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Lesson Planning Template

Teacher: Chupp/Citro Date: 1.11.11 Subject/Block/Unit: Math


Aims: What is my standards-based, bite-sized aim for this lesson? Make Assessment of Mastery of the Aim:
sure this aim fits in a logical sequence with other aims from this unit.
- independent practice of journal pp. 128,
- SWBAT identify the number of minutes around the face of an 129
analog clock. - half-sheet of paper (Math Message)
- SWBAT tell time on a analog clock given the time on an
digital clock.

Vocabulary: What words do students need to know to be successful with this material? What other vocab words (Tier 2) could be
tied in?

digital clock
Quick Questions/Do now: Generally focused on cumulative Materials:
review (based on IA data, yesterday’s lesson, prerequisite skills or preview
for today)
- Math Journal 2, pp. 128 and 129
- Home Link 6.9
Tell number stories such as those suggested below. Children - SMART board projection of MM, p. 186
solve them any way they can. Have children share their - half-sheets of paper
solution strategies after solving each problem. Summarize - demonstration clock
their solutions by drawing an appropriate diagram and by - digital clock
writing a number model.

• Shadae collects stones. She had 14 stones from the


park. She collected 3 more from her neighbors’ yards.
How many stones has Shadae collected in all? [17
stones]
• Ilianna was 43 inches tall at the start of first grade.
When she was measured at the end of first grade, she
had grown 5 inches. How tall was Ilianna at the end of
first grade? [48 inches]
• Terrence is trying to finish reading a book. It is 32
pages long. He has read 20 pages already. How many
pages does Terrence still have to read?

Review: What essential content from previous lessons do students need to practice to maintain fluency? Quick fire.

Briefly review Home Link 6.9.


Hook/Motivation: How will you convey the importance of today’s objective and/or make it interesting?

Math Message: Take a half-sheet of paper. Write the numbers you say when you count by 5s to 60.

Mini-Lesson / Modeling (the “I” or “I/We”) and Guided Practice (the “We”):

Collect the Math Message papers. Look through them to assess readiness for today’s lesson.

Remind students that it takes 1 minute for the minute hand to move from one mark to the next. Move the
minute hand on your demonstration clock slowly around the clock face, starting at 12 o’clock. Children count
by 1s to 60 as the minute hand passes each minute mark. Point out that the hour hand has moved from 12
to 1. Ask, “How many minutes are there in 1 hour?” [60 minutes]

Point to the hour numbers on the clock face: 1, 2, 3 … 12. To check that it takes 5 minutes for the minute
hand to move from one hour number to the next, count the minute marks between two or three pairs of hour
numbers. Then set your demonstration clock to 12 o’clock and move the minute hand slowly around the
clock face. Have children count by 5s as the minute hand passes the number for each hour.

Children fill in the numbers of minutes at 5-minute intervals around the clock face on journal page 128 and
then record the number of minutes in 1 hour, half an hour, a quarter hour, and three-quarters of an hour.
After children have completed the journal page, set your demonstration clock to 3 o’clock and move the
minute hand slowly around the clock. As the minute hand passes each hour number, say the time with
children: 5 minutes after 3, 10 minutes after 3, 15 minutes after 3, and so on.

Show times on the demonstration clock, such as 8:00, 4:10, 7:30, 10:15, 5:35, and 11:45. Have children say
the time, referring to the clock face in their journals as needed.

Show 5 o’clock on the demonstration clock. Ask if anyone has a clock at home that shows “5 o’clock” with
numbers only. Explain that this is called a digital clock. Write digital clock on the board. Display a digital
clock. Use a projection of Math Masters, p. 186 for the following routine.

1. Draw hands on the analog clock face on the projection to show 5 o’clock. Then write “5:00” on the
digital clock on the projection. Explain that these two clocks show the same time.
2. Show 10 minutes after 7 on the analog clock and write “7:10” on the digital clock. Again, point out
that the two clocks show the same time. We can say that the time shown is “10 minutes after 7” or
“seven-ten.”
3. Show 5 minutes after 6 on the analog clock and write “6:05” on the digital clock. We can say that the
time shown is “5 minutes after 6” or “six-o-five.”

Repeat with several other times. Then show a time with the minute hand pointing to an hour number on the
analog clock and ask children what time is shown. Write the time on the digital clock. After a few examples,
give a time and ask volunteers to draw the hands on the analog clock and write the time on the digital clock.
Include times such as “half-past 9,” “a quarter past 4,” and, “a quarter to 10.”

Explain what the numbers and symbols on the digital clock mean.

• The numbers are separated by a colon (:).


• The number before the colon tells the hour.
• The number after the colon tells the minutes after the hour.
• Write the following on the board:
6:05
hour:minutes

Note: Watch for children who:


• write 2:00 as 2:60.
• write 2:00 as 2:12.
• Write 2:00 as 10:00.

Discuss the similarity between dollars-and-cents notation for money and digital notation for money and
digital notation for time. In dollars-and-cents notation, two places are needed after the decimal point to
accommodate cents amounts up to 99 cents. In digital notation for time, two places are needed after the
colon to accommodate numbers of minutes up to 59. Just as we write 6 dollars and 5 cents as $6.05, not
$6.5, we write 5 minutes after 6 as 6:05, not 6:5.

Key questions/strategy to check for understanding before Independent Practice: How w ill I
know if students are ready to move into independent practice?

Tell the class that “00” is the smallest number of minutes that can be displayed on a digital clock.

• “What is the largest number of minutes that can be displayed?” [59]


• “What is the smallest number of hours that can be displayed?” [1]
• “What is the largest number of hours that can be displayed?” [12]

Independent Practice (the “You”): What will be the product? What will students do? Students need lots of AT BATS,
and they need to be able to do these successfully and independently.

Students will draw the hour and minute hands to show a time given in digital notation. They write the time
shown on an analog clock face in digital notation. They will complete Math Boxes 6.10 when they finish.

**Ms. Citro will pull our lowest group to explore the minutes on a clock face, using Math Masters, p. 188.

Final Check for Understanding/Share:

Bring students back together to review a few of the answers from independent practice.

Homework: Am I totally confidently that all students can do the homework independently and successfully?

Post-Lesson Reflection: What do you want to change about this lesson for next year?