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Welcome to the Pagan Talking Dictionary
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Akashic - Athame
Akashic əә-KASH-ik Akasha is the fifth element, or spiritual ether. "Akashic" therefore, means "of the ether", or "of the spiritual world". The occult element of Akasha embraces the traditional four elements (earth, air, fire, and water), and is the source from which they spring. Akasha is the non-material plane, the realm of pattern or causality, adjacent to and yet congruent with the physical world we ordinarily inhabit. (To learn more about Akasha, and the Akashic records, be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) amulet AM-yəә-ləәt A pendant or charm carried as a protection from evil or illness, usually magically charged to protect from a specific threat. (be sure to visit our "amulets" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) ankh ahngk An Egyptian heiroglyph, representing life, and used as a universal life charm. It represents the union of male and female, as its shape suggests a superimposition of both female and male genitalia. The ankh symbol is a cross with a looped, oval top, frequently worn as a pendant. Sometimes referred to as The Key of the Nile. (be sure to visit our "ankh" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Ansuz AWN-sooz The Rune of Odin, the Rune of the Ash tree, and the Rune of Release. In traditional references it is the "God rune". (To learn more about the runes, be sure to visit our "futhark" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Aradia əә-RAH-dyəә Daughter of the Goddess Diana, and a name for the Goddess used by Italian Witches or Strega, commonly used in many Wiccan traditions today. Also, the title of a book (Aradia, or the Gospel of the Witches) by Charles G. Leland, claiming to be an Strega's book of shadows. (To learn more about Ariada, or the Strega, be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) arcana ar-KAY-nəә Secret or hidden knowledge; secrets or mysteries. Also refers to the two portions of a Tarot deck. The Major Arcana consists of the 22 trumps, the Minor (or lesser) Arcana consists of the 56 suit cards. (To learn more about the Tarot, or arcana, be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) archetype AR-kəә-tīp An original model or type after which other similar things are patterned; a prototype. An archetype is a generic, idealized model of a person, object, or concept from which similar instances are derived, copied, patterned, or emulated. In psychology, (especially Jungian) an archetype is a model of a person, personality, or behavior. (be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) athame ATH-əә-may A double-edged, black-handled, (generally iron or steel) knife, used by Wiccans for circle casting, and other ritual. Never used to cut objects on the physical plane. One of the elemental tools, generally considered in Wicca to represent Fire, although published material from the Golden Dawn associated it with the element of air (perhaps deliberately misleading). Most traditions prescribe specific characters to be incised onto the handle. (be sure to visit our "athames" pages for our wide selection of lovely traditional and modern athames!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Balefire - Brighid
balefire BAYL-fīəәr A bonfire created and lit for magical purposes, frequently using specific woods for their magical properties. (be sure to visit our "Flame & Smoke" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) bane bayn Bad, evil, destructive- the original term meant "slayer" or "murderer". Therefore "fleabane" would destroy fleas, "wolfbane" wolves, etc. (be sure to visit our "leopards-bane" (arnica) pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Baphomet

BAF-əә-met A corruption of the name Muhammed, The name Baphomet was first seen in transcripts of trials (during the Inquisition) of Knights Templar in the 12th century. The classic drawing of a goat-headed God, inscribed in an inverted pentagram, drawn by Eliphas Levi (which he called the "Sabbatic Goat of Mendes") in the 19th century, seems to have been inspired by some of the works of Spanish painter Francisco Goya. It has no relation to Muhammed, or the Templars (or the goat of Mendes, for that matter), except perhaps in the mind of Levi. It has been adopted by Satanists, as it is suitably "scary" for their purposes. (be sure to visit our "books" pages for more information!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Beltane BEL-tayn A Wiccan Sabbat and Celtic holiday held between spring and the onset of summer, between April 30th and May 1st. Beltane was a "Fire Festival". Cattle were driven between two bonfires to protect them from disease. Fertility rituals, such as jumping over the bonfire are commonly a part of Beltane celebration. (be sure to visit our "Beltane" pages for information and supplies!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) besom BEE-zəәm A broom, more particularly the broom of a witch. Instead of (or in addition to) broomcorn, it is frequently made of twigs selected for their magical attributes, bound into a round form. The besom is used to sweep sacred areas, ground a circle, or to brush away negative influences. (be sure to visit our "besom" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) boline BOH-leen The Wiccan white handled knife, single edged, and used magically for cutting string or cord, trimming herbs, or engraving candles; the blade is frequently in the form of miniature scythe, a curved bladed tool or a sickle. Some traditions prefer a copper or bronze boline. (be sure to visit our "boline" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Brighid Breed Brighid was the goddess of all things perceived to be "elevated" such as high-rising flames, highlands, hill-forts and upland areas; and of activities and such lofty human attributes as wisdom, intelligence, eloquence, craftsmanship (especially blacksmithing), healing ability, and skill in warfare. She is largely associated with the concepts of home and hearth. (be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Cauldron - Cowan
cauldron KAWL-drəәn A large three-legged metal (usually iron) pot or kettle for cooking over an open fire, generally attached to a hanger with the shape of an arc, called a bail. Witches may use a cauldron to cook potions, for scrying, for needfires/balefires, and as a censer. On an altar, the cauldron symbolizes the feminine Goddess, life, death, and rebirth. A famous mythical cauldron was kept by Cerridwen. Sometimes spelled caldron. (be sure to visit our "cauldron" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Celtic

KEL-tik Refers to the Indo-European language family of the peoples of England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Brittany and some Teutonic lands, during the Iron Age-- also referring to those peoples themselves. (be sure to visit our "Celtic" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) censer SEN-səәr A heat-proof, ventilated container in which incense is smoldered or burned. It symbolises the element of air. Often a censer is used during ritual to "cense" an area, generally by moving the censer around the area and especially around the circle as a means of purification. Frequently suspended by chains. Also, see thurible. (be sure to visit our "censer" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Cernunnos KUR-nəә-nəәs The Horned God. No, not Satan. (To learn more about Cernunnos and Celtic mythology, be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Cerridwen kəәr-ID-wəәn Wiccan goddess-name, whose cauldron symbolizes the feminine principal. In Welsh mythology, Cerridwen had a magical cauldron in which she could cook up a potion granting wisdom. (To learn more about Cerridwen and Welsh mythology, be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) chakra SHUK-əәr According to yoga philosophy, a chakra is one of seven main physical or spiritual energy centers paralleling the spine, suspended on the sushumna nerve through which the Kundalini rises. The seven main chakras are located at the root base region (Muladhara), genital region (Svadhisthana), belly region (Manipura), heart region (Ana Hata), throat region (Vishudda), forehead region (Ajna), and the top of head (Sahasrara).(be sure to visit our "chakra items" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Chaldean kal-DEE-əәn A kingdom in the southern portion of Babylonia primarily on the right bank of the Euphrates. Though the name later came to be commonly used to refer to the whole of Babylonia, Chaldea proper was the alluvial plain in the south formed by the marshy land along the Euphrates and the Tigris, extending about four hundred miles along the riverbanks, and about a hundred miles wide. (To learn more about Chaldea and Babylonia, be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) consecrate KON-səә-krayt To dedicate an inanimate object to a sacred purpose through ritual: to make sacred; to hallow. (be sure to visit our "books" pages to learn more about pagan and Wiccan consecration rituals!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) coven KƏӘ-vəәn In Wicca and other modern witchcraft, a coven is a gathering or community of witches, similar to a Christian congregation. It is composed of a group (generally of the same tradition) who gather together for ritual, education, and fellowship. Generally the size of the group is from 3 to 13 members, a number which

can fit conveniently in a nine-foot circle. (To learn more about covens, be sure to visit our "coven items" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) covenstead KƏӘ-vəәn-sted The place where a coven regularly meets. It could be any place, indoors or out. This could be a grove in the forest or the home of a member, frequently the High Priestess, where all members can feel safe and at home. The Stone Pentacle is located on our covenstead. (Be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) cowan KƏӘ-wen One who builds dry (mortarless) stone walls - In the days of guildmasons this describes a person who worked as mason, but had not been regularly apprenticed or bred to the trade: therefore, in Freemasonry, "one who has not been regularly initiated" (a non-mason): therefore in witchcraft, a non-witch. Some traditions use the term in a derogatory manner; others use it to describe a non-witch "friend of the craft". (be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Deosil - Dowsing
deasil DJEE-zhəәl To move in a clockwise direction, to move in the direction of the sun. The direction most Wiccan dance, procession, and spellcasting is performed. (To learn more about spellcasting, be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Deist DEE-ist An adherent of that system of thought which emphasizes natural religion, focusing on morality. Deists recognize God the creator, sometimes thought of as the "grand watchmaker", who, having set the universe in motion, does not further interfere with it. Benjamin Franklin was a self-professed Deist, and the Deist philosophy is "that common religion" referred to by Freemasons. (be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) deosil DJEE-zhəәl To move in a clockwise direction, to move in the direction of the sun. The direction most Wiccan dance, procession, and spellcasting is performed. (be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) dowsing DOW-zeeng To use a divining-rod, dowsing rod, or dowsing rods, usually to locate water sources underground. (To learn more, be sure to visit our "dowsing books and items" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Enochian - Esbat
Enochian in-OHK-ee-yəәn Of, or relating to the prophet Enoch- frequently used to describe

the magical language, calls, and magic of Dr. John Dee and his associate Edward Kelley in the late 16th century. (To learn more, be sure to visit our "Enochian books and items" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Eostre EES-trəә On or about March 21st. More frequently seen as Ostara, the spring or Vernal Equinox. One of the eight Wiccan Sabbats. Eostre is a time to celebrate the beginnings of new life, planting, and fertility. Often celebrated with dawn bonfires (balefires). (Be sure to visit our "Eostre books and items" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Esbat ESS-bot A wiccan gathering or (for a solitary) ritual time that does not fall on a Sabbat- generally held on the day of the full, or new moon. Esbats are held on days that do not coincide with one of the eight Sabbat days- otherwise, there are few rules as to when an Esbat can be held. (Be sure to visit our "Esbat " pages for information and supplies for Esbats!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Fith-Fath - Futhark
fith-fath fee-fah One who takes on the appearance of a deer, or more generally, a shapeshifting spell. It refers to a body of Scot's Gaelic shape-shifting lore, for example, the following invocation for justice: "I will go in the name of God, in the likeness of deer, in likeness of horse, in likeness of serpent, in likeness of King. More victorious am I than all others." Alex Sanders (founder of Alexandrian witchcraft) seems to have confused the term, and used it to refer to a poppet, voodoo-doll, or corn-dolly. Doreen Valiente figured it was because Sander's knowlege of Witchcraft was actually quite limited, and he needed to flesh out his teachings with research from Ceremonial Magic and other cultures. (No offense intended to members of the Alexandrian tradition!) (Be sure to visit our "books" pages for information on shape-shifting!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) flittermouse FLIT-əәr-mows A bat; also seen as flickermouse, flindermouse, and flintymouse, due to the fact that a bat looks like a winged mouse. (Be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) futhark (futhorc) FOO-thark The Runic alphabet. (the "th" is almost a light 't' sound in Scandanavian dialects-- as in "Neanderthal") (Be sure to visit our "futhark" pages for information on runes!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Gaia (Gaea) - Grimoire
Gaia

GĪ-əә In Greek mythology, Goddess of the earth and mother of Cronus and the Titans. By extension, the personification of the spiritual being we think of as "Mother Earth", as well as the philosophical concept that all organisms and matter on the earth are connected as one self-regulating overarching being, called the Gaia hypothesis. (To learn more about Gaia, be sure to visit our "Gaia" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) grimoire GRIM-wahr A book of magic- in some traditions, the personal Book of Shadows, but more generally a large tome of magical symbols and spells. Famous grimoires include "The Greater Key of Solomon", "The Black Pullet", and the "Picatrix". (Be sure to visit our "grimoire" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Hecate - Herne
Hecate HEK-əә-tee Associated by the Greeks with the moon, Hecate had a beneficent influence over such activities as farming, but she was also a goddess of the dark hours-- ghosts and witchcraft fascinated the distant one who dwelt "on tombs", at crossroads, or "near the blood of the murdered". (be sure to visit our "Hecate" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Hermes HƏӘR-meez In Greek mythology, a deity, the son of Zeus and Maia, represented as the herald and messenger of the gods, the god of science, commerce, eloquence, invention, travel, and theft and many of the arts of life; usually depicted as a youth, with a caduceus, brimmed hat, and winged shoes. Identified by the Romans with Mercury. Also refers to Hermes Trismegistus the name given by mystics and alchemists to the Egyptian god Thoth, associated with the Grecian Hermes, and the author of all mysterious doctrines, and more particularly, the secrets of alchemy. (be sure to visit our "Hermes" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Hermetic Həәr-MET-ik Pertaining to Hermes Trismegistus, and the philosophical, theosophical, and other writings ascribed to him, or relating to or dealing with occult science, alchemy; magic, hermetic art, philosophy, and science, or relating to the Gnostic writings and teachings attributed to Hermes Trismegistus. (be sure to visit our "Hermetic items" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Herne Həәrn "The Hunter of Windsor Forest", That aspect of the Horned God (Cernunnos) whose role is Lord of the Dead. (be sure to visit our "Herne books and items" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Imbolc - Incantation
Imbolc IM-əәlg February 2. One of the eight major Sabbats, in Celtic countries dedicated to Brighid, goddess of poetry, healing and smithcraft. A fire festival, concurrent with

Candlemas. Imbolc is a celebration of the lengthening days, and a time for weather prediction, (such as the custom of "Groundhog Day"). (be sure to visit our "Imbolc" pages for supplies and information!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) incantation in-kan-TAY-shəәn Words spoken or chanted to produce a magical effect, the utterance of a spell or charm, or verbal charms spoken or sung as a part of a magical ritual. (be sure to visit our "incantation" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Janus - Juno
Janus JAY-nəәs The doorkeeper of heaven, guardian of doors and gates, entrances or beginnings of things; represented with a face on the front and another on the back of his head; the doors of his temple in the Rome were always open in time of war, and closed in time of peace. (be sure to visit our "books"` pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Jove Johv The thunderbolt-hurling supreme deity of the ancient Romans, equivalent to the Greek Zeus; the ruler of gods and men, and the god of the heavens. (be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Juno JOO-noh In Roman mythology the wife of Jupiter; the goddess of marriage and childbirth. (be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Kabbalah - Koan
Kabbala Ka-bəә-LƏӘ A Gnostic tradition within Judaism, claiming to date from the oral teachings of Abraham. It concentrates on mystical interpretations of scripture and esoteric doctrines about the being of God. The Kabbala is central to Ceremonial magic. The Kabbalistic "Tree of Life", or Sephirot is seen in many magical systems. (be sure to visit our "kabbala" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) koan KO-ahn In Zen Buddhism, a paradox put to a student to stimulate his mind, such as "what is the sound of one hand clapping" (Which, by the way, is the sound of slapping yourself on the forehead, and saying "I can't believe I did that!"-- so now you know...). (be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Lamen - Lughnasadh
lamen LAM-əәn A magical device, used by ceremonial magicians, worn around the neck,

and laying upon the chest as a symbol of occult authority. A lamen is sometimes made of metal, which has magical symbols or words inscribed upon it. Modern lamens are often made from wood, parchment or cardboard, with magical words and symbols written on the surface. (be sure to visit our "parchment" pages for material to make your own lamens!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Lammas LAM-əәs August 1st. One of the eight Wiccan Sabbats, celebrating the coming harvest. Also called Lughnasad. (Be sure to visit our "Lammas" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) ley-line LEE-līn According to the theories of Alfred Watkins (1922), ley lines connect ancient sites and tap into planetary power. (be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Litha LEE-thəә On or about June 21st (or June 24th, under the pre-Gregorian "old calendar"), the Summer Solstice, the longest day of the year. One of the eight Wiccan Sabbats, sometimes called Midsummer. A festival celebrated with bonfires (balefires). Saint John's (John the Baptist's) day was established on June 24th to allow people to continue their traditional celebrations-- the only "Saint's Day" falling on a saint's birthday, as opposed to the date of his martyrdom. (Be sure to visit our "Litha" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Lughnasadh LOO(d)-nəә-səә August 1st. One of the eight Wiccan Sabbats, celebrating the coming harvest. More frequently referred to as Litha, no doubt due to uncertainties over pronouncing Lughnasadh. (Be sure to visit our "Lughnasadh" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Mabinogion - Magus
Mabinogion MAW-bəәn-oh-gee-yəәn The Mabinogion is a selection of four narrative works found in one or both of the two great ancient books of Wales: the Red Book of Hergest and the White Book of Rhydderch. These stories are a part of "The Matter of Britain" and probably go back (in oral form) to the Iron Age Celts. (be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Mabon MAY-bəәn September 23rd, the Autumnal equinox. One of the eight Wiccan Sabbats. It is a traditional time for feasting. The name Mabon is first seen in writings of Aidan Kelly in the 1970s. The term may have originated with Doreen Valiente. (be sure to visit our "Mabon" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) mage Mayj A magician, or sorcerer. More generally, a person of exceptional wisdom and learning. (be sure to visit our "mage" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

magus MAY-gəәs A member of a hereditary priestly class among the ancient Medes and Persians which became influential in the development of Zoroastrianism. The magi were involved in magical practices and beliefs, and in astrology, therefore a person skilled in eastern magic and astrology; a magician or sorcerer. (be sure to visit our "magus" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Necromancy - Nibelung
necromancy NEH-krəә-mant-see Divination or fortunetelling through communication with the spirits of the dead. (be sure to visit our "necromancy" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Nibelung NEE-bəә-lung A member of a race of subterranean dwarfs who guarded the treasure sought and eventually taken by Siegfried.(be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Oimelc - Ostara
Oimelc EEM-əәlk February 2. One of the eight major Sabbats, in Celtic countries dedicated to Brighid, goddess of poetry, healing and smithcraft. A fire festival, concurrent with Candlemas. Imbolc (Oimelc) is a celebration of the lengthening days, and a time for weather prediction, (such as the custom of "Groundhog Day"). (Be sure to visit our "Oimelc" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Ostara oh-STAHR-əә On or about March 21st, the spring or Vernal Equinox. One of the eight Wiccan Sabbats. Ostara is a time to celebrate the beginnings of new life, planting, and fertility. Often celebrated with dawn bonfires (balefires). (Be sure to visit our "Ostara" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Pantheon - Phylactery
pantheon PAN-thee-əәn A group of all the Gods and Goddesses in a particular religious or mythical structure, such as the Greek pantheon, Roman pantheon, etc,or a building dedicated to all the Gods and Goddesses in such a pantheon. (Be sure to visit our "books" pages for information on various pantheons!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) philtre FIL-təәr A potion or drug which stimulates sexual passion or love, especially towards a particularly targeted person; a love potion. More generally: any potion or drug having supposedly magical properties. (be sure to visit our "potions" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

phylactery fəә-LAK-təә-ree Either of two small square leather boxes, containing Hebrew texts of the Bible written on parchment, worn by Orthodox Jewish males during morning weekday prayers. One of the boxes is worn on the left arm, the other on the forehead, with the same four texts inserted into each. These are Deuteronomy 6:4-9 and 11:1321 and Exodus 13:1-10 and 11-16. More generally, an amulet, a protective charm,or a safeguard. (be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Quire - Quoit
quire kwīr The set of leaves which are folded together before a book is bound. Also called the section, gathering or signature. (be sure to visit our "parchment" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) quoit kwoit A single-chambered megalithic tomb, usually consisting of three or more upright stones (megaliths) supporting a large flat horizontal capstone. Sometimes also called a Cromlech or Dolmen. (be sure to visit our " books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Rede - Runes
rede reed Rule or law, enforced by the honor of the rede-bound individual. The traditional Wiccan Rede is: "An it harm none, Do as thou wilt". (Be sure to visit our "rede" pages- we even have copies of the Wiccan Rede suitable for framing!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) runes roonz The letters of the ancient Nordic alphabet, or futhark, originally designed to be easily inscribed on wood or stone, now used for divination, chants, charrns, or spells. Sometimes taken to mean any magical alphabet. (Be sure to visit our "runes" pages for rune sets and information!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Sabbat - Siobhan
Sabbat SAB-əәt One of the eight solar festivals that celebrate the Wiccan wheel of the year. Includes the Solstices, the Equinoxes, and the four "cross-quarter days". (be sure to visit our "Sabbat" pages for Sabbat information and supplies!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Samhain SOW-whəәn October 31st, or Halloween. The beginning of the Celtic New Year. A time when the veil between this world, and the "otherworld" becomes more transparent, and may be drawn back. (be sure to visit our "Samhain" pages for supplies and information!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Santeria sant-əә-REE-yəә Santeria (the Way of the Saints), is based on elements of the Yoruba religions brought to the new world by slaves imported to the Caribbean. Santeria includes a tradition of possession trance for communicating with the ancestors and deities, the use of animal sacrifice and the practice of sacred drumming and dance, combined with portions of the Catholic religion.(be sure to visit our "Santeria" pages for Santeria supplies and information!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) scry skrī Scrying is art of using a reflective or scintillating surface such as a black glass, crystal ball, bowl of water, candle flame, or similar object for divination. (be sure to visit our "scrying" pages for scrying mirrors, crystal balls, and more!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Sidhe Shee Any of the fairy (faery) races of Celtic countries. (Be sure to visit our "Sidhe" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) sigil SIDJ-əәl A symbol, sign, glyph, or drawing with some occult meaning that may be used in magickal workings. It may be carried, worn or otherwise used to control the power symbolized. (be sure to visit our "sigil" pages for sigils and parchment!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Siobhan Shəәv-AHN An Irish Gaelic name, meaning "god is gracious", according to some references. (Be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Talisman - Triskele
talisman TAL-iz-məәn An small object carried for protection or other goals that has been magically charged for a specific purpose. (Be sure to visit our "talisman" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) tarot tair-OH A set of 78 cards with pictures and symbols that are used for divination. (Be sure to visit our "tarot" pages for Tarot decks and information!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) thurible THYUR-əә-bəәl A container for burning incense, see also "censer". (be sure to visit our "thurible" pages for incense burners!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) triquetra trī-KWET-rəә A triangular figure, formed of three interlaced arcs or leaflike (football-shaped) nodes Frequently used as a Pagan symbol (be sure to visit our "triquetra products" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

triskele TRĪ-skeel A figure composed of three curved arms radiating from a center. Frequently used as a Pagan symbol (be sure to visit our "triskele" pages for triskele jewelry and items!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Undine - Ushabti
undine ƏӘN-deen An elemental female being, inhabiting the water; a water nymph. (be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Urania Yoo-RAY-nee-əә The Greek muse of astronomy. (be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) ushabti əә-SHAB-tee A figurine, frequently in the form of a mummy, placed in an Egyptian tomb to do work for the deceased. Some tombs have yielded entire crews of ushabti workers, along with tools of their various trades. Although a complete set of ushabti consisted of 365 workers and a foreman for every 10 workers, (for a total of 401), most tombs held fewer. On rare occasions, tombs were found with over a thousand ushabti. (be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Venendum - Voodoo/Voudoun
venendum ven-EN-dəәm A staff or rod the height of a person, with a forked top, usually made of hardwood and often decorated with crystals or sacred symbols. More commonly known as a stang. (be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Voodoo/Vodoun VOO-doo A form of religious witchcraft, derived from African polytheism and ancestor worship, and common among Blacks in the West Indies, (especially Haiti), and the southern United States. (be sure to visit our "voodoo" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Walpurgisnacht - Widdershins
Walpurgisnacht Val-PUR-gəәs-nahkt Another name for Beltane, the Wiccan Sabbat and Celtic holiday held between spring and the onset of summer, between April 30th and May 1st. Beltane was a "Fire Festival". Cattle were driven between two bonfires to protect them from disease. Fertility rituals, such as jumping over the bonfire are commonly a part of Beltane celebration. (Be sure to visit our "walpurgisnacht" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Wicca

WIK-əә Wicca, or "the Craft" modern interpretation of witchcraft, based on the preChristian traditions of Celtic and Anglo-Saxon countries, popularized in the writings of Gerald Gardner. (Be sure to visit our "wicca" information pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) widdershins WID-er-shinz Counterclockwise motion (the opposite of deasil) used in magical workings or ceremonies. It is sometimes used in banishing magick, or in the "reversal" of spells originally cast in a clockwise direction.(be sure to visit our "books" pages for more information on spellcasting!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Xenomancy - Xylomancy
xenomancy ZEEN-əә-mant-see Divination by means of strangers- usually the first stranger met. (be sure to visit our "scrying" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) xylomancy ZĪ-ləә-mant-see A form of Slavic divination, done by interpreting the shape and position of twigs, kindling or other wood pieces that can be found ready for burning, or from the arrangement of logs in a fireplace and from the manner in which they burn. (be sure to visit our "scrying" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Yggdrasil - Yule
Yggdrasil IG-drəә-sil In Norse mythology, the great ash (sometimes yew) tree whose branches and roots extend through the universe, spreading over the world and binding earth, hell, and heaven together. (be sure to visit our "Norse" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) Yule Yool December 21st, the Winter Solstice, one of the eight major Wiccan Sabbats. (be sure to visit our "Yule" pages for supplies and information!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page)

Zohar - Zorastrian
Zohar ZƏӘ-har The major text of the Kabbalah, attributed to Simeon Ben Iochai. The Zohar is a mystical commentary on the Pentateuch (the first five books of the Old Testament), written in medieval Aramaic and Hebrew. It is an exploration of the nature of the mind of God, the origin and structure of the universe, the soul, sin, redemption, good and evil, and other important topics. (be sure to visit our "kabbalah" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) zoroastrian zor-əә-WAS-tree-əәn Of or pertaining to Zoroaster or his dualistic religious system. A follower of Zoroaster; a Parsee. The philosophy of Zoroaster was promulgated in

the Avesta. Zoroastrians worship a supreme god Ahura Mazda, who requires good deeds for help in the struggle against the evil spirit Ahriman. (be sure to visit our "books" pages!) Return to Dictionary Navigation (top of page) These pages are designed to be used with modern graphical browsers. If you have problems viewing any of these pages, you should consider downloading a copy of the most recent Netscape Navigator, or Microsoft Internet Explorer.
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