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AMERICAN KENPO

Yellow Belt Manual


Instructor Douglas G. Turner, Jr.

Copyright © 2004 by Douglas G. Turner, Jr. No portion of this book, except for review, may be reproduced,
stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying,
recording or otherwise, without the written permission of the author.
Written permission must be included in said reproduction.

Doug Turner, Jr.


MotionKenpo@gmail.com

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KENPO CREED

"I COME TO YOU WITH ONLY KARATE, EMPTY HANDS. I HAVE NO WEAPONS, BUT SHOULD I
BE FORCED TO DEFEND MYSELF, MY PRINCIPLES, OR MY HONOR; SHOULD IT BE A MATTER
OF LIFE OR DEATH, OF RIGHT OR WRONG; THEN HERE ARE MY WEAPONS,

KARATE, MY EMPTY HANDS."

ED PARKER

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INTRODUCTION

The art of American Kenpo is a method of empty hand and foot fighting based on the scientific use of
the body in self-defense. Instruction is designed to provide you with the ability to coordinate your mind, body
and spirit into a more efficient weapon by implementing the motions that you use in your every day life.
Moreover, you will find that instruction stresses the development of character, integrity, and respect for others.
As you advance, you will realize that American Kenpo is a way of life. You will gain a new way of thinking
and acting which will guide you in all areas of life so that you will be happier, healthier, and wiser.
This manual will hopefully provide guidance to novice and advanced students alike. It will show you the
methods of American Kenpo, but no matter how well this manual is written, remember: only real practice will
teach you how to use your hands and feet in such a manner that you will be able to defend yourself against an
armed or unarmed assailant. Hard work is always the true key to success.

NUMBERING SYSTEM
Each technique will be described “by the number.” When there are multiples of the same numbers, this mean
that all of the moves labeled with that number will be performed at the same time.

PHASE 1 - THE IDEAL PHASE


In this first phase of learning a technique you are given a fixed pattern of movement to defend against a pre-
arranged attack. This phase is designed to give the student the basics of how to structure a technique and to let
the student analyze the principles and concepts behind the technique from three points of view: the defender's
point of view, the attacker's point of view, and an observer's point of view.

PHASE 2 - THE WHAT IF PHASE


In this second phase of learning a technique you are ready to take the base technique and apply the equation
formula to a technique in order to improve or tailor it to fit your specific needs. In this phase you ask yourself
questions such as “What if the attack is different?”, “Can the same sequence of movements work against a
different attack?”, and “What if the range is different?” This is where the equation formula comes into play.
The equation formula allows you to prefix, suffix, insert, delete, rearrange, change or modify the weapons or
targets used in the given base technique in order to react to any given situation.

PHASE 3 - THE FORMULATION PHASE


In this last phase of learning a technique you take what you have learned in the what-if phase and apply it
spontaneously to any situation. In this phase, the base technique becomes less the technique and more just
simple motions that create the technique. The motions used in the base technique are analyzed, and hidden
maneuvers are found to provide greater flexibility in applying the equation formula.

Since it is impossible for me to show you the spontaneous use of a technique in writing I will be using this
section to further the what-if stage by reducing the technique to just simple motions and interpreting it based on
the methods of other martial arts to demonstrate the fact that when you truly break down an art, it is, in essence,
the same as any other.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
KENPO CREED .......................................................................................................................................................................................2

INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................................................................................3
NUMBERING SYSTEM........................................................................................................................................................................3
TABLE OF CONTENTS..........................................................................................................................................................................4

YELLOW BELT REQUIREMENTS......................................................................................................................................................6

YELLOW BELT BASICS........................................................................................................................................................................7

CONCEPTS, PRINCIPLES AND THEORIES....................................................................................................................................11

TERMINOLOGY....................................................................................................................................................................................13

YELLOW BELT SELF DEFENSE TECHNIQUES............................................................................................................................16


DELAYED SWORD............................................................................................................................................................................16
NAME...............................................................................................................................................................................................16
THE LESSON...................................................................................................................................................................................16
TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS.....................................................................................................................................................16
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE......................................................................................................................................17
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT-IF PHASE.................................................................................................................................19
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORUMLATION PHASE.....................................................................................................................20
ALTERNATING MACES....................................................................................................................................................................21
NAME...............................................................................................................................................................................................21
THE LESSON...................................................................................................................................................................................21
TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS.....................................................................................................................................................21
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE......................................................................................................................................22
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT IF PHASE..................................................................................................................................23
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION PHASE.....................................................................................................................24
SWORD OF DESTRUCTION.............................................................................................................................................................25
NAME...............................................................................................................................................................................................25
THE LESSON...................................................................................................................................................................................25
TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS.....................................................................................................................................................25
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE......................................................................................................................................26
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT-IF PHASE.................................................................................................................................27
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION PHASE.....................................................................................................................28
DEFLECTING HAMMER...................................................................................................................................................................29
NAME...............................................................................................................................................................................................29
THE LESSON...................................................................................................................................................................................29
TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS.....................................................................................................................................................29
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE......................................................................................................................................30
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT-IF PHASE.................................................................................................................................31
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION PHASE.....................................................................................................................32
CAPTURED TWIGS............................................................................................................................................................................33
NAME...............................................................................................................................................................................................33
LESSON...........................................................................................................................................................................................33
TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS.....................................................................................................................................................33
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE......................................................................................................................................34
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION PHASE.....................................................................................................................36
GRASP OF DEATH.............................................................................................................................................................................37
NAME...............................................................................................................................................................................................37
THE LESSON...................................................................................................................................................................................37
TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS.....................................................................................................................................................37
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE......................................................................................................................................38
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT-IF PHASE.................................................................................................................................39

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TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION STAGE......................................................................................................................40
CHECKING THE STORM..................................................................................................................................................................41
NAME...............................................................................................................................................................................................41
THE LESSON...................................................................................................................................................................................41
TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS.....................................................................................................................................................41
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE......................................................................................................................................42
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT-IF PHASE.................................................................................................................................43
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION PHASE.....................................................................................................................44
MACE OF AGGRESSION...................................................................................................................................................................45
NAME...............................................................................................................................................................................................45
THE LESSON...................................................................................................................................................................................45
TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS.....................................................................................................................................................45
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE......................................................................................................................................46
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT-IF PHASE.................................................................................................................................47
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION PHASE.....................................................................................................................48
ATTACKING MACE...........................................................................................................................................................................49
NAME...............................................................................................................................................................................................49
THE LESSON...................................................................................................................................................................................49
TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS.....................................................................................................................................................49
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE......................................................................................................................................50
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT-IF PHASE.................................................................................................................................51
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION PHASE.....................................................................................................................52
SWORD AND HAMMER....................................................................................................................................................................53
NAME...............................................................................................................................................................................................53
THE LESSON...................................................................................................................................................................................53
TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS.....................................................................................................................................................53
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE......................................................................................................................................54
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT-IF PHASE.................................................................................................................................55
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION PHASE.....................................................................................................................56
BLOCKING SET #1................................................................................................................................................................................57
BLOCKING SET #1.............................................................................................................................................................................58
SHORT FORM #1...................................................................................................................................................................................59
SHORT FORM #1................................................................................................................................................................................60
THE LESSON...................................................................................................................................................................................60

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YELLOW BELT REQUIREMENTS
DEFENSIVE TECHNIQUES

1. DELAYED SWORD (front - right hand lapel grab)

2. ALTERNATING MACES (front - two-hand push)

3. SWORD OF DESTRUCTION (front - left roundhouse punch)

4. DEFLECTING HAMMER (front - right front thrust kick)

5. CAPTURED TWIGS (rear - bear hug, arms pinned)

6. THE GRASP OF DEATH (left flank - right arm headlock)

7. CHECKING THE STORM (front - right step-through overhead club)

8. MACE OF AGGRESSION (front - two-hand lapel grab, pulling in)

9. ATTACKING MACE (front - right step-through straight punch)

10. SWORD AND HAMMER (right flank -left hand shoulder grab)

FORMS AND SETS

1. BLOCKING SET #1

2. SHORT FORM #1

YELLOW BELT SAYINGS

1. Distance is your best friend.


2. Whatever the attitude, so is the response.
3. When blocking on the inside of an opponent's arm, do so below the elbow, never above it.
4. When blocking on the outside of an opponent's arm, do so at or above the elbow, never below it.
5. The ankle is the wrist of the foot.
6. A knife-edge kick is a chop with the foot.
7. Deflection; then infliction of pain.

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YELLOW BELT BASICS
STANCES
1. Attention (standard)
Stand straight with your heels together and your toes slightly apart forming a 45 degree angle. You knees
should be slightly flexed, not locked. Arms are at your sides with your elbows lightly flexed, not locked.
Your shoulders are back and your chin is slightly tucked. Weight is distributed evenly on both feet.

This stance is used for disciplinary purposes only. Due to the close proximity of the feet to each other this
is considered a single dimensional stance. Force applied at any angle will not result in a complete loss of
balance due to the ability to redistribute the weight into virtually any stance.

2. Horse (training)
Starting in a natural stance, step sideways so that your feet are two shoulder widths apart. Your hips
should dip a little and your back should be lightly flexed to maintain balance. This stance has disciplinary
and transitional purposes. Your weight should be distributed evenly on both feet.

Since the feet are on the same width plane, this stance is considered a two dimensional stance. Force
applied from 12 o’clock or 6 o’clock will result in the greatest loss of balance. This stance fully exposes
the centerline. As a transitional stance this is mostly designed to move from one stance to another or to
attack of defend yourself. For example, this stance would be used for a split second if you need to lower
your body weight to execute a throw. However, you should recover to a fighting stance as quickly as
possible so that your assailant can't take advantage of your vulnerability.

3. Neutral Bow
Stand with your feet a little more than shoulder width apart at a 45 degree angle. Your feet should run
parallel to each other, offset so that your rear toe is even with your front heel. Your knees should be
lightly flexed, not locked. Your arms should be up and ready to attack or defend. Your shoulders should
be slightly forward and your chin tucked. Your weight should be distributed evenly over both feet.

This stance is considered the Master Key stance of the American Kenpo system. Most of the stances used
are variations of the neutral bow. The feet are on different width and depth planes so this is considered a
three dimensional stance. Force applied in a circular motion from 1:30 and 7:30 will result in the greatest
loss of balance. However, the ease at which you can redistribute your weight to another stance makes it a
great fighting stance. Overall this stance is stable and mobile and offers protection to the centerline.

4. Forward bow
From a natural stance, step forward so that your front knee forms a 90 degree angle and your back leg is
nearly straight, but with your rear knee slightly flexed. Your rear foot should point straight forward and
your front foot should be at a 45 degree angle. Your weight should be distributed evenly on both feet.
Your back should be straight with your chest out and chin in.

This stance is primarily a transitional stance used employ back-up mass or to create a bracing angle. The
feet are on different width and depth planes so this is considered a three dimensional stance. Force applied
in a circular motion from 1:30 and 7:30 will result in the greatest loss of balance. This stance is stable but
not too mobile.

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5. Close Kneel
This stance is primarily a transitional stance used to employ marriage of gravity or to check or buckle
legs. You should distribute your weight evenly on both feet. Your feet are on different width and depth
planes so this is considered a three dimensional stance. Force applied in a circular motion from 1:30 and
7:30 will result in the greatest loss of balance. This stance covers the centerline quite well though it lacks
stability and mobility.

6. Cat (45 degree)


Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart at a 45 degree angle so that one foot is forward forming an “L”
shape. Your knees should be lightly flexed, not locked. Your arms should be up and ready to attack or
defend. You shoulders should be slightly forward and your chin tucked. You should distribute your
weight so that 90 percent is on your back leg and 10 percent is on your front leg.

This stance is primarily a transitional stance used prior to kicking or moving. The feet are on a different
width and depth planes so this is consider a three dimensional stance. Force applied from 9 o’clock
though 11:30 will result in the greatest loss of balance. Your front leg has little to no weight on it allowing
you to quickly throw kicks when you want to attack or transition quickly to a fighting stance if under
attack. Because most of your weight is on one leg, an attack against that leg will cause loss of balance and
make it difficult to transition to another stance. Like all transition stances, you should recover to a fighting
stance as soon as possible so that your assailant can't take advantage of your vulnerability.

FOOT MANEUVERS

l. Front Step Through


Move your rear foot forward to the front and pivot on your front foot as it becomes the back foot.

2. Rear Step Through


Move your front foot back past your rear foot so that it becomes the rear foot in the stance.

3. Step-Drag Shuffle
Step forward with front foot then drag rear foot up into the same stance you started with

4. Drag-Step Shuffle
Drag your rear foot forward almost to your front foot then step forward with front foot into the same
stance you started in.

5. Push-Drag Shuffle
Push forward with your rear foot. Your front foot will come slightly off the ground to move forward as
your rear foot slides on the ground forward.

6. Front Crossover
Your front foot steps in front of and past your rear foot into a cross stance, then your rear foot moves out
along the same plane to return back to stance.

7. Rear Crossover
Your front foot steps in behind and past your rear foot into a cross stance, then your rear foot moves along
the same plan to return back to stance.

8. Side Cover
Pivot 90 degrees towards the open portion of your stance to end up with the opposite leg forward.

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10. Rear Cover
Step your rear foot across the line of your lead leg and pivot 180 degrees to the rear.

PUNCHES
1. Snapping Horizontal (corkscrew)
From point of origin; punch straight out with your fist. Your knuckles should face upward.

2. Snapping Vertical
From point of origin; punch out and slightly upward with your fist. Your knuckles should face to the
outside of your body.

3. Snapping Inverted Vertical


From point of origin; punch out and slightly downward with your fist. Your knuckles should face to the
inside of your body.

4. Upward Roundhouse (uppercut)


From a hip chamber; punch up and away from your body stopping at approximately level with your solar
plexus. Your knuckles should face outward.

FOOT AND LEG STRIKES


1. Front Snapping Ball Kick
From a crane chamber; extend the ball of the foot or the heel forward into the target then quickly return
your leg to the crane chamber. Your body does not cross the point of no return.

2. Rear Snapping Heel Kick


From a crane chamber; drive the heel of the foot directly backwards into the target then quickly return
your leg to the crane chamber. Your body does not cross the point of no return.

3. Side Snapping Knife-Edge Kick


From a crane chamber; extend the blade of the foot in an outside to inside circular motion to slice the
target using marriage of gravity and torque. Pivot on the supporting leg so that the toes face perpendicular
to or away from the striking leg.

4. Roundhouse Kick
From a crane chamber; point the knee to the inside of your body and extend the shin inward into the
target. Extend the toes and pivot on the supporting leg so that the toes are 90 degrees or greater to the
outside of the body.

5. All Step-Through Kicks


Perform the kicks above as described. Use more power so that you are carried in the direction of the strike
and can not return to your original position. Instead, step through so that your kicking leg is now the lead
leg of the stance.

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BLOCKS
1. Inward
Start with your hand closed and fist facing toward your face in a low chamber at the hips; move at a 45
degree angle across the body diagonally upwards.

2. Vertical Outward
Start with your hand closed and fist facing inward in a cross chamber; move across the body at a 45
degree angle

3. Extended Outward
Start with your hand closed and fist facing inward in a cross chamber; move across the body at a 45
degree angle as you rotate your palm outward

4. Upward
Start with your hand closed and palm facing inward in a cross chamber; move upward to form a 45 degree
angle as you rotate your palm upward.

5. Downward (outward)
Start with your hand open and palm facing inward in a high shoulder chamber; move your arm across
your body in a downward arc until it’s out barely past the leg. Keep your elbow slightly bent.

6. Push-Down
Start with your hand closed and fist facing upward, chambered at your hip. As you extend your arm
downward along your centerline, rotate your palm down and open your hand.

7. Rear Elbow
From a hip chamber; drive your elbow backwards into the target with your hand trailing directly behind
your elbow.

FINGER STRIKES
1. Inward Overhead Claw
From an upward block position, open your hand and use your fingers to attack soft targets as you move
your arm across and to the outside of your body.

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Concepts, Principles and Theories
In each of your Yellow Belt techniques, be able to utilize the following concepts principles, and theories to
achieve maximum effectiveness.

1. CLOCK PRINCIPLE

Throughout your lessons constant reference will be made to the face of a clock. This reference actually relates
to angles used when teaching, to show you the proper positioning of your feet in the performance of your
basics, self-defense techniques, freestyle techniques, forms, etc. For example, when starting a form (set), you
should picture yourself standing in the middle of a large clock that has been placed on the floor. The direction
you face when starting should always be 12 o'clock, to the right of you 3 o'clock, directly behind you 6 o'clock,
and to your left 9 o'clock. The "Clock Principle" is a directional reference used to aid you in selecting the proper
direction when attacked, retaliating, or working your basics.

2. ANGLES OF ATTACK

The eight major directions from which you or an assailant can attack or defend. For the purpose of this manual
the angles are as follows:
1. Diagonally downward from upper outside to lower inside.
2. Diagonally downward from upper inside to lower outside.
3. Diagonally upward from lower outside to upper inside.
4. Diagonally upward from lower inside to upper outside.
5. Upward from low to high.
6. Inward from outside to inside.
7. Outward from inside to outside.
8. Downward from high to low.

3. EQUATION FORMULA

To any given base, whether it is a single move or a series of movements, you can:
1. Prefix it: add a move or moves before it.
2. Suffix it: add a move or moves after it.
3. Insert: add a move into the already established sequence.
4. Rearrange: change the sequence of the moves.
5. Alter: change the weapon, target, or both weapon and target.
6. Adjust: change the range, angle of execution, or both angle of execution and range.
7. Regulate: change the speed, force, speed and force, or intent and speed.
8. Delete: exclude a move or moves from the sequence.

4. CENTERLINE THEORY

The centerline theory is based on the concept that your body is symmetrical. Our most vulnerable points are
near the line of symmetry leading the martial artist to develop stances and body positions which protect that line
of symmetry.

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5. OPPOSITE MOTION

Opposite motion refers to motion as it would appear in rewind. The opposite motion of an inward is outward.
So the opposite motion of an inward hand sword would be an outward hand sword.

6. THE CATEGORICAL BREAKDOWN OF TYPES OF ATTACKS

1. Grabs and Tackles


2. Pushes
3. Punches
4. Kicks
5. Holds and Hugs
6. Chokes and Locks
7. Weapons
8. Multiple Attacks

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Terminology
The following list of terminology is provided to aid the serious student in his pursuit of Kenpo
knowledge. The terminology should not be viewed as mere definitions, but it should be utilized to
increase your knowledge and understanding of Kenpo. By studying these concepts and applying them to
fighting sequences, you will maximize your fighting ability and realize your full potential.

ANGLES OF ATTACK - the eight directions from which you or an opponent can attack.

BASICS - simplified moves which form the base of the Art. They are divided into stances, blocks,
punches, strikes, kicks, etc.

BLOCK - a defensive maneuver used to hinder or check an attack.

CHOP - the execution of a cutting blow to an opponent or an object which generally employs the knife-
edge of the hand as the weapon.

CLASSICAL - a term used to describe the so called pure systems of Karate. Many of the movements
associated with these systems are not practical in our present environment, since their methods were
created for the types of defense found prevalent during ancient times.

CLAW - pulling and tearing action utilizing the fingertips which results in scratching and/or ripping.

CLOCK PRINCIPLE - A system, in teaching, which helps the student to visually imagine the direction
which he is to follow. He is generally asked to think of himself as being in the middle of a big clock
facing 12 o'clock with 6 o'clock to the rear, 3 and 9 to his right and left and all other numbers in their
respective places.

COMBAT - realistic fight which excludes control and rules.

CORKSCREW PUNCH - a torquing, twisting punch, which makes contact at the time the clenched fist is
facing palm down.

DRAG - the sliding of one foot against the other while either moving forward, back, or to the side.

DRAG-STEP - the dragging of one foot against the other while either moving forward, back, or to the
side as the other foot steps away from it. This is one of three methods of shuffling.

EMBRYONIC BASICS - simple basic movements which are generally single in action and single in
purpose. Moves that are primitive in nature.

FORMS - offensive and defensive maneuvers incorporated into a dance. It is an index of movements
whereby one can get answers to certain situations. It is a physical expression of form, speed, power,
continuity, poise, etc.

FREESTYLE - a term used in Karate for sparring. As in boxing it is a combination of offense and defense
- free physical expression.

GUARD - a set or arranged position of the arms and legs in anticipation of an attack.

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HEEL-KNEE - method of determining the proper depth of a neutral bow and arrow stance where the heel
of the forward foot is on the same line as the knee of the rear leg when it is smartly and naturally placed
on the ground.

KICK - refers to the methods used when striking with the foot.

LOCK-OUT - refers to a body weapon that is delivered and which remains at the target rather than being
retrieved.

MECHANICAL - refers" to those whose movements are very staccato in appearance. Sequence of
movements which look as if they are being done by the numbers.

MOVE - a command used when teaching to cause a student to react to a particular exercise.

NATURAL WEAPONS - use of body parts as offensive weapons. This includes using parts of the hand,
arm, foot, leg, etc.

OVER-REACH - to over-extend oneself with a blow or kick needlessly- to reach beyond or above a
certain point unnecessarily.

PARRY - to ward off a blow or kick. Riding and re-directing the force of a blow or kick.

PIVOT - is the changing from one stance or position to another while in place. This is done without
moving the foot front the spot it is in.

POKE - refers to the thrusting of the tips or the joints of the fingers to particular target areas on an
opponent's body.

PRACTICAL - realistic and applicable moves that work, especially on the street. Moves that work not
only in theory but in practice as well.

PUNCH - primarily refers to the methods used when striking with the front portion of the fist.

PUSH-DRAG - involves slightly raising the forward or the rear leg as the other leg pushes' the body
forward or back before catching up to resume the original distance between the feet. This is another of the
three methods.

SET - another term used to describe FORM, a dance routine of offensive and defensive maneuvers
created to have the practitioner to physically express himself.

SHUFFLE - is the shifting of the body forward or back to close or to increase the distance between your
opponent and you. In our system, there are three methods that accomplish this: push-drag, drag-step, and
step-drag. These are categorized as FOOT MANEUVERS.

SNAP - a particular method of execution which involves utilizing a whipping type attack or blow but with
greater magnitude than a whip.

SOPHISTICATED BASICS - basic movements which, although singular in movement, produce multiple
results.

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STEP-DRAG - the stepping forward, back or to the side with one foot as the other drags to meet it. This is
another of the three methods of shuffling.

STEP THROUGH - the execution of one full step forward or back, or in the case of a step through kick, it
means kicking with the forward foot and planting that foot back, or kicking with the rear foot and planting
that foot forward.

STRIKE - the delivery of natural body weapons in hitting human targets, the method of which excludes
punches and kicks.

SWITCH - is the changing form one stance or position to another while in place. This is done while
moving the feet from one spot to another. This involves a lead leg where one of two things can happen, (l)
you can step back to forward, (2) step forward to back, or a third possibility (3) jumping in place.

TARGETS - vital areas on an opponent's or your body which when struck can cause injury or damage.

THRUST - a particular method of execution which involves utilizing a propelling push type attack or
blow.

TOE-HEEL - method of determining the proper width of a neutral bow and arrow stance where the toe of
the forward foot is in line with the heel of the rear foot.

TORQUE - that twisting action used with your offensive or defensive movements which positions your
body and muscles to work at maximum efficiency.

VITAL AREAS - essential body parts which when struck can be injurious or fatal.

WEIGHT DISTRIBUTION - the apportionment of weight related to a particular stance. It may vary, fifty-
fifty, sixty-forty, ninety-ten, etc.

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YELLOW BELT SELF DEFENSE TECHNIQUES

DELAYED SWORD

Defense against a grab to your left shoulder


1. Step your left foot back to 6 o’clock into a right neutral bow facing 12 o’clock.
1. Execute a right inward block to assailant’s right arm.
1. Bring your left hand up to your solar plexus to act as a check.
2. Execute a right snap kick to your assailant's groin.
3. Plant your right foot at 11 o’clock into a right neutral bow.
3. Execute a right outward hand sword to your assailant's neck.

NAME
American Kenpo uses nicknames for certain basic strikes to aid in remembering the technique by associating
the name with the movements in the technique. “Sword” is the nickname for hand sword or knife hand.
“Delayed Sword” derives its name from the sequence of movements. The hand sword is delayed by the
insertion of a snap kick prior to its use.

THE LESSON
This technique was designed to teach you how to create distance from your attacker while blocking. As your
hands move out of range, you can then follow up with a long range weapon, which in turn brings the target back
in range of your hands.

TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS
Father: Right Inward Block
Mother: Left check at left ribcage
Sister: Right Snap Kick
Master Key Technique: Five Swords
Opposite Motion Technique: Sword of Destruction
Reverse Motion Technique: Intellectual Departure

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TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE
Step back away from the attack to create distance and allow yourself more time to react to any follow-ups that
your assailant may use.

If your assailant maintains the grab on your shoulder, he will lose his balance as you step back. This disruption
of balance is called an angle of disturbance. His right arm will extend, causing his left shoulder to rotate back.
This will cancel both arms. His right leg will also be canceled because all of his weight will be shifted onto it.
Your left hand should be ready and in place to check against any follow-ups.

As you perform your inward block, you need to make sure that your arm and body are aligned properly to get
the maximum effect. To do this, hold your right hand out in front of you as if in a defensive posture. Anchor
your elbow to your hip bone and hold your fist out so that your arm forms a 45 degree angle. When you step
back into the neutral bow your arm should automatically swing into position to perform the inside block. The
inside block is a natural part of the step back, so all you need to do is add a little force to make it more effective.

The inward block will cause the extended arm to collapse, pulling your assailant toward you with what is called
a frictional pull. This will place more weight on your assailant’s right foot making it that much more difficult
for him to counterattack.

At this point in the technique, your assailant is outside of your ability to strike with your hands. With that in
mind, use the next weapon available to you. Shift your weight onto your left leg and pull your right leg back a
little into a cat stance facing 12:00. Execute a snap kick to your assailant’s groin.

The snap kick will anatomically position your assailant by bringing head within contact penetration range of
your hands. As your assailant’s head comes forward you have the opportunity to borrow the force of his
forward momentum to increase the power of your strike as you employ your own forward momentum to meet
the oncoming force. Striking an object coming toward you causes much more damage than striking a still target.

When you execute your snap kick, you are throwing your body forward and then placing most of your weight
on the kicking foot, almost like you do when walking. As gravity pulls your weight down on that foot you
should finish with the hand sword to the neck, using all of that weight to add power to your strike in a marriage
of gravity and force.

Your assailant's possible attempt to follow up with a strike using his left arm or leg will be canceled by the
outward hand sword to his neck. The strike will force his weight back on his rear leg making the leg and the
arm ineffective as weapons. Leaving the strike out is known as a lockout check. Because it is resting on a
portion of his body it is also considered a gravitational check. The pinning check and the gravitational check
working together effectively cancel your assailant's width and depth zones. His width and depth is canceled
because he can no longer move forward, back and side to side. Your pinning check prevents him from moving
back and to your right. Your gravitational check prevents him from moving forward or to your left. It also
prevents him from rising canceling his height dimension. His only course of action is to drop down, which can
easily be countered by another snap kick.

Over the course of this technique you only counter attack with two strikes, the snap kick and the outward hand
sword. Since this technique is in response to a grab, it is probably sufficient However, what if you feel that you
need a stronger response? Without deviating from the primary motions of this technique you can add at least
one more strike.

Kenpo defines each movement as a letter of the alphabet. A self-defense technique is known as a fighting
sentence, a set is an index and a form is a dictionary or an encyclopedia of motion. Some of these individual
17
movements make use of the uppercase and lowercase portion of the letter. The inward block of Delayed Sword
is one such letter. As you block with your forearm your fist is in position to strike the jaw while en route. The
forearm block is the lowercase and the hammer-fist to the jaw is the uppercase portion of the letter.

18
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT-IF PHASE
What if you feel Delayed Sword is not a strong enough response to the attack? Perhaps, you started Delayed
Sword and immediately realize that it wasn't going to be effective in controlling your assailant. Your next
option is to graft another technique into it.

1. Step your left foot back toward 6 o’clock into a right neutral bow facing 12 o’clock.
1. Execute a right inward block to your assailant’s right forearm.
1. Bring your left hand up to your solar plexus to act as a positional check.
2. Slide your right foot back into a transitional cat stance.
2. Execute a right snap kick to your assailant's groin.
3. Execute a right outward hand sword to your assailant's neck.
Graft Five Swords on to the end of the technique:
4. Follow with a left sword hand strike to his eyes and cheekbone.
5. Execute a right uppercut to his solar plexus.
5. Chamber your left hand across your body in a positional check.
6. Follow with a left outside sword hand to his neck.
7. Finish with a right sword hand to his neck.

If you alter the last right inward hand sword to the neck with a hammer-fist to the jaw you can repeat Delayed
Sword as if the last technique were the uppercase portion of the inward block.

Part of the what-if phase of Kenpo is tailoring the technique to fit your individual preferences. While I teach
Delayed Sword in its ideal phase, I also teach a slight variation which I feel provides the defender with better
control over the assailant.

1. Step your left foot back toward 6:00 into a right neutral bow facing 12:00.
1. Bring your left hand up and pin your assailant’s right hand to your shoulder.
1. Execute a right inward hammering strike to your assailant’s right forearm.
2. Slide your right foot back into a transitional cat stance.
2. Cross chamber your right hand across your body in a positional cock.
2. Execute a snap kick to your assailant’s groin.
3. Plant your right foot toward 11:00 into a right neutral bow.
3. Execute a right outward hand sword to your assailant’s neck.

By using a pinning check with your left hand to control your assailant’s right hand, I believe that you have
better control over your assailant. As you strike his forearm you can be assured that you can’t strike his arm so
hard that you put it back into orbit allowing it to become another weapon for you to worry about, nor do you
have to lose the benefits of the angle of disturbance that you create by pulling him with you as you step back.

19
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORUMLATION PHASE
Delayed Sword from a contact manipulation perspective:

Defense against a right to left shoulder grab


1. Step back with your left foot toward 6:00 into a right neutral bow facing 12:00.
1. Grab your assailant’s hand with your right hand
1. Bring your left hand up to your solar plexus to act as a positional check.
2. Execute a shuffling front leg kick to your assailant’s groin.
3. Peel his hand off of your shoulder and bend his arm across his body.
3. Push up on his elbow with your left hand.
3. Torque his wrist clockwise with your right hand to apply an S-lock.

This technique uses the same basic motions as Delayed Sword. You step back to gain distance and then grab
your assailant’s right hand with your right hand. The grab is accomplished by reaching across your body, which
is the same movement as a right inward block. It’s the same motion, but with a different intent. You then
execute a snap kick to your assailant’s groin to distract them long enough to apply the final move. The only
purpose of the snap kick in both the ideal version and the formulation version of Delayed sword is to set your
assailant up for the final strike. It’s a minor move, yet important all the same. In the formulation phase you
torque your assailant’s wrist backwards as if getting ready to apply a come-along hold/wrist activated arm bar.
Indeed you could actually use the arm bar to finish, but because the kick closed your range, I would expect the
arm to be bent in a goose-neck or s-lock fashion. This is also known as a reverse wrist lock.

The principles used by American Kenpo are maintained and yet the technique is one that would be more likely
to be found in Hapkido, Shorinji Kempo, or other grappling art. If you look hard enough it’s found within
American Kenpo too. The major point that I wish to get across in these manuals is that all martial arts are
motion. The only difference between the arts is their strategy and tactics. If you remove all of that and allow
yourself to use any strategy or tactic the lines between the arts becomes blurred and you have what American
Kenpo and Jeet Kun do and Dragon Kenpo are meant to be. Use what works for any given situation.

20
ALTERNATING MACES

Defense against a two-handed push from 12 o’clock

1. Step your left foot back toward 6 o’clock into a right neutral bow.
1. Execute a right inward block.
1. Chamber your left hand at your hip.
1. Extend your inward block down on top of your assailant’s arms.
2. Pivot into a right forward bow.
2. Execute a left reverse punch to the solar plexus.
2. Maintain your right forearm’s horizontal position across your assailant’s arms.
3. Pivot back into a right neutral bow.
3. Execute a right back-fist to your assailant’s temple.
3. Drop your left arm down horizontally across your assailant’s arms.

NAME
Mace is the nickname for a clenched fist in American Kenpo. In this technique you will be alternating your
strikes and your targets with a clenched fist making the name Alternating Maces very appropriate.

THE LESSON
Like Delayed Sword, this technique teaches you the importance of creating distance. It teaches how to utilize
stance changes to make your strikes more effective. It also teaches how to use your fists alternately, using
specific weapons for specific targets.

TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS
Father: Right Inward Block
Mother: Left check at left ribcage
Brother: Left reverse punch
Master Key Technique: Five Swords
Opposite Motion Technique: Raining Claw
Family Related Technique: Snaking Talon
Evolving Technique: Calming the Storm

21
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE
Step back with your left foot to 6:00 into a right neutral bow for the angle of least resistance. The step back
should be extremely explosive. Make it a step drag if necessary to gain a little extra distance from the incoming
push. Your angle of deflection should be as close to your assailant as possible to deflect the force and
momentum of the push so that you are not affected. Don’t try to just ride the push. If you are hit by the push,
this technique will probably not work.

Extend your inward block down so that it is parallel to your body and placed a little bit below your assailant’s
elbow joints so that his arms are pinned to his body in a pinning check while pivoting into a forward bow. This
check only checks his height zone by preventing your assailant from rising. It doesn’t prevent him from
collapsing forward into a head butt, so you will need to explode into the second move. The block will provide a
minor amount of frictional pull that will help him head-butt you, but if you are quick enough you can borrow
that force.

Launch your reverse punch as soon as you start to pivot into a right forward bow. The strike and the stance in
proper alignment acts as a bracing angle that will keep you stable. Meeting your assailant’s forward
momentum with your torque cancels his follow-up as well as borrows his force. The action of a pivot into a
forward bow along with a reverse punch brings your whole body into alignment and allows your entire weight
to settle into the strike. Rarely should you just strike out with your arm strength alone. To some soft tissue
targets it can be devastating, but for maximum efficiency, use proper hip rotation to add power to your strike.

Immediately upon making contact with the reverse punch, unwind back into a neutral bow and use the counter
rotation to aid the power of the back-fist to your assailant’s temple. Use your retreating reverse punch as a guide
to contour along and aim your back-fist. Snap the reverse punch back fast enough so that the movement will
help pull your left hip back and push your right hip forward adding more speed and power to the back-fist. End
the technique with your left hand checking your assailant’s hands and your right hand controlling his three
dimensional zones with a lock-out check.

22
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT IF PHASE
The potential for our technique not to be sufficient to disable an assailant is always going to be the first what-if
covered in this series. The concept of grafting is very important for the student who hasn’t developed the
knowledge to be completely spontaneous in dealing with the possibilities that an assailant might present.
Grafting provides a tool in which a student can use the framework of the techniques given to react to the less
than ideal attacks and responses in the course of combat.

Defense against a two-handed push

1. Step back with your left foot toward 6 o’clock into a right neutral bow.
1. Execute a right inward block.
1. Bring your left hand up to your solar plexus to check.
Graft in Mace of Aggression
2. Execute a right inward elbow strike.
2. Slice his left knee with your right foot.
3. Plant your foot down to a right neutral bow.
3. Execute a right outward elbow.
3. Drop your right arm down horizontal across your assailant’s arms to check
4. Pivot to a right forward bow.
4. Execute a left reverse punch to your assailant’s solar plexus.
5. Unwind back into a neutral bow.
5. Finish with a right outward hammer to your assailant’s temple.

The inclusion of part of Mace of Aggression will angle the assailant’s momentum further off to the side and
may cause him to partially turn making his solar plexus unavailable as a target for your reverse punch. If this is
the case, use the target that now presents itself; the ribcage. The strike to the ribcage has the potential of
breaking a few ribs and will cause the assailant to arch his head forward and turn toward you allowing your
outward hammer to fit perfectly.

What if you moved too far away from your assailant with a step drag in order to get away from the force of the
push?

1. Step back with your left foot toward 6 o’clock into a right neutral bow.
1. Execute a right inward block.
Use the equation formula and insert a move.
2. Shuffle up into a cat stance
2. Execute a right snap kick to your assailant’s groin.
3. Drop your right foot closer to you assailant into a right neutral bow.
4. Pivot to a right forward bow.
4. Execute a left reverse punch to the solar plexus.
5. Unwind back into a neutral bow.
5. Finish with a right outward hammer to your assailant’s temple.

Adding the snap kick changes the entire dynamics of the technique, yet it still works. You borrow the assailant’s
forward momentum and stop it using the forward momentum from your snap kick. If your assailant was already
starting to bend forward from the inward block forcing him to turn and drop, the snap kick might cause the head
to whip down, making it difficult to effectively use your reverse punch. If this is the case, change to Delayed
Sword and strike with an outward hand sword.

23
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION PHASE
Alternating Maces from a contact manipulation perspective:

You assailant is in your guard with his hands planted on your chest.

1. Snake your left leg back and place your right knee across his hips.
1. Reach across your body with your right hand and grab his right lapel, pinning his hands to your chest and
pulling him closer to you.
2. Push with your right knee.
2. Push with your right hand and roll over into a mount.
3. Grab his left lapel with your left hand.
4. Roll your body weight higher onto your assailant’s chest as you apply a scissor choke.

In this technique I’m equating turning your left hip down with stepping your left foot back into the right neutral
bow. In this case your right knee is being placed across your assailant’s hips to scissor you to the mount. Your
right hand does virtually the same as it does in the ideal version. It reaches across your body and drops down to
check your assailant’s hands while pulling him closer to you to deny him space to maneuver.

Roll over and firmly obtain a good mounted position, dropping your hips as low as possible to stabilize your
base. Because both of your hands are going to be working on his body you don’t have a three point base and are
a little easier to be rolled. Drop your leg out to the side for extra stability if your assailant attempts to roll you.
Beware that the attempt to roll you might be used just to create that space between his body and your leg. Your
assailant might strive to thread his leg between the two, so as soon as he stops trying to roll you, bring your leg
back tightly against his body.

Lift your right elbow up just enough to create space for you to slip your left hand under to grab his right lapel.
This move is relative to the left reverse punch. Apply the scissor choke by pulling your hands to their respective
sides; left to left, right to right. This action is relative to you re-chambering or re-checking your assailant’s
hands with your left and executing the whipping back-fist to your assailant’s head in the ideal version.

24
SWORD OF DESTRUCTION

Defense against a left hook punch to your head

1. Step back with your left foot toward 6 o’clock into a right neutral bow.
1. Execute a right outward block to your assailant’s left forearm.
1. Bring your left hand up to your solar plexus as a check.
2. Execute a snap kick to the assailant’s groin.
3. Plant your right foot down toward 1 o’clock into a right neutral bow.
3. Finish with a right inward hand sword to your assailant’s neck.

NAME
Sword of Destruction describes the basic moves of the technique by alerting you to the weapon that is being
used; the hand sword. The use of the term destruction implies the powerful nature and the potential danger of
the hand sword.

THE LESSON
This technique teaches the same lesson as Delayed Sword using reverse motion. Delayed Sword’s motion was
inward followed by an outward motion. Sword of Destruction uses an outward motion followed by an inward
motion. These two motions are the Master Keys to many of the following techniques.

TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS
Father: Right Extended Outward Block
Mother: Left mid-level check
Sister: Right Snap Kick
Master Key Technique: Shielding Hammer
Opposite Motion Technique: Delayed Sword
Family Related Technique: Shielding Hammer

25
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE
Step back toward 6:00 with your left foot into a right neutral bow to gain distance to allow you more reaction
time. Solidify your base as you execute your right outward block. Your right arm should be locked into a frame
just barely outside the peripheral of your body so that you don’t create too much dead space by blocking strikes
that will never hit you.

Block the hook punch between your assailant’s fist and elbow. If your block lands on the bicep, your assailant
has the ability to collapse his fist inward to strike you. Your block should be locked in with the rest of your
body so that in order for your assailant to move beyond the block he would have to move your whole body.

At this point you haven’t fully checked your assailant’s ability to attack. Quickly fire the snap kick to the groin
to cancel his height, width and depth zones to prevent him from striking with his right side. The snap kick
should bring your assailant’s head forward into your hands contact penetration zone.

The snap kick to the groin should start a fraction of a second before your inward hand sword to the neck. Like
Delayed Sword, the hand sword should connect at the same time as the foot plants on the ground to make full
use of marriage of gravity.

The inward hand sword should contour along your assailant’s hook punch as much as possible to make your
attack more accurate. After the strike, leave your hand in place to act as a lock-out check, checking his height,
width and depth zones.

26
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT-IF PHASE
Technique Grafting:

1. Step back with your left foot toward 6 o’clock into a right neutral bow.
1. Execute a right outward block to your assailant’s left forearm.
Graft in the end of Entwined Maces
2. Execute a right inward hand sword to your assailant’s neck.
3. Step your left foot toward 1:30 into a left rear crossover.
3. Execute a right outward elbow to your assailant’s solar plexus.
4. Step your right foot toward 1:30 into a right reverse bow facing 1:30.
4. Execute a right back hammer fist to your assailant groin.
4. Bring your left up to check over your right shoulder.
5. Pivot clockwise into a right front twist stance.
5. Execute a right upward block.
5. Execute a left palm strike to your assailant’s sternum.
6. Execute a right knee.
7. Plant your right foot back to 6:00 into a right neutral bow.
7. Execute a right inward hammer fist to your assailant’s left collar bone.
8. Step your left foot behind your right into a rear cross over.
8. Execute a right rear kick to your assailant’s solar plexus.
9. Cross out to 6:00 to finish.

What if your assailant immediately follows up with a right punch after his left hook punch is blocked?

Defense against a left hook punch to your head followed by a straight right punch to your head

1. Step back with your left foot toward 6 o’clock into a right neutral bow.
1. Execute a right outward block to your assailant’s left forearm.
1. Bring your left hand up to your solar plexus as a check.
2. Execute a right inward block to your assailant’s right forearm.
3. Slide your right foot back into a transitional cat stance.
3. Execute a right snap kick to your assailant's groin.
4. Execute a right outward hand sword to your assailant's neck.

The response to the attack was simple; I switched techniques and went to Delayed Sword instead of Sword of
Destruction.

TIP: A drill that can often be used with your students is to alternate attacks from left to right and hope that the
student will continue to block until he reaches a point where he can solidify his base and immediately counter
with either the technique he is currently working on with the same hand that the technique requires, or counter
with the technique he is currently working on with the opposite hand the technique requires, or switch to a
different technique.

27
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION PHASE
Sword of Destruction from a contact manipulation perspective:

Defense against a straight right punch

1. Push-drag your left foot toward 7:30 into a right neutral bow.
1. Execute a right outward hooking block trapping your assailant’s right wrist.
2. Step your right foot toward 12:00 into a right neutral bow.
2. Apply a wrist lock.

In this technique the motions are more passive than in the ideal phase. Like step one of the ideal phase, drop
back and solidify your base while blocking outward. You then move in with an inward motion. To get the wrist
lock to work at its peak efficiency, hook grab your assailant’s hand at the thumb. Shuffle in and torque his hand
inward and use your left hand to check his hand or his elbow to get as much torque as possible. If you find it
difficult to get your assailant to comply, move your left foot up the circle toward 4:30 in a right neutral bow
facing 10:30 to get more torque and to bring him off balance.

28
DEFLECTING HAMMER

Defense against a right step through front kick

1. Step your left leg back to 7:30 into a right neutral bow.
1. Execute a right downward block.
1. Bring your left arm up to about chin height to check.
2. Shuffle toward 1:30 maintaining your right neutral bow.
2. Check your assailant’s right shoulder with your left hand.
2. Finish with a right horizontal elbow strike to your assailant’s face.

NAME
This technique’s name is derived from the angle of deflection the blocking arm establishes. The word hammer
is symbolic of the downward hammering action of the block.

THE LESSON
Deflecting Hammer teaches you how to employ footwork to open and close the gap between you and your
assailant. It also teaches you how to move out of the line of attack by changing angles.

TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS
Father: Right Downward Outward Block
Mother: Left midlevel check
Sister: Right Inward Elbow Strike
Master Key Technique: Five Swords
Family Related Technique: Thrusting Salute
Family Related Technique: Buckling Branch

29
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE
Your first priority is to avoid getting hit with the initial strike. You do this by stepping back and out of line with
your attacker so that you create distance as well as off-setting yourself from the attack in the case that maybe
the assailant is prepared to close the gap efficiently. By stepping up the circle you keep your weapons within
contact but you’ll force your assailant to have to adjust in order to move from out of range to within contact.

Your block serves a dual purpose. It deflects the attack and covers a portion of the second priority, which is to
prevent a secondary attack. The block forces your assailant to overstep which cancels his width and creates an
angle of disturbance. Take care to control your block so that it doesn’t extend beyond your outer rim and
create dead space that might allow your assailant an opening.

Your shuffle in also serves two purposes. It acts as an alternative method of checking your assailant’s width by
placing your knee right at his tailbone. If your assailant attempts to step his right foot toward you, your knee
prevents the movement. If he attempts to step away, you can bump his tailbone creating an angle of
disturbance which will require him to focus on regaining his balance rather than completing his attack. Your
shuffle also gathers momentum that you can utilize to increase the power of your final strike. However, first you
need to be sure that your assailant is completely neutralized before you counter attack. Your left hand does this
by checking your assailant’s right shoulder. This pins his arm to his side to check against any intentional or
unintentional strike. It also checks his height and depth so that he can’t follow-up with any other weapon.

Your right arm has remained in motion through this whole process. Moving from a lower hammering block
around and up, being catapulted forward by your forward momentum and marriage of gravity from the
shuffle forward and rotational force developed from turning your upper body to face 12:00 as your arm
collapses into a horizontal elbow strike to your assailant’s head.

30
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT-IF PHASE

Technique Grafting:

1. Step your left leg back toward 7:30 into a right neutral bow.
1. Execute a right downward block.
1. Bring your left arm up to about chin height to check.
2. Shuffle toward 1:30 maintaining your right neutral bow.
2. Check your assailant’s right shoulder with your left hand.
2. Finish with a right horizontal elbow strike to your assailant’s face.
Graft in Circling Destruction
3. Execute a right front scoop kick to your assailant’s groin.
3. Execute a left palm strike to your assailant’s left kidney.
3. Execute a right two finger rake to your attacker’s eyes.
4. Plant your right foot back toward 7:30 and cross out.

What if your assailant follows up the right step through kick with a lunge punch?

1. Step your left leg back toward 7:30 into a right neutral bow.
1. Execute a right downward block.
1. Bring your left arm up to about chin height to check.
2. Shuffle toward 1:30 maintaining your right neutral bow.
2. Check your assailant’s right shoulder with your left hand.
2. Finish with a right horizontal elbow strike to your assailant’s ribcage.

Due to the punch’s angle of execution, it becomes necessary to adjust your counter-attack to fit the situation.
Your path to strike the head is blocked by the outstretched arm. So instead of trying to go over it, go under it
and attack the ribs.

31
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION PHASE
Deflecting Hammer from a contact manipulation perspective

Counter to an O-Soto-Gari (Outer Major Reap).

Your assailant grabs your shoulders and pushes backwards to take you off balance, then steps through…

1. From a natural stance, step your right leg back toward 6:00 into a left neutral bow facing 12:00 to catch your
assailant’s leg on yours.
2. Drop your right arm down and hook your assailant’s leg with your arm and lift.
3. Step forward into a right neutral bow to dump your assailant onto his back.

In order to make Deflecting Hammer work against an inner major reap, it was necessary to adjust the technique
so that you drop back your right foot to catch your assailant’s leg instead of dropping back with your left leg in
the Ideal Phase of Deflecting Hammer.

32
CAPTURED TWIGS

Defense technique against a bear hug from behind where your arms remain free

1. Step with your left leg to 9:00 into a horse stance.


1. Pin your assailant’s hands to your body with your left hand.
1. Execute a right hammer fist to your assailant’s groin.
2. Step with your right leg toward 9:00 into a cat stance.
2. Pivot your upper body to face 3:00
2. Clear your assailant’s hands from your body with your left hand.
2. Finish with a right vertical elbow strike to your assailant’s jaw.

NAME
The name Captured Twigs is derived from the attack. In Ed Parker’s Kenpo systems the term “twigs” is used to
describe the arms. So, in this case, the name of the technique gives us a hint at what the technique is defending
against.

LESSON
In keeping with the techniques taught so far, Captured Twig teaches you how to retreat to create space and
distance and then respond to your assailant’s attack. Since you are unable to step back, you are taught to step
sideways into a more stable stance and to use the space provided by the shift to counter your assailant’s attack.

TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS
Father: Right Hammer Fist
Mother: Left midlevel check
Sister: Right Vertical Elbow Strike
Master Key Technique: Five Swords
Family Related Technique: Crushing Hammer
Family Related Technique: Squeezing the Peach

33
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE
Approached unawares from behind, you are grabbed in a bear hug with your arms pinned. As soon as you feel
the arms reach around you, start to act. If your assailant has a chance to lift you off the floor, there isn’t much
that you can do. Immediately step your left leg out toward 9 o’clock into a horse stance and sink your hips a
little to anchor yourself to the ground. Getting below his center of gravity will make it next to impossible for
your assailant to lift you up.

Bring your left hand up to pin his hands. Drop a little bit in your horse stance and use marriage of gravity to
hammer strike your assailant’s groin. His natural reaction will be to drop his hips back away from the strike and
possibly bring his hands down to protect his groin from being attacked again. By striking his groin you are
anatomically positioning your assailant to set up the next target that you wish to attack. Never go looking for a
target; hit what’s available.

Pivot 90 degrees to your right into a cat stance with your left hand checking, and use your assailant’s natural
reaction to being struck in the groin. Contour your assailant’s body up to the chin that is now exposed. Because
this elbow is coming up while his head is coming down you will be borrowing his force while attacking in one
of your assailant’s zones of obscurity. He’ll neither see nor expect the elbow to strike allowing it to cause a
great deal more damage.

Hidden Moves
As you begin to step down into horse stance feel free to throw your head back and attempt to head-butt your
assailant in the face. If nothing else, this move will cause him to be more wary of your head and lean back a
little better exposing his groin for your next attack. To add an extra move to the hammer to the groin, slightly
bend your wrist and poke with your fingers while also shoving your elbow into his solar plexus. You can also
add more power to the hammer strike by stomping his foot; this will allow more marriage of gravity and dual
motion to be employed making the technique more effective. Grab and rip his groin with your right hand as you
pivot into a cat stance, spiking his thigh with your knee and poking his eyes with your left hand. Be careful with
the eye poke because it might cause your assailant to reel back making it impossible for the elbow to make
contact.

34
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT-IF PHASE
Technique Grafting:

1. Step with your left leg to 9:00 into a horse stance.


1. Pin your assailant’s hands to your body with your left hand.
1. Execute a right hammer fist to your assailant’s groin.
Graft in Crushing Hammer
2. Pull your right foot to your left into a transitional cat stance.
2. Bring your right hand up as a finger whip to your assailant’s face.
Graft in Spreading the Branch (Yellow Belt Extra Technique)
3. Step your right foot toward 7:30.
3. Execute a right back hammer fist to your assailant’s groin.
4. Slap the right side of your assailant’s head.
4. Grab the left side of your assailant’s head with your left hand.
5. Execute a right knee strike as you pull your assailant’s head down to your knee.
5. Plant your right foot toward 1:30 into a right forward bow.
5. Execute a right inward overhead elbow strike down onto your assailant’s spine to finish.

What if your assailant is able to lift you off the ground before you have a chance to respond? The problem with
this what-if situation is that as soon as you are lifted off the ground your assailant may be able to cause you
damage. When the proper force is applied your back will be instantly out of action. Take bear hugs seriously,
they are considered more dangerous than a kick for a reason.

1. Kick your assailant in the shins.


1. Execute a lower hammer strike to the groin.
2. As soon as your feet hit the ground, execute a rising elbow to your assailant’s chin.

The most common reaction to a bear hug where you are lifted off the ground is to attempt to either head butt
your assailant or poke him in the eyes over your shoulders. Unfortunately, this throws your weight higher when,
instead, you want to be dropping your weight and trying to get your feet on the ground again. Bend over and
strike your assailant low in order to distract him and get him to loosen his grip so that you can escape.

35
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION PHASE
Just as Captured Twigs is simply effective in its ideal stage, it’s equally effective in its simplicity when looked
at from a contact manipulation perspective.

Captured Twigs self defense technique against a tackle where your assailant remains standing in your guard.

1. As soon as you hit the ground, place your feet on your assailant’s hips or upper thigh.
1. Drop your right hand down to grab your assailant’s left foot.
2. Push with your feet.
2. Pull with your hand to take your assailant to the ground on his back.
3. Immediately move to a mount and take control of your assailant.

As your assailant takes you to the ground, immediately establish your base by placing your feet in the hollows
of your assailant’s hips. Grab the nearest leg with the hand on the same side. Use a push pull motion to take him
to the ground. Quickly move to establish a mount.

If your assailant’s legs are too far away to grab with your hand, place one of your feet behind his knee and pull
with your foot as you push with the other foot to take him down.

36
GRASP OF DEATH

Defense against a left flanking headlock

1. Step your right foot toward 12:00 into a right neutral bow.
1. Grab your assailant’s right hand with your right hand.
2. Shuffle in with a left ridge-hand strike to the groin.
2. Execute a left knee strike to your assailant’s right leg.
3. Step with your left foot toward 12:00 into a left neutral bow.
3. Bring your left arm up and around to apply pressure to the back of your assailant’s right arm.
4. Pivot into a left neutral bow.
4. Finish with a right reverse punch to the face.

NAME
The name “Grip of Death” refers to the potentially life-threatening nature of the headlock.

THE LESSON
This technique is designed to teach the beginner how to prioritize and deal with a potentially life-threatening
situation, using the weapons that are available.

TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS
Father: Left Ridgehand Strike/Left Thigh Pinch
Mother: Right High Check/Wrist Grab
Sister: Left Knee Strike
Master Key Technique: Thundering Hammers
Family Related Technique: Grip of Death
Related Technique: Crossing Talon

37
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE
Your first priority in a defense against a hold that cuts off the air supply is to regain control of your air supply.
Immediately as you feel the arm go around your neck, grab the arm and anchor your elbow to your body so that
your assailant will be unable to completely close off your windpipe. If you apply the anchor soon enough and
lock it into place, as your assailant attempts to squeeze his arm together he’ll be more likely to lift you up off
the ground rather than it closing around your neck. Simultaneously, turn your head toward your assailant and
the opening rather than keeping your throat facing the arm or his elbow. This will help you to keep breathing.

Only after you have regained control of your air passage should you begin to counter. Yet in real-time the
previous two moves and the next move should happen within a fraction of a second of each other. As he pulls
your head down, shuffle forward into a right neutral bow to get into a more stable stance so that your assailant
can’t take you to the ground or bend you over too far. Spike the back of his knee with your left leg to buckle his
leg and create an angle of disturbance and a gravitational check. Horse pinch his right inner thigh with your
left hand. This should throw your assailant off balance enough and hurt enough so that he loosens up on the
hold around your neck.

Once you feel him relaxing, twist his hand that you grabbed outward as you step your left foot forward into a
left neutral bow while placing your left hand on your assailant’s triceps to break or control with an arm bar.
This also acts as a pressing check to ensure your assailant can’t counter attack. The act of locking out his elbow
and stepping forward while maintaining hold with your right hand will bend your assailant over forward and
spin him around to face 3 o’clock. Execute a right reverse punch to his face utilizing upper body rotation to add
torque to your punch.

38
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT-IF PHASE
Technique Grafting:

1. With your right hand, grab your assailant’s right hand.


1. Turn your head toward the left to keep your airway open.
1. Step with your right foot toward 12:00 into a right neutral bow.
2. Push-drag forward remaining in a right neutral bow.
2. Horse pinch your assailant’s inner thigh with your left hand.
Graft in Grip of Death
3. Pivot toward 9:00 into a horse stance.
3. Execute a right hammer strike to your assailant’s groin.
4. Step with your left foot toward 12:00 into a left neutral bow facing 12:00.
4. Apply pressure on your assailant’s right arm with your left arm.
5. Pivot into a left forward bow.
5. Finish with a right reverse punch to your assailant’s face.

What if your assailant attempts to run your head into a wall?

1. With your right hand, grab your assailant’s right hand.


1. Turn your head toward your left to keep your airway open.
1. Step with your right leg toward 12:00 into a horse stance facing 9:00.
2. With your left hand grab your assailant’s right leg.
2. Side step toward 12:00 while remaining in a horse stance.
2. Drop your right leg on the back of your assailant’s right leg.
3. Step with your right leg toward 12:00 into a right neutral bow.
3. Bring your right arm up and apply pressure to the back of your assailant’s left triceps.
3. Twist your assailant’s right hand out with your right hand.
4. Rotate your upper body and execute a reverse punch to your assailant’s head.

When being dragged by your assailant toward an object that can cause you harm, you are given an additional
priority of stopping him. However, for this technique your first priority remains: Protect your airway! If you
can’t breathe then you may never realize you hit the object your assailant is running you toward. Once your
airway is safe and you can breath, attempt to establish a base. Drop into a horse stance and grab your assailant’s
nearest leg and then drop your leg onto the back of his leg in an attempt to cancel his height and depth zones.
Once your assailant is stopped you can continue on with the escape and counter.

39
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION STAGE
Grasp of Death from a contact manipulation perspective:

Your assailant has you in his guard with his feet planted firmly on the ground.

1. With your right hand, grab your assailant’s belt and hold tightly.
1. Drive your right knee into his groin or his tail bone.
2. Reach underneath his leg with your left arm and attempt to lift.
2. Rise up onto your right knee placing your left foot flat on the floor.
3. Grab your assailant’s left lapel with your left hand.
3. Step forward with your left foot beside your assailant’s hip.
4. Drive forward and press your assailant’s leg to his chest, pinning it between your shoulder and his body.
5. Allow his leg to pass under your body to be caught in the crook of your right arm, which should still be
grabbing his belt.
6. Drop to your knees beside his body in a side mount.

Trapped in your assailant’s guard you attempt to pass his legs to find that he has planted them firmly to the
ground so that you are unable to lift them up with just the strength of your arm. You get up on your knee and
use your entire body mass to drive forward, lifting his leg onto your shoulder and pinning it between your chest
and his chest. Walk around to obtain the side mount.

This is similar to Grasp of Death in that you are trapped in a somewhat precarious position and need to escape.
You drive your right knee forward to distract your assailant. This move equates your step forward into your
right neutral bow. The difference is that it is your right knee that will be checking or bumping your assailant
rather than your left knee.

Rise to your right knee and step through with your left to simulate the move from a right neutral bow to the left
neutral bow. Your right hand continues to check while your left hand drives forward to trap your assailant’s
limb. You then rotate your whole body instead of just your upper body as you move to a side mount.

40
CHECKING THE STORM

Defense against an overhead club attack (angle 8)

1. Step your right foot toward 3:00 into a horse stance.


1. Execute a right inward parry to your assailant’s right hand.
2. Drag your left foot toward 3:00 into a cat stance facing 10:30.
2. Execute a left outward parry to your assailant’s forearm.
2. Bring your right hand down to your solar plexus to act as a check.
3. Keep your left arm extended to check your assailant’s right arm.
3. Execute a left snapping ball kick to your assailant’s groin.
4. Plant your left foot down toward 10:30 into a left front twist stance.
4. Execute a right slice kick to the inside of your assailant’s right knee.
5. Plant your right foot down into a right neutral bow facing 10:30
5. Finish with a right outward whipping back fist to your assailant’s temple.

NAME
In Ed Parker’s American Kenpo, the term “Storm” refers to the use of a club. In this technique you will be
attacked with a club and will be required to check it and keep it checked while you counter.

THE LESSON
When faced with a deadly weapon, this technique teaches you how to move to one of the safest points (the
safest point in a tornado is inside the eye) while remaining in range keeping the weapon in check while you
counter and attempt to disable the assailant.

TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS
Father: Left Outward Block
Mother: Right Midlevel check
Sister: Left Snap Kick
Master Key Technique: Repeating Mace
Related Technique: Sword of Destruction
Family Related Technique: Evading the Storm
Family Related Technique: Brushing the Storm
Family Related Technique: Escape from the Storm

41
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE
From a natural stance, step toward 3 o’clock into a horse stance as you perform an inside outside block. This
moves you out of the line of attack. When dealing with a club attack you want to be sure to check the hand that
is holding the stick as well as the stick itself. Some martial arts teach you to block the hand, but your assailant
can easily clip the club down on your head. Check his hand with your left as you block approximately midway
along the club with your right. If you so desire, as your right hand is moving to check his hand, add in an eye
rake to further distract him while you perform your counter. With this block you want to step directly into the
attack with your angle of deflection as soon as possible to ensure there is very little momentum built up in the
strike. If you were to block the club just prior to it’s hitting you, the momentum that had been build up would
probably break your arm or, at the very least, disable it.

Shift your left foot back into a left cat stance and then execute a kick to your assailant’s groin. This cancels your
assailant’s height zone and forces the club to drop beyond your body.
Land in an outward twist stance and create an angle of alignment. Pivot toward 10:30 as you execute a right
slicing kick to buckle your assailant’s knee using the torque of the pivot to generate power. Plant into a right
neutral bow and use the marriage of gravity to strike with a right outward back fist to your assailant’s temple.

42
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT-IF PHASE
Technique Grafting:

1. Step your right foot toward 3:00 into a horse stance.


1. Execute a right inward parry to your assailant’s right hand.
2. Drag your left foot toward 3:00 into a cat stance facing 10:30.
2. Execute a left outward parry to your assailant’s forearm.
2. Bring your right hand down to your solar plexus to act as a check.
3. Keep your left arm extended to check your assailant’s right arm.
3. Execute a left snapping ball kick to your assailant’s groin.
4. Plant your left foot down toward 10:30 into a left front twist stance.
4. Execute a right slice kick to the inside of your assailant’s right knee.
Graft Mace of Aggression in simultaneously…
4. …With a right inward hammer strike to the face.
5. Plant back out toward 1:00 into a right neutral bow.
5. Execute a right elbow to the face.
6. Flow into a right back fist to the temple.

What if your assailant attacks with an overhead club strike then retracts the club one you begin to block and
follows up with a horizontal strike to the ribs:

1. Step your right foot toward 3:00 into a horse stance.


1. Execute a right inward parry to your assailant’s right hand.
2. Drag your left foot toward 3:00 into a cat stance facing 10:30.
2. Execute a left outward parry to your assailant’s forearm.
2. Bring your right hand down to your solar plexus to act as a check.

Your assailant takes advantage of the new opening to your ribs when you block high and rotates his wrist
around to attack them.

3. Drop your left foot back to 6:00 into a right neutral bow.
3. Execute a horizontal palm block across your body with your checking hand.
3. Grab the club with your right hand.
3. Execute a left lower block to your assailant’s wrist to take control of his club.
4. Use the butt end of the club to attack your assailant’s temple.
5. Re-chamber your right hand across your body.
5. Pivot into a right forward bow with a reverse punch to the solar plexus.
6. Pivot back into a right neutral bow with an angle 2 attack to your assailant’s collar bone.

43
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION PHASE
Checking The Storm from a contact manipulation perspective:

Your assailant is underneath you in your mount with his arms up protecting his face.

1. Grab your assailant’s left wrist with your left hand.


2. Step your left leg up under your assailant’s right armpit.
3. Step your right leg up to the left side of your assailant’s head.
4. Grab your left wrist with your right hand.
5. Fall backward and apply an arm lock.

44
MACE OF AGGRESSION

Defense against a two hand lapel grab.

1. Reach over your assailant’s arms with your left arm and grab your assailant’s left wrist.
1. Step forward with your right foot and stomp the top of your assailant’s right foot.
1. Execute a right inward rake to your assailant’s nose.
1. Strike your assailant’s left elbow with your right forearm.
2. Hammer your right arm down across your assailant’s arm.
3. Execute a right inward horizontal elbow strike to your assailant’s jaw.
4. Finish with a right outward elbow strike to your assailant’s jaw.

NAME
Mace of Aggression is in reference to the forward step along with raking fist. The Kenpo alias for a fist is mace,
hence the name.

THE LESSON
Unlike the majority of the Yellow Belt techniques, Aggressive Mace teaches you how to advance on your
assailant while using dual motion to both block and attack at the same time.

TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS
Father: Right Inward Block
Mother: Left Midlevel Horizontal Check
Sister: Right Inward Elbow Strike
Master Key Technique: Five Swords
Family Related Technique: Twin Kimono
Family Related Technique: Raking Mace
Family Related Technique: Blinding Sacrifice
Similar Action Technique: Triggered Salute

45
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE
Place your left hand horizontally across your body and use a hugging check to pin both of your assailant’s
hands to your chest. Anchor your elbow to your ribs to prevent your assailant from gaining enough leverage to
escape. This also will pull him forward and bend him over giving you control of his depth and height zones.

Execute a right inward strike to the side of your assailant’s head using dual motion as you slice kick his legs
with your right foot to plant in a horse stance. The circular motion of this strike adds power to the strikes and
the dual motion makes it difficult for either of the attacks to be countered. With his hands on your shoulders his
only means of attack is with his head or with his lower body. The strike to the head and the legs cancels those
possibilities out while leaving you free to follow up on your counter strike. Continue your rotation and flow into
a right inside elbow to the head to continue to check his height, width, and depth.

Step your right foot toward 3 o’clock into a right neutral bow as you reserve your rotational motion with a
reverse elbow to the head to finish. With this last move you’ll borrow a small amount of force by knocking his
head one way and then while it is still in motion, knocking it back the other way. This last strike also has the
capability of checking his depth zones, but at that point it’s not really necessary since you’ve knocked him all
over the place and taken away his ability to respond.

Upper Case and Lower Case: This is seen with the initial hammer to the head. The fist portion of your hand acts
as a strike while the elbow portion acts to block the arms away from your body if you so desire.

Major and Minor Moves: After the completion of your outward elbow strike your hand is perfectly positioned
to follow up with a rake to the face or poke to the eyes.

46
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT-IF PHASE
Technique Grafting:

1. Reach over your assailant’s arms with your left arm and grab your assailant’s left wrist.
1. Step forward with your right foot and stomp the top of your assailant’s right foot.
1. Execute a right inward rake to your assailant’s nose.
1. Strike your assailant’s left elbow with your right forearm.
2. Hammer your right arm down across your assailant’s arm.
3. Execute a right inward horizontal elbow strike to your assailant’s jaw.
4. Finish with a right outward elbow strike to your assailant’s jaw.
Graft in Five Swords
5. Follow with a left sword hand strike to his eyes and cheekbone.
6. Execute a right uppercut to his solar plexus.
6. Chamber your left hand across your body in a positional check.
7. Follow with a left outside sword hand to his neck.
8. Finish with a right sword hand to his neck.

What if your assailant grabs you and begins pulling you with a stiff armed grab rather than a bent arm grab?

1. Immediately pin your assailant’s hands to your chest with your left hand. Your left hand should be
horizontally across your assailant’s arms grabbing his left wrist.
1. Step your right foot forward into a right neutral bow.
1. Execute an inward hammer strike to your assailant’s jaw with your fist and an inside vertical block with your
forearm.
2. Execute a right slicing kick to your assailant’s knee.
2. Execute a right inward elbow strike to his temple.
2. Plant your right foot down on top of your assailant’s right foot in a modified horse stance.
3. Execute a right outward elbow strike to your assailant’s temple.

As soon as your assailant pulls you forward your first priority is to attempt to stop him. Whenever a person
attempts to take you someplace else, it’s a sure sign that he’s uncomfortable doing what he plans on doing in
your current location. You want to do your best to remain in your current location no matter what.

Step forward with your right foot into a right neutral bow. This will help you solidify your base and stop your
assailant from dragging you around.

Reach across your body with your left hand and grab your assailant’s left hand and pin his hands very tightly to
your chest. As long as you have his hands pinned to your chest you know that they can not be used effectively
against you as weapons. It may also surprise or worry your assailant enough that he will begin to focus on
getting free and allow you all the time you need to defend yourself.

As you step forward and solidify your base, use that body momentum to drive your fist diagonally into your
assailant’s face. The motion is like an inward uppercut. You want to strike the face as well as roll your
assailant’s arm up so that you will be applying pressure to the back of his elbow, possibly breaking it.

Maintaining the inward motion of your inward vertical block, execute a right slicing kick to your assailant’s
right knee as your right arm flows into an inward elbow strike. Scrape down your assailant’s shin with your
right foot and plant on top of his foot. This will cause your assailant to lose balance. Planting your foot on top of
his foot acts as a check. Rebound and execute a right outward strike to the other side of your assailant’s head.

47
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION PHASE
Mace of Aggression from a contact manipulation perspective:

Defense against a two handed pull:

1. Step toward 12:00 into a right neutral bow to solidify your stance.
1. Grab your assailant’s right elbow with your left arm and pull it across your body.
1. Grab your assailant’s left shoulder with your right hand and push.
2. Continue the counter clockwise movement.
2. Once all of your assailant’s weight is on his right foot, use your right foot to hook it and pull it out from
underneath your assailant to take him down with an inner reaping throw.

48
ATTACKING MACE

Defense against a right punch:

1. Step with your right foot back to 6:00 into a left neutral bow.
1. Execute a left inward block.
1. Chamber your right fist at your solar plexus.
2. Pivot into a left forward bow.
2. Execute a right reverse punch to your assailant’s rib cage.
3. Circle your right hand clockwise and grab your assailant’s right wrist.
3. Execute a right roundhouse kick to your assailant’s groin.
4. Plant your right leg toward 12:00 into a right neutral bow.
4. Finish with a left vertical punch to your assailant’s right kidney.

NAME
As you learned in Mace of Aggression and Attacking Mace, the term mace is the symbolic name for a clenched
fist. Attacking mace describes your assailant’s method of attack.

THE LESSON
This technique teaches you how to use a check to control your assailant and to reverse your motions of attack.

TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS
Father: Left Inward Block
Mother: Right Midlevel Check
Brother: Right Reverse Punch
Master Key Technique: Thundering Hammers
Family Related Technique: Flashing Wings
Related Technique: Alternating Maces

49
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE
From a natural stance, step your right foot back toward approximately 6 o’clock into a left forward bow and
solidify your base. This opens the gap and may move you out of contact range with your assailant’s punch,
allowing you a little time to size up your assailant.

Execute a left inward block to the back of your assailant’s elbow to attempt to hyper-extend it as well as deflect
it.

Pivot into a right forward bow and counter-attack with a right reverse punch to your assailant’s ribs. By
pivoting into a forward bow you add torque to the power of your punch, as well as borrow the force from his
forward momentum to enhance the power of your strike. This also acts as a bracing angle, giving you the
ability to use an angle of incidence to bring your maximum power to bear. Due to the fact that your block is to
the outside of the body, you are also checking his dimension zones, keeping him from following up with
another attack.

Grab your assailant’s arm with your right hand to maintain your check and follow up with a roundhouse kick to
the midsection using rotational force to enhance the power of your kick.

Reverse your rotation and plant your foot back into a left neutral bow and finish with a left hook to punch his
kidney. The force of the kick will anatomically position his body to expose his kidney for you. As you drop
your foot down this will add the marriage of gravity to your rotational force enhancing your strike.

50
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT-IF PHASE
Technique Grafting:

1. Step with your right foot back to 6:00 into a left neutral bow.
1. Execute a left inward block.
1. Chamber your right fist at your solar plexus.
2. Pivot into a left forward bow.
2. Execute a right reverse punch to your assailant’s rib cage.
3. Circle your right hand clockwise and grab your assailant’s right wrist.
3. Execute a right roundhouse kick to your assailant’s groin.
Graft in dance of death.
4. Plant to 12:00 between your assailant’s legs in a right neutral bow.
4. Hook your assailant’s right leg with your left arm and lift.
4. Execute a right elbow strike your assailant’s solar plexus to take him down.
5. Execute a right fore-knuckle strike to the inner thigh.
6. Finish by rolling your hand into a hammer strike to the groin.

Another what-if we must consider with almost all of our techniques, is “Will the same technique work if our
hands are in a different place due to a prior action or inaction? The ideal version of Attacking Maces starts as if
each hand’s point of origin is in the chamber position. How rare will that be? Isn’t it more likely that our hands
will be elsewhere? Let’s say that this technique started with Sword of Destruction. We stepped back with our
left foot and blocked with our right hand which propelled the attacker’s right fist at us faster than we could get
the kick and inward hammer strike in.

Start after the first move of Sword of Destruction…

1. Step Drag your left foot toward 12:00 into a left neutral bow.
1. Execute a left inside block.
1. Execute a right raking knuckle to the ribs.
2. Trap your assailant’s attacking arm with your right.
2. Execute a right roundhouse kick to his midsection.
3. Plant your foot down toward 12:00 in a right neutral bow.
3. Execute a left hook punch to the kidney to finish.

51
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION PHASE
Attacking Mace from a contact manipulation perspective:

From a clinch where your left hand is grabbing your assailant’s right elbow and your right hand is grabbing
your assailant’s right lapel:

1. Pull with your left arm, guiding his arm underneath your right arm.
1. Push with your right arm, raising your forearm over his shoulder as you spin your assailant 180 degrees.
2. Wrap you right leg around your assailant’s legs and drop down on your back.
3. Lift up your assailant’s chin with your right forearm.
3. Grab your assailant’s left lapel with your left hand and apply a rear naked choke.

52
SWORD AND HAMMER

Defense against a right flank shoulder grab

1. Step with your right foot toward 3:00 into a horse stance.
1. Grab your assailant’s hand with your left hand and pin it to your shoulder.
1. Execute an outward hand sword to your assailant’s throat.
2. Execute a right back hammer fist to your assailant’s groin.

NAME
The name of this technique originates from the reaction to your assailant’s grab. The sword is symbolic for the
hand sword and the hammer is symbolic for the hammer fist strike.

THE LESSON
This technique teaches you to be aware of possible unintentional reactions that your assailant might have and to
confidently react to an attack that may come from outside your line of vision.

TECHNIQUE RELATIONSHIPS
Father: Right Outward Hand Sword
Mother: Left Shoulder Pin
Sister: Right Lower Hammer Fist
Master Key Technique: Five Swords
Family Related Technique: Obscure Wing
Reverse Targeting Order: Delayed Sword

53
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: IDEAL PHASE
As soon as you feel your assailant grab your shoulder, drop your weight and anchor your body in place so that
you can’t be easily moved. Check his left hand so that when you strike the hand won’t fly forward into your
face. At the same time, execute a hand sword to your assailant’s throat. This is a particularly devastating strike,
so do your best to keep it controlled in class. Use a striking shield to catch the full force of the blow or use a
mannequin like BOB. If these tools are not available, at least have the student guard his throat with his free
hand.

The hand sword to the throat will cause your assailant to either step backward or bend over slightly backward to
avoid or absorb the blow to the throat. This is the reaction you are looking for because it anatomically
positions your next strike for you. As he bends over slightly backward his midsection will protrude, giving you
a chance to use marriage of gravity and borrowed force to make the strike to the groin more potent.

54
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: WHAT-IF PHASE
Technique Grafting:

1. Step to your left toward 9:00 into a horse stance.


1. Pin his left hand to your right shoulder with your left hand.
1. Execute a right outward sword hand to your assailant’s throat.
2. Drop down with a right lower hammer strike to his groin.
Graft in Captured Twigs
3. Execute a right obscure elbow up to your assailant’s jaw.

What if your assailant approaches from behind and grabs your right shoulder and pulls?

1. Step your right foot back into a 45 degree horse stance along the angle of least resistance.
1. Use your assailant’s pull to throw your hand sword into his throat.
1. Check his hand with your left as before.
2. Execute a lower hammer strike to his groin.

55
TECHNIQUE ANALYSIS: FORMULATION PHASE
Sword and Hammer from a contact manipulation perspective:

Defense against a left cross wrist grab.

1. Step with your right foot toward 9:00 pivoting into a horse stance facing 6:00
1. Counter grab your assailants left wrist.
2. Go over and then under your assailants arm and grab your own wrist to apply a figure four arm lock.

56
BLOCKING SET #1

BLOCKING SET #1 CONTAINS:

1. BLOCKS:
a. Upward
b. Inward
c. Vertical Outward (transitional)
d. Extended Outward
e. Outward Downward
f. Rear Elbow
g. Push-Down

2. STANCES:
a. Attention
b. Training Horse

BLOCKING SET #1 TEACHES:

1. A sequence of movements which promotes Continuity of Motion and preserves Economy of Motion.

2. The correct execution of the six principle blocks and one hidden block.

3. Blocks which protect all three Zones of Protection.

4. The execution of blocks while in a stationary position.

5. Maximum cover of head and upper body areas.

SUGGESTIONS FOR PERFECTION:

1. Strive to achieve a spatial precision in the execution and placement of your blocks.

2. Blocks should be executed sharply and crisply.

3. Practice to maintain a good horse stance throughout the set.

4. Study the motion of the hand and arm while executing the moves.

5. Train with a partner by having him throw punches and kicks.

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BLOCKING SET #1

OPENING:

1. From your attention stance, step with your left foot to 9:00 into a horse stance.
1. Place your left open hand over your right clenched fist.
2. Immediately chamber both hands to your hips.

SECTION 1:

1. Deliver a right upward block. Your left hand remains chambered.


2. Convert this upward block into a right inward block. Your left hand remains chambered.
3. After your right inward block, deliver a right extended outward block. Your left hand remains chambered.
4. Now deliver a right outward downward block. Your left hand remains chambered.
5. After your right outward downward block, chamber your right hand to your right hip (this is a rear elbow
block). Your left hand remains chambered.
6. Finally, deliver a right push-down block. Your left hand remains chambered.

SECTION 2:

1. From your right push-down block position, chamber your right hand as
1. You deliver a left upward block.
2. Convert this upward block into a left inward block. Your right hand remains chambered.
3. After your left inward block, deliver a left extended outward block. Your right hand remains chambered.
4. Now deliver a left outward downward block. Your right hand remains chambered.
5. After your left outward downward block, chamber your left hand to your left hip (this is a rear elbow block).
Your right hand remains chambered.
6. Finally, deliver a left push-down block. Your right hand remains chambered.

CLOSING:

1. From your left push-down block position. chamber your left hand to your left hip.
2. Place your left open hand over your right clenched fist.
3. Come back to your attention stance by bringing your left foot to meet your right.
3. Hands come to your sides.

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SHORT FORM #1
SHORT FORM #1 CONTAINS:

1. Moves that are strictly defensive.


2. Stances:
a. Attention
b. Horse
c. Neutral

3. Basic blocks:
a. Inward
b. Outward
c. Upward
d. Downward

4. Double blocks (Double Factor):


a. High
b. Low

5. Four basic angles of attack.


6. Back elbow strike while blocking.
7. Nineteen moves including both sides and close.

SHORT FORM #1 TEACHES:

1. Stay down while in a stance.


2. Erect posture.
3. Increased peripheral vision.
4. Always look at your opponent.
5. Never expose your back unnecessarily.
6. How to cover into a neutral bow.
7. Constant head level while changing stances.
8. How to retreat from an opponent when turning to face the unknown.
9. Basic timing of hands and feet.
10. How to block while retreating. (Opposite hand, Opposite foot)
11. Relax and tense at the proper moment.
12. Angle changes in preparation for a mass attack.
13. How to use the opposite arm as a hidden weapon.
14. How to move up and down in an "L" shape pattern.
15. Repetition of the four basic blocks while retreating.
16. To have your block make contact at a distance from you so that your opponent's punch will be greatly
diverted.
17. Crisp moves with snap and torque.

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SHORT FORM #1

1. Start in a horse stance with your left hand open over your right fist at about solar plexus level.
2. Step back into a right neutral bow facing 12:00.
2. Execute a right inside block.
3. Step back into a left neutral bow facing 12:00.
3. Execute a left inside block.
4. Step forward with your right foot into a right neutral bow facing 12:00.
4. Pivot 90 degrees to your left in a left neutral bow facing 9:00.
4. Execute a left outside block
5. Step back into a right neutral bow facing 9:00.
5. Execute a right outside block.
6. Step your left foot behind your right into a right deep cross stance facing 9:00.
6. Pivot 180 degrees into a left neutral bow facing 3:00.
6. Execute a left rising block.
7. Step your left foot back into a right neutral bow facing 3:00.
7. Execute a right rising block.
8. Step your left foot forward into a left neutral bow facing 3:00.
8. Pivot 90 degrees to your right into a right neutral bow facing 6:00.
8. Execute a right downward block
9. Step your right foot back into a left neutral bow facing 6:00.
9. Execute a left downward block
10. Pivot on your right foot clockwise 180 degrees to face 12:00 in a horse stance.
10. Place your left hand open over your right fist at about solar plexus level.

THE LESSON
Like the majority of the yellow belt self defense techniques, the lesson learned from this form is to retreat while
blocking. All stances in this form, except the initial horse stances and the transitional twist stances are the
neutral bow stance. The form moves in a straight line from 12:00 to 6:00 and 9:00 to 3:00 and then in the
opposite direction. Maintain a constant height in the stance; attempt to walk as if you have a cup of water on
your head.

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