NEXT-GENERATION MOBILE NETWORK

SYNOPSIS
The Next-Generation Mobile Network will be an integrated global system that provides heterogeneous services across network providers, network backbones, and geographical regions. Global roaming is a basic service of the future mobile networks, where terminal mobility, personal mobility, and service provider portability must be supported. A nongeographic personal telecommunication number (PTN) for each mobile user is desirable to implement these types of mobile freedom. With location-independent PTNs, users can access their personalized services regardless of terminal or attachment point to the network; they can move into different service provider’s network and continue to receive subscribed services without changing their PTNs. Another advantage of the flat PTN scheme is that it is much more efficient in terms of capacity than the location-dependent numbering scheme where the capacity of the subscriber number (SN) may be exhausted in a highly populated area, whereas the SN’s capacity is wasted in a sparsely populated area . However, using the location-independent numbering plan may introduce large centralized databases into a mobile system. To make things worse, each call may require an interrogation to the centralized databases, thus signaling traffic will grow considerably and call setup time may increase dramatically. The large centralized databases may become the bottleneck of the global mobile system, thus necessitating research into the design and performance of high-throughput database technologies as used in mobile networks to meet future demands. Location management is one of the most important functions to support global roaming. Location management procedures involve numerous operations in various databases. These databases record the relevant information of a mobile user, trace the user’s location by updating the relevant database entries, and map the user’s PTN to its current location. In current cellular networks location tracking is based on two types of location databases: the home location register (HLR) and the visitor location register (VLR). In general, there is an HLR for each mobile network. Each mobile subscriber has a service profile stored in the HLR. The user profile contains

network backbones. personal mobility. OBJECTIVES OF THE PROJECT The next-generation mobile network will be an integrated global system that provides heterogeneous services across network providers. which controls a group of registration areas (RAs). the user’s current location. and the MT is deregistered from the old VLR. With location-independent PTNs. the HLR is updated to point to the new location. DB0s. which in turn relays this information to the calling MSC. the called MT’s HLR is queried to get the location of the serving VLR of the MT. Global roaming is a basic service of the future mobile networks.information such as the service types subscribed. A nongeographic personal telecommunication number (PTN) for each mobile user is desirable to implement these types of mobile freedom. However. The proposed database system is a multitree structure consisting of a number of distributed database subsystems (DSs). adding more levels will introduce longer delays in location registration and call delivery. where terminal mobility. they can move into different service provider’s network and continue to receive subscribed services without changing their PTNs. users can access their personalized services regardless of terminal or attachment point to the network. etc. Whenever an MT changes its RA. More than three levels may be adopted in a DS. ATM networks. or other networks. The VLR where a mobile terminal (MT) resides also keeps a copy of the MT’s user profile. which are connected to the others by the public switched telephone network (PSTN). and service provider portability must be supported. The MSC allocates a temporary local directory number (TLDN) to the called MT and sends back the TLDN to the HLR. Another advantage of the flat PTN scheme is that it is much more efficient in terms of capacity than the location-dependent numbering scheme where the capacity of the subscriber number (SN) may be exhausted in a . each of which is a threelevel tree structure. These DSs communicate with each other only through their root databases. A VLR is usually collocated with a mobile switching center (MSC). As an incoming call arrives. then a routing address request message is sent to the MSC/VLR.

. each call may require an centralized databases. The large centralized databases may become the bottleneck of the global mobile system. However. using the location-independent numbering plan may introduce large centralized databases into a mobile system.highly populated area. thus signaling traffic will grow considerably and call setup time may increase dramatically. To make things worse. thus necessitating research into the design and performance of high-throughput database technologies as used in mobile networks to meet future demands.