGORY

S. No Position Category No. of respondents

1. Managerial level 26

2. Middle level 24

Total 50

Figure-4.3
Position category of the respondent

Interpretation :

The above table clearly shows that 24% of respondents are middle level people and 26%
of respondents are managerial level people.

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TABLE – 4.4

NUMBER OF YEARS OF SERVICE

S. No Response No. of respondents

1. < 1 year 8

2. 1-2 years 16

3. 2-3 years 10

4. 3-4 years 5
5. > 4 years 11
Total 50

Figure-4.4 Number of years of service

Interpretation :

It is inferred that 32% of respondents have years of service in the organization of 1-2
years and 10% of respondents have 3-4 years of service.

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TABLE – 4.5
SALARY

S. No Response No. of respondents

1. 4000-6000 _

2. 6001-8000 _

3. 8001-1000 6

4. 10000 & above 44

Total 50

Figure-4.5 Salary

Interpretation :

The above table indicates that 12% of respondents are earning a monthly salary of
Rs.8001-10000 and 88% of respondents are offered a monthly salary of above Rs 10,000

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TABLE – 4.6

AMOUNT OF TIME SPEND ON TRAVELING

S. No Response No. of respondents

1. Upto 30 min 14
2. 30-60 min 19

3. 60-120 min 13

4. Above 120 min 14

Total 50

Figure-4.6
Amount of time spend on traveling

Interpretation :
It is inferred that 38% of respondents are spending 30-60 min and 26% of respondents
are spending 60-120 min on traveling

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TABLE – 4.7
JOURNEY TO WORK

S. No Response No. of respondents

1. Highly adds stress _

2. Slightly adds stress 6

3. Have no impact 27

4. Slightly reduce stress 17

Total 50

Figure-4.7
Journey to work

Interpretation :

It is inferred that the journey to work slightly adds stress to 12% of respondents and
have no impact to 54% of respondents.

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TABLE – 4.8

BALANCING PERSONAL LIFE WITH WORK

S. No Response No. of respondents

1. Often _

2. sometimes 13

3. Rarely 20

4. Never 17

Total 50

Figure-4.8 Balancing personal life with work

Interpretation :

It is inferred that 34% of respondents are rarely difficult to balance personal life
with work and 26% of respondents are sometimes difficult to balance personal life with work

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TABLE – 4.9

SICKNESS MAKES YOU ABSENT FROM WORK

S. No Response No. of respondents

1. Very often 8

2. sometimes 12

3. Very seldom 19

4. No 10

Total 50

Figure-4.9
Sickness makes you absent from work

Interpretation :

It is inferred that 38% of respondents are very seldom in absent from work and 16% of
respondents are very often in absent from work.

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TABLE – 4.10
FOR WHAT REASON YOU TAKE LEAVE

S. No Response
No. of respondents

1. Sickness
8
Lack of interests in 6
2.
job
23
3. Personal reason

4. Long working hours 8

5. others 5

Total 50

Figure-4.10
For what reason you take leave

Interpretation :

It is inferred that 46 % of respondents takes leave for personal reason and 16% of
respondents takes leave for sickness,12% for lack of interests in job,16% for long working hours
and 10% for other reason.

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TABLE – 4.11

RECOGNISED FOR EXCELLING IN YOUR JOB

S. No Response
No. of respondents

1. Always 8

13
2. Often

23
3. Sometimes

4. Never 6

Total 50

Figure-4.11
Recognised for excelling in your job

Interpretation :

It is inferred that 46% of respondents are sometimes recognized for excelling in job and
12% of respondents are never recognized for excelling in job.

31
TABLE – 4.12

ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH THE EXISTING WORK CONDITION

S. No Response No. of respondents

1. Highly satisfied 7

2. satisfied 26

3. Neutral 12

4. Dissatisfied 5
5. Highly dissatisfied _
Total 50

Figure-4.12
Are you satisfied with the existing work condition

Interpretation:
It is inferred that 16% of respondents are highly satisfied,26% of respondents are
satisfied,46% of respondents are neutral and 12% of respondents are dissatisfied with the
existing work condition.

32
TABLE – 4.13

OPINION REGARDING WORK ENVIRONMENT

S. No Response
No. of respondents
22
1. Excellent
16
2. Good
7
3. Fair

4. Poor 5

Total 50

Figure-4.13

Opinion regarding work environment

Interpretation:
It is inferred that 44% of respondents are excellent,32% of respondents are good,14% of
respondents are fair and 10% of respondents are poor opinion regarding work environment.

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TABLE – 4.14

STRESS IS APART OF WORK LIFE

S. No Response
No. of respondents
7
1. Strongly agree
14
2. Agree
18
3. Neutral

4. Strongly disagree 11

Total 50

Figure-4.14

Stress is a part of work life

Interpretation:
It is inferred that 14% of respondents are strongly agree,28% of respondents are
agree,36% of respondents are neutral and 22% of respondents are strongly dis agree with stress is
a part of work life.

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TABLE – 4.15

WORK ASSIGNMENT ARE DISTRIBUTED FAIRLY

S. No Response
No. of respondents

1. Strongly agree 19
19
2. Agree
7
3. Neutral

4. Disagree 5

5. Strongly disagree _

50
Total

Figure-4.15

Work assignments are distributed fairly

Interpretation:
It is inferred that 38% of respondents are strongly agree,38% of respondents are
agree,14% of respondents are neutral and 10% of respondents are strongly dis agree with work
assignments are distributed fairly.

35
TABLE – 4.16

DOES YOUR JOB PROFILE MATCH WITH YOUR QUALIFICATION

S. No Response
No. of respondents
40
1. Yes
10
2. No

Total 50

Figure-4.16

Does your job profile match with your qualification

Interpretation:

It is inferred that 80% of respondents said yes regarding job profile match with

their qualification and rest of them are said no.

36
TABLE – 4.17

OPINION REGARDING WAGES RELATED TO WORK

S. No Response
No. of respondents

1. Above average 22

2. Average 17
3. Below average _
11
4. No idea
50
Total

Figure-4.17

Opinion regarding wages related to work

Interpretation:
It is inferred that 44% of respondents have above average,34% of respondents
have average and 22% of respondents have no idea regarding wages related to work .

37
TABLE – 4.18

DOES ANY BIAS EXISTS IN PROMOTIONAL POLICY

S. No Response No. of respondents

1. Yes 10

2. No 40

Figure-4.18

Does any bias exists in promotional policy

Interpretation:

It is inferred that 80% of respondents has some problem exists in promotional policy.

38
TABLE – 4.19

ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH THE PROMOTIONAL POLICIES

S. No Response
No. of respondents

18
1. Highly satisfied

20
2. satisfied
7
3. Neutral

4. Dissatisfied 5
5. Highly dissatisfied _
Total 50

Figure-4.19

Promotional policies

Interpretation:

It is inferred that 36% of respondents are highly satisfied, 40% of respondents are
satisfied,14% of respondents are neutral and 10% of respondents are dissatisfied with the
existing work condition.

39
TABLE – 4.20

INCENTIVE PLANS

S. No Response
No. of respondents

1. Production based 19

2. Sales based 19
12
3. Management based

Total 50

Figure-4.20
Incentive plans

Interpretation:

It is inferred that 38% of respondents said that the incentive plans are production based.
24% of respondents said that the incentive plans are Management based.

40
TABLE – 4.21

PROMOTIONAL POLICIES

S. No Response
No. of respondents
14
1. Experience
Performance 15
2.
11
3. Qualification

4. Loyalty 10

Total 50

Figure-4.21
Promotional policies

Interpretation:

It is inferred that 28% of respondents said that the promotional policies are based on
experience,30% of respondents said that the promotional policies are based on performance 22%
of respondents said that the promotional policies are based on qualification and 20% of
respondents said that the promotional policies are based on loyalty.

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TABLE – 4.22

MOTIVATION FACTORS

S. No Response No. of respondents


Good employee
1. relation
21
16
2. Work environment
8
3. Recognition of work

4. Future prospects 5

Total 50

Figure-4.22
Motivation factors

Interpretation:

It is inferred 42% of respondents are motivated by good employee relation, 32% of


respondents are motivated by work environment, 16% of respondents are motivated by
recognition of work, 10% of respondents are motivated by future prospects.

42
TABLE – 4.23

ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH THE WELFARE MEASURES

S. No Response No. of respondents


20
1. Highly satisfied
21
2. Satisfied
9
3. Neutral

4. Dissatisfied _
5. Highly dissatisfied _

Total 50

Figure-4.23
Welfare measures

Interpretation:

It is inferred that 40% of respondents are highly satisfied, 42% of respondents are
satisfied,18% of respondents are neutral with the welfare measures.

43
TABLE – 4.24

ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH THE HEALTH AND SAFETY MEASURES

S. No Response No. of respondents

1. Highly satisfied 19
22
2. satisfied
9
3. Neutral

4. Dissatisfied _

5. Highly dissatisfied _

Total 50

Figure-4.24
Health and safety measures

Interpretation:

It is inferred that 38% of respondents are highly satisfied, 44% of respondents are
satisfied,18% of respondents are neutral with the health and safety measures.

44
TABLE – 4.25
FACTORS TO BE IMPROVED

S. No Response No. of respondents


9
1. Drinking water
16
2. Sanitary condition
22
3. Proper lighting

4. Ventilation 3
5. Highly dissatisfied _
Total 50

Figure-4.25
Factors to be improved

Interpretation:

It is inferred that 18% of respondents feel drinking water,32% of respondents feel


sanitary condition,44% of respondents feel proper lighting and 6% of respondents feel
ventilation are to be improved.

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TABLE – 4.26
CANTEEN FACILITY

S. No Response No. of respondents

1. Excellent 21
15
2. Good
14
3. Satisfactory

4. poor _

Total 50

Figure-4.26
Canteen facility

Interpretation:

It is inferred that 42% of respondent feel excellent,30% of respondent feel good and
28% of respondent feel satisfactory regarding canteen facility.

46
TABLE – 4.27
IN YOUR OPINION HOW ABSENTEEISM CAN BE CONTROLLED

S. No Response No. of respondents


Change management 15
1.
style
14
2. Change work conditions
5
3. Provide incentives
Extra working to be
4. 16
controlled
5. others _
Total 50

Figure-4.27

In your opinion how absenteeism can be controlled

Interpretation:

It is inferred that 30% of respondents feel change management style,28% of respondents


feel change working conditions,10% of respondents feel provide incentives and 32% of
respondents feel extra working condition to be controlled regarding absenteeism

47
TABLE – 4.28
To determine whether there is a significant difference between stress level and gender

: There is no significance difference between stress level and gender.


: There is a significance difference between stress level and gender.

Stress No of Respondents
Strongly Agree Neutral Strongly Total
Gender agree Dis agree

Male 7 14 14 10 45

Female _ _ 4 1 5

Total 7 14 18 11 50

Expected frequencies are

( 7*45)/50 (14*45)/50 (18*45)/50 (11*45)/50


= 6.3 = 12.6 = 16.2 = 9.9

(7*5)/50 (14*5)/50 (18*5)/50 (11*5)/50


= 0.7 = 1.4 =1.8 = 1.1

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Calculation of :

Observed Expected
/E
Frequency (0) Frequency (E)
7 6.3 0.49 0.07
14 12.6 1.96 0.15
14 16.2 4.84 0.298
10 9.9 0.01 0.0010
- 0.7 0.49 0.7
- 1.4 1.96 1.4
4 1.8 4.84 2.68
1 1.1 0.01 0.009
5.308

0 – Observed Frequency
E – Expected Frequency
= 5.308
Calculated = 5.308
Degree of freedom = (2 - 1)(4 – 1)
= 3 d.f at 5% level of significance
Therefore, Tabulated = 7.815

49
Since Calculated < Tabulated
Therefore, we accept the hypothesis.

promotional
policy No of respondents
Tot
Position HS S N DS HDS al
category

Managerial 9 7 6 2 _ 24
level

Middle level 8 13 2 3 _ 26

Total 17 20 8 5 _ 50

TABLE – 4.29
To determine whether there is significant difference between position category
and promotional policy.

: There is no significance difference between position category and promotional policy


: There is significance difference between position category and promotional policy.

Expected frequencies are

(1 7*24)/50 (20*24)/50 (8*24)/50 (5*24)/50

50
= 8.16 = 9.6 = 3.84 = 2.4

(17*26)/50 (20*26)/50 (8*26)/50 (5*26)/50


= 8.84 = 10.4 =4.16 = 2.6

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Calculation of :

Observed Expected /E
Frequency (0) Frequency (E)
9 8.16 0.7056 0.086
7 9.6 6.76 0.704
6 3.84 4.66 1.213
2 2.4 0.16 0.06
- _ _ _
8 8.84 0.7056 0.079
13 10.4 6.76 0.65
2 4.16 4.66 1.12
3 2.6 0.16
0.06
_ _ _

3.972

0 – Observed Frequency
E – Expected Frequency
= 3.972
Calculated = 3.972
Degree of freedom = (2 - 1)(5 – 1)
= 4 d.f at 5% level of significance
Therefore, Tabulated = 9.488
Since Calculated < Tabulated
Therefore, we accept the hypothesis.

52
TABLE – 4.30
To determine whether there is a significant relationship between the level of
satisfaction in existing work condition

No of
S. NO Options Percentage (%)
respondents
1. Highly satisfied 7 14
2. Satisfied 26 52
3. Neutral 12 24
4. Dissatisfied 5 10
Highly
5. 0 0
dissatisfied
Total 50 100

Expected Frequency = 50/5 = 10


H0 : There is significant relationship between the level of satisfaction in existing work
condition.
H1 : There is significant relationship between the level of satisfaction in existing work
condition.

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Calculation of :

Observed Expected
/E
Frequency (0) Frequency (E)
7 10 9 0.9
26 10 256 25.6
12 10 4 0.4
5 10 25 2.5
0 10 100 10
39.4

Calculated ψ^2 =

0 – Observed Frequency
E – Expected Frequency
Calculated = 39.4
Degree of freedom = (5-1)
= 4 d.f at 5 % level of significance

54
Therefore, Tabulated =9.488
Since Calculated > Tabulated
Therefore, we reject the hypothesis.

Hence there is significant relationship between the level of satisfaction in existing work
condition.

TABLE-4.31

Table showing opinion of respondents towards work assignment:

OPTIONS RESPONDENTS(Xi) WEIGHTAGE(Wi) WiXi/ ∑Wi RANK

Strongly Agree 19 5 6.33 I


Agree 16 4 4.27 II
Neutral 7 3 1.40 III
Disagree 5 2 0.67 IV
Strongly Disagree 3 1 0.20 V
TOTAL 50 15 12.87

INTERPRETATION:

The above table reveals that the employees have given first preference to the option
strongly agree, second preference to the option agree, third to neutral, fourth to disagree and fifth
preference to the option strongly disagree with respect to overall job.

55
TABLE-4.32

Table showing opinion of respondents regarding work environment:

OPTIONS RESPONDENTS(Xi) WEIGHTAGE(Wi) WiXi/ ∑Wi RANK

Excellent 15 3 4.50 II
Good 19 4 7.60 I
Fair 9 2 1.80 III
Poor 7 1 0.70 IV
TOTAL 50 10 14.60

INTERPRETATION:

56
The above table reveals that the employees have given first preference to the option
Good, second preference to the option Excellent, third to Fair and fourth to Poor with respect to
the work environment.

CHAPTER 5
FINDINGS
It is inferred from the above table that 45% respondents are male and only 5% are female. It
indicates that most of the respondents are male.

It is inferred that 38% of respondents fall in the age group of 36-45, and 30% respondents are in
the age group of 26-35 and so majority are in between the age of 36-45.

It is inferred that 24% of respondents are middle level people and 26% of respondents are
managerial level people.

It is inferred that 32% of respondents have years of service in the organisation of 1-2 years and
10% of respondents have 3-4 years of service.

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It is inferred that 12% of respondents are earning a monthly salary of Rs.8001-10000 and 88% of
respondents are offered a monthly salary of Rs 10,000

It is inferred that 30% of respondents feel change management style,28% of feel change working
conditions,10% of respondents feel provide incentives and 32% of respondents feel extra
working condition to be controlled regarding absenteeism.

It is inferred that 42% of respondent feel excellent,30% of respondent feel good and 28% of
respondent feel satisfactory regarding canteen facility.

It is inferred that the journey to work slightly adds stress to 12% of respondents and have no
impact to 54% of respondents

58
CHAPTER 6
SUGGESTIONS
 The management must intervene in the day to day activities of the employees. They
should provide full-fledged support, guidance and encouragement.

 The management must provide training programme to the employees at a frequent basis.
This will help them to enhance their skill and improve their existing performance. The
management must further, scrutinize the response of the employees after the
implementation of the training programme.

 Overloaded workaholic atmosphere must be avoided, as it may create a lot of stress-


related problems.

 Employees must be encouraged for their creativity and innovative outlook towards their
job assigned.

 Welfare measures of the employees should be improved so as to make the employees feel
more satisfied and contended. A satisfied employee will be more committed to the
organization.

 Medi-claim policies, weekly or monthly medical checkups etc should be provided to the
employees’ in order to make them physically fit for the job.

59
 The employees should either be provided with transportation facility or housing facility
so that they would have ample time for recreation in substitute for the time they spend in
traveling.

 The management should take necessary action to strengthen the relationship between the
employees.

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CHAPTER 7

CONCLUSION

The study concluded that providing positive incentives to workers in the form of those
motivational factors that normally influence workers to be absent is better than imposing
penalties for discouraging absenteeism. The best reward for workers with low absenteeism is to
grant additional time off for personal matters. Workers are influenced to a lesser extent by
deterrents, loss of pay and benefits and loss of promotion opportunities and discharge, imposed
for frequent absenteeism. Finally a combination of incentives (additional time off) and penalties
(loss of benefits or job) with the primary emphasis on motivational incentives is the most
effective approach to reducing absenteeism.

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ANNEXURES

Dear Sir/Madam,

My name is B.Brinda and I’m studying MBA in Jerusalem engineering college. I’m
doing project in your organization regarding employees absenteeism. As part of my project I
have to submit questionnaire. Therefore kindly heip me by filling this questionnaire. Details
furnished by you will be kept absolutely confidential and will be used only for my academic
purpose only.

Thank you.

Questionnaire

Part-A

Personal information
1. Gender:

a) Male b) Female

2. Age:

a) 20-25 b) 26-35 c) 36-45 d) > 45

3. Position Category:

a) Managerial level b) Middle level

4. No of years of service:

a) < 1year b) 1-2 years c) 2-3 years d) 3-4 year e)>4years

5. Salary:

a) 4000-6000 b) 6001-8000 c) 8001-10000 d) 10000& above

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Part-B

1. How much time do you spend on travelling to and from work every day?

a) upto 30min b) 30-60 min c) 60-120 min d) above 120 min

2. Does your journey to work?


a) highly adds stress b) slightly adds stress
c) have no impact d) slightly reduce stress
3. Do you find it difficult to balance your family/personal life with work?
a) often b) sometimes c) rarely d) never
4. Does sickness makes you absent from work?
a) very often b) sometimes c) very seldom d) no
5. For what reason you take leave?
a) sickness
b) lack of interests in job
c) personal reason
d) long working hours
e) others please specify ………….
6. Are you being recognised for excelling in your job?
a) always b) often c) sometimes d) never
7. Are you satisfied with the existing work condition?
a) highly satisfied b) satisfied c) neutral d) dissatisfied e) highly dissatisfied
8. Your opinion regarding work environment?
a) Excellent b) good c) fair d) poor
9. Stress is a part of work life?
a) strongly agree b) agree c) neutral d) strongly disagree
10. Work assignments are distributed fairly?
a) strongly agree b) agree c) neutral d) disagree
e) strongly disagree

63
11. Does your job profile with your qualification?
a) yes b) no
12. What is your opinion regarding wages related to your work?
a) above average b) average c) below average d) no idea
13. Does any bias exists in promotional policy?
a) yes b) no

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14. Are you satisfied with the promotional policies?
a) highly satisfied b) satisfied c) neutral d) dissatisfied
e) highly dissatisfied
15. The incentive plans are
a) production based b) sales based c) Management based
16. Promotional policies are based on
a) experience b) performance c) qualification d) loyalty
17. Which factors will motivate you to attend regularly?
a) Good employee relations
b) Work environment
c) Recognition of work
d) Future prospects
18. Are you satisfied with the welfare measures provided by the company?
a) highly satisfied b) satisfied c) neutral
d)dissatisfied e) highly dissatisfied
19. What do you think about health and safety measures?
a) highly satisfied b) satisfied c) neutral
d) dissatisfied e) highly dissatisfied
20. Among the following factors which has to be improved?
a) Drinking water
b) Sanitary condition
c) Proper lighting
d) Ventilation
21. Canteen facility is
a) excellent b) good c) satisfactory d) poor
22. In your opinion how absenteeism can be controlled?
a) change management style
b) change working conditions/time
c) provide incentives
d) extra working to be controlled
e) others please specify …………

65
BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. Managing Human Resources, Tata McGraw - Bohlander, Snell, 2005

2. Personnel Management by C B Mamoria.

3. Research Methodology – C.R Kothari

4. Statistical Method by S.P Gupta

5. Human Resource and Personnel Management - Fourth edition,Tata McGraw Hill


K.Aswathappa, 2005

WebSites:

1. www.scribd.com
2. www.citehr.com
3. www.askforhrd.com
4. www.hyundai-motor.com

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