EE 474 Communication Simulation Tech & Lab IS¸IK UNIVERSITY

Single Sideband Modulation with Coherent Demodulation
Handout
1 Purpose
In this experiment, we will verify the principles of Single Sideband (SSB) Modulation using audio
frequency signals. SSB modulation will be implemented using the phase shift method. The demodulation
method to be investigated will be coherent demodulation. We are going to examine the estimation of side-
band suppression and definition of peak output power PEP.
Previously we studied standard amplitude modulation (AM). Recall that the equations considered for
AM had the form;
s(t) = A
c
[1 + µm(t)] cos(ω
c
t) (1)
= A
c
cos(ω
c
t) + A
c
µm(t) cos(ω
c
t) (2)
Now, if we let M(f ) be the frequency domain description of the message signal m(t) then the Fourier
transform of the AM signal in (1) can be shown as in Figure 1.
EE 474 Communication Systems Laboratory IS¸IK UNIVERSITY
Single Sideband Modulation with Coherent Demodulation
1 Purpose
In this experiment, we will verify the principles of Single Sideband (SSB) Modulation using audio
frequency signals. SSB modulation will be implemented using the phase shift method. The demodulation
method to be investigated will be coherent demodulation. We are going to examine the estimation of side-
band suppression and definition of peak output power PEP.
Previously we studied standard amplitude modulation (AM). Recall that the equations considered for
AM had the form;
s(t) = A
c
[1 +µm(t)] cos(ω
c
t) (1)
= A
c
cos(ω
c
t) +A
c
µm(t) cos(ω
c
t) (2)
Now, if we let M(f ) be the frequency domain description of the message signal m(t) then the Fourier
transform of the AM signal in (1) can be shown as in Figure 1.
Ac/2 µ
f
f
M(f)
Sc(f)
Lower Sideband
Upper Sideband
-fc fc
W -W
1
Ac/2
-fc+W -fc-W
fc-W
fc+W
Figure 1: Double Sideband Modulation
We can see that the spectrum consists of impulses at the carrier frequency, f
c
, and has message
components, M(f + f
c
) and M(f − f
c
) on either side of f
c
. The portion of the message spectrum at
frequencies above f
c
is referred to as an upper sideband and the portion at frequencies below f
c
is
referred to as the lower sideband. The relevant parameters, along with the upper and lower sidebands
are illustrated in Fig. 1.
It can be seen from Fig. 1 that there are several forms of inefficiency in this type of modulation. These
include:
1. The total bandwidth of the modulated signal is twice that of the baseband message signal.
2. The lower sideband is a mirror image of the upper sideband (repeated information).
3. the impulse response at the carrier frequency contributes nothing to the determination of the signal
m(t).
Thus, this double sideband modulation is wasteful of resources in terms of both bandwidth and power.
In this lab, we consider means to improve the efficiency of the amplitude modulation scheme used
in Lab #1. By considering the points of inefficiency mentioned above, we do this by firstly removing
the carrier frequency impulse component. (The resulting modulation scheme is called double side-
band suppressed carrier modulation.) Secondly, we remove one of the sidebands with the resulting
modulation scheme being called single sideband suppressed carrier modulation.
2.3 Single Sideband Modulation (SSB)
Generation of the single sideband signal can be achieved by realizing the following equation
s(t) = A
c
(m(t) cos ω
c
t + ˆ m(t) sin ω
c
t) (6)
where ˆ m(t) is the Hilbert transform of m(t). Please consult section 5-5 (pp 312–316) of Couch for more
information on single sideband modulation.
2.4 Coherent Demodulation
In Lab#1 we used two different demodulation methods for the AM signal. These were envelope de-
tection and coherent demodulation. Only signals of the form of (1) are able to be demodulated via
envelope detection. Thus, it is not possible to demodulate single sideband suppressed carrier modulated
signals via envelope detection, so we use only coherent demodulation.
Recall that coherent demodulation (also called synchronous detection) consists of multiplying the
modulated signal by a sinusoid of the same frequency as the carrier and low-pass filtering so that the
resulting higher frequency components are discarded and only a scaled version of the original baseband
message signal remains. (Practical note: for audio signals the higher frequency components would most
likely not be able to be heard anyway, so low-pass filtering might not be absolutely necessary.)
2
Figure 1: Spectrum of a Double Sideband Modulation
We can see that the spectrum consists of impulses at the carrier frequency, f
c
, and has message compo-
nents, M(f + f
c
) and M(f − f
c
) on either side of f
c
. The portion of the message spectrum at frequencies
above f
c
is referred to as an upper sideband and the portion at frequencies below f
c
is referred to as the
lower sideband. The relevant parameters, along with the upper and lower sidebands are illustrated in
Figure 1.
It can be seen from Figure 1 that there are several forms of inefficiency in this type of modulation. These
include:
1. The total bandwidth of the modulated signal is twice that of the baseband message signal.
2. The lower sideband is a mirror image of the upper sideband (repeated information).
3. The impulse response at the carrier frequency contributes nothing to the determination of the signal
m(t).
Thus, this double sideband modulation is wasteful of resources in terms of both bandwidth and power.
1
Figure 1: Spectrum of a Double Sideband Modulation
We can see that the spectrum consists of impulses at the carrier frequency, f
c
, and has message compo-
nents, M(f + f
c
) and M(f − f
c
) on either side of f
c
. The portion of the message spectrum at frequencies
above f
c
is referred to as an upper sideband and the portion at frequencies below f
c
is referred to as the
lower sideband. The relevant parameters, along with the upper and lower sidebands are illustrated in
Figure 1.
It can be seen from Figure 1 that there are several forms of inefficiency in this type of modulation. These
include:
1. The total bandwidth of the modulated signal is twice that of the baseband message signal.
2. The lower sideband is a mirror image of the upper sideband (repeated information).
3. The impulse response at the carrier frequency contributes nothing to the determination of the signal
m(t).
1
Thus, this double sideband modulation is wasteful of resources in terms of both bandwidth and power.
In this lab, we consider means to improve the efficiency of the amplitude modulation scheme by considering
the points of inefficiency mentioned above. We do this by firstly removing the carrier frequency impulse
component. (The resulting modulation scheme is called double sideband suppressed carrier modulation.)
Secondly, we remove one of the sidebands with the resulting modulation scheme being called single sideband
suppressed carrier modulation.
2 Preparation
2.1 Definition of Single Sideband (SSB) Modulation
There are three well-known methods of SSB generation using analog techniques. These are Weaver’s method,
filtering method and phasing method.
Among these methods the filtering method is probably the most common method of SSB generation.
You have already modelled a DSBSC signal. An SSB signal may be derived from this signal by the use of a
suitable bandpass filter commonly called as an SSB sideband filter. Mass production has given rise to low
cost, yet high performance filters. However, these filters are usually at ’standard’ frequencies (for example
455kHz or 10.7MHz) and SSB generation by the filter method at other frequencies can be expensive.
The phasing method for SSB generation does not require an expensive filter, but instead an accurate
phasing network, or quadrature phase splitter (QPS). It is capable of acceptable performance in many appli-
cations. Unlike the filter ingmethod, the QPS operates at baseband, no matter what the carrier frequency
is. Generation of the single sideband signal via phasing method can be achieved by realizing the following
equation:
s(t) = A
c
m(t)cos(ω
c
t) + A
c
ˆ m(t)sin(ω
c
t) (3)
where ˆ m(t) is the Hilbert transform of m(t).
The phasing method of SSB generation is based on the addition of two DSBSC signals (3), so phased that,
their upper sidebands are identical in phase and amplitude, whilst the other two are of similar amplitude but
opposite phase. The two out-of-phase sidebands will cancel if added; alternatively the in-phase sidebands
will cancel if subtracted.
The principle of the SSB phasing generator is illustrated in Figure 2. Notice that there are two 90

phase
changers. The carrier phase changer operates at a single frequency, ω
c
rad/s. The message is shown as a
single tone at frequency µrad/s. But this can lie anywhere within the frequency range of speech. A network
providing a constant 90

phase shift over this frequency range is very difficult to design. This would be a
wideband phase shifter, or Hilbert transformer.
2.2 Sideband Suppression
A most important characteristic of any SSB generator is the amount of out-of-band energy it produces,
relative to the wanted output. In most cases this is determined by the degree to which the unwanted
sideband is suppressed. A ratio of wanted-to-unwanted output power of at least 60dB is acceptable
commercial performance. To measure the ratio of wanted-to-unwanted sideband suppression directly
requires a SPECTRUM ANALYSER. In commercial practice these instruments are very expensive, and
their purchase cannot always be justified merely to measure an SSB generaor performance. As always, there
are indirect methods of measurement. One such method depends upon a measurement of the SSB envelope,
as already hinted. It is a simple matter to measure the sideband suppression from peak-to-peak and the
trough-to-trough amplitudes, giving twice P, and twice Q, respectively. Figure 3
sideband suppression = 20 log(
P + Q
P −Q
)dB (4)
2
Figure 2: A block diagram to generate a SSB signal via phasing method
2.2 Sideband Suppression
A most important characteristic of any SSB generator is the amount of out-of-band energy it produces, rela-
tive to the wanted output. In most cases this is determined by the degree to which the unwanted sideband is
suppressed. A ratio of wanted-to-unwanted output power of at least 60dB is acceptable commercial perfor-
mance. To measure the ratio of wanted-to-unwanted sideband suppression directly requires a SPECTRUM
ANALYSER. In commercial practice these instruments are very expensive, and their purchase cannot always
be justified merely to measure an SSB generaor performance. As always, there are indirect methods of mea-
surement. One such method depends upon a measurement of the SSB envelope, as already hinted. It is a
0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1
−1
−0.5
0
0.5
1
P
Q
Figure 3: SSB signal with unwanted sideband component
simple matter to measure the sideband suppression from peak-to-peak and the trough-to-trough amplitudes,
giving twice P, and twice Q, respectively. Figure 3
sideband suppression = 20 log(
P + Q
P −Q
)dB (4)
2.3 Coherent Demodulation
In Amplitude Modulation experiment we used two different demodulation methods for the AM signal. These
were envelope detection and coherent demodulation. Only signals of the form of (1) are able to be demod-
ulated via envelope detection. Thus, it is not possible to demodulate single sideband suppressed carrier
modulated signals via envelope detection, so we use only coherent demodulation. Recall that coherent
demodulation (also called synchronous detection) consists of multiplying the modulated signal by a sinusoid
of the same frequency as the carrier and low-pass filtering so that the resulting higher frequency components
are discarded and only a scaled version of the original baseband message signal remains. (Practical note:
for audio signals the higher frequency components would most likely not be able to be heard anyway, so
low-pass filtering might not be absolutely necessary.)
3 SSB Modulation With Matlab
In the following exercise you will SSB modulate a signal and examine the result in both the time and
frequency domains. The best part is that the Matlab file is already written for you, all you have to do is
modify a few variables!
Exercise 1: Edit ssb test.m in a text editor. In Matlab, run the file and view the resulting plot. It should
resemble the plot shown in Figure 4
Exercise 1:Modify the code in am test.m to create a new signal with a bi-tone message signal. Execute
the m-file and print the resulting plot.
% ssb_test.m
%
% M-file for SSB modulation experimentation using
3
Figure 3: SSB signal with unwanted sideband component
2.3 Coherent Demodulation
In Amplitude Modulation experiment we used two different demodulation methods for the AM signal. These
were envelope detection and coherent demodulation. Only signals of the form of (1) are able to be demod-
ulated via envelope detection. Thus, it is not possible to demodulate single sideband suppressed carrier
modulated signals via envelope detection, so we use only coherent demodulation. Recall that coherent
demodulation (also called synchronous detection) consists of multiplying the modulated signal by a sinusoid
of the same frequency as the carrier and low-pass filtering so that the resulting higher frequency components
are discarded and only a scaled version of the original baseband message signal remains. (Practical note:
for audio signals the higher frequency components would most likely not be able to be heard anyway, so
low-pass filtering might not be absolutely necessary.)
3 SSB Modulation With Matlab
In the following exercise you will SSB modulate a signal and examine the result in both the time and
frequency domains. The best part is that the Matlab file is already written for you, all you have to do is
modify a few variables!
Exercise 1: Edit ssb test.m in a text editor. In Matlab, run the file and view the resulting plot. It should
resemble the plot shown in Figure 4
3
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1
−2
−1
0
1
2
time (ms)
m(t)
m
hat
(t)
−50 −40 −30 −20 −10 0 10 20 30 40 50
0
0.2
0.4
frequency (kHz)
M(f)
−50 −40 −30 −20 −10 0 10 20 30 40 50
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
frequency (kHz)
S(f)
Figure 4: SSB example with Matlab
% the SSB formula:
%
% s(t) = A_c[m(t)*cos(2*pi*f_c*t)+ m_hat(t)*sin(2*pi*f_c*t)]
%
% m(t) is a sinusoid message with adjustable frequncy
% m_hat(t) = hilbert transform
% s(t) is the final ampitude modulated signal
%
% EE 474 Communication Lab.
%
%
f_s = 400; % sampling frequency (kHz)
f_0 = 5; % m(t) frequency (kHz)
f_c = 25; % carrier frequency (kHz)
% Total number of samples =
% number of periods desired * number of samples per period.
num_periods = 40; samp_per_period = f_s/f_0; total_samp
=samp_per_period*num_periods;
% Create the discrete time variable ’n’ with length equal to
% the total number of samples, create a time variable ’t’,
% then create the signal m(t) based on the sampling frequency
% and desired signal frequency. m_hat is the hilmery transform
% of m(t)
n = [0:total_samp-1]; t = n/f_s; m = cos(2*pi*f_0*t);
m_hat=imag(hilbert(m));
4
Figure 4: SSB example with Matlab
% ssb_test.m
%
% M-file for SSB modulation experimentation using
% the SSB formula:
%
% s(t) = A_c[m(t)*cos(2*pi*f_c*t)+ m_hat(t)*sin(2*pi*f_c*t)]
%
% m(t) is a sinusoid message with adjustable frequncy
% m_hat(t) = hilbert transform
% s(t) is the final ampitude modulated signal
%
% EE 474 Communication Lab.
%
%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% Preparation %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%
f_0 = 5; % m(t) frequency (Hz)
f_c = 25; % carrier frequency (Hz)
fs = 400; % sampling frequency must be greater than f_0 and f_c (Hz)
dt = 1/fs; % sampling period
Tmx = 5; % End time
t = 0:dt:Tmx; % the t vector is created here in order to
% supply us with the time axis samples
L = length(t); % "L" is the number of elements in vector "t"
% = number of samples
df = fs/L; % sampling interval in frequency domain
Fmx = fs/2; % Frequency range
4
F = -Fmx+df/2 : df : Fmx-df/2;% the F vector is created here in order to
% supply us with the frequency axis samples
%
%%%%%%%%%% End of Preparation %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%
%%%%%%%%%%%%% MAIN PROGRAM %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%
% MODULATION
%
% TIME DOMAIN ANALYSIS %
%
m = cos(2*pi*f_0*t); % message signal
m_hat=imag(hilbert(m)); % m_hat is the hilbert transform of m(t)
% to understand usage write "help hilbert" on command window
% create the SSB signal s(t);
s = (m.*cos(2*pi*f_c*t))+(m_hat.*sin(2*pi*f_c*t)); % SSB Modulated signal
%
% FREQUENCY DOMAIN ANALYSIS %
%
M = fftshift(fft(m))/L; % "M" is the Fast Fourier Transform of message vector "m"
S = fftshift(fft(s))/L; % "S" is the desired, correct Fourier Transform of "s",
% the DSB AM vector.
% COHERENT DEMODULATION !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
% demodulated signal r(t) = LPF{s(t)*c(t)}
mr = s.*cos(2*pi*f_c*t); % mr(t)=s(t)*c(t)
%%% Filter Design
F_cut = 10; % choose cut-off Frequency as 10Hz
[B, A] = butter(10, F_cut/Fmx); % B and A, will be the parameters of 10th order
% Butterworth lowpass filter with
% cut-off frequency = F_cut
% Notice that the cut-off frequency is
% normalized with Fmx
% for more.. >> help butter
r = 2.*filter(B,A,mr); % filtered signal
%
%%%%%%%%%% End of Main Program %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%
%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% Plotting %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
figure(1) %
subplot(4,1,1) %
plot(t,m,t,m_hat,’r-.’) %
grid %
axis([0 1 -1.5 1.5]) %
xlabel(’time (ms)’) %
legend(’m(t)’,’m_{hat}(t)’) %
5
subplot(4,1,2) %
plot(F,abs(M)) %
axis([-30 30 0 0.6]) %
grid %
xlabel(’frequency (Hz)’) %
legend(’M(f)’) %
subplot(4,1,3) %
plot(F,abs(S)) %
axis([-30 30 0 0.6]) %
grid %
xlabel(’frequency (kHz)’) %
legend(’S(f)’) %
subplot(4,1,4) %
plot(t,r) %
axis([0 1 -2 2]) %
xlabel(’time (ms)’) %
legend(’r(t)’) %
grid %
Exercises:
1. Using the ”freqz” command plot the frequency response (Gain and Phase response) of the Butterworth
filter, used to demodulation. And decide the minimum cut-off frequency ”F cut”. (in Matlab use help
freqz command to find out how)
2. Perform demodulation via different filters using cheby1, cheby2, and ellip, commands. Plot the
frequency responses (Gain and Phase response) of the filters. Plot and compare(comment on) de-
modulated signals. Do not forget to indicate the extra parameters. (i.e. Ripple in pass-band)
3. Using Matlab, modulate (SSB) the message signal and carrier frequency given below, and plot them.
(Carefully determine the ”fs”, ”Tmx” and appropriate filter)
m(t) = rect(t −3), fc = 20
6
4 Experiment
4.1 SSB Modulation
You will use the TIMS system to develop a circuit to perform the modulation function in equation (3). You
will need to set up figure 5 to carry out the ssb modulation part of the laboratory.
1. Use the Audio Oscillator module to provide the message signal m(t) and record its frequency f
m
. In
this case it will simply be a sinusoid in the audio frequency range.
f
m
=
MASTER
SlGNALS
sin( t)
TTL
TTL
sin( t)
100kHz
CARRlER
8.3kHz
SAMPLE
CLOCK
2kHz
MESSAGE
cos( t)
MULTlPLlER
Y kXY
X
AC
DC
ADDER
G
g
B GA+gB
A
MULTlPLlER
Y kXY
X
AC
DC
Ext.
Trig
CH1-A
CH2-A
QUADRATURE
PHASE
SPLlTTER
OUT2 lN2
OUT1 lN1
AUDlO
OSClLLATOR
SYNC cos( t)
f
sin( t)
TTL
CH1-B
Figure 5: Setup to observe AM frequency spectrum
2. Patch up a model of the phasing SSB generator, following the arrangement illustrated in figure 5.
3. The QUADRATURE PHASE SPLITTER, (QPS) module is supposed to provide the π/2 rad phase shifted
(Hilbert Transform) message signal from ”OUT 2” and the original message signal from ”OUT 1”.
Measure the phase difference ∆θ of the signals at the QPS outputs, using the XY view mode of the
oscilloscope.

Figure 6: Measurement of phase difference
∆θ = arcsin(
A
B
)
7
∆θ =
4. Separate DSBSC signals should already exist at the output of each MULTIPLIER. These need to be
of equal amplitudes at the output of the ADDER. You will set this up, at first approximately and
independently, then jointly and with precision, to achieve the required output result. Adjust the gains
on the Adder so that both signals are given equal weighting (A
c
). Equalize and record the amplitudes
of separate DSB-SC signals at the output of adder.
A
c
=
5. Write down the Hilbert transform ˆ m(t) for the sinusoidal message signal we are using in this Lab.
ˆ m(t) =
6. Given the m(t) we are using in this Lab, write down the the equation for the single sideband modulated
signal s(t) resulting from this.
s(t) =
7. Observe the single sideband modulated signal s(t) on your oscilloscope and measure its frequency f
s
.
f
s
=
8. Decide the type of single sideband modulation, is it L-SSB or U-SSB why?.
. . . −SSB, because ...
9. The QPS is not a precision device, and a sideband suppression of better than 26dB is unlikely. After
the best balance has been achieved, using Figure 3 as a guide measure the sideband suppression.
sideband suppression =
4.2 SSB Demodulation via Coherent Detection
You will investigate ssb demodulation via coherent detection using an imperfect (or local) carrier. That is,
the receivers carrier is not perfectly matched to the transmitters carrier (as would be the case in practice).
Figure 6: Setup for coherent demodulation of SSB signal
2. Use figure 6 to demodulate the signal s(t) via coherent detection.
5 Questions
1. Which sideband has been kept in your circuit?
2. How can you modify your circuit (equation) to switch transmitted sidebands?
3. What is the bandwidth of an SSB signal?
4. Give the definition of Hilbert transform
5. MATLAB Question
Suppose that you received 1 second of your favorite song as a message modulated via Lower Sideband
SSB, with a carrier frequency f
c
equal to 100 − BkHz. (B is the number at the end of your student
id. i.e. if your student id is 9702EE150, then B = 150).
(a) Plot message signal and its spectrum,
(b) Plot the received signal and its spectrum,
(c) Demodulate the received signal plot its spectrum, and record the demodulated message as ssb demod.wav
Note: You can use wavwrite command to record a music file from Matlab environment. For more
reference, type ”help wavwrite” in command window.
7
Figure 7: Setup for coherent demodulation of SSB signal
8
In addition to the modules used for amplitude modulation, you will need the following setup in figure 7 to
carry out amplitude demodulation via coherent detection.
1. Write down the equations governing amplitude modulation via coherent detection with a perfect re-
ceiver carrier.
m
received
(t) =
2. Use figure 7 to demodulate the signal s(t) via coherent detection.
9
EE 474 Communication Systems Laboratory IS¸IK UNIVERSITY
Single Sideband Modulation with Coherent Demodulation Data
Sheet
Name: Date: ../../....
Number:
Section:
Equations:
ˆ m(t) =
s(t) =
m
received
(t) =
Values:
..............Unit
f
m
= ..............
∆θ = ..............
A
c
= ..............
f
s
= ..............
sideband suppression = ..............
. . . −SSB, because...
10

(The resulting modulation scheme is called double sideband suppressed carrier modulation. In most cases this is determined by the degree to which the unwanted sideband is suppressed. as already hinted. In commercial practice these instruments are very expensive. filtering method and phasing method. As always. Generation of the single sideband signal via phasing method can be achieved by realizing the following equation: s(t) = Ac m(t)cos(ωc t) + Ac m(t)sin(ωc t) ˆ (3) where m(t) is the Hilbert transform of m(t). 2. or quadrature phase splitter (QPS). The two out-of-phase sidebands will cancel if added. there are indirect methods of measurement. and twice Q. These are Weaver’s method. The message is shown as a single tone at frequency µrad/s. and their purchase cannot always be justified merely to measure an SSB generaor performance. yet high performance filters. ˆ The phasing method of SSB generation is based on the addition of two DSBSC signals (3). Figure 3 sideband suppression = 20 log( P +Q )dB P −Q (4) 2 . One such method depends upon a measurement of the SSB envelope. these filters are usually at ’standard’ frequencies (for example 455kHz or 10. This would be a wideband phase shifter. whilst the other two are of similar amplitude but opposite phase.2 Sideband Suppression A most important characteristic of any SSB generator is the amount of out-of-band energy it produces. A network providing a constant 90◦ phase shift over this frequency range is very difficult to design. respectively. An SSB signal may be derived from this signal by the use of a suitable bandpass filter commonly called as an SSB sideband filter. The principle of the SSB phasing generator is illustrated in Figure 2. or Hilbert transformer. You have already modelled a DSBSC signal. The carrier phase changer operates at a single frequency. We do this by firstly removing the carrier frequency impulse component. giving twice P. Unlike the filter ingmethod. A ratio of wanted-to-unwanted output power of at least 60dB is acceptable commercial performance. no matter what the carrier frequency is. But this can lie anywhere within the frequency range of speech. In this lab. their upper sidebands are identical in phase and amplitude. ωc rad/s. It is a simple matter to measure the sideband suppression from peak-to-peak and the trough-to-trough amplitudes. but instead an accurate phasing network. The phasing method for SSB generation does not require an expensive filter.Thus.) Secondly. However. Notice that there are two 90◦ phase changers. Mass production has given rise to low cost. this double sideband modulation is wasteful of resources in terms of both bandwidth and power. Among these methods the filtering method is probably the most common method of SSB generation. relative to the wanted output. To measure the ratio of wanted-to-unwanted sideband suppression directly requires a SPECTRUM ANALYSER. we remove one of the sidebands with the resulting modulation scheme being called single sideband suppressed carrier modulation. the QPS operates at baseband. alternatively the in-phase sidebands will cancel if subtracted. 2 2.1 Preparation Definition of Single Sideband (SSB) Modulation There are three well-known methods of SSB generation using analog techniques. we consider means to improve the efficiency of the amplitude modulation scheme by considering the points of inefficiency mentioned above. It is capable of acceptable performance in many applications.7M Hz) and SSB generation by the filter method at other frequencies can be expensive. so phased that.

respectively. Execute the m-file and print the resulting plot.5 −1 0 0. there are method be justified merely to measure an SSB generaorgenerate a SSB signal via phasingindirect methods of measurement. These )dB (4) sideband suppression = 20 log( P of were envelope detection and coherent demodulation.m in a text editor.) In the following exercise you will SSB modulate a signal and examine the result in both the time and frequency domains. it is not possible to demodulate single sideband suppressed carrier 2. It is a 1 0. In Matlab. It should resemble the plot shown in Figure 4 3 Exercise 1:Modify the code in am test. relative to the wanted output. run the file and view the resulting plot. and their purchase cannot always Figure 2: A block diagram to performance.3 Coherent Demodulation Figure 3 P +Q In Amplitude Modulation experiment we used two different demodulation methods for the AM signal. so Modulation With Matlab for audio be able to be low-pass filtering might not be absolutely necessary. A ratio of wanted-to-unwanted output power of at least 60dB is acceptable commercial performance.8 1 Figure 3: SSB signal with unwanted sideband component Figure 3: SSB signal with unwanted sideband component simple matter to measure the sideband suppression from peak-to-peak and the trough-to-trough amplitudes. It should In the following exercise you will resemble the plot shown in Figure 4 SSB modulate a signal and examine the result in both the time and frequency domains. To measure the ratio of wanted-to-unwanted sideband suppression directly requires a SPECTRUM ANALYSER. all you have to do is modify a few variables! Exercise 1: Edit ssb test. In Matlab.5 Q P 0 −0. In most cases this is determined by the degree to which the unwanted sideband is suppressed. As always. In commercial practice these instruments are very expensive. Recall that coherent demodulation (also called synchronous detection) consists of multiplying the modulated signal by a sinusoid In Amplitude Modulation experiment we used two different demodulation methods for the AM signal. modulated signals via Demodulation so we use only coherent demodulation.6 0. (Practical note: discarded and only a scaled Thus. of not possible to demodulate single sideband suppressed carrier for modulated signals via envelope detection. so audio signals the higher frequency components would most likely not be able to be heard coherent low-pass filtering(also called synchronous detection) consists of multiplying the modulated signal by a sinusoid demodulation might not be absolutely necessary.heard anyway. % ssb_test. so we use only coherent demodulation.) of the same frequency as the carrier and low-pass filtering so that the resulting higher frequency components discarded and only a scaled version of the original baseband message (Practical note: 3 areSSB signals the higher frequency components would most likely not signal remains. Only signals of the form of (1) are able to be demodlow-pass filtering so that the resulting higher frequency components were envelope detection and coherent areulated via envelope detection. run the file and view the resulting plot. The best part is that the Matlab file is already written for you. giving twice P.3 Coherent envelope detection.m in a text editor. One such method depends upon a measurement of the SSB envelope. Recall that anyway. and twice Q. Only signals− Qthe form of (1) are able to be demodulated via envelope detection. versionit isthe original baseband message signal remains. as already hinted.m to create a new signal with a bi-tone message signal. The best part is that the Matlab file is already written for you.m .2 0. Thus.2 Sideband Suppression A most important characteristic of any SSB generator is the amount of out-of-band energy it produces. 2. These of the same frequency as the carrier anddemodulation.4 0.2. all you have to do is modify a few variables! 3 SSB Modulation With Matlab Exercise 1: Edit ssb test.

2 0 −50 1 m(t) mhat(t) −40 −30 −20 −10 0 10 frequency (kHz) 20 30 40 50 −40 −30 −20 −10 0 10 frequency (kHz) 20 30 40 50 Figure 4: SSB example Figure 4: SSB example with Matlab the SSB formula: %% ssb_test. m_hat is the hilmery transform % of m(t) L = length(t).4 0.8 0. t = 0:dt:Tmx. = 5.6 S(f) 0.1 0. % sampling interval in frequency domain m_hat=imag(hilbert(m)).3 0. % m(t) frequency (Hz) num_periods = 40.9 M(f) 0.6 0. EE 474 Communication Lab.7 0.5 time (ms) 0.m % % s(t) = SSB modulation experimentation using %% M-file forA_c[m(t)*cos(2*pi*f_c*t)+ m_hat(t)*sin(2*pi*f_c*t)] % the SSB formula: % %% m(t) is a sinusoid message with adjustable frequncy %% m_hat(t) A_c[m(t)*cos(2*pi*f_c*t)+ m_hat(t)*sin(2*pi*f_c*t)] s(t) = = hilbert transform % s(t) is the final ampitude modulated signal % %% m(t) is a sinusoid message with adjustable frequncy EE 474 = hilbert transform %% m_hat(t)Communication Lab. % End time % the total number of samples. df = fs/L. % sampling frequency must be greater than f_0 and f_c (Hz) dt = 1/fs. % carrier frequency (Hz) =samp_per_period*num_periods.2 0. create a time variable ’t’. frequency (kHz) f_0 = 5. Fmx = fs/2.4 0. samp_per_period = f_s/f_0. % sampling period % Create the discrete time variable ’n’ with length equal to Tmx = 5.4 0. % s(t) is the final ampitude modulated signal % %% % sampling %f_s = 400. % m(t) frequency (kHz) % f_c = 25. fs = 400. total_samp f_c = 25.2 0 −50 0. % carrier frequency (kHz) % %%%%%%%%%%%%%%% Preparation %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% %% Total number of samples = % f_0number of periods desired * number of samples per period. % Frequency range 4 4 . t = n/f_s. % the t vector is created here in order to % then create the signal m(t) based on the sampling frequency % supply us with the time axis samples % and desired signal frequency. % "L" is the number of elements in vector "t" % = number of samples n = [0:total_samp-1]. m = cos(2*pi*f_0*t).2 1 0 −1 −2 0 0.

% the F vector is created here in order to % supply us with the frequency axis samples % %%%%%%%%%% End of Preparation %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% % %%%%%%%%%%%%% MAIN PROGRAM %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% % % MODULATION % % TIME DOMAIN ANALYSIS % % m = cos(2*pi*f_0*t).1.’m_{hat}(t)’) % 5 . % "S" is the desired.5]) % xlabel(’time (ms)’) % legend(’m(t)’. % SSB Modulated signal % % FREQUENCY DOMAIN ANALYSIS % % M = fftshift(fft(m))/L. >> help butter [B. % "M" is the Fast Fourier Transform of message vector "m" S = fftshift(fft(s))/L.*sin(2*pi*f_c*t)).’r-. % message signal m_hat=imag(hilbert(m)). % m_hat is the hilbert transform of m(t) % to understand usage write "help hilbert" on command window % create the SSB signal s(t).1) % plot(t.t.*cos(2*pi*f_c*t).F = -Fmx+df/2 : df : Fmx-df/2. will be the parameters of 10th order Butterworth lowpass filter with cut-off frequency = F_cut Notice that the cut-off frequency is normalized with Fmx for more. F_cut/Fmx). %%% Filter Design F_cut = 10.*filter(B. s = (m..A.5 1. correct Fourier Transform of "s".m.m_hat.*cos(2*pi*f_c*t))+(m_hat. % filtered signal % %%%%%%%%%% End of Main Program %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% % % %%%%%%%%%%%%%%% Plotting %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% figure(1) % subplot(4.’) % grid % axis([0 1 -1. A] = butter(10. % mr(t)=s(t)*c(t) % choose cut-off Frequency as 10Hz B and A. % COHERENT DEMODULATION !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! % demodulated signal r(t) = LPF{s(t)*c(t)} mr = s. % % % % % % r = 2.mr). % the DSB AM vector.

1. Using the ”freqz” command plot the frequency response (Gain and Phase response) of the Butterworth filter. modulate (SSB) the message signal and carrier frequency given below. Using Matlab.1. (Carefully determine the ”fs”.r) axis([0 1 -2 2]) xlabel(’time (ms)’) legend(’r(t)’) grid Exercises: % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % 1.1. Perform demodulation via different filters using cheby1.4) plot(t. used to demodulation. Plot and compare(comment on) demodulated signals. (in Matlab use help freqz command to find out how) 2. Do not forget to indicate the extra parameters.e. (i.6]) grid xlabel(’frequency (kHz)’) legend(’S(f)’) subplot(4. cheby2.6]) grid xlabel(’frequency (Hz)’) legend(’M(f)’) subplot(4.abs(S)) axis([-30 30 0 0.2) plot(F. f c = 20 6 . commands. and ellip. and plot them. And decide the minimum cut-off frequency ”F cut”.abs(M)) axis([-30 30 0 0.subplot(4. Ripple in pass-band) 3. Plot the frequency responses (Gain and Phase response) of the filters.3) plot(F. ”Tmx” and appropriate filter) m(t) = rect(t − 3).

Measure the phase difference ∆θ of the signals at the QPS outputs.4 4. In this case it will simply be a sinusoid in the audio frequency range.1 Experiment SSB Modulation You will use the TIMS system to develop a circuit to perform the modulation function in equation (3). fm = ! * ( )% $ # ! $ + ! $ ! $ $ " " #" ! . Figure 6: Measurement of phase difference ∆θ = 7 arcsin( A ) B . following the arrangement illustrated in figure 5. using the XY view mode of the oscilloscope. You will need to set up figure 5 to carry out the ssb modulation part of the laboratory. 3. Use the Audio Oscillator module to provide the message signal m(t) and record its frequency fm . $ % ! & ' %& ! *& # " #" * Figure 5: Setup to observe AM frequency spectrum 2. 1. Patch up a model of the phasing SSB generator. The QUADRATURE PHASE SPLITTER. (QPS) module is supposed to provide the π/2 rad phase shifted (Hilbert Transform) message signal from ”OUT 2” and the original message signal from ”OUT 1”.

. Write down the Hilbert transform m(t) for the sinusoidal message signal we are using in this Lab. .. the receivers carrier is not perfectly matched to the transmitters carrier (as would be the case in practice). Given the m(t) we are using in this Lab. After the best balance has been achieved. That is. then jointly and with precision.∆θ = 4. Use figure 6 to demodulate the signal s(t) via coherent detection. The QPS is not a precision device.2 SSB Demodulation via Coherent Detection You will investigate ssb demodulation via coherent detection using an imperfect (or local) carrier. Ac = 5. Figure 6: Setup for coherent demodulation of SSB signal Figure 7: Setup for coherent demodulation of SSB signal 2. 9. and a sideband suppression of better than 26dB is unlikely. s(t) = 7. using Figure 3 as a guide measure the sideband suppression. Separate DSBSC signals should already exist at the output of each MULTIPLIER. ˆ m(t) = ˆ 6. sideband suppression = 4. 8 5 Questions 1. write down the the equation for the single sideband modulated signal s(t) resulting from this. at first approximately and independently. is it L-SSB or U-SSB why?. Observe the single sideband modulated signal s(t) on your oscilloscope and measure its frequency fs . − SSB. to achieve the required output result. fs = 8. You will set this up. These need to be of equal amplitudes at the output of the ADDER.. . Adjust the gains on the Adder so that both signals are given equal weighting (Ac ). Equalize and record the amplitudes of separate DSB-SC signals at the output of adder. Which sideband has been kept in your circuit? . because . Decide the type of single sideband modulation.

9 . Use figure 7 to demodulate the signal s(t) via coherent detection.In addition to the modules used for amplitude modulation. Write down the equations governing amplitude modulation via coherent detection with a perfect receiver carrier. mreceived (t) = 2. you will need the following setup in figure 7 to carry out amplitude demodulation via coherent detection. 1.

... Equations: m(t) = ˆ s(t) = mreceived (t) = Values: . − SSB................. ./.......... fm ∆θ Ac fs sideband suppression = = = = = .../.... ............ 10 .. .. . ........EE 474 Communication Systems Laboratory ISIK UNIVERSITY ¸ Single Sideband Modulation with Coherent Demodulation Data Sheet Name: Number: Section: Date: .... ............U nit ....... because.............

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