Historic Sites

teacher’s guide
missouri town 1855

fort osage national historic landmark
Jackson County Parks and Recreation
REVISED FALL 2008

TEACHER’S GUIDE
FOR

FORT OSAGE NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK
AND

MISSOURI TOWN 1855

Jackson County Parks and Recreation

INTRODUCTION “Society has many built-in time spanners that help to link the present generation with the past. Our sense of the past is developed by contact with the older generation, by our knowledge of history, by the accumulated heritage of art, music, literature and science passed down to us through the years. It is enhanced by immediate contact with the objects that surround us, each of which has a point of origin in the past, each of which provides us with a trace of identification with the past.”
-Alvin Toffler, Future Shock

Jackson County Parks and Recreation hopes this Teacher’s Guide is useful to educators planning to visit Missouri Town 1855 or Fort Osage National Historic Landmark. This guide has been designed as a basis from which to direct class studies and prepare the students for their site activity. Please feel free to duplicate or rearrange this format to one which best benefits the students.

The following people and texts were consulted during the compilation of this Teacher’s Guide: The Timetables of History. Bernard Grunn. Simon and Schuster Inc. New York: 1982. A People and a Nation. Mary Beth Norton et al. Houghton Mifflin Company. Boston: 1986. The Timetables of American History. Laurence Urdang Simon and Schuster Inc. New York: 1981. Fort Osage Staff and Volunteers Missouri Town 1855 Staff and Volunteers

CONTENTS
Planning Your Visit .................................................................................................................. 1 Group Programs ..................................................................................................................... 2-3 Historic Cemetery Courtesy ..................................................................................................... 4 Historic Site Courtesy............................................................................................................... 5 Guidelines for Teachers and Chaperones ................................................................................ 6 Glossary of Preservation Terms ............................................................................................... 7 Chronology of United States History ................................................................................... 8-9 Chronology of Missouri History ........................................................................................ 10-13 Fort Osage Fact Sheet ....................................................................................................... 16-17 Fort Osage History............................................................................................................. 18-19 Lewis & Clark in the Greater Kansas City Area .................................................................. 20 Fort Osage School Tour Teacher Materials ...................................................................... 21-23 List of Books and Videos Relating to Early 1800s History and Fort Osage ........................ 24 Map to Fort Osage .................................................................................................................. 25 Missouri Town 1855 Fact Sheet ........................................................................................ 28-29 Synopsis of Missouri Town 1855 ....................................................................................... 30-32 Missouri Town 1855 School Tour Teacher Materials ...................................................... 33-35 Missouri Town 1855 Animal Guide .................................................................................. 36-37 Sample Mercantile Items and Prices ..................................................................................... 38 List of Books and Videos Relating to 1850s Missouri History ........................................ 39-40 Pioneer Penmanship .......................................................................................................... 41-42 Map to Missouri Town 1855 ................................................................................................... 43 Other Educational Opportunities .......................................................................................... 44 Program Evaluation Form................................................................................................. 46-47 Additional Educational Materials .......................................................................................... 48

Monday through Friday from 8:00 a. The minimum requirement for chaperones is one adult per ten students. the Mercantile is located in the village. 1 . The people fulfilling this requirement will be allowed into the site free of charge. When scheduling. if necessary. as well as. Please plan to picnic at Hayes Park in Sibley. When a group is larger than 75 students it makes it difficult for the site. Gift shop items include souvenirs and books. Bookings for the Spring tours begin on December 1. To schedule your group tour program call our office at (816) 503-4864. There are exhibits and a gift shop in the Fort Osage Education Center. some costing less than $5. where a covered shelter is located. Groups with more than 75 students are strongly encouraged to divide their groups into smaller numbers and visit the site in two groups. The gift shop at Missouri Town 1855 is located near the parking lot.m. and the group itself. Important information on the sites and behavior expected from the group is contained in the Teacher’s Guide. The site administrators ask that teachers or adult leaders accompany students into the gift shop areas.PLANNING YOUR VISIT TO FORT OSAGE AND MISSOURI TOWN 1855 Jackson County Parks and Recreation is excited to bring historical tours and programs to students studying Missouri History. Missouri. Tour dates are limited and must be arranged in advance. Picnicking at Fort Osage National Historic Landmark is no longer feasible for large groups due to the noise level disturbing other groups at Fort Osage National Historic Landmark. Payment is required two weeks prior to the tour date. Bookings for the Fall tours begin July 1. please note that you will be expected to begin your tour/program at your designated time.00. The Gift Shop attendant will provide you directions. Teachers and adult chaperones are responsible for keeping order during student programs. to 4:00 p. unload the bus and organize your group. Your group will be expected to follow the historic site courtesy information located in the Teacher’s Guide when you visit Missouri Town 1855 or Fort Osage National Historic Landmark.m. interpreters. A confirmation will be sent after booking your date. We believe “To Live History…Is to Learn History!” Our historic tours and programs can be enjoyed by all grade levels but are targeted for 4th grade classes who are studying Missouri History. a Trade Room located in the Fort itself. Please plan to arrive 15 minutes earlier in order to check in at the Gift Shop at Missouri Town 1855 or the Education Center at Fort Osage National Historic Landmark to receive further instructions. Picnicking is allowed at the picnic tables south of the Missouri Town 1855 parking lot.

Group size: Minimum 40/Maximum 75 Inclement weather may affect program activities.00 per student. Thursday and Friday. Add’l adults are $3. Group size: Minimum 20/Maximum 120 FRONTIER PROGRAM – Approximately 1. flora and fauna.m. Flora and Fauna. Exhibits begin with Geology. Cost: $5. or military life. The final 20 minutes will incorporate a learning time with one or two of the interpreters and the students. SELF-GUIDED TOUR – Approximately 1 hour Your class will tour both the Education Center and Fort Osage. such as Lewis & Clark. This will enable the students to develop a better comprehension of the vital role the river has on human activities. Interpreters dressed in period attire are in the facilities to answer your questions. It creates a sensory transition to the Fort’s history and prehistory of the immediate area.org 2 . This program is available Wednesday. please allow 50 minutes for your visit here.5 hours Designed for elementary and middle school. No specialized activities are offered with this component. Large groups may be divided to rotate through the facilities. Beginning at the Education Center. Also included is emphasis on the importance the Missouri River played in establishing the Fort at this location. and relevant hands-on activities.5 hours This program is oriented for 3rd grade and up. Stations may include programs in the Trade House.Choose one of the three programs below for your Frontier Adventure! Beginning in 2008 your field trip to Fort Osage NHL will include a tour of the new Fort Osage Education Center.m.00 per student. so sign up for your Fort Osage Field Trip TODAY! 1 adult/10 students is required and will receive complimentary admission. – 4:30 p.jacksongov.00 each. To schedule a program or for more information call 816-503-4864 or visit www. Cost: $4. Thursday and Friday. At the historic site a brief orientation precedes the self-guided tour of the Fort. Specialized programs. Military garrison. This Center is a state of the art facility where students will fully experience the historical significance of Fort Osage. may be scheduled. Missouri River. Proceeding to the Fort your group will be divided into smaller groups and may rotate through multiple stations. This program is available Wednesday. students will begin with a visit to the Education Center.00 per student. Group size: Minimum 10/Maximum 40 LIVING HISTORY PROGRAM – Approximately 2. FORT OSAGE FIELD TRIPS Cost: $3. Fort Osage National Historic Landmark Hours of Operation: January – December • 9:00 a. • Tuesday through Sunday Space is limited. Transportation on the River and finishes with Sustainability.

jacksongov.m. Choose from one of the programs below for your school group. The presentation might be on the lifestyles of the 1850s or a visit to a schoolteacher. ox drover or blacksmith. Interpreters dressed in period attire are in the village to answer your questions. This is followed by a self guided tour with interpreters located in the village to answer any questions.m. • Tuesday through Sunday November 16 – February 28 • 9:00 a.org 3 .00 per student Group size: Minimum 10/Maximum 40 LIVING HISTORY PROGRAM – Approximately 2 hours This program is designed for 3rd grade and up. so sign up for your Missouri Town 1855 Field Trip TODAY! 1 adult/10 students is required and will receive complimentary admission. Thursday or Friday.00 per student Group size: Minimum 40/Maximum 80 Missouri Town 1855 Hours of Operation: March 1 – November 15 • 9:00 a. • Saturday and Sunday Space is limited. PRESCHOOL PROGRAM – Approximately 1 hour Preschoolers 5 years or younger participate in a 15-20 minute presentation on what clothing from the 1850s was like.Approximately 1 hour Your class will tour the open and gated buildings.5 hours This program is designed for elementary and middle school students.m.m. the tavern keeper.00 per student Group size: Minimum 10/Maximum 40 SELF-GUIDED TOUR . – 4:30 p. and the ox drover. This program is available Wednesday. You might also take a tour of the herb garden. An activity sheet is provided with your confirmation. the woodworker. Your teachers and students will be divided into smaller groups that rotate through several stations. Cost: $1. This program is available Wednesday. seeing and touching actual lye soap or petting one of the Missouri Town 1855 oxen. An 1800s Antebellum town is represented with authentic period buildings across 22 sloping acres and interpreters demonstrating everyday lifestyles of the times. The students will take part in a 30-minute presentation and a self-guided tour.00 each. Some of the stations could include visits with some of the residents such as the blacksmith. the merchant. Cost: $5. Add’l adults are $3. Cost: $4.Missouri Town 1855 Field Trips Choose one of the four programs below for your Heritage Adventure! Bring Missouri Heritage to life for preschoolers and up at Missouri Town 1855. To schedule a program or for more information call 816-503-4864 or visit www. Cost: $3.00 per student Group size: Minimum 20/Maximum 120 PIONEER PROGRAM – Approximately 1. Thursday or Friday. – 4:30 p.

Making gravestone rubbings is strongly discouraged as it deteriorates the older grave markers. Please walk between the graves and not over them. New markers replaced these stones at the original burial sites.HISTORIC CEMETERY COURTESY A historic cemetery is located near Fort Osage and contains the graves of soldiers and civilians. The following are some guidelines to share with your students and adult leaders when you visit the Jackson County historic sites: * * * Please do not run. A granite marker and bronze plaque. 1810. while serving their country at Fort Osage and Fort Atkinson. one must still act with dignity and respect in any cemetery they may visit. * * Thank you for your consideration. The oldest marker is dated 1819. 4 . Students must be accompanied by an adult leader in the cemetery. jump or play around the gravestones. recognizes the contribution of 49 soldiers who lost their lives. Please do not beat or chip at the markers with any object. The earliest known interment in this cemetery is of Private John King on November 15. as it opened its doors to the western frontier. The gravestones resting at Missouri Town 1855 were moved to the site for safekeeping. Their deaths are symbolic of the hardships and dedication which typify the character of a new nation. Even though the cemetery at Missouri Town 1855 is not authentic. furnished by the Veterans Administration.

* * * * * * * * * 5 . it is helpful to discuss the appropriate behavior expected during the visit. Please respect these and do not remove them. Please do not touch. Thank you for your consideration. or any wildlife at the sites. Questions about daily life at Fort Osage or Missouri Town 1855 are encouraged and welcomed. During the use of hiking trails. The site administrator or gift shop employees will be glad to provide directions. Please do not climb fences. trees or buildings. other picnic facilities are available at Fleming Park and Hayes Park. They need to show appropriate museum behavior at all times. Visitors are asked not to touch artifacts unless given permission by the guide or interpreter. follow the instructions of staff interpreter. Students need to listen and pay attention to the guide and the interpreters at the individual stations. The following are some points which should be covered prior to your tour: * Students need to be reminded that the site is a museum. even though they are outdoors. roughhousing and running will not be tolerated by the staff or site administrators. chase or feed the livestock and poultry. Horseplay. Barriers on doors are designed to protect the artifacts. Picnic areas are available outside the historic site area.HISTORIC SITE COURTESY Before arriving at the historical sites. Food and drink are not permitted within the sites. The buildings and sites are of historic value and should be treated with the utmost respect.

The museum is an outdoor living history site. Please be sure and dress appropriately for the weather. if your group is late for whatever reason. Please remember that you were assigned a specific time slot. It is suggested to have one check. the group leader should exit the bus and enter the Museum Gift Shop or Visitor’s Center. If your group comes to a building that is full. for the amount. 5. their history and answer any questions they may have. please wait outside or stop by the building later. Please remind students that they are in a museum and that appropriate museum behavior will be expected.GUIDELINES FOR TEACHERS AND CHAPERONES 1. There is no smoking permitted in or around the buildings as most of them are historic structures and contain many irreplaceable artifacts. made out to Jackson County Parks and Recreation. The group leader should have an exact count of children and adults and any unpaid admission fees for the group. 3. Our interpreters and volunteers are located at our interpretive stations and will be more than happy to tell your group about the buildings. Please arrive in plenty of time to check in at the Museum Gift Shop or Education Center. it will cut into your touring time at the site. An interpreter will meet your group to give an orientation to the site and any further instructions as needed. If circumstances prompt you to cancel a visit. Depending on the type of program you have booked. you need to plan on spending at least one hour in the site itself. 7. 4. Upon arrival. The students may then unload and the bus driver should park the bus in the parking lot at the entrance to the historic site. Plan to enjoy yourself. please courtesy call (816) 503-4864 with cancellation information. As an adult supervisor you are responsible for keeping your group of ten children together at all times including restroom stops. 6. 2. Please do not combine your groups as it could disrupt the entire program. 6 .

shape or form.Fort Osage and Missouri Town 1855 are sites where historic preservation is practiced. when citizens of Philadelphia united together and saved the historic Independence Hall where the Declaration of Independence was signed and a new country was formed. 7 . Editor. Diane Maddex. structures and objects and providing for their continued use by means of restoration. Washington D. structures and furnishings. The Preservation Press. cutlery and textiles. GLOSSARY OF PRESERVATION TERMS Historical Archeology The study of the cultural remains of literate societies. Material Culture Tangible objects used by people to cope with the physical world. rehabilitation or adaptive use. weapons. pottery. such as utensils. Reconstruction “The act of process of reproducing by new construction the exact form and detail of a vanished building.: 1990. Landmark Yellow Pages. The historic preservation movement continues today by restoring structures and sites important in the evolution of our country’s history. The historic preservation movement got its start in 1816. all of which provide evidence of culturally determined behavior. or a part thereof. Historic Preservation is a means by which an older building of significant architectural construction or a site of historical importance is preserved for public viewing and study. glassware. No facet of history is too small or insignificant not to be preserved in some way. sites. re-created or replica village site in which several or many structures have been restored. structure or object.C. as it appeared at a specific period of time. Preservation Saving from destruction or deterioration old and historic buildings. including excavated material as well as above-ground resources such as buildings. tools.” — Secretary of the Interior’s Standards Glossary information taken from. Outdoor Museum A restored. period or activity. rebuilt or moved and whose purpose is to interpret a historical or cultural setting.

S. Missouri becomes the 24th state. William Henry Harrison is the 9th President of U. Florida purchased from Spain. War of 1812 (2nd War for Independence). Louisiana Territory purchased from France.S. James Madison is the 4th President of U. Martin VanBuren is the 8th President of U.S. Missouri Compromise. John Tyler is the 10th President of U.S.S. The Monroe Doctrine is established which calls for noncolonization and nonintervention in the Western Hemisphere by European nations. . John Adams is the 2nd President of U.S. Clark on the bank of the Missouri River.S.CHRONOLOGY OF UNITED STATES HISTORY 1775-1783 1776 1789-1797 1797-1801 1801-1809 1803 1804-1806 1808 American Revolution Declaration of Independence George Washington is elected the 1st President. Battle of the Alamo fought in Texas. Battle of New Orleans establishes Andrew Jackson as a national hero.S.S. John Quincy Adams is the 6th President of U.dies after one month in office. Thomas Jefferson is the 3rd President of U. Fort Osage established by Gen. 8 1809-1817 1812-1814 1815 1817-1825 1819 1820 1821 1823 1825-1829 1829-1837 1836 1837-1841 1841 1841-1845 . Andrew Jackson is the 7th President of U. James Monroe is the 5th President of U. Lewis and Clark explore the Louisiana Purchase.

C.S. Abraham Lincoln is the 16th President of U. Oregon Treaty extends the northern border of the U. Mexican War . 1846 1846-1848 1848-1849 1849-1850 1850-1853 1850 1853-1857 1854 1854-1861 1861 1857-1861 1861-1865 1861-1865 9 . Kansas-Nebraska Act gives the question of slavery to the individual states to decide by popular vote.U. and enacts the fugitive slave act.S. Texas. Nevada.S.S. New Mexico.S.S. Kansas becomes the 34th state.S. Franklin Pierce is the 14th President of U. James Buchanan is the 15th President of U. The Civil War splits the U. Compromise of 1850 admits California as a free state. gains Arizona.1841 1845-1849 1846 First wagon train leaves Missouri for California. outlaws the slave trade in Washington D. into North and South. Millard Fillmore is the 13th President of U.S. California. Border War fought in the Western U.S.S. The California gold rush begins. The Mormons move to Utah. James Knox Polk is the 11th President of U. Zachary Taylor is the 12th President of U. to the Pacific Coast and ends the joint occupation of Oregon Territory with the British. Utah and part of Colorado.

Etienne de Bourgmout surveys the Missouri to the Kansas City area to the Platte River.000. Legislative Council and a House Of Representatives. Formal transfer of the Louisiana Purchase between the U. Due to isolation and re-supply. garrison is transferred to Lake Erie region. The first Territorial General Assembly meets in St. Louisiana Purchase bought from France for $15. Louis as the capital. Louis. Territory of Louisiana established St. Louis. to control the Mississippi River. Fort Bellefontaine established. Baron de Cavagnial supervises the construction of Fort de la Trinite’ (later Fort de Cavagnial) near present day Ft.S. Leavenworth. St. Fort Osage established as a military post including a government trade house.CHRONOLOGY OF MISSOURI HISTORY 1673 Father Marquette gives the first European description of the “river pekistanoui” (Missouri). Kansas. and France made in St. Pike expedition leaves for Southwest. New Madrid earthquakes begin.000. 1713 1723 1744 1763 1764 1803 1804 1805 1806 1808 1811 1812 1813 10 . Louis surveyed and founded by Auguste Chouteau and Pierre Leclede. de Bourgmont supervises the construction of Fort Orleans. the first European settlement on the Missouri River in Carroll County. Lewis and Clark expedition leaves St. Includes the present state of Missouri and allowed the U.S. French give up all military posts in North America due to Treaty of Paris. Louis. Territory of Louisiana becomes Territory of Missouri with a Governor.

Site for the county seat of Jackson County and Independence chosen. House and Senate fail to agree on Missouri Bill. Mormons are driven from Jackson County into Clay County. * Missouri Compromise evades the issue of “popular sovereignty” by admitting Missouri as a slave state and Maine as a free state and forbidding slavery in new territories above 36° 30’ except Missouri. Missouri admitted to the Union. Legislature holds first session in Jefferson City. Jackson County organized.1816 1818 Formal end of the War of 1812. Fort Osage abandoned by government. is published in Germany and influences German immigration to Missouri. The Platte purchase adds six northwest counties to Missouri. Joseph Smith reveals Jackson County as the site of Zion. Congress passes the Missouri Enabling Act approving statehood. Gottfried Duden’s Bericht uber eine Reise. Town lots are platted and sold. Kansas and Shawnee Indians cede rights to all remaining land in Missouri. Fort Leavenworth opens. County judges. 1819 1820 1821 1822 1825 1826 1827 1829 1831 1833 1836 11 . Big and Little Osage. sheriff and Circuit Court judge chosen. Petitions presented in Congress asking statehood for Missouri Territory. U.S. First heavy German immigration begins. Constitutional Convention meets in St. First state election. Louis. Factory system shut down by Congress.

Louis to Cheltenham. Cholera epidemic in Mississippi Valley. * The Town of Kansas founded. Penn upholds the Fugitive Slave Act of 1793. Hill and Company. leaves Elm Grove in western Missouri for Oregon. Plat filed for the Town of Kansas. Louis and the East Coast established. The Bidwell-Bartleson Party arrives in the Sacramento Valley via the Oregon Trail.1838 Mormon War. a party of more than 120 wagons. State authorities are not required to help the owner. Regiment for Mexican War raised in Missouri under the command of Colonels A. which allows the owner of a fugitive slave to recover the slave despite conflicting state laws. Doniphan and Sterling Price. Pacific Railroad begins first railroad services in the state from St. Military unit begins historic overland march. First emigrant wagon train leaves Independence. * Cherokee Indian Trail of Tears passes through southern Missouri on their way to the reservation in Oklahoma. “The Great Emigration”.W. Telegraph communication between St.St. Missouri State capitol completed. especially in emigrant trade towns. 1839 1840 1841 1842 1843 1845 1846 1847 1849 1850 1852 12 . Governor Boggs declares Mormons are enemies and must be exterminated or driven from Missouri. * Hannibal . The phrase “Manifest Destiny” comes into use. * Classes begin at Missouri University. Joseph Railroad Company incorporated. First government mail route leaves Independence for the West under the ownership of Waldo. Prigg v. Honey War with Iowa over border dispute. claims 4557 lives in St. Louis. One thousand emigrants leave Independence for Oregon in May.

1861. * Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Society encourages anti-slavery emigration to Kansas. Pro-slavery Missourians voting in Kansas Territorial election seat a pro-slavery legislature. Michigan as a reaction to the Kansas-Nebraska Act. Kansas-Nebraska Act repeals the Missouri Compromise by giving territorial settlers the right to decide the slave question for their state and also affirms legality of slave holding in the United States. * First high school in the state opened in St.1853 City of Kansas incorporated. * The Republican Party is organized in Jackson. Louis. 1854 1855 13 . The Civil War begins in this area several years before the firing begins at Fort Sumter April 12. * Border War between pro-slavery and anti-slavery supporters on the Missouri and Kansas border areas begin as a result of the Kansas-Nebraska Act.

FORT OSAGE NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK INFORMATION .a Jackson County Historic Site ...

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Finally. as staff and volunteers portray the work and livelihood of Fort Osage residents. Grand Festival of Chez les Canses and the Territorial Militia Muster. A gift shop is located in the Education Center.FORT OSAGE FACT SHEET DESCRIPTION: Reconstructed on its original site. Fort Osage also aided the American government in establishing alliances with neighboring Nations. Honoring the American Soldier. Fort Osage was built in 1808 and occupied until 1827. The Fort Osage Education Center has actual artifacts which date back to the time the Fort was in operation. as well as the most expensive to build and maintain. the Fort offered western Missouri’s first settlers a sanctuary from which to venture west. housing soldiers to guard the new territory and to protect the trading post located there. Fort Osage is a complex of hewn log structures located on a high bluff overlooking the Missouri River. Annual events include Coalition of Historic Trekkers National Gathering. joint commander of the Lewis and Clark expedition. soldiers began construction of the Fort in 1808 to serve several purposes.S. HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Under the direction of William Clark. It functioned as one of the first Federal outposts in the newly acquired Louisiana Territory. Group rates are available to organized groups of 20 or more people with PRE-REGISTRATION and YEAR FOUNDED: ANNUAL EVENTS: SIZE: TOURS: 16 . Factory System. Reconstruction of the historic site began in 1948. Including the walk to the Education Center. Living history interpretation is featured. Trading post functions were discontinued in 1822. Independence Day. Tours are self-guided and take about one hour. Fort Osage was the nation’s largest factory outpost. Fort Osage is approximately the size of five city blocks. Fort Osage was also one of the few financially successful trading post of the U.

Fort Osage’s physical address is 107 Osage Street. Drive north through Sibley and follow the signs one mile farther to the Fort. From I-70. MO. take 24 Highway east to Buckner. Missouri. to 4:30 p. Missouri. exit at BB Highway/Grain Valley exit. Fort Osage is located in Sibley. on the Missouri River 14 miles northeast of Independence. Follow brown directional signs to Fort Osage National Historic Landmark. watching carefully for signs.m. From Kansas City. SEASON: Year-round: Tuesday thru Sunday 9:00 a. Missouri. 64088 LOCATION: 17 . Proceed north on BB through Buckner.m. Turn north at Sibley Street (BB Hwy) and travel 3 miles to the town of Sibley.PRE-PAYMENT. Sibley.

France and Great Britain that the United States meant to protect its territory by military strength and to establish healthy relations with the Native American population in the territory. whiskey or brandy. This extra duty was performed during their free time and they were paid ten cents a day for common labor and sixteen cents a day for skilled labor. lack of incentives for the factor. The height and location of the bluff provided a clear view of the river for many miles and the river current around the bluff caused the boats to slow down considerably in order to safely navigate.000 dollars a year. The purpose of the factory was to trade quality goods at a low price with the Indian tribes in order to establish good relations with them. successful competition of private traders who could go to the Indian villages instead of the Indians coming to them and the influences of European traders in the remote regions of the country. The factory system in the United States was established in 1796 under President George Washington and expanded by President Thomas Jefferson into the Louisiana Territory. At the time of establishment. The system practiced by private European and American fur traders seemed to be a constant contributor to unrest in the territory. 18 . The decline of the United States factory system was due to a number of reasons. government regulations and budget restrictions which hampered any effort to increase the trade. The Fort’s purpose was to provide a military presence in the territory in order to assure Spain. The lack of factors familiar with Indian trade. candles and vinegar. The soldiers enlisted for a minimum of five years service and were paid five dollars a month depending on service and rank. The United States factory system was discontinued by Congress in 1822. His duties included bookkeeping. These conditions provided a natural defense for the Fort. the Fort had a company of 81 officers and enlisted men under the command of Captain Eli B. A soldier’s daily rations included: one and a quarter pounds of beef or three quarters pound of pork.FORT OSAGE HISTORY Fort Osage was established in 1808 as a military outpost in the newly acquired Louisiana Territory by General William Clark. Extra duty was also required of each soldier at the Fort. Fort Osage was built on a strategic bluff overlooking the Missouri River. The factory system derives its meaning from the English common law definition of a factor as a person who buys and sells on behalf of his employer. when he received a raise of $300. supervising the trade room. The soldiers performed military drills and duty for most of the day. Clemson. This salary can compare in today’s economy of around $90. processing furs. George Sibley was the factor at Fort Osage from 1808 until 1822. stocking the trade room and attending to Indian affairs. eighteen ounces of bread and one gill of rum. They were issued salt for their food. It was Jefferson’s hope to undermine the private traders and gain Indian alliances for the United States. due to pressures from the rival fur trade interests. Sibley was paid an annual salary of $800 until 1811.

The military left Fort Osage again in 1827 when Fort Leavenworth was established. It then returned in 1815 to re-establish the military garrison.The military left Fort Osage in 1813 due to the War of 1812. 19 .

Lewis had the boats take shelter on a small island. President Thomas Jefferson ordered Meriwether Lewis. Lewis was also required to keep accurate maps of his travels. He stripped bark from a tree to provide more protection for a night away from the main party. islands and tricky currents as they proceeded upriver. For the next two days. The Expedition celebrated the Fourth of July just outside of what now is Atchison. They also recorded seeing seams of coal in large limestone outcroppings. The men continued upriver for several more days with the leaders writing about the heat and large quantities of animals. Kansas. One of the soldiers got into trouble for drinking whiskey while on duty. He would remember this location and the high bluff on the south side of the small island and return in 1808 to build what would be known as Fort Osage. Louis. on an epic journey into a largely unknown territory. opposite St. A small temporary fort was made for protection by using logs and brush. Lewis was charged with noting the plants and animals he encountered. in addition to carefully recording his efforts to form friendships with the Indians. had to seek shelter by himself on the river bank after sinking into the mud. Lewis asked a friend and fellow army officer. Each man received an extra “gill of whiskey. The Expedition entered what would later be known as the Kansas City area on June 23. a common form of punishment at the time. A boat well equipped for river navigation. He was court-martialed and sentenced to receive 100 lashes from a whip. to organize an expedition to explore the newly acquired Louisiana Territory. The Lewis and Clark Expedition is still regarded as one of the greatest adventures in American history. a young army captain. On this date.LEWIS & CLARK IN THE GREATER KANSAS CITY AREA In 1803. It was decided they would stay at this camp for three days in order for one of the pirogues to be repaired. raspberries and wild apples. A camp was established on June 26th where the Kaw (Kansas) River flowed into the Missouri. Louis. with the boat crews struggling against strong winds.” They would name the small creek by which they camped “Independence Creek. 1803. Believing there might be a water route to the Pacific Ocean. These birds are now extinct. William Clark to serve as a co-leader. The members of the Expedition had to become expert boat handlers and strained as they were challenged by numerous sand bars. It was noted that the Kaw River was very muddy and its water tasted bad. scouting ahead of the main group. William Clark. they proceeded upriver and noted large amounts of wild plums. What was now known as the Corps of Volunteers for Northwestern Discovery departed in May of 1803. It is here that Clark noted that he had seen large flocks of Carolina Parakeets. On June 29th they camped just north of what is now Parkville. known as a keelboat. The winter of 1803-1804 saw the expedition making final preparations at Camp Dubois. The men had to hunt for their food and depend on each other and their leaders in order to proceed.” The Expedition did eventually reach the Pacific Ocean and return safely to St. with the keelboat and two smaller boats known as pirogues. was built for the trip. 20 .

what supplies will be needed. Make a few recipes from the early 1800s. In the Factory Kitchen. 21 . What are their hopes and dreams for the future in the area? While touring the facility. Talk with the interpreters to see what the differences are between their occupations and those of the student’s parents. how labor will be divided. electric light bulb and telephones).FORT OSAGE SCHOOL TOUR TEACHER MATERIALS SUGGESTED TEACHING STRATEGIES What if you bring students ages 5-8? Relate today’s life to what you see on the tour. Do work using slates and chalk. ask the residents what they would have brought with them on the journey. compare and contrast what you see with the amenities in the student’s kitchen at home. etc. Have the students pretend that they will be establishing a settlement near the Fort. Do not use electricity or modern conveniences. PRE-VISIT ACTIVITIES Plan a day at your school set in the early 1800s. preparation and tastes. Have the students make a list of the foods that they eat for two days. What if you bring students age 9 and older? Put the past into perspective. They should keep track of the packaging. where you will get food and water. As you visit the Fort. Prepare a trip back in time to the early 1800s. Have the students bring non-refrigerated lunches and play games from the period at recess. Compare the student’s clothing to those of the interpreters’. Consider location. remind the students to think of the changes that have occurred since the early 1800s (i.e. Compare these lists with foods from the 1800s. Visit the Trade Room in the Factory building and compare it to stores that the students are familiar with. Have the students ask the residents of the Fort about their experiences of living at a frontier outpost. Have the students pick five items that they would need to take with them for a journey up river. Challenge them to continue the activity at home. the automobile.

Daycap .An 18th century term referring to the building where an agent or “Factor” did business.A wooden tool used to remove the flesh and membrane from animal hides during processing. For each of the five senses. Sibley. The wooden tool used to beat or “dash” the cream is called a DASHER.A container used to turn cream into butter. These two storied structures were thick walled wooden buildings with gun and cannon ports. internal benches for shooting and floorboards on the second story overhangs that could be removed to allow defense of the structures base area. Fleshing Beam . the “Trade Factor” at Fort Osage.A person that works for a skilled craftsman in order to learn the trade. It is constructed from a half-round long with two legs on one end.To do arithmetic. Cypher .A basic military defensive structure used in the construction of fortifications. Fort Osage has a “Trade Factory” in the civilian compound. list a memory of the trip to Fort Osage. Write a letter to your family back east about your experiences.POST-VISIT ACTIVITIES Have the students write an article for the school newspaper or publish a newsletter about their field trip experiences.A tool made of wood and leather having a metal nozzle that is used by a blacksmith to force air into a forge.A head covering used by young girls and ladies to keep their hair clean and out of the way while working. See Blockhouse #1 on site. Have students choose five objects from their lives that they would include in a museum to represent life today.An 18th century term referring to an agent such as George C. Imagine that you are a traveler coming up the river and you have stayed at the Fort for a few days. Blockhouse . VOCABULARY Apprentice . Butter Churn . The increased air flow created by this device makes the fire hotter and allows metals to be heated for shaping or even melted for casting into intricate shapes. 22 . Factor . Create a bulletin board with pictures or words associated with your trip for every letter of the alphabet. Factory . Encourage the students to interview each other. Bellows .

Hearth . just as a backpack or purse is used today.A type of communication that involves the interpreter’s complete character portrayal of a historic person.A type of communication that requires the interpreter to dress in historic attire and allows him/her to react to guests in present day terms. Tick . Can be placed on a bed frame or on the floor.A bag used to carry things in.The undressed (tanned or treated) skin and fur of an animal. black. A costumed tour guide. 23 . Shako .A staff person that teaches history through historic roles.A person who comes to live in an area.The brick or stone area in front of the fireplace.The mattress of a bed. Settler . Interpreter . Poke . Pelt . Pioneer . 1st Person Interpretation . Stockade . felt hat worn by soldiers at Fort Osage. Usually filled with feathers or straw. The floor of the fireplace.The enclosing wall of a fort that is made of wooden posts driven into the ground.A metal cooking pan that rests on legs.The tall. The legs give the pan its name and raise it up from the hearth. 3rd Person Interpretation . Spider Pan .A person who first settles in an area.

” The Expedition of Lewis and Clark. by Peter Bosco The War of 1812... by Terry P. created by Jackson County Parks and Recreation. by Alden R. by Richard Steins Indians of North America: The Osage. available for purchase a the Fort Osage Gift Shop. Historic Communities Series. Kaw Valley Films and Video VC 973. by Louis F. by Albert Marrin A Nation is Born.4 EX71 BOOKS All books listed are available at Mid-Continent Libraries. Wilson 24 . Carter Osage Indian Customs and Myths. by Bobbi Kalman and David Schimpky 1812. The Mid-Continent Library has a video available for a one-week checkout period that would make an excellent prelude to a visit to Fort Osage. Burns Fort Life.LIST OF BOOKS AND VIDEOS RELATING TO EARLY 1800s HISTORY AND FORT OSAGE DVDs There is a DVD. Rebellion and Independence in America (1700-1820). “We Proceeded On. The War of 1812. The War Nobody Won.

MAP TO FORT OSAGE NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK 25 .

a Jackson County Historic Site ...MISSOURI TOWN 1855 INFORMATION .

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m. March 1 to November 15: Tuesday through Sunday 9:00 a. Living history interpreters.MISSOURI TOWN 1855 FACT SHEET DESCRIPTION: Missouri Town 1855 is a collection of original mid19th century structures carefully relocated from seven western Missouri counties to one site. Principal buildings and features were in place by 1970.m. tavern.m. blacksmith shop and a livery stable depict a typical antebellum farming community. Annual events include Sheep Shearing. Spirits From The Past and A Christmas Celebration. a one-room schoolhouse. YEAR FOUNDED: ANNUAL EVENTS: SIZE: TOURS: SEASON: 28 . Children’s Day. bring the site to life by portraying the daily routines of village residents. church. lawyer’s office. Missouri Town 1855 Fall Festival. A self-guided tour takes about one hour. Additions in the village continue based on a Master Plan and as funding becomes available. The first building was erected in 1963. Independence Day. 9:00 a. Group rates are available to organized groups of 20 or more people with PRE-REGISTRATION and PREPAYMENT. in 19th century attire. as an assembled unit. portray a typical 1855 Missouri farming community. November 15 to March 1: Weekends only. Over twenty-five period buildings including houses with barns and outbuildings.m. HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The buildings at Missouri Town 1855 present a variety of architectural styles popular in the mid19th century and. to 4:30 p. Approximately the size of six city blocks. to 4:30 p.

MO. 64064. Park Road. Missouri. Blue Springs. Missouri Town 1855’s physical address is 8010 E. Lee’s Summit.LOCATION: Missouri Town 1855 is located on the east side of Lake Jacomo in Fleming Park. 29 .

... meat and feathers.. Meat....... television or microwaves...... Hogs..... breeds typical to 1855 are bought and raised for interpretive purposes at Missouri Town 1855.... 30 ... church and mercantile store..... corn provided income and cornmeal for the family plus feed for animals. The houses represent the many social classes living in the village.. Instead it is a reconstruction of what a person may have found at a Missouri crossroads during the mid-nineteenth century. A typical village in western Missouri would look much like Missouri Town 1855.. blacksmith’s shop.. Grains. Wheat for flour and income. People at this time. There would be a school house..... Riding and driving..... The Colonel’s House.... tavern.. Cattle.. The middle and lower classes are represented by the Tradesman’s House. as well as improvements in transportation represented by steamboats and the expanding railroad network.. Blacksmith’s House and the Settler’s House........ Fresh vegetables for seasonal consumption and preservation...... Social activities in the town would probably have taken place at the non-denominational church or in private homes... whiskey... Dairy products.SYNOPSIS OF MISSOURI TOWN 1855 Missouri Town 1855 was never a real village in which real people lived and worked. wool for clothing. The animals at Missouri Town 1855 represent the various breeds and animal types that were common in the mid-nineteenth century.................. Poultry. however. spoke proudly of recent inventions such as the telegraph and the sewing machine.. The year 1855 was chosen as the year to interpret because it was the last year before the Kansas border fighting began to disrupt the area... running water. lynchings and violence had polarized pro-slavery and anti-slavery adherents into open conflict.. These are actual buildings from the mid-nineteenth century.... The following is a list of items grown on a farm and what they provided for a family: Garden.there was no electricity. cars....... shootings..... Mules and Horses . The buildings in the village were moved to Missouri Town 1855 from other locations in seven different western Missouri counties....... Eggs.... By 1856.............. Life in 1855 seems very hard to people who live in the modern world --... Meat and lard... The average family in western Missouri lived on a farm which was mostly self-sufficient and provided the family with an income... Sheep ..... meat and leather.. Whenever possible........ Squire’s House and their various outbuildings represent the upper class....

a bag of marbles or a doll. “hide and go seek” and “French and English” (which we know as “tug of war”) were also popular. candy and coffee. while the women and girls would work in the garden and house and continue with the usual chores of cooking. The merchant owned the store. Games such as “buz”. When they had free time. sugar. Students went to school from sunup to sundown during the winter. Usually the class varied from one student to twelve students at one time. School did not start until after harvest in October and lasted until spring planting in April. community work projects such as corn shuckings. lawyer and tavern owner were an important part of community life. were allowed to go outside for brief periods. if a child was needed at home or the parents could not afford to send them to school that term. Also. These goods would have included small luxury items such as Chinese tea. Small children. Attendance at the school was not regular. Agriculture is not the only trade represented at Missouri Town 1855--the blacksmith. salt. Different denominations had traveling preachers who went to different towns each Sunday to deliver a sermon. as Missouri Town would have been only one day’s ride from a riverboat landing. who stopped on his “circuit” once or twice a month. The men and boys of the family would work in the fields and tend to the animals. some lasting as much as three hours and no one was allowed to nap during the service. in addition to necessities such as cloth from the textile mills in the East. Children of other families would be allowed to attend the school if their parents could pay the eight dollars per school year per child. “blind man’s buff”. Throughout the growing season. 31 . The tavern was also the location for news and information in the village. The lawyer. would have taken care of any legal problems such as deeds. a trip to the mercantile or to the city might result in stick candy. The blacksmith repaired tools and other implements needed by consumers in the village or by farmers in the area. During the summer and harvest seasons there was very little free time left to children because everyone had chores to do. Sermons were long. hardware. wills and property boundaries. in the village. barn raisings and quilting bees formed a major part of the social life of a small rural town. The Baptists may have had a preacher on one Sunday while the Methodists or Presbyterians might have a preacher on the next Sunday. then they did not attend. School was held everyday but Sunday during the school term. books.Rural families often bartered the goods they produced with their neighbors. sewing and milking. or mercantile. who also hired the school marm or master to instruct his children. The school would have been held in a one room school house built by the Colonel. During the summer the whole family worked hard in order to insure a good harvest. The school at Missouri Town 1855 is typical of most rural schools in the region during this time period. merchant. Some items found in the mercantile include cloth. cleaning. The church at Missouri Town 1855 represents a non-denominational church found in most rural areas in the mid-nineteenth century. however. The tavern was probably the busiest place in the village since it was the stop for travelers and the village mail was delivered here. a wide variety of consumer goods was available at the mercantile store.

Politics was becoming a heated topic in western Missouri in 1855. The United States was divided by sectional interests in the Northern industrial states and the Southern agricultural states. where many people came from a southern background. Slavery was a topic of heated debate in western Missouri. abolitionists and states’ rights were topics of discussion. 32 . the Kansas-Nebraska Act introduced slavery in the new territories to the west of Missouri. The relative contentment of rural life was soon to give way to the hardships of war. “Bleeding Kansas”. In 1854. and another chapter in American history was begun.

What if you bring students age 9 and older? Put the past into perspective. Visit J. Do not use electricity or modern conveniences. ask the residents what they would have brought with them to Missouri Town 1855. Do work using slates and chalk. Talk with the interpreters working with the livestock. Find out the differences between this person’s occupation and those of the student’s parents. T. Have the students bring non-refrigerated lunches and play games from the period at recess. Challenge them to continue the activity at home. As you visit the village. Blackwell’s Mercantile Store and compare it to stores that the students are familiar with. electric light bulb and telephone) PRE-VISIT ACTIVITIES Plan a day at your school set in the early 1850s.MISSOURI TOWN 1855 SCHOOL TOUR TEACHER MATERIALS SUGGESTED TEACHING STRATEGIES What if you bring students ages 5-8? Relate today’s life to what you see on the tour. Stop in at the Blacksmith’s Shop for a look at his daily activities. Have the students pick five items that they would need to take with them.e. Have the students ask the townspeople about their experiences in moving to the Missouri region (or have they always lived here) and what are their hopes and dreams for the future? While touring the facility. Discuss the similarities and differences between 1850s agriculture and today’s practices. Compare the student’s clothing to those of the interpreters’. Prepare a trip back in time to the 1850s. compare and contrast what you see with the amenities of a hotel. At the Tavern. 33 . the automobile. remind the students to think of the changes that have occurred since the 1850s (i.

POST-VISIT ACTIVITIES Have the students write an article for the school newspaper or publish a newsletter about their field trip experiences. etc. Plan exercises utilizing the Missouri Town 1855 map. The wooden tool used to beat or “dash” the cream is called a DASHER.A person that works for a skilled craftsman in order to learn the trade.To do arithmetic. Consider location. They should keep track of the packaging. preparation and tastes. Create a bulletin board with pictures or words associated with your trip for every letter of the alphabet. Copybook . Have the students make a list of the foods that they eat for two days. lodging. what supplies are needed. Circle the buildings where residents would find food. Conestoga Wagon . Encourage the students to interview each other. Make a few recipes from the 1850s.Organize a settlement in 1850s Missouri. animals. Cypher . Daycap . Have students choose five objects from their lives that they would include in a museum to represent life today.A head covering used by young girls and ladies to keep their hair clean and out of the way while working.A notebook in which school lessons are written. VOCABULARY Apprentice .A container used to turn cream into butter. Compare these lists with foods from the 1850s. Write a letter to your family back east about your experiences. where you will get food and water. 34 . Butter Churn . For each of the five senses. Imagine that you are a traveler going through Missouri in the 1850s and stayed at Missouri Town 1855 for a few days. list a memory of the trip to Missouri Town 1855. Note where different social and economic boundaries are in the village. etc.A covered wagon drawn by horses or oxen used to move freight or household goods. how labor will be divided.

A costumed tour guide. lift and turn the soil so that seed can be planted. The legs give the pan its name and raise it up from the hearth. just as a backpack or purse is used today.A person who comes to live in an area. 1st Person Interpretation . Can be placed on a bed frame or on the floor. Usually filled with feathers or straw. Trundle Bed . Spider Pan . Settler . The floor of the fireplace.A person who first settles in an area. Tick . Yoke . Interpreter .A metal cooking pan that rests on legs. Plow .A bag used to carry things in.A craftsperson such as the blacksmith who makes goods.A student.A type of communication that requires the interpreter to dress in historic attire and allows him/her to react to guests in present day terms. 35 . Scholar . The term “yoke” also refers to the wooden frame placed on the necks or oxen when these animals are pulling loads such as a plow or wagon.The mattress of a bed. Poke .A wooden frame worn over the shoulders of a person to carry two water buckets.The brick or stone area in front of the fireplace.Hearth . Mechanic . Pioneer .A staff person that teaches history through historic roles.An implement used to cut. 3rd Person Interpretation .A type of communication that involves the interpreter’s complete character portrayal of a historic person.A bed built low enough to slide under a regular bed frame.

stamina. willingness to work and intelligence SHEEP BORDER LEICESTER CROSS SHEEP: -a popular breed in the U. Horses were used for pulling wagons. Among those represented are: OXEN SHORTHORN STEERS: -developed in England about 1600 -first imported to Virginia in 1783 -popular with early settlers. mules and oxen provided the power necessary to do the heavy farm work. in the mid-nineteenth century -known for its fine fleece and good temperament -Missouri Town 1855 has Border Leicester crosses 36 . carriages and for riding.MISSOURI TOWN 1855 ANIMAL GUIDE Missouri Town’s programming offers the visitor a glimpse at rural life and animal breeds that would have been found in Western Missouri in the 1850s. They are typically steers and are worked in pairs. as was often the case. Horses and mules were used for farm work as well. Horses. They were favored by many over horses because of their lower cost and less demanding dietary needs. A valued breed for meat and milk -found to be willing power for the wagon and plow -Abe and Moses were brought to Missouri Town 1855 in 1999 and are being trained as an oxen team HORSES STANDARD BRED: -the breeds’ origin dates from a Thoroughbred imported from England in 1788 MORGAN: -a truly American horse breed with roots dating back to the late 1700s -Morgans are known for their speed.S. Missouri Town’s livestock. Oxen can be any breed of cattle that has been trained to work. includes both pure breeds and crosses.

setters and care givers to their young GAME FOWL: -the “Arabian horses” of poultry -very colorful.POULTRY Missouri Town 1855 has a wide variety of poultry that would have been commonly seen on most farms in rural Western Missouri in the 1850s. CHICKENS Missouri Town 1855 has a variety of Chicken breeds represented in the village: COCHIN: -buff and partridge colored -their feathered legs are their most distinguishable feature POLISH: -there are several varieties -their unique top-knot on their head is their most distinguishable feature DOMINIQUE: -good all-around chicken breed -were known to be good layers. not as domesticated as many other breeds 37 .

10¢ a pack Ribbon .SAMPLE MERCANTILE ITEMS AND PRICES Soap .30¢ per pound Pocket knife . Sibley.February 1855 38 .75¢ Fine comb . MO November 1854 .6 1/2¢ per pound Bottle ink .15¢ Domestic cloth .12¢ per pound Sugar .30¢ Slate pencil .5¢ Ax .15¢ Slate .80¢ per pound Primer .2¢ per pound Coffee .7 1/2¢ a yard Singing book .6 1/2¢ per pound Salt .40 Ream of Letter Paper .$1.65¢ Tea .00 Blank book .50 Information is taken from: Garrison-Childe’s Ledger.$1.10¢ per yard Needles .$2.5¢ Candy .

by Ernestine Bennett Briggs Missouri. by Franklin Folsom Geography of Missouri. (educational film). by Earl A. by John Allan Carpenter Missouri. VC 813.841 EI44 Across Five Aprils. An 1850s Village. Saveland Missouri Stories for Young People. from its Glorious Past to the Present. (movie based on novel of the same name) AME. by Bernadine Freeman Bailey The Trail to Santa Fe. by Irene Hunt Children’s Stories of the 1850s. RMI Medica Productions.H. by Robert N. History and Government. Famous Pioneers.3 AC77 BOOKS (Non-Fiction) All books listed are available at Mid-Continent Libraries. by American Review Coon Holler. Inc. McClure Picture Book of Missouri. VC 977.LIST OF BOOKS AND VIDEOS RELATING TO 1850s MISSOURI HISTORY VIDEOS These videos were filmed at Missouri Town 1855 and are available at Mid-Continent Libraries for a one week checkout. by Olive Rambo Cook Farmer Boy. Its Geography. The call numbers are listed after the producers of the videos. by Laura Ingalls Wilder 39 . Lavender BOOKS (Fiction) All books listed are available at Mid-Continent Libraries. a Story of the People and the Regions of the “Show Me” State. Collins Missouri. Its People and Its Progress. by S. by C.D. Across Five Aprils. Inc.

(complete series) by Laura Ingals Wilder Missouri River Boy.The First Four Years. by Cena Christopher Draper 40 . by Rose Wilder Lane Huckleberry Hill. by Glen Dines The Prairie Schooners. by Glen Rounds Ridge Willoughby. by William Henman On The Way Home. by Rose Wilder Lane Overland Stage. by Elizabeth Gemming Little House on the Prairie.

goose or turkey Thomas Jefferson. If a quill was not available. Blueberries and gooseberries produced purple inks. Ben Franklin. 41 . kids had to bring their own ink to school.PIONEER PENMANSHIP Thanks to a barnyard chicken. nutshells and teas created inks in shades of brown and black. Chimney soot. one end of a small twig would be whittled to a point and then dipped into ink as a substitute. pens of the eighteenth century were made by dipping quills from chicken and other birds into homemade ink. The style of writing was called calligraphy. Try your had at writing with the pens of long ago. usually made from berries they found in the woods or from cracked nutshells. Unlike the ball point pens and felt tip markers we use today. flowers and barks. The inks were made from natural ingredients. John Hancock and the other fifty-three forefathers could sign the Declaration of Independence. In Early America. such as the juices of fruits.

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OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES Other programs and services available to schools and educators: Speaker Services Trunk Shows Workshops Please contact our office at (816) 503-4864 Jackson County Parks and Recreation 44 .

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PROGRAM EVALUATION FORM Jackson County Parks and Recreation would like to know your impression of the program in which your group participated. Please take a few minutes to complete this evaluation and return it to our office at the address listed at the end of this form. We are interested in your comments and suggestions in order to improve our sites and programs. Name of your group: Site your group visited: Overall Impression Was the length of the visit appropriate for your group? Comments Was the tour fee reasonable? Comments Was the staff professional and courteous to your group? Comments Describe the cleanliness of the site: Excellent Comments Program Describe the organization of the program: Excellent Comments Would you recommend this program to another group/teacher? Comments What areas of the program did your group like best? Yes No Very Good Good Fair Poor Very Good Good Fair Poor Yes No Yes No Yes Too Short Too Long Missouri Town 1855 Date of visit: Fort Osage Nat’l Historic Landmark 46 .

Do you have any suggestions for alternative activities. if any. JACKSON COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION Historic Sites Division 22807 Woods Chapel Road Blue Springs. would you suggest be included in the Teacher’s Guide? Yes No Very Good Good Fair Poor Yes No Yes No High Average Low Very Low What would be your overall rating of our School Tour Program? Excellent Comments Thank you for taking part in our programs and providing us with this important information. MO 64015 (816) 503-4860 47 Very Good Good Fair Poor . if so what would they be? What was the level of interest your students had for the information presented? Very High Comments Was the information presented appropriate for the age level of your students? Comments Interpreters Did the interpreters present information that your students did not know before? Comments How would you describe the knowledge and presentation of the interpreters? Excellent Comments Teacher’s Guide Was the Teacher’s Guide helpful in preparing the students prior to their visit? Comments What additional information.

Missouri Town 1855 DVD by Jackson County Parks and Recreation $10.00 includes shipping.00 + shipping and handling.00 includes shipping. Additional Educational Materials Order Form Enclosed is a check payable to Jackson County Parks and Recreation for #_____ copies of the following item: Name of item Please send to: Name Address City 48 State Zip Code .ADDITIONAL EDUCATION MATERIALS The following publications relating to Missouri Town 1855 and Fort Osage National Historic Landmark history are available for order: Educational Guide to Missouri Town 1855 by Darlene Robinson & Jackson County Parks and Recreation $5. Fort Osage National Historic Landmark 1808-1827 DVD by Jackson County Parks and Recreation $10.

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