EXHIBIT A

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cinzens for responSl rhty

and ethics in w-ashington

October 19,2010

By facsimile: 202-514-6117

Rena Y. Kim

Chief, FOIA/PA Section Criminal Division

U.S. Department of Justice

Suite 1127, Keeney Building 950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20530-0001

Re: Freedom of Information Act Request

Dear Ms. Kim:

Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington ("CREW") makes this request for records, regardless of format, medium, or physical characteristics, and including electronic records and information, audiotapes, videotapes and photographs, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act ("FOIA"), 5 U.S.C. §§ 552, et seq., and U.S. Department of Justice ("DOJ") regulations, 28 C.F.R. Part 16.

Specifically, CREW requests any witness statements, investigation reports, prosecution memoranda, and FBI 302 reports related to DOl's investigation of former House Majority Leader TOI11 Del.ay. This includes, but is not limited to, DOTs investigation of relationships between Mr. Del.ay and Christine DeLay, Dani DeLay, Jack Abramoff, Edwin Buckham, Tony Rudy, Michael Scanlon, Susan Hirshmann, the Alexander Strategy Group, the National Center for Public Policy Research, eLottery, Inc., the U.S. Family Network, Americans for a Republican Majority PAC ("ARMPAC"), Texans for a Republican Majority PAC ("TRtvlPAC"), and/or the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands.

Mr. DeLay was one of the subjects ofDOJ's extensive investigation into illegal lobbying activities by Mr. Abramoff and others. See R. Jeffrey Smith, Justice Department Drops Investigation of De La v Tics to Abramoff, Wash. Post, August 17,2010 (attached as Exhibit A). Among other things, DOJ investigated allegations Mr. Abramoff, Mr. Buckham, and Mr. Rudy laundered money from entities with interests before Congress through non-profit organizations to pay for Mr. and Mrs. Del.ays overseas travel. For example, Mr. Abramoff funneled payments provided by eLottery, Inc. and other gambling interests through the National Center for Public Policy Research to pay for 1v11'. and Mrs. DeLay's trip to Scotland, and used the same organization to launder money from a Russian oil company to pay for Nil'. and Mrs. DeLay's trip to Russia. See, e.g, Phil Shenon, Ex-DeLav Aide Pleads Guilty In Lobbv Case, N. Y. Times, April 1,2006 (attached as Exhibit B); R. Jeffrey Smith, The DeLav-Abramoff Monev Trail,

1400 Eye Street, N.W, Suite

Washington, D.C. 2COCJ~)

2C2.408.5~)6:) phone

202.588.5020 fax

Rena Y. Kim October 19,2010 Page 2

Wash. Post, December 31,2005 (attached as Exhibit C); R. Jeffrey Smith, DeLay Airfare Was Charged To Lobbyist's Credit Card, Wash. Post, April 24, 2005 (attached as Exhibit D); James V. Grimaldi & R. Jeffrey Smith, Gambling Interests Funded DeLay Trip, Wash. Post, March 12, 2005 (attached as Exhibit E).

DOJ also investigated allegations: (1) the Alexander Strategy Group, a lobbying firm run by Mr. Buckham and Mr. Rudy, employed Mrs. DeLay in an effort to influence Mr. Del.ay, see Susan Schmidt & James V. Grimaldi, Lawmakers Under Scrutiny in Probe of Lobbyist, Wash. Post, November 26, 2005 (attached as Exhibit F); Philip Shenon, Lobbying Cases Highlight Prime Targets' Family Ties, N Y Times, April 9, 2006 (attached as Exhibit G); (2) Mrs. DeLay and the DeLays' daughter Dani improperly were paid $350,000 in consulting fees and expenses paid by ARMPAC, Mr. DeLay's political action committee, see Michael Hedges, As Lobbving Scandal Drags On, DeLay Takes a Shot at FBI, Houston Chronicle, May 9, 2007 (attached as Exhibit H); (3) Mr. Abramoff and Mr. Buckham funneled $1 million from the Russian oil company through the U.S. Family Network in an effort to influence Mr. DeLay and others, see Smith, Wash. Post, December 31, 2005; Laylan Copelin, Subpoena List in DeLay Case Reads Like Who's Who of Political, Business Interests, Austin American-Statesman, October 16,2010 (attached as Exhibit I); and (4) Mr. DeLay and two associates conspired to illegally lauder corporate campaign contributions through TRMPAC, id.; and (5) Mr. Abramoff arranged for a trip to the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands to influence Mr. DeLay, see Michael Hedges, Lobbyist Pleads Guilty to Conspiracy, Houston Chronicle, November 22,2005 (attached as Exhibit J).

DOJ apparently concluded its investigation of Mr. DeLay recently without bringing charges against him. See Smith, Wash. Post, August 17,2010.

Please search for responsive records regardless of format, medium, or physical characteristics. Where possible, please produce records electronically, in PDF or TIF format on a CD-ROM. We seek records of any kind, including electronic records, audiotapes, videotapes, and photographs. Our request includes any letters, ernails, facsimiles, telephone messages, voice mail messages, and transcripts, notes, or minutes of any meetings, telephone conversations, or discussions. Our request also includes any attachments to these records.

If it is your position that any portion of the requested records is exempt fr0111 disclosure, CREW requests that you provide it with an index of those documents as required under Vaughn v. Rosen, 484 F.2d 820 (D.C. Cir. 1973), cert. denied, 415 U.S. 977 (1972). As you are aware, a Vaughn index must describe each document claimed as exempt with sufficient specificity "to permit a reasoned judgment as to whether the material is actually exempt under FOIA." Founding Church of SCientology v. Bell, 603 F.2d 945, 949 (D.C. Cir. 1979). Moreover, the Vaughn index must "describe each document or portion thereof withheld, and for each withholding it must discuss the consequences of supplying the sought-after information." King v.

Rena Y. Kim October 19,2010 Page 3

US. Dep 't of Justice, 830 F.2d 210,223-24 (D.C. Cir. 1987) (emphasis added). Further, "the withholding agency must supply' a relatively detailed justification, specifically identifying the reasons why a particular exemption is relevant and correlating those claims with the particular part of a withheld document to which they apply. '" ld. at 224 (citing Mead Data Central v. U.S Dep't of the Air Force, 566 F.2d 242, 251 (D.C. Cir. 1977»).

In the event that some portions of the requested records are properly exempt from disclosure, please disclose any reasonably segregable non-exempt portions of the requested records. See 5 U.S.c. § 552(b). Ifit is your position that a document contains non-exempt segments, but that those non-exempt segments are so dispersed throughout the document as to make segregation impossible, please state what portion of the document is non-exempt, and how the material is dispersed throughout the document. Mead Data Central, 566 F.2d at 261. Claims of nonsegregability must be made with the same degree of detail as required for claims of exemptions in a Vaughn index. If a request is denied in whole, please state specifically that it is not reasonable to segregate portions of the record for release.

Finally, CREW welcomes the opportunity to discuss with you whether and to what extent this request can be narrowed or modified to better enable DO] to process it within the FOIA's deadlines.

Fee Waiver Request

In accordance with 5 U.S.C. § 552(a)(4)(A)(iii) and 28 C.F.R. § 16.11(k), CREW requests a waiver of fees associated with processing this request for records. The subject of this request concerns the operations of the federal government and expenditures, and the disclosures will likely contribute to a better understanding of relevant government procedures by CREW and thc general public in a significant way. Moreover, the request is primarily and fundamentally for non-commercial purposes. 5 U.S.C. § 552(a)(4)(A)(iii). See, e.g., McClellan Ecological v. Carlucci, 835 F.2d 1282, 1285 (9th Cir. 1987).

These records are likely to contribute to greater public awareness of alleged malfeasance and possible criminal behavior by the former majority leader of the House of Representatives, and of DOJ's recently concluded investigation into Mr. DeLay's activities. Related DO] investigations resulted in criminal convictions of Mr. Abramoff, Mr. Rudy, Mr. Scanlon, former Rep. Bob Ney, and others. While DO] eventually decided not to prosecute Mr. DeLay, his activities still may have been illegal or violations of the rules of the House of Representatives, and the requested records would shed light on them. In addition, other criminal allegations against Mr. DeLay remain very active - a trial on state charges related to money laundering through TRMPAC is scheduled to begin on October 26,2010. See Copelin, Austin AmericanStatesman, October 16, 2010. The public unquestionably has a powerful interest in learning the extent to which a leading member of Congress engaged in illegal or improper behavior. Us. Dep 't of Justice v. Reporters Comm. for Freedom of the Press, 489 U.S. 749, 774 (1989)

Rena Y. Kim October 19,2010 Page 4

(suggesting a public interest in documents that would reveal a congressman's allegedly corrupt behavior).

These documents also would shed light on DOl's conduct in conducting the investigation of Mr. DeLay, and its apparent decision to close the investigation without bringing charges against Mr. DeLay.

CREW is a non-profit corporation, organized under section 501 (c )(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. CREW is committed to protecting the public's right to be aware of the activities of government officials and to ensuring the integrity of those officials. CREW uses a combination of research, litigation, and advocacy to advance its mission. The release of information garnered through this request is not in CREW's financial interest. CREW will analyze the information responsive to this request, and will share its analysis with the public, either through memoranda, reports, or press releases. In addition, CREW will disseminate any documents it acquires from this request to the public through its website, www.citizensforethics.org, which also includes links to thousands of pages of documents CREW acquired through its multiple FOrA requests as well as documents related to CREW's litigation and agency complaints, and through www.scribd.com.

News Media Fee Waiver Request

CREW also asks that it not be charged search or review fees for this request because CREW qualifies as a "representative of the news media" pursuant to the FOrA and SEC regulation 17 C.F.R. § 200.80(e)(1 0). In Nat'! Sec. Archive v. Us. Dep 't of Defense, 880 F.2d 1381,1386 (D.C. Cir. 1989), the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit found the National Security Archive was a representative of the news media under the FOrA, relying on the FOIA's legislative history, which indicates the phrase "representative of the news media" is to be interpreted broadly; "it is critical that the phrase 'representative of the news media' be broadly interpreted if the act is to work as expected .... In fact, any person or organization which regularly publishes or disseminates information to the public ... should qualify for waivers as a 'representative of the news media.": 132 Congo Rec. S14298 (daily ed. Sept. 30, 1986) (emphasis added), cited in id.

CREW routinely and systematically disseminates information to the public in several ways. First, CREW maintains a frequently visited website, v/\\l\v.citizensforethics.oH,J:, that received 108,643 visits in September 2010. In addition, CREW posts all of the documents it receives under the FOrA on www.scribd.col11. and that site has received 419,786visits to CREW's documents since April 14,2010.

Second, since May 2007 CREW has published an online newsletter, CREWCuts, that currently has 17,322 subscribers. CREWCuts provides subscribers with regular updates regarding CREW's activities and information the organization has received from government

Rena Y. Kim October 19,2010 Page 5

entities. A complete archive of past CREWCuts is available at http://wvvvv. ci tizensforethics. org/newsletter.

Third, CREW publishes a blog, Citizens bloggingfor responsibility and ethics in Washington, that reports on and analyzes newsworthy developments regarding government ethics and corruption. The blog, located at http://'vvwvv.citiznesforethics.org/blog, also provides links that direct readers to other news articles and commentary on these issues. CREW's blog had 1,772 hits in September.

Finally, CREW has published numerous reports to educate the public about government ethics and corruption, including agencies' failure to comply with their record keeping responsibilities. See Record Chaos, which examines agency compliance with electronic record keeping responsibilities; The Revolving Door, a comprehensive look into the post-government activities of24 former members of President Bush's cabinet; and Those Who Dared: 30 Officials Who Stood Up For Our Country. These and all other CREW's reports are available at http://Vvww.citizensforethics.org/reports.

Based on these extensive publication activities, CREW qualifies for a fee waiver as a "representative of the news media" under the FOIA and agency regulations.

Request for Expedition

Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. § 552(a)(6)(E)(I) and 28 C.F.R. § 16.5(d)(1)(iv), CREW requests that your office expedite the processing of this request. As required by DO] regulations, 28 C.F.R. § 16.5(d)(2), CREW is submitting its request for expedition to the director of Public Affairs. A copy of CREW's request is enclosed.

CREW also requests that DO] expedite its request pursuant to 28 C.F.R. § 16.5(d)(l)(ii).

As explained above, CREW is engaged primarily in the dissemination of information that it gathers from a variety of sources, including the FOIA, and seeks the information requested in the FOl A request for the express purpose of disseminating it to the public. In addition to the websites on which CREW posts all documents it acquires through the FOIA, CREW's website contains numerous examples of its efforts, including reports it has published based on information it receives through the FOIA. For example, CREW's report, Record Chaos: The Deplorable State of Electronic Record Keeping in the Federal Government, was based on significant part on documents CREW requested under the FOIA from a variety of agencies, including DOl

There is a particular urgency to inform the public about these investigations because, as noted above, Mr. DeLay's criminal trial on state conspiracy charges is scheduled to begin in one week. See Copelin, Austin American-Statesman, October 16, 2010. Witnesses subpoenaed by the prosecution for the trial include Mr. Buckham and Mr. Scanlon, who may be questioned

Rena v. Kim October 19, 2010 Page 6

about '''the inner workings of Tom DeLay's political organization' as well as the defendant's lobby-paid trips to Russia, Scotland and the Northern Marianas Islands" that were the subject of DOJ's investigation, Id. In light of the importance of this information for Mr. DeLay's criminal trial, immediate action is required,

Pursuant to 28 C.F,R, § 16,5(d)(3), I hereby certify that the basis for CREW's request for expedition, as outlined above, is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief.

Conclusion

If you have any questions about this request or foresee any problems in releasing fully the requested records please contact me at (202) 408-5565, Also, if CREW's request for a fee waiver is not granted in full, please contact our office immediately upon making such a determination, Please send the requested records to Adam 1. Rappaport, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, 1400 Eye Street, N,W" Suite 450, Washington, D,C, 20005,

Sincerely,

Adam J, Senior Counsel

Enclosures

EXHIBIT A

Justice Department drops investigation of Delay ties to Abramoff

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/contentlarticle/20 1 0/08/16/,

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Justice Department drops investigation of DeLay ties to Abramoff

By R. Jeffrey Smith Washington Post Staff Writer Tuesday, August 17,20]0; AO]

Former House majority leader Tom DeLay (R-Tex.) was both defiant and ebullient on Monday after hearing that the Justice Department had dropped its six-year investigation of his interactions with lobbyist Jack Abramoff and a host of other political contributors for whom he allegedly did political favors.

"I always knew this day would come," DeLay said on the telephone from his home in Sugar Land, Tex. He said he has no regrets about his conduct in Washington, insisted that his actions were always legal, and assailed what he called the "criminalization of politics" by a federal ethics enforcement process he considers deeply flawed.

His celebratory remarks came a week before he is slated to return to a Texas courtroom for a pretrial hearing on allegations of felony conspiracy and money laundering, which still could put the 63-year-old politician behind bars. His 2005 indictment in that Texas case is what short-circuited his three-year tenure in one of Washington's most powerful jobs.

The Justice Department declined to comment about DeLay's claim of exoneration, following its policy of not discussing the status or termination of its criminal investigations. A source familiar with the long-running inquiry, in which many witnesses were brought before one or more grand juries, confirmed that it had ended.

Speaking on the condition of anonymity, he said the main reason for dropping the effort was that prosecutors were unable to compel incriminating testimony by a former DeLay aide, Edwin A. Buckham, and find other witnesses or evidence that could have led to a conviction.

Buckham has similarly been cleared by the Justice Department, a source close to DeLay said. Buckham's attorney, David Geneson, declined to comment.

In recent years, DeLay has worked on rehabilitating his public image as well as his career, appearing in a television dancing competition, working as a paid consultant to corporations and advising -- by his own description -- the factions that make up the "tea party" movement.

Asked whether he plans to attempt a return to Congress, DeLay acknowledged that his political effectiveness has been hampered by years of scrutiny. People don't necessarily "want to associate with you" after being under such a heavy legal cloud for so long, he said, explaining why he has declined to endorse candidates.

The Justice Department investigation focused in part on payments made by Buckham, a former adviser

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Justice Department drops investigation of DeLay ties to Abramoff

http://www.washingtonpost.comlwp-dynlcontentlarti cle/20 1 0/08/16/.

who was a registered lobbyist in 2000, to cover some of DeLay's expenses on an overseas golf trip. Doing so violated House rules, but DeLay said he was unaware of the payments. Buckham's now-shuttered firm employed DeLay's wife, Christine, from 1998 to 2002 and set up a retirement account for her. A political action committee that Buckham controlled employed both DeLay's wife and his daughter.

111e payments amounted to nearly half a million dollars, drawn partly from revenue from corporations and their officers that had interests in legislation pending before the House.

DeLay and Buckham were at one point two of the principal targets in the department's multifaceted probe of Abramoffs lobbying practice that led to the convictions of 19 people, including two DeLay aides. DeLay has maintained he was unaware of their wrongdoing. He said Monday that the department "couldn't find anything" otherwise in the documents, e-mails and computer hard drives that his office had turned over to investigators without protest.

The source familiar with the investigation said that some of those working on the probe had disagreed about the importance of holding out for Buckham's testimony when Abramoff himself was potentially available as a cooperating witness. Abramoff recently worked in a kosher pizza parlor in Baltimore while wrapping up a four-year sentence for conspiracy, mail fraud and tax evasion.

DeLay referred to Abramoff, who admitted to corrupting public officials and defrauding his clients, as "a friend of mine." He said Abramoffs lavish pay from Native American tribes for lobbying had resulted from inattention by the leaders of those tribes.

Known for a hard-edged, take-no-prisoners political style reflected in his nickname, "The Hammer," DeLay decried what he called "new politics" in which opponents try to "drown you," ruin your finances and then "dance on your grave."

When asked whether he thought the recent House ethics charges against Democratic Reps. Maxine Waters (Calif.) and Charles B. Rangel (N.Y.) also resulted an effort to punish successful fundraising and strong political views, DeLay said their cases are different from his.

DeLay's principal attorney, Richard Cullen of Richmond, said the Justice Department's decision also covered Christine DeLay. "We had conversations off and on during '05, '06, '07 that were across the board," Cullen said of his contacts with the Justice Department. "Prosecutors follow leads and a lot of those leads were in the paper."

DeLay and Cullen said that he was never interviewed during the probe.

Staff writer James V Grimaldi contributed to this report.

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EXHIBIT B

Ex-DeLay Aide Pleads Guilty In Lobby Case - The New York Times

http://query.nytimes.com/gstJfullpage.hbnJ ?rcs~9903 E4 D71230F932A

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April 1, 2006

Ex-DeLay Aide Pleads Guilty In Lobby Case

By PHILIP SHENON

A former top aide to Representative Tom DeLay pleaded guilty on Friday to charges that he accepted thousands of dollars in illegal gifts, including money funneled through a consulting firm he set up with his wife and travel by private jet to California, in return for influencing legislation on behalf of the lobbyist Jack Abramoff.

The plea agreement by the aide, Tony Rudy, a lobbyist who was Mr. DeLay's deputy chief of staff from 1998 to 2000 and one of his closest advisers, makes Mr. Rudy the second former DeLay aide to admit wrongdoing in the corruption investigation centered on Mr. Abramoff.

Mr. Abramoff pleaded guilty in the investigation in January, aclmowledging that he had conspired with Mr. Rudy and others to corrupt public officials, including members of Congress. Another of Mr. Abramoffs former lobbying partners, Michael Scanlon, who had been Mr. DeLay's press secretary in the House, pleaded guilty last year to similar criminal charges in a scandal that has put pressure on Congressional leaders to tighten federal ethics rules.

Mr. Rudy, Mr. Scanlon and Mr. Abramoff are all cooperating with the Justice Department, which is investigating whether Mr. DeLay and other members of Congress, including Representative Bob N ey, Republican of Ohio, accepted travel, gifts or money from Mr. Abramoff and his associates in return for legislative favors.

Mr. Rudy's plea agreement, which covers actions he took on Mr. Abramoffs behalf both while on Mr. DeLay's staff and after leaving the House to work as a lobbyist, did not allege any wrongdoing by Mr. DeLay, the former Republican majority leader, or say that Mr. DeLay knew of any criminal activities by Mr. Rudy. Mr. DeLay is under indictment in Texas on unrelated charges involving violations of state election laws.

But the plea agreement suggested more trouble for Mr. Ney. It said that Mr. Rudy, who joined Mr. Abramoffs lobbying firm after leaving Mr. DeLay's staff in late 2000, said he, too, was involved in "providing things of value to and soliciting and obtaining the agreement" of a lawmaker -- identified only as "Representative NO.1" -- to assist Mr. Abramoff and his clients. Federal law-enforcement officials, speaking on condition of anonymity because federal grand jury rules bar them from commenting publicly, said "Representative NO.1" was Mr. Ney.

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Ex-DeLay Aide Pleads Guilty In Lobby Case - The New York Times

http://query.nytimes .coml gst/fllllpage.html?res=9903 E4 D71230F9 32A.

Mr. Rudy's plea agreement suggested that tens of thousands of dollars in illegal gifts were funneled to Mr. Rudy through a consulting firm that he and his wife, Lisa Rudy, established in August 1999, when Mr. Rudy was working on Mr. DeLay's House staff. According to the Justice Department's calculations, the firm, Liberty Consulting, took in about $86,000, much of it from a nonprofit group underwritten by Mr. Abramoffs lobbying clients.

Under the plea bargain, the Justice Department agreed not to prosecute Ms. Rudy in exchange for her cooperation. Prosecutors said at the hearing that they would ask that Mr. Rudy, who remains free, not be incarcerated until his cooperation was no longer needed in the investigation.

He faces a maximum penalty of five years in prison, a $250,000 fine and restitution of up to $100,000. But under federal sentencing guidelines, Judge Ellen Huvelle of the Federal District Court in Washington said he was more likely to receive a prison sentence between two and two-and-a-half years.

In return for the gifts, court documents show, Mr. Rudy helped block a bill in the summer of 2000 to restrict Internet gambling -- Mr. Abramoff represented an Internet-gambling company -- and had Mr. DeLay sign a letter in April 2000 opposing a postal-rate increase. Mr. Abramoffs clients in the magazine-publishing industry opposed the increase.

In the plea agreement, Mr. Rudy acknowledged that he had received a long list of gifts from

Mr. Abramoff while serving on Mr. DeLay's staff, including a trip by private jet to the U.S. Open golf tournament in Pebble Beach, Calif., in 2000; use of a box suite for a bachelor party at an August 2000 Washington Redskins game; tickets to the Daytona 500 in Florida; a trip with his wife to Hilton Head, S.C.; meals at "expensive restaurants" in Washington; and golf clubs "costing several hundred dollars."

Mr. DeLay has acknowledged that he took a series of lavish overseas trips that were arranged by Mr. Abramoff; Mr. DeLay's wife received more than $100,000 in consulting fees between 1998 and 2002 from Alexander Strategy Group, the lobbying firm where Mr. Rudy worked most recently.

But the plea agreement signed by Mr. Rudy and made public on Friday does not allege that Mr. DeLay had any knowledge of his former aide's corruption or that he himself had ever accepted any gifts in exchange for specific acts in Congress.

"I have no indication that prosecutors are circling in on Mr. DeLay," said Richard Cullen, Mr. DeLay's criminal defense lawyer. Mr. Cullen said he was advised several months ago by the Justice Department that Mr. DeLay was not considered a target of the investigation. The lawyer said he had no reason to believe Mr. DeLay's status had changed.

"Mr. DeLay was unaware of any of the acts to which Mr. Rudy has pleaded guilty," Mr. Cullen said. "To say that he's bitterly disappointed is an understatement."

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10/]9/201010:44 Af\

Ex-DeLay Aide Pleads Guilty In Lobby Case - The New York Times

http://query.nytimes.com/gstJfullpage.htmi ?res=9903 E4 07123 OF93 2A.

In the summer of 2000, Mr. Rudy said in his plea agreement, he assisted Mr. Abramoff in devising a strategy that killed an otherwise popular bill backed by most House Republicans to restrict gambling on the Internet; at the time, Mr. Abramoff represented an Internet-gambling company, eLottery, that faced collapse if the bill passed.

Despite his longstanding opposition to gambling, Mr. DeLay was instrumental, with Mr. Rudy's prompting, in blocking action on the bill. In May 2000, eLottery made a $25,000 contribution to a private educational group that underwrote a trip that month by Mr. DeLay and his wife to Britain; Mr. DeLay has said he had no knowledge of the company's contribution. M1'. Abramoff has told prosecutors that he steered $50,000 in consulting fees to Ms. Rudy as a result of her husband's help.

Mr. Rudy also acknowledged that, at M1'. Abramoffs behest, he obtained Mr. DeLay's signature on a letter in early 2000 criticizing plans by the Postal Service to raise its rates; the increase was strongly opposed by the Magazine Publishers Association, one of M1'. Abramoffs lobbying clients. Mr. DeLay was among many lawmakers, including Democrats, who opposed the rate increase, and while the rates were increased the next year, they went up less than originally planned.

M1'. Rudy's deal with the prosecutors appeared to buttress information provided earlier to prosecutors about Mr. Ney by Mr. Abramoff and Mr. Scanlon. In their earlier plea agreements, Mr. Abramoff and Mr. Scanlon had singled out Mr. Ney as the recipient of many of their gifts, including a 2002 golf excursion to the fabled St. Andrews course in Scotland.

Mr. Rudy said in his agreement that Mr. Ney, identified as Representative NO.1, agreed in March 2001 to support legislation that would have allowed Mr. Abramoffs clients in the Northern Mariana Islands, a small American territory in the western Pacific, to continue to make clothing that could be labeled "Made in the U.S.A." even though the islands' migrant Asian garment workers were not protected by federal labor laws and the minimum wage. Human rights groups and labor unions have long described the garment factories as sweat shops.

Mr. Rudy's plea agreement refers to the 2002 Scottish golfing trip, with Mr. Rudy acknowledging that he solicited $25,000 from one of M1'. Abramoffs Indian tribe clients to help pay for the trip, claiming to thetribe that the money would be used by a charity group. Court documents show that Mr. Rudy invited Mr. Ney on the trip, promising golf and "drinking and smoking Cubans."

Mr. Ney's office did not dispute that he was Representative No. 1. His spokesman, Brian J. Walsh, said in a statement that Mr. Rudy's plea agreement made "clear yet again that Jack Abramoff and his subordinates engaged in a collaborative and deliberate strategy to defraud, manipulate and lie in order to advance their own personal greed." Mr. Walsh said Mr. Ney, who is facing a difficult race for re-election in November, remained confident "that he did absolutely nothing wrong."

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Ex-Del.ay Aide Pleads Guilty In Lobby Case - The New York Times

http://query. nytimes.com/gsUfullpage.html?res=9903 E4 D71230F932A.

Mr. Rudy, 39, entered his guilty plea in Federal District Court in Washington, saying nothing beyond "yes" and "no" in response to a series of questions posed by Judge Huvelle about the terms of his agreement with the Justice Department. Asked later how he pleaded to the single conspiracy count in the plea agreement, Mr. Rudy replied, "Guilty, your honor."

Photo: Tony Rudy, a lobbyist and former Congressional aide, pleaded guilty to corruption charges yesterday at Federal District Court in Washington. Mr. Rudy's case is tied with that of the lobbyist Jack Abramoff. (Photo by Lawrence Jackson/Associated Press)(pg. A12)

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EXHIBIT C

The DeLay-AbramoffMoney Trail

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The DeLay-Abramoff Money Trail Nonprofit Group Linked to Lawmaker Was Funded Mostly by Clients of Lobbyist

By R. Jeffrey Smith Washington Post Staff Writer Saturday, December 31, 2005

111e U.S. Family Network, a public advocacy group that operated in the 1990s with close ties to Rep. Tom DeLay and claimed to be a nationwide grass-roots organization, was funded almost entirely by corporations linked to embattled lobbyist Jack Abramoff, according to tax records and former associates of the group.

http://www,washingtonpost.convwp-dynicontent!artici e/2005/ 12/30/.

During its five-year existence, the US. Family Network raised $2.5 million but kept its donor list secret, The list, obtained by 111e Washington Post, shows that $1 million of its revenue came in a single 1998 check from a now-defunct London law firm whose former partners would not identify the money's origins.

Two former associates of Edwin A. B uckham, the congressman's former chief of staff and the organizer of the US. Family Network, said Buckham told them the funds came from Russian oil and gas executives. Abramoff had been working closely with two such Russian energy executives on their Washington agenda, and the lobbyist and Buckham had helped organize a 1997 Moscow visit by DeLay (R-Tex.).

The former president of the US. Family Network said Buckham told him that Russians contributed $1 million to the group in 1998 specifically to influence DeLay's vote on legislation the International Monetary Fund needed to fmance a bailout of the collapsing Russian economy.

A spokesman for DeLay, who is fighting in a Texas state court unrelated charges of illegal fund raising, denied that the contributions influenced the former House majority leader's political activities. The Russian energy executives who worked with Abramoff denied yesterday knowing anything about the million-dollar London transaction described in tax documents,

Whatever the real motive for the contribution of $1 million -- a sum not prohibited by law but extraordinary for a small, nonprofit group -- the steady stream of corporate payments detailed on the donor list makes it clear that Abrarnoff's long-standing alliance with DeLay was sealed by a much more extensive web of financial ties than previously known.

Records and interviews also illuminate the mixture of influence and illusion that surrounded the US. Family Network. Despite the group's avowed purpose, records show it did little to promote conservative ideas through grass-roots advocacy. The money it raised came from businesses with no demonstrated interest in the conservative "moral fitness" agenda that was the group's professed aim.

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In addition to the million-dollar payment involving the London law firm, for example, half a million dollars was donated to the U.S. Family Network by the owners of textile companies in the Mariana Islands in the Pacific, according to the tax records. 111e textile owners -- with Abramoffs help -- solicited and received DeLay's public commitment to block legislation that would boost their labor costs, according to Abramoff associates, one of the owners and a DeLay speech in 1997.

A quarter of a million dollars was donated over two years by the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Abramoff's largest lobbying client, which counted DeLay as an ally in fighting legislation allowing the taxation of its gambling revenue.

The records, other documents and interviews call into question the very purpose of the U.S. Family Network, which functioned mostly by collecting funds from domestic and foreign businesses whose interests coincided with DeLay's activities while he was serving as House majority whip from 1995 to 2002, and as majority leader from 2002 until the end of September.

After the group was formed in 1996, its director told the Internal Revenue Service that its goal was to advocate policies favorable for "economic growth and prosperity, social improvement, moral fitness, and the general well-being of the United States." DeLay, in a 1999 fundraising letter, called the group "a powerful nationwide organization dedicated to restoring our government to citizen control" by mobilizing grass-roots citizen support.

But the records show that the tiny U.S. Family Network, which never had more than one full-time staff member, spent comparatively little money on public advocacy or education projects. Although established as a nonprofit organization, it paid hundreds of thousands of dollars in fees to Buckham and his lobbying firm, Alexander Strategy Group.

There is no evidence DeLay received a direct financial benefit, but Buckham's firm employed DeLay's wife, Christine, and paid her a salary of at least $3,200 each month for three of the years the group existed. Richard Cullen, DeLay's attorney, has said that the pay was compensation for lists Christine DeLay supplied to Buckham of lawmakers' favorite charities, and that it was appropriate under House rules and election law.

Some of the U.S. Family Network's revenue was used to pay for radio ads attacking vulnerable Democratic lawmakers in 1999; other funds were used to finance the cash purchase of a townhouse three blocks from DeLay's congressional office. Del.ay's associates at the time called it "the Safe House."

DeLay made his own fundraising telephone pitches from the townhouse's second-floor master suite every few weeks, according to two former associates. Other rooms in the townhouse were used by Alexander Strategy Group, Buckham's newly formed lobbying firm, and Americans for a Republican Majority (ARMP AC), DeLay's leadership committee.

They paid modest rent to the U.S. Family Network, which occupied a single small room in the back.

'Red Flags' on Tax Returns

Nine months before the June 25, 1998, payment of $1 million by the London law firm James & Sarch Co., as recorded in the tax forms, Buckham and DeLay were the dinner guests in Moscow of Marina Nevskaya and Alexander Koulakovsky of the oil firm Naftasib, which in promotional literature counted as its principal clients the Ministry of Defense and the Ministry of Interior.

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B uckham, a graduate of the University of Tennessee, had worked for DeLay since 1995, after serving in other congressional offices and then as executive director of the Republican Study Committee, a group of fiscally conservative House members.

Their other dining companions were Abramoff and Washington lawyer Julius "Jay" Kaplan, whose lobbying firms collected $440,000 in 1997 and 1998 from an obscure Bahamian firm that helped organize and indirectly pay for the DeLay trip, in conjunction with the Russians. In disclosure forms, the stated purpose of the lobbying was to promote the policies of the Russian government.

Kaplan and British lawyer David Sarch had worked together previously. (Sarch died a month before the $1 million was paid.) Buckham's trip with DeLay was his second to Moscow that year for meetings with Nevskaya and Koulakovsky; on the earlier one, the DeLay aide attracted media attention by returning through Paris aboard the Concorde, a $5,500 flight.

Former Abramoff associates and documents in the hands of federal prosecutors state that Nevskaya and Koulakovsky sought Abramoffs help at the time in securing various favors from the U.S. government, including congressional earmarks or federal grants for their modular-home construction firm near Moscow and the construction of a fossil-fuel plant in Israel. None appears to have been obtained by their firm.

Former DeLay employees say Koulakovsky and Nevskaya met with him on multiple occasions. The Russians also frequently used Abramoffs skyboxes at local sports stadiums -- as did Kaplan, according to sources and a 2001 e-mail Abramoff wrote to another client.

Three sources familiar with Abramoffs activities on their behalf say that the two Russians -- who knew the head of the Russian energy giant Gazprom and had invested heavily in that firm -- partly wanted just to be seen with a prominent American politician as a way of bolstering their credibility with the Russian government and their safety on Moscow's streets. The Russian oil and gas business at the time had a Wild West character, and its executives worried about extortion and kidnapping threats. The anxieties of Nevskaya and Koulakovsky were not hidden; like many other business people, they traveled in Moscow with guards armed with machine guns.

During the DeLays' visit on Aug. 5 to 11, 1997, the congressman met with Nevskaya and was escorted around Moscow by Koulakovsky, Naftasib's general manager. DeLay told the House clerk that the trip's sponsor was the National Center for Public Policy Research, but multiple sources told The Post that his expenses were indirectly reimbursed by the Russian-connected Bahamian company.

DeLay spokesman Kevin Madden said the principal reason for his Moscow trip was "to meet with religious leaders there." Nevskaya, in a letter this spring, said Naftasib's involvement in such trips was meant "to foster better understanding between our country and the United States" and denied that the firm was seeking protection through its U.S. contacts.

Nevskaya added in an e-mail yesterday that Naftasib and its officials were not representing the ministries of defense and interior or any other government agencies "in connection with meetings or other lobbying activities in Washington D.C. or Moscow."

A former Abramoff associate said the two executives "wanted to contribute to DeLay" and clearly had the resources to do it. At one point, Koulakovsky asked during a dinner in Moscow "what would happen if the DeLays woke up one morning" and found a luxury car in their front driveway, the former associate said. They were told the DeLays "would go to jail and you would go to jail."

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The tax form states that the $1 million came by check on June 25, 1998, from "Nations Corp, James & Sarch co." The Washington Post checked with the listed executives of Texas and Florida firms that have names similar to Nations Corp, and they said they had no connection to any such payment.

James & Sarch Co. was dissolved in May 2000, but two former partners said they recalled hearing the names of the Russians at their office. Asked if the firm represented them, former partner Philip McGuirk at first said "it may ring a bell," but later he faxed a statement that he could say no more because confidentiality practices prevent him "from disclosing any information regarding the affairs of a client (or former client)."

Nevskaya said in the e-mail yesterday, however, that "neither Naftasib nor the principals you mentioned have ever been represented by a London law firm that you name as James & Sarch Co." She also said that Naftasib and its principals did not pay $1 million to the firm, and denied knowing about the transaction.

Two former Buckham associates said that he told them years ago not only that the $1 million donation was solicited from Russian oil and gas executives, but also that the initial plan was for the donation to be made via a delivery of cash to be picked up at a Washington area airport.

One of the former associates, a Frederick, Md., pastor named Christopher Geeslin who served as the

U.S. Family Network's director or president from 1998 to 2001, said Buckham further told him in 1999 that the payment was meant to influence DeLay's vote in 1998 on legislation that helped make it possible for the IMF to bailout the faltering Russian economy and the wealthy investors there.

"Ed told me, 'This is the way things work in Washington,' " Geeslin said. "He said the Russians wanted to give the money first in cash." Buckharn, he said, orchestrated all the group's fundraising and spending and rarely informed the board about the details. Buckham and his attorney, Laura Miller, did not reply to repeated requests for C0ITll11ent on this article.

The IMF funding legislation was a contentious issue in 1998. TI1e Russian stock market fell steeply in April and May, and the government in Moscow announced on June 18 -- just a week before the $1 million check was sent by the London law firm -- that it needed $10 billion to $15 billion in new international loans.

House Republican leaders had expressed opposition through that spring to giving the IMF the money it could use for new bailouts, decrying what they described as previous destabilizing loans to other countries. TI1e IMF and its Western funders, meanwhile, were pressing Moscow, as a condition of any loan, to increase taxes on major domestic oil companies such as Gazprom, which had earlier defaulted on billions of dollars in tax payments.

On Aug. 18, 1998, the Russian government devalued the ruble and defaulted on its treasury bills. But DeLay, appearing on "Fox News Sunday" on Aug. 30 of that year, criticized the IMF financing bill, calling the replenishment of its funds "unfortunate" because the IMF was wrongly insisting on a Russian tax increase. "TI1ey are trying to force Russia to raise taxes at a time when they ought to be cutting taxes in order to get a loan from the IMF. That's just outrageous," DeLay said.

In the end, the Russian legislature refused to raise taxes, the IMF agreed to lend the money anyway, and DeLay voted on Sept. 17, 1998, for a foreign aid bill containing new funds to replenish the IMF account. DeLay's spokesman said the lawmaker "makes decisions and sets legislative priorities based on good policy and what is best for his constituents and the country." He added: "Mr. DeLay has very firm beliefs, and he fights very hard for them."

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Kaplan did not respond to repeated messages, and through a spokesman for lawyer Abbe Lowell, Abramoff declined to comment.

No legal bar exists to a $1 million donation by a foreign entity to a group such as the US. Family Network, according to Marcus Owens, a Washington lawyer who directed the IRS's office of tax-exempt organizations from 1990 to 2000 and who reviewed, at The Post's request, the tax returns filed by the US. Family Network.

But "a million dollars is a staggering amount of money to come from a foreign source" because such a donor would not be entitled to claim the tax deduction allowed for U.S. citizens, Owens said. "Giving large donations to an organization whose purposes are as ambiguous as these ... is extraordinary. I haven't seen that before. It suggests something else is going on.

"There are any number of red flags on these returns."

Hailing Indian Tribe's Hiring of Lobbyists

Buckham and Tony Rudy were the first DeLay staff members to visit the Choctaw Reservation near Meridian, Miss., where the tribe built a 500-room hotel and a 90,000-square-foot gambling casino. Their trip from March 25 to 27,1997, cost the Choctaws $3,000, according to statements filed with the House clerk.

DeLay, his wife and Susan Hirschman -- Buckham's successor in 1998 as chief of staff -- were the next to go. Their trip from July 31 to Aug. 2, 1998, was described on House disclosure forms as a "site review and reservation tour for charitable event," and the forms said it cost the Choctaws $6,935.

Buckham, who was then a lobbyist, arranged DeLay's trip, which included a visit to the tribe's golf course to assess it as a possible location for the lawmaker's annual charity tournament, according to a tribal source. Abramoff told the tribe he could not accompany DeLay because of a prior commitment, the source said.

One day after the DeLays departed for Washington, the U.S. Family Network registered an initial $150,000 payment made by the Choctaws, according to its tax return. The tribe made additional payments to the group totaling $100,000 on "various" dates the following year, the returns state. The Choctaws separately paid Abramoff $4.5 million for his lobbying work on their behalf in 1998 and 1999. Abramoff and his wife contributed $22,000 to DeLay's political campaigns from 1997 to 2000, according to public records.

A former Abramoff associate who is aware of the payments, and who spoke on the condition of anonymity to protect his clients, said the tribe made contributions to entities associated with DeLay because DeLay was crucial to the tribe's continuing fight against legislation to allow the taxation of Indians' gambling revenue.

An attorney for the tribe, Bryant Rogers, said the funds were meant not only to "get the message out" about the adverse tax law proposals but also to finance a campaign by Buckham's group within "the conservative base" against legislation to strip tribes of their control over Indian adoptions. "This was a group connected to the right-wing Christian movement," Rogers said. "This is Ed Buckham's connection. "

In March 1999, after the tribe had paid a substantial sum directly to the U.S. Family Network, Buckharn expressed his general gratitude to Abramoff in an e-mail. "I really appreciate you going to bat for us.

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Remember it is the first bit of money that is always the hardest, but means the most," Buckham said, according to a copy. He added: "Pray for God's wisdom. I really believe this is supposed to be what we are doing to save our team."

During this period, a fundraising letter on the u.s. Family Network stationery was sent to residents of Alabama, announcing a petition drive to promote a cause of interest to Abramoffs Indian gambling clients in Mississippi and Louisiana, including the Choctaw casino that drew many customers from Alabama: the blocking of a rival casino proposed by the Poarch Creek Indians on their land in Alabama.

"TI1e American family is under attack from all sides: crime, drugs, pornography, and one of the least talked about but equally as destructive -- gambling," said the group's letter, which was signed by then-Rep. Bob Riley (R), now the Alabama governor. "We need your help today ... to prevent the Poarch Creek Indians from building casinos in Alabama."

Asked about the letter, Rogers said "none of us have seen" it and "the tribe's contributions have nothing to do with it." A spokesman for Riley said that he could not recall the circumstances behind the letter, but that he has long opposed any expansion of gambling in Alabama.

DeLay, meanwhile, saluted Choctaw chief Philip Martin in the Congressional Record on Jan. 3,2001, citing "all he has done to further the cause of freedom." DeLay also attached to his remarks an editorial that hailed the tribe's gambling income and its "hiring [of] quality lobbyists."

Throughout this period, the U.S. Family Network was paying a monthly fee of at least $10,000 to Buckham and Alexander Strategy Group for general "consulting," according to a former Buckham associate and a copy of the contract. While DeLay's wife drew a monthly salary from the lobbying firm, she did not work at its offices in the townhouse on Capitol Hill, according to former Buckham associates.

Neither the House nor the Federal Election Commission bars the payment of corporate funds to spouses through consulting firms or political action committees, but the spouses must perform real work for reasonable wages.

"Anytime you [as a congressman] hire your child or spouse, it raises questions as to whether this is a throwback to the time when people used campaigns and government jobs to enrich their families," said Larry Noble, executive director of the Center for Responsive Politics, a nonpartisan watchdog group, and a former general counsel of the FEC.

Research editor Lucy Shackelford; researchers Alice Crites, Madonna Lebling, Karl Evanzz and Meg Smith; and research database editor Derek Willis contributed to this report.

View all comments that have been posted about this article.

© 2005 The Washington Post Company

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washingtonpost.com

DeLay Airfare Was Charged To Lobbyist's Credit Card

By R. Jeffrey Smith

Washington Post Staff Writer Sunday, April 24, 2005; Page AOl

The airfare to London and Scotland in 2000 for then-House Majority Whip Tom DeLay (R-Tex.) was charged to an American Express card issued to Jack Abramoff, a Washington lobbyist at the center of a federal criminal and tax probe, according to two sources who know Abrarnoff's credit card account number and to a copy of a travel invoice displaying that number.

DeLay's expenses during the same trip for food, phone calls and other items at a golf course hotel in Scotland were billed to a different credit card also used on the trip by a second registered Washington lobbyist, Edwin A. Buckham, according to receipts documenting that portion of the trip.

House ethics rules bar lawmakers from accepting travel and related expenses from registered lobbyists. DeLay, who is now House majority leader, has said that his expenses on this trip were paid by a nonprofit organization and that the financial arrangements for it were proper. He has also said he had no way of knowing that any lobbyist might have financially supported the trip, either directly or through reimbursements to the nonprofit organization.

The documents obtained by The Washington Post, including receipts for his hotel stays in Scotland and London and billings for his golfing during the trip at the famed St. Andrews course in Scotland, substantiate for the first time that some of DeLay's expenses on the trip were billed to charge cards used by the two lobbyists. The invoice for DeLay's plane fare lists the name of what was then Abramoffs lobbying finn, Preston Gates & Ellis.

Multiple sources, inc lud ing DeLay's then-chief of staff Susan Hirschmann, have confirmed that Del.ay's congressional office was in direct contact with Preston Gates about the trip itinerary before DeLay's departure, to work out details of his travel. These contacts raise questions about DeLay's statement that he had no way of knowing about the financial and logistical support provided by Abramoff and his firm.

Yesterday, DeLay's lawyer, Bobby R. Burchfield, said that DeLay's staff was aware that Preston Gates was trying to arrange meetings and hotels for the trip but that DeLay was unaware of the "logistics" of bill payments, and that DeLay "continues to understand his expenses" were properly paid by the nonprofit organization, the National Center for Public Policy Research.

In 2000, Abrarnoff was a board member of the group. In a telephone interview yesterday, Hirschmann said the contacts between DeLay's office and persons at Preston Gates occurred because Abramoff "was a board member of the sponsoring organization." Hirschmann added: "We were assured that the National Center paid for the trip."

House rules do not exempt such nonprofit organization board members from the prohibition on lobbyist payments for travel. They also state that this prohibition "applies even where the lobbyist ... will later be reimbursed for those expenses by a non-lobbyist client."

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Burchfield did not dispute that Abramoff used his credit card to pay for DeLay's plane fare, but said in a statement that "the majority leader has always believed and continues to believe that all appropriate expenses for the U.K trip were paid by the National Center for Public Policy Research." He said that "to the extent that Mr. Abramoff put the charges on his personal credit card, Mr. DeLay has no knowledge of this. But that would be consistent with Mr. Abrarnoff obtaining full reimbursement from the National Center."

He said further that, in his view, Abramoffs participation on this trip as a board member meant he was permitted to pay for some of the expenses, subject to reimbursement, and that numerous court decisions recognize that different rules may be applicable to the same person acting in different capacities.

Andrew Blum, a publicist for Abrarnoff's lawyer and spokesman for Abramoff, did not respond to questions relating to the use of Abrarnoff's credit card for DeLay's plane fare. But he said in a statement yesterday that it was the National Center that "sponsored" the trip, "not Jack Abramoff."

Blum said that DeLay was "one of the center's honored guests on this trip" and that Abramoff "is being singled out for doing what is commonly done by lobbyists -- taking trips with members of Congress and their staff so that they can learn about issues that impact

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the Congress and government policy." The center's ability to sponsor "this type of educational trip, using contributor funds, is both legal and proper," Blum said.

DeLay was admonished three times last year by the House ethics committee for infringing rules governing lawmakers' activities and their contacts with registered lobbyists. House ethics rules bar the payment by lobbyists for any lawmaker's travel-connected entertainment and recreational activities costing more than $50; they also require that lawmakers accurately report the sponsor of their trips and the full cost.

In an article last month about the same trip by DeLay, The Post reported that an Indian tribe and a gambling services company made donations to the National Center for Public Policy Research that covered most of the expenses declared by participants at that time. The article also said these payments were made two months before DeLay voted against legislation opposed by the tribe and the company. DeLay has said the vote was unrelated to the payments.

The article also reported that Abrarnoff submitted an expense voucher to Preston Gates seeking a reimbursement of $12,789.73 to cover expenses for meals, hotels and transportation during the London and Scotland trip incurred by DeLay; his wife, Christine; and his two aides.

The new receipts add more detail about these expenses, make clear that the total expenses for all of the participants were at least $50,000 more than was previously known, and connect Abramoff directly to the payment of some charges.

For DeLay, the I O-day trip began on May 25 with a flight to London from Dulles airport and ended on June 3 with a return trip from Europe via Newark and ending in Houston. In between, his itinerary called for stops in Edinburgh, Glasgow, and St. Andrews, in Scotland. DeLay said the purpose of the trip was to hold meetings with "Conservative leaders" in Britain and Scotland, including Margaret Thatcher, The former prime minister's office has confirmed that such a meeting occurred.

De Lay's two aides, Tony Rudy and Susan Hirschmann, had an overlapping itinerary; Rudy participated from May 29 to June 3, and Hirschmann participated from May 22 to June 2. The spouses of Rudy and Buckharn also were present.

The travel receipts do not make clear how the expenses for the entire trip -- which involved at least 10 people and which two sources said exceeded $120,000 -- were paid. One source familiar with the billings said yesterday that the National Center reimbursed Abramoff for the charges incurred by DeLay and his staff that were billed to Abramoffs credit card; but the receipts themselves do not indicate whether some of the charges incurred by Abramoffwere ultimately reimbursed and, ifso, by whom.

The receipts make clear that flights for DeLay and his wife were initially billed to Abramoff. The plane ticket for the husband of one of DeLay's aides -- David Hirschmann -- was billed to the same American Express card used for the De l.ay tickets, according to a copy of the invoice.

Although Amy Ridenour, director of the National Center for Public Policy Research, has said she organized the trip, two other sources said that DeLay's round-trip business-class tickets on Continental Airlines and British Airways were booked by Preston Gates employees.

The itinerary and invoice for DeLay's trip, prepared by a travel service in Seattle, was sent by the service to Preston Gates on May 23,2000, according to a copy of the invoice. That was two days before De.Lay's departure. The invoice states that DeLay's business-class tickets on Continental Airlines and British Airways cost $6,938.70.

The records also indicate that the expenses associated with DeLay exceeded those that he declared in a signed statement to the House clerk on June 30, 2000. That form listed the purpose of the trip as "educational" and gave a tally of$28,106 in expenses for DeLay and his wife, or an average of $2,800 a day; it stated that all of these charges were paid by the National Center for Public Policy Research, which provided the data to DeLay.

Receipts from the golfing portion of the trip show that DeLay accumulated additional charges, which, according to fees set by the tour arranger, amounted to nearly $5,000 for each golfer and totaled in the tens of thousands of dollars for the entire group. Fees associated with playing golf are not listed on DeLay's travel disclosure f01111. Burchfield, DeLay's lawyer, said DeLay "personally paid for two rounds of golf and understands that the other two rounds of golf he played were included in his hotel package" and reimbursed by the National Center.

A copy of the $ 184 bill for the DeLays' expenses during the trip at a separate hotel in St. Andrews -- the Old Course Hotel Golf Resort & Spa -- states that those charges were paid by the same American Express credit card used on the trip by Buckham, the lobbyist, to pay for his own hotel room at the Glasgow Hilton. Buckham could not be reached by phone at home or his office and did not respond to an e-rnailed request for comment. Burchfield said he cannot explain how this happened and did not know who owned this credit card; he also said DeLay was unaware of this fact.

Buckham, a former chief of staff to DeLay, was at the time a registered lobbyist for AT&T, Enron Corp., and the Nuclear Energy Institute. DeLay's wife was employed, at the time of the trip, by Buckham's lobbying firm, the Alexander Strategy Group, and was

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receiving a salary from it, according (0 Del.ay's personal financial disclosure statement for that year, on file with the House clerk.

Abramoff, at the time of the trip, represented eLottery Inc. , a gambling services company that opposed the Internet gambling bill pending before the House. Preston Gates registered as a lobbyist for eLottery on June 2, 2000, one day before the trip ended; later in the year, Abramoffregistered as a lobbyist for other clients who opposed the bill, including several Indian tribes. The federal probe is looking into his handling of his tribal clients and the large fees he was paid.

Hirschmann and her husband ultimately accumulated charges of 2,073 British pounds, or about $3,109 at the prevailing exchange rate for four nights in their "superior" room at the London Four Seasons Hotel. Those charges included $129 at the hotel lounge, $75 from the room bar, $34 from the gift shop, and $422 for chauffeured cars, according to a copy of their hotel bill. Hirschmann said one car was used to reach the meeting with Thatcher.

At least one of the Hirschmanns also played golf at St. Andrews. Susan Hirschmann is now a lobbyist at the Washington finn of Williams & Jensen; the finn's Web site contains a published claim that DeLay and other House Republican leaders are in frequent contact with her. As a staff member at the time of the trip, she would have been covered by the same ethics rules that apply to DeLay and other House members. Rudy, her staff colleague at the time, now works for Buckham's lobbying finn.

DeLay and his wife, for their part, stayed for four nights in a "conservatory" 1'00111 at the same hotel in London as Hirschmann, accumulating charges of roughly $790 a night for rooms that included a glass-enclosed porch overlooking London's Park Lane, according to a copy of the bill for their stay and the Web site of the hotel.

They also ran up hotel charges of $145 for room service, $13 for a valet pressing and $302 for a private car from Heathrow airport, the bill states. Their room bill also lists a charge of $434 for six theater tickets, but Burchfield said the DeLays do not recall attending any plays in London. He said if the hotel charges were being "picked up" by a representative of the National Center, "they would not necessarily have seen the hotel bill."

Del.ay, Burchfield said, "does not know how the logistics ... [of the bill payments for the trip] were being effectuated."

House ethics rules contain detailed provisions barring the acceptance of any travel funds from private sources if doing so would "create the appearance of using public office for private gain." They also obligate lawmakers to "make inquiry on the source of the funds that will be used to pay" for any travel ostensibly financed by a nonprofit organization -- to rule out the acceptance of reimbursements that come from one organization when a trip is "in fact organized and conducted by someone else."

Trips outside the United States are also not supposed to exceed a week in length out of concern, the rules state, for "the public perception that such trips often may amount to paid vacations for the Member and his family at the expense of special interest groups." Research editor Lucy Shackelford and researchers Alice Crites and Madonna Lebling contributed to this report.

© 2005 The Washington Post Company

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washingtonpost.com

Gambling Interests Funded DeLay Trip Later in 2000, Lawmaker's Vote Helped Defeat Regulatory Measure

By James V, Grimaldi and R, Jeffrey Smith Washington Post Staff Writers

Saturday, March 12,2005; Page AO!

An Indian tribe and a gambling services company made donations to a Washington public policy group that covered most of the cost ofa $70,000 trip to Britain by House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (RvTex.), his wife, two aides and two lobbyists in mid-2000, two months before DeLay helped kill legislation opposed by the tribe and the company.

The sponsor of the week-long trip listed in DeLay's financial disclosures was the nonprofit National Center for Public Policy Research, but a person involved in arranging DeLay's travel said that lobbyist Jack Abramoff suggested the trip and then arranged for checks to be sent by two of his clients, the

Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and eLottery Inc.

The dates on the checks coincided with the day DeLay left on the trip, May 25, 2000, according to grants documents reviewed by The Washington Post. The Choctaw and eLottery each sent a check for $25,000, according to the documents. They now say that they were unaware the money was being used to finance Del.ay's travels.

But Amy Ridenour, president of the National Center, said that, when the trip was arranged, Abramoff promised he would secure financial backing. She said that even without Abramoffs efforts, the National Center would have borne the cost ofthe trip, which was intended to allow the group to network with

conservative British politicians and included an outing to the famous st. Andrews golf course in Scotland,

"We paid for the trip," Ridenour said. "This trip was going to be paid for by the National Center, regardless of whether we got the donations from the Choctaw or el.ottery."

House ethics rules allow lawmakers and their staffs to have travel expenses paid only for officially

connected travel and only by organizations directly connected to the trips. The rules also require that lawmakers accurately report the people or organizations that pay for the trips. TIley prohibit payments by registered lobbyists for lawmakers' travel.

DeLay's spokesman, Dan Allen, said: "The trip was sponsored, organized and paid for by the National Center for Public Policy Research, as our travel disclosures accurately reflect and what the National Center has publicly said."

Abramoff's attorney, Abbe David Lowell, declined to comment. Abramoff, the National Center and the flow of money between them are now being investigated by a federal task force and by the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs; DeLay was admonished three times last year for infringements of House eth ics ru les,

To prove an ethics violation, investigators would have to show that DeLay and his staff knew the gambling interests were funding the trip, said Jan W. B awn, a Wiley Rein & Fielding LLP ethics lawyer who often represents Republicans. "If somebody is doing some backdoor financing, how would the member know?"

Abramoff, a member of the National Center's board,joined the DeLays on the May 25 to June 3, 2000, trip, which DeLay's congressional office has said included a stop in London and a visit with Margaret Thatcher, along with the golf outing at St. Andrews, where colleagues say Abramoff has a membership.

Del.ay, an avid golfer, listed the purpose of the trip on a report filed with the House clerk as "educational." He was majority whip at the time and brought h is wife, Christine, and two top staff members -- Tony Rudy from the whip's office and chief of staff Susan Hirschmann, as well as her husband, David Hirschmann, according to filings with the House clerk that indicated the total cost of transportation, lodging and meals was $70,265,

internet Gambling Bill Killed

Two months later, in July 2000, DeLay and 43 other Republicans joined 114 Democrats in killing the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act, which would have made it a federal crime to place certain bets over the Internet and was opposed by eLottery and the

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Choctaws. The bill was supported by 165 Republicans and 79 Democrats but fell about 25 votes short of passage; because of a parliamentary maneuver, it required a two-thirds majority vote.

DeLay spokesman Allen said that DeLay voted against the bill because it had exemptions for jai alai and horse and dog racing. Rudy later that year went to work for Abrarnoff as a lobbyist.

The Choctaw Indians run a highly profitable casino near Philadelphia, Miss., that bankrolls their community activities and has subsidized an extensive lobbying effort in Washington. The tribe donated a total of $65,000 to Ridenour's group in 2000 and $1.07 million in 2002.

The Choctaw money was intended to help the center create a program to build support for the idea that Indian casinos could drive prosperity for poor tribes, Ridenour said. "We were trying to tell the Choctaw story," she said. On its Web site, the center attributes the following statement to DeLay: "TIle National Center is The Center for conservative communications."

Asked about the DeLay trip to Britain, tribal lawyer Bryant Rogers said: "TIle tribe did not authorize the use of any money for this purpose .... If it occurred, it occurred without the tribe's knowledge."

ELottery is a Connecticut company that provides Internet services to state lotteries. One version of the gambling legislation contained a provision that would have severely restricted state lottery sales over the Internet. Edwin 1. McGuinn, president of eLot Inc., the parent ofeLottery, said the provision would have killed his company. "We wouldn't have been able to operate," he said.

McGuinn said he was unaware that eLottery's $25,000 check was meant to pay for DeLay's trip. Of the donation to the National Center, he said: "It certainly was our impression that any and all moneys were being positioned to get the attention and focus of our cause. "

DeLay today describes himself as a longtime opponent of any expansion of gambling. But in a House floor speech six months after his trip to Britain, he praised the head of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians as a "champion of peace and prosperity" and placed in the Congressional Record an editorial praising chief Phillip Martin for enriching the tribe through the "construction of a casino. "

The editorial, from the magazine Indian Country Today, noted that Martin had also wisely positioned his tribe "to solidify friendships with Republican powerhouses." It said -- in an apparent reference to Abramoff -- that the tribe and its chief had hired "quality lobbyists as their new wealth allowed" and successfully persuaded Republican leaders that the tribal revenue from gambling and other ventures shou Id not be taxed.

Three and a half weeks after DeLay's Jan. 3,200 I, speech saluting Martin "for all he has done to further the cause of freedom," at least one of DeLay's aides went on a trip via private jet to the Super Bowl in Tampa arranged and financed by one of Abrarnoff's companies. Sources familiar with the trip said the guests were also taken out to an Abramoff-owned gambling ship that was anchored near Tampa.

No one on DeLay's staff filed a report disclosing the trip, a task required by House rules for "the receipt of travel expenses from private sources" but not for government-funded or political travel.

DeLay spokesman Allen said: "The staffer went down to participate in a National Republican Congressional Committee party, so it was considered political travel. The staffer never saw Abramoff during the trip."

The Internet gambling legislation was the only issue Abramoff and his employer at the time, Preston Gates Ellis & Rouvelas Meeds LLP, mentioned in lobbying disclosure records when they reported earning $440,000 in fees from eLottery in 2000. The Internet gambling bill was one of several legislative issues listed in a separate lobbying disclosure for the firm's efforts on behalf of the Choctaw, which paid Preston Gates $880,000 in 2000.

Expense Voucher Submitted

The trip to Britain by the DeLays previously attracted notice because Abramoff submitted an expense voucher to Preston Gates seeking a reimbursement of$12,789.73 to cover expenses for meals, hotels and transportation incurred by the DeLays, the Hirschmanns and a former DeLay chief of staff -- lobbyist Ed Buckharn -- who also went on the trip.

House ethics rules prohibit registered lobbyists such as Abramoff frorn paying for a lawmaker's expenses. But the Preston Gates records state that Abramofftold his firm he paid $4,285.35 for the DeLays' stay at London's Four Seasons Hotel, plus $5,174.64 for the Hirschmanns' stay. He also reported spending $800 on transportation for the group between May 25 and May 29.

The existence of the voucher and a portion of its contents were reported last month in the National Journal. The voucher's tally of expenses differs from the account given by DeLay in a signed report to the House clerk on June 30, 2000, in which he reported that

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total lodging for the couple over nine nights cost Ridenour's group $3,840. Susan Hirschmann's separate, signed report also gave a different figure from Abramoff; she stated that lodging expenses for her husband and her for this period amounted to $3,360.

Both the DeLays and the Hirschmanns reported their meal expenses during the trip as $2,000 per person, or roughly $200 a day.

Last week, DeLay told reporters that he had reported the trip "as we are supposed to do." He said that, to his knowledge, the National Center "paid for the trip."

Del.ay told Cox News Service earlier this month: "I went to London to meet with conservatives in England and Scotland and talk about the things we had been doing in the Republican, conservative House. They wanted to dialogue to see if they could adopt some the things that we had done."

A person who went on the trip but spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the controversy said that DeLay talked with Thatcher about her efforts to help end the Cold War and with others about trade issues. An aide to Thatcher confirmed that the meeting occurred.

Abrarnoff was a member of the board of the National Center from about 1997 until last October, when the center accepted his resignation.

Stanley Brand, a former Democratic counsel to the House and an ethics specialist, said arrangements in which funds are passed through an intermediary to pay for a lawmaker's travels breach ethics rules ifthe lawmaker who benefited "knew or should have known" the origin of funds.

Brand said the House ethics committee, if it opens an investigation, would have to decide whether the circumstances of the travel "shou Id have put a reasonable person on notice that it was paid for by someone else."

Researchers A/ice Crites, Lucy Shackelford and Don Pohlman contributed /0 this report.

© 2005 The Washington Post Company

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Lawmakers Under Scrutiny in Probe of Lobbyist

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Lawmakers Under Scrutiny in Probe of Lobbyist

Ney and DeLay Among the Members of Congress Said to Be a Focus of Abramoff Investigation

By Susan Schmidt and James V. Grimaldi Washington Post Staff Writers

Saturday, November 26, 2005

TIle Justice Department's wide-ranging investigation of former lobbyist Jack Abramoff has entered a highly active phase as prosecutors are beginning to move on evidence pointing to possible corruption in Congress and executive branch agencies, lawyers involved in the case said.

http://www.washingtonpost.comlwp-dyn/contenUartic le/2005/11 125/.

Prosecutors have already told one lawmaker, Rep. Robert W. Ney (R-Ohio), and his former chief of staff that they are preparing a possible bribery case against them, according to two sources knowledgeable about the matter who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

The 35 to 40 investigators and prosecutors on the Abramoff case are focused on at least half a dozen members of Congress, lawyers and others close to the probe said. The investigators are looking at payments made by Abramoff and his colleagues to the wives of some lawmakers and at actions taken by senior Capitol Hill aides, some of whom went to work for Abramoff at the law firm Greenberg Traurig LLP, lawyers and others familiar with the probe said.

Former House majority leader Tom DeLay (R), now facing separate campaign finance charges in his home state of Texas, is one of the members under scrutiny, the sources said. Sen. Conrad Burns (R-Mont.), Rep. John T. Doolittle (R-Calif.) and other members of Congress involved with Indian affairs, one of Abramoffs key areas of interest, are also said to be among them.

Prosecutions and plea deals have become more likely, the lawyers said, now that Abramoffs former partner -- public relations executive Michael Scanlon -- has agreed to plead guilty to conspiracy and to testify about gifts that he and his K Street colleagues showered on lawmakers, allegedly in exchange for official favors.

An attorney for DeLay, whose wife worked for a lobbying firm that received client referrals from Abramoff, said there was no connection between her work and congressional business. A spokesman for Doolittle, whose wife received payments from Abramoffs lobbying firm, also said there was no connection with her husband's position. Burns's office has said his actions were consistent with his support for improving conditions for Indian tribes.

Ney is the congressman whose name has surfaced most prominently in the Abramoff investigation. His spokesman and attorney have said for weeks that Ney has not been told he is a target of the inquiry, even while acknowledging that his office has received a grand jury subpoena and that his activities were mentioned in Scanlon's plea agreement.

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But the sources said that during the third week of October prosecutors told Ney and his former chief of staff, Neil Volz, that they were preparing a bribery case based in part on activities that occurred in October 2000. Abramoff and another business partner, Adam Kidan, were also told that they are targets in that case, the sources said.

The five-year statute of limitations for filing charges based on those events expired last month; the prosecutors sought and received a waiver of the deadline from all four men while they continue their investigation, the sources said. Prosecutors are often able to obtain such waivers by giving the targets a choice of being indicted right away or granting more time to see if information might surface that exonerates them.

Ney's attorney, Mark H. Tuohey, did not return calls seeking comment on the waiver. Ney spokesman Brian Walsh said the office had no comment, as did a lawyer for Volz.

The attorneys of Abramoff and Kidan did not return calls seeking comment.

111e events in 2000 that interest investigators are connected to the purchase by Abramoff and Kidan of Sun Cruz Casinos, owner of a fleet of Florida gambling boats. Ney twice placed comments in the Congressional Record about Sun Cruz, first criticizing its former owner when Abramoff and Kidan were in difficult purchase negotiations and then, in October, praising Kidan's new management. Abramoff and Kidan are facing trial in January on charges of defrauding lenders in their purchase of the casino boats.

The statute of limitations may also soon run out on a 2001 Super Bowl trip sponsored by SunCruz that sources said investigators have reviewed. The Washington Post reported earlier this year that aides to Burns and DeLay were ferried to Tampa on a Sun Cruz corporate jet arranged by Abramoff. Ney and his sons were invited to the 2001 Super Bowl outing, former Abramoff associates said, but did not go.

The Hill aides were treated to the game and a night of gambling on a Sun Cruz ship. They were offered $500 in gambling chips, sources knowledgeable about the trip said.

111e Post has reported that Burns, who received $137,000 in contributions from Abramofflobbyists and their tribal clients, obtained a controversial $3 million school construction grant for one of Abramoffs wealthy tribal clients after pressuring the Bureau ofIndian Affairs.

Investigators are also gathering information about Abramoffs hiring of several congressional wives, sources said, as well as his referral of clients to Alexander Strategy Group, a lobbying and consulting firm run by former senior aides to DeLay. Financial disclosure forms show that the firm employed DeLay's wife, Christine, from 1998 to 2002.

Former Abramoff lobbying associates have said that Abramoff shared some of his high-paying clients with the group, including Malaysian interests, the Mississippi Choctaw Indian tribe and online gambling firms. Federal investigators have questioned some former Abramoff associates about whether those referrals were related to Christine DeLay's employment there, sources said.

Alexander Strategy Group is run by former DeLay senior staffers Edwin A. Buckharn and Tony C. Rudy. Rudy served as DeLay's deputy chief of staff until 200 1, when he took a job with Abramoff, and later moved on to join Buckham.

Investigators are looking into whether Rudy aided Abramoffs lobbying clients while he was working on the Hill, the sources said, and are reviewing payments from Abramoff clients and associates to Liberty Consulting, a political firm founded by Rudy's wife, Lisa. The Washington Post reported last month that

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Rudy, while on DeLay's staff, helped scuttle a bill opposed by eLottery Inc., an Abramoff client, and that Abramoff had eLottery pay a foundation to hire Liberty Consulting.

Richard Cullen, an attorney for the DeLays, said Christine DeLay was hired by Buckham, an old family friend, to determine the favorite charity of every member of Congress. She was paid $3,200 to $3,400 a month for three years, or about $115,000 total, he said.

"It wasn't like she did this 9 to 5, but it was an ongoing project," Cullen said. He said Christine DeLay's work was commensurate with the project and had nothing to do with her husband or any official congressional business. "This was something that she found to be very interesting, very challenging and very worthwhile," Cullen said.

Rudy and Buckham and their attorneys did not return calls seeking comment.

Abramoff's connections to Doolittle are also of interest to investigators, sources said. Doolittle's former chief of staff, Kevin A. Ring, went to work with Abramoff. Doolittle's wife, Julie, owned a consulting firm that was hired by Abramoff and his firm, Greenberg Traurig, to do fund raising for a charity he founded. Two sources close to the investigation said that Ring, while working for Abramoff, was an intermediary in the hiring of Julie Doolittle's firm, Sierra Dominion Financial Solutions Inc., which last year received a subpoena from the grand jury investigating Abramoff.

Julie Doolittle's attorney, William L. Stauffer Jr., said Siena Dominion Financial was hired by Greenberg Traurig to provide "event planning, marketing and related services, as requested by Mr. Abramoff' for Abramoffs Capital Athletic Foundation and his Signatures restaurant. Sierra Dominion received a monthly retainer from Greenberg Traurig from January 2003 until February 2004, at a rate similar to that paid by other Sierra Dominion clients, Stauffer said.

Abramoff frequently used the athletic foundation as a pass-through organization to run lobbying efforts and to pay for expenses, records show. Julie Doolittle was hired to put on a fundraiser for the foundation at the International Spy Museum, but the event was canceled because it had been scheduled to take place just at the Iraq war was commencing, Stauffer said.

"Sierra Dominion primarily performed public relations and other event planning services for the Spy Museum event," Stauffer said in an e-mail reply to questions. "This included responding to all individuals calling the Capital Athletic Foundation concerning the Spy Museum event, identifying (and contacting) possible attendees for the event, and assisting in fund raising strategy and letters."

Doolittle's office denied any connection between the firm's work and official acts.

"In no way did Sierra Dominion's business services work for Greenberg Traurig have any relationship to Congressman Doolittle's official duties as a member of the House of Representatives," said Doolittle spokeswoman Laura Blackrnann.

"Congressman Doolittle has never received a subpoena regarding this matter, nor has he ever been contacted by the Justice Department to provide information or be questioned," she said.

The Justice Department investigation is also looking into Abramoffs influence among executive branch officials. Sources said prosecutors are continuing to seek information about Abramoffs dealings with then-Deputy Interior Secretary J. Steven Griles, including a job offer from the lobbyist at a time when he was seeking department actions on behalf of his tribal clients.

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The former top procurement official in the Bush administration, David H. Safavian, has already been charged with lying and obstruction of justice in connection with the Abramoff investigation. Safavian, who traveled to Scotland with Ney on a golf outing arranged by Abramoff, is accused of concealing from federal investigators that Abramoff was seeking to do business with the General Services Administration at the time of the golf trip. Safavian was then GSA chief of staff.

View all comments that have been posted about this article.

© 2005 The Washington Post Company

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Lobbying Cases Highlight Prime Targets' Family Ties - The New York".

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April 9. 2006

Lobbying Cases Highlight Prime Targets' Family Ties

By PHILIP SHENON

On Dec. 3, 2003, Aeneas Enterprises opened for business in the Woodland Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles, and judging by its bank records, the small consulting company with no listed telephone number was an instant success. Within a month, its records show, Aeneas had taken in $2.3 million from a single client.

Aeneas is under scrutiny by the Justice Department and Congressional investigators. Its founder, Robert Abramoff, a lawyer and sometime Hollywood movie producer, is the brother of Jack Abramoff, the Republican lobbyist at the center of a Washington influence-peddling scandal involving several members of Congress.

The company's records show that the $2.3 million was received from another consulting firm, GrassRoots Interactive of Silver Spring, Md., which was established by Jack Abramoff and where he directed some of his huge lobbying fees. Billing statements prepared by Aeneas do not show what service Robert Abramoff provided to warrant millions of dollars in payments from his brother's company.

Robert Abramoff did not return phone calls for comment.

His apparent entanglement in his brother's business is an example of what investigators say is something remarkable about the criminal inquiry centered on Jack Abramoff and his Washington lobbying network the degree to which the spouses and other family members of the investigation's central targets are being caught up in it. Some have dealt with subpoenas and interviews with the Federal Bureau ofInvestigation, with at least the possibility offacing civil or criminal charges.

Lawyers with detailed knowledge of the Justice Department's investigation, who were granted anonymity because of rules barring public discussion of grand jury evidence, say that so many of the wives oflawmakers and lobbyists have become tied up in the investigation that F.B.I. agents have begun referring to them as "The Wives Club,"

At least one of the wives, Julie Doolittle, who is married to Representative John T. Doolittle, Republican of California, has been subpoenaed in the investigation of Mr. Abramoff and

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questioned by the F.B.I. The June 2004 subpoena sought information about Mrs. Doolittle's marketing and events-planning work for Mr. Abrarnoff's lobbying firm and for his Washington restaurant, Signatures, which he later sold. Her lawyer, William L. Stauffer, said Mrs. Doolittle was contacted by the Justice Department again last year and asked for additional records.

Mr. Stauffer said that Mrs. Doolittle's consulting firm, Sierra Dominion Financial Solutions, has "complied fully with the subpoena."

Lisa Rudy, who is married to Tony Rudy, the former deputy chief of staff to Representative Tom DeLay, Republican of Texas, received $50,000 in consulting fees as a result of what her husband has ac1mowledged was a corrupt scheme with Mr. Abramoffto influence the workings of Mr. DeLay's office and promote the concerns of Mr. Abramoffs clients on Capitol Hill.

Mr. Rudy pleaded guilty to federal conspiracy charges last month. The Justice Department has said that Mrs. Rudy has agreed to cooperate with the investigation and will sign her own agreement with prosecutors. The Rudy family's lawyer, Laura A. Miller, did not return phone calls for comment.

Christine A. DeLay, Mr. DeLay's wife, received $115,000 in consulting fees from 1998 to 2002 from a lobbying firm set up by her husband's former chief of staff, Edwin A. Buckham, who is also under scrutiny by the Justice Department because of his lobbying contacts with Mr. Del.ay's House office.

Although there is no suggestion of any criminal investigation focused on Mrs. DeLay, lawyers involved in the investigation say prosecutors have asked about the circumstances of her hiring by Mr. Buckham and whether it was an effort to influence Mr. DeLay, the former House majority leader. Mr. DeLay announced this week that he was resigning from Congress, saying he wanted to avoid an "ugly" re-election fight this fall that might focus on ethical issues.

A lawyer for the DeLays, Richard Cullen, said Mrs. DeLay had been employed by Mr. Buckharn's firm, the Alexander Strategy Group, to gather information on the favorite charities of members of Congress. "Christine DeLay is a very talented woman with a keen political mind, and the project she was working on was one that had substance and added value to Alexander," he said.

The phone records of the couple's daughter, Dani DeLay Ferro, a political organizer for her father, were formally requested last year by a grand jury in Travis County, Tex., where Mr. DeLay is under indictment, accused of violating his home state's election laws.

Mr. Buckha m's wife, Wendy, shared more than $1 million in consulting fees with her husband from the U.S. Family Network, a nonprofit group tied to Mr. DeLay. The group has drawn the scrutiny of law enforcement officials because so much of its income was directed to the Buckham family and appears to have come from Russian businessmen eager to court favor from Mr. DeLay. The Buckharns did not return phone calls seeking comment.

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Jack Abramoffs wife, Pamela, was tied to at least some of her husband's activities that he has now acknowledged were crimes.

Although there is no suggestion by the Justice Department that Mrs. Abrarnoff was aware of her husband's criminal acts, she and her husband were the sole directors of a nonprofit group, the Capital Athletic Foundation, which Mr. Abramoff used illegally to channel millions of dollars from his clients to pet projects that had nothing to with the charity's supposed mission: sports programs for needy children.

Most of the charity'S money was spent to underwrite a J ewish school in Maryland that was founded by Mr. Abramoff and where the couple educated two of their sons. The foundation also underwrote a 2002 trip to Britain for Representative Bob Ney, an Ohio Republican who is under investigation by the Justice Department for gifts he received from Mr. Abramoff. Mr. Ney has denied wrongdoing, saying he was duped by Mr. Abramoff about the financing of the $150,000 trip, which included rounds of golf at the fabled course at St. Andrews in Scotland.

There are also references to Mrs. Abramoffs activities in the indictment of a former senior White House budget official, David F. Safavian. The Justice Department has accused Mr. Safavian oflying about his ties to Mr. Abramoff, who sought Mr. Safaviari's help in trying to buy government land for himself and clients. Mr. Abramoff has acknowledged that he sent his wife to inspect the properties, instructing her not to reveal her real name to government officials to avoid scrutiny.

A spokesman for Mr. Abramoffs defense team, Andrew Blum, had no comment when asked whether Mrs. Abramoffhad obtained separate counsel in the investigation. Mr. Blum also would not comment on Mr. Abramoffs involvement with GrassRoots Interactive, the Maryland consulting firm, and the lobbyist's business ties to his brother Robert.

The Abramoffbrothers have been in business together for years. They co-wrote -- and Jack Abramoffproduced -- a poorly reviewed 1989 action movie called "Red Scorpion."

State business records in California show that Robert Abramoff is a director or registered agent for almost 100 companies, many of them with colorful names, including FilmSoup, and Make-Up Your Mind Inc.

He is also the registered agent for Nicole Richie Inc., an umbrella company for the business activities of the young Hollywood celebrity. Ms. Richie's spokeswoman, Cindy Guagenti, said that Mr. Abramoff had been hired to deal with the logistics of the company's incorporation. She said Ms. Richie "has never met him."

Robert Abramoff appears tohave been drawn into his brother's Washington lobbying network through Aeneas Enterprises, which shared its offices and phone number with Robert Abrarnoff's law office.

Documents gathered from Jack Abramoffs files by government investigators and provided to

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The New York Times show that Robert Abramoff sent an e-mail message to his brother's accountant on Dec. 19, 2000 -- 16 days after Aeneas was incorporated -- that provided instructions on wiring money to Aeneas's bank account.

An Aeneas billing statement sent later that month to GrassRoots Interactive shows that $1.4 million was received from GrassRoots on Dec. 26. A January statement shows that an additional $900,000 was received by Aeneas on Jan. 2,2004.

The one-page statements make no reference to what service, if any, was performed by Robert Abrarnoff's company in exchange for the payments, nor do they indicate how Aeneas disbursed the money.

Chart/Photos: "A Family Affair"

Spouses and other family members have become integral parts of the Justice Department's investigation of Jack Abrarnoff and his Washington lobbying network A look at how family members are tied to the scandal, based on indictments and other records collected from the investigation.

JACK ABRAMOFF AND HIS FAMILY

Jack Abramoff

Pleaded guilty to fraud, tax evasion and conspiracy to bribe public officials.

Robert Abramoff (family member) Brother

Founded a consulting firm that shares offices and phone number with his law office in California. His firm received $2.3 million from one of his brother's companies for services not specified in billing statements.

Pam Abramoff (family member) Wife

Co-director of a nonprofit group used by her husband to illegally channel money from his lobbying clients to other projects.

Inspected goverment properties for her husband and his clients without revealing her identity to officials to avoid scrutiny.

LAWMAKERS AND THEIR WIVES

Julie Doolittle (family member)

Did marketing and eventsplanning work for Mr. Abramoff.

Representative John T. Doolittle (R-Calif.)

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Received campaign contributions from Mr. Abramoff and his associates.

Representative Tom DeLay (R-Tex.)

Formerly employed Mr. Buckham and Mr. Rudy

Has received campaign contributions from Mr. Abramoff, who has reportedly financed some of Mr. DeLay's overseas trips.

Christine DeLay (family member)

Received $115,000 in consulting fees from Alexander Strategy over a four-year period.

LOBBYISTS AT THE ALEXANDER STRATEGY GROUP AND THEIR WIVES

Edwin A. Buckharn

Under scrutiny by the Justice Department for his lobbying contacts with Representative Tom DeLay's House office.

Tony Rudy

Pleaded guilty to charges that he accepted illegal donations and gifts from Mr. Abramoff in return for influencing legislation and the workings of Mr. Del.ay's office.

Wendy Buckham (family member)

Shared more than $1 million in consulting fees with her husband from the U.S. Family Network, a nonprofit group with ties to Mr. DeLay. The fees appear to come from Mr. Abramoffs clients.

Lisa Rudy (family member)

Received consulting fees from Mr. Abramoff, as part of illegal gifts to her husband.

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As lobbying scandal drags on, Delay takes a shot at FBI

Ex-congressman blasts Justice as 'running amok' in the Abramoff case

By MICHAEL HEDGES Copyright 2007 Houston Chronicle Washington Bureau May 9. 2007. 10:10PM

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WASHINGTON - Tom DeLay is lashing out at federal prosecutors probing his ties with disgraced lobbyist Jack Abramoff, challenging them to charge him with a crime or drop their lengthy investigation .

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Yahoo! Buzz "It is a Justice Department that is running amok," the former Sugar

land lawmaker said to The Hill, a publication covering Congress, ex StumblcUpon "Fish or cut bait. Do something."

DeLay, the former House majority leader who resigned his seat in Congress last year after being charged in Texas in an unrelated case, has not been accused of wrongdoing in the Abramoff investigation.

But one former GOP member of Congress, Bob Ney of Ohio, and two former top aides of Delay's have pleaded guilty to corruption in the wide-ranging grand jury investigation into efforts by Abramoff to gain illegal advantages for his clients in exchange for bribes.

Be the first of your friends to recommend this.

Abramoff has pleaded guilty to corruption charges and is cooperating with investigators.

The inquiry into Delay's actions has focused on payments to his wife, Christine, by two organizations controlled by former DeLay chief of staff Edwin Buckham.

After leaving Delay's staff, Buckham ran a lobbying firm called Alexander Strategy Group that paid her about $115,000 between 1998 and 2002.

Christine DeLay and Delay's daughter, Dani Ferro, were also paid consulting fees and expenses totalling about $350,000 by Delay's political action committee, ARM PAC, which was also managed by Buckham.

Delay's lawyer, Richard Cullen, said the payments were for legitimate work.

"Clearly the Justice Department is conducting a very thorough investigation into all aspects of Mrs. DeLay's employment," Cullen said. "We have given them documents that demonstrate clearly that she was an integral part of Tom Delay's political operation, and that she earned every penny - probably more - than she was paid."

The FBI and the Justice Department declined to discuss the ongoing Abramoff investigation Wednesday.

FBI director Robert Mueller, meeting with Washington journalists Wednesday, sidestepped a question on the DeLay probe.

But he said, "Public corruption has been our No.1 priority on the criminal side .... We've almost doubled the number of convictions in the last year that we had in 2000-2001. We have additional resources addressing public corruption (and) I'm comfortable we've taken the steps that are appropriate."

Delay had not voiced frustration or anger at federal investigators before.

But he has been open with his contempt for Travis County District Attorney Ronnie Earle, who obtained a campaign money laundering indictment of Delay. The former congressman has called the charges a thinly veiled political attack by a Democratic prosecutor.

Cullen said Delay's remarks Tuesday are a spillover from his aggravation at the Texas case.

"I think the frustration is consistent with somebody who believes passionately that he has done nothing wrong," Cullen said. "Tom DeLay wants the investigation to be over. That is a very human response."

michaeUlCdges@clJron.com

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10119/2010 12:05 P!\

EXHIBIT I

Subpoena list in Delay case reads like a who's who of political, busine.. http;//www.statesman.com/news/texas-politics/subpoena-list-in-delay-.

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Subpoena list in DeLay case reads like a who's who of political, business interests.

Witnesses include associates of Abramoff.former state House Speaker Craddick.

By Layfan Copelin AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF

Updated: 10:18 p.m. Saturday, Oct 16,2010 Published: 10:00 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 16, 2010

lawyers in the Tom Delay conspiracy trial have subpoenaed a who's who of witnesses, from associates of disgraced Washington, D.C., lobbyist Jack Abramoff to former Texas Speaker Tom Craddick, for the biggest political trial in Austin in years.

The witness list for Travis County prosecutors includes chief executives of companies indicted for donating corporate money, several state lawmakers, enough Beltway lobbyists to pack a Capitol hearing and associates that Delay shared with Abramoff, a former D.C. powerbroker nicknamed "Casino Jack" who pleaded guilty to conspiring to bribe public officials.

Delay's lawyers have countered with their own heavyweights: former Ambassador Tony Garza, Austin lobbyist Buddy Jones and Craddick, the politician who benefited the most from Delay's campaign efforts, which led to the charges that he conspired to launder corporate money - which is illegal in Texas campaigns - during the 2002 elections.

Jury selection begins Oct. 26, and testimony is expected to begin the following week.

Jurors may have to be reintroduced to Delay, known as "the Hammer" and who as U.S. House majority leader reshaped Texas politics before the conspiracy indictment forced him to retire from Congress. After all, it's been five years - a lifetime in politics - since he resigned to become a guest on cable TV talk shows and a contestant, albeit with two broken feet, on "Dancing With the Stars."

Several of the witnesses, particularly those tainted by ties to Abramoff, aren't likely to be called unless Delay is convicted on the conspiracy charge, allowing prosecutors to bring up allegations that the U.S. Justice Department couldn't prove as an argument for a stiff penalty.

The witness list includes Abramoff associates Edwin Buckham and Michael Scanlon, two former Delay staffers who, according to the subpoenas, may be asked about "the inner workings of Tom Delay's political organization" as well as the defendant's lobby-paid trips to Russia, Scotland and the Northern Mariana Islands.

In the paperwork, prosecutors cite allegations that Russian energy executives donated $1 million to the U.S. Family Network, a Buckham client, to influence Delay's vote to help the Russian economy. Buckham is Delay's former chief of staff who created an influential lobbying firm that paid Delay's wife, Christine, $3,200 a month to identify federal lawmakers' favorite charities.

None of these allegations are new.

In August, the Justice Department suspended its long-running investigation of Delay's and Buckilam's ties to Abramoff, the central figure in a federal investigation that shook Congress five years ago and prompted Scanlon and Tony Rudy, another Delay staffer, to plead guilty to corruption charges.

1 of3

10118/20102:58 Pi\

Subpoena list in DeLay case reads like a who's who of political, busine... http://www.statesman.com/news/texas-politics/subpoena-Iist-in-delay-.

So why bring up allegations so far afield of the conspiracy charges rooted in one transaction during the 2002 elections?

Travis County prosecutors declined to discuss their strategy because of orders by Judge Pat Priest, a senior judge from San Antonio who's presiding over the case.

Dick DeGuerin, Delay's lawyer, is upset by the wide-ranging and inflammatory subpoenas, but he declined to comment on the prosecution's tactics.

He also wasn't tipping his hand on how he chose his own witnesses.

Garza served with Delay on an advisory board of Texans for a Republican Majority, the fundraising committee at the center of the controversy, before President George W. Bush appointed him ambassador to Mexico. It's unclear why Jones, an Austin lobbyist with a peripheral role to the controversy, will be a defense witness.

As for Craddick, the former Texas speaker could help the defense, but there is a risk that prosecutors might elicit information unfavorable to Delay under cross-examination.

Travis County prosecutors investigated Craddick at the same time they were pursuing Delay. But they never sought charges, even though Craddick personally picked up a $100,000 corporate donation for Delay's committee. Texans for a Republican Majority also routed its donations through Craddick's office to individual candidates to bolster Craddick's campaign to become speaker of the Texas House.

Those donations allowed Craddick's office to deliver money to grateful candidates who would be voting for a new House leader after the election.

Putting Craddick on the stand would allow prosecutors to paint a fuller picture of the committee's activities. But the defense also would be able to contrast Craddick's hands-on involvement with what the defense contends was Delay's limited role with the committee.

The crux of the conspiracy charge is $190,000 of corporate money that Delay's political committee, Texans for a Republican Majority, sent to the Republican National Committee. An arm of the RNC, in turn, donated the same amount from its noncorporate account to seven Texas candidates.

Texas law prohibits corporate or union money from being donated to candidates.

Jurors must decide whether Delay conspired to launder that corporate money into campaign donations, as the indictment claims, or whether the exchange was a legal transaction, as Delay says, and that his lieutenants did it without telling him beforehand.

Almost everyone who touched that money - donor or recipient- has been subpoenaed.

Much of the money was raised in Washington D.C., by Delay fundraiser Warren Robold from corporations with interests in front of Congress. That's why so many Beltway lobbyists or company CEOs were subpoenaed. Some of the companies that were indicted got their charges dropped in exchange for cooperating with prosecutors. One was Questerra Corp., a Charlottesville, Va.-based software company. It's former CEO, Tim Milovich, was subpoenaed to testify.

The seven former and current Texas House members who got donations from Texans for a Republican Majority also are on the list, including Austin-area residents Todd Baxter, Jack Stick and Rick Green.

Also subpoenaed are Texas officials who served with Delay on the advisory board of Texans for a Republican Majority: Sen. Florence Shapiro, R-Plano ; former Rep. Dianne White Delisi, R-Temple; and Rep. Beverly Woolley, R-Houston .

Prosecutors also are seeking testimony to paint a broader picture beyond Texans for a Republican Majority.

2of3

10!18/2010 2:58 PI\

Subpoena list in DeLay case reads like a who's who of political, busine... http://www.statesman.com/news/texas-politics/subpoena-list-in-delay-.

For example, Peter Cloeren, a business executive from Orange, is expected to testify about pleading guilty to illegally funneling money to a congressional candidate in 1996 at the urging of Delay, an allegation that Delay denied. Federal authorities never charged Delay in that case, but Cloeren was fined $400,000 and got two year's probation. Cloeren pleaded guilty to funneling money through his company's employees and out-of-state gro ups.

Prosecutors also will try to use Delay's own words against him.

They have subpoenaed tapes of several cable news shows on which Delay declared he knew nothing about the $190,000 transaction until after it happened and professed his general lack of involvement with Texans for a Republican Majority outside of headlining five fundraisers.

Prosecutors are expected to contrast Delay's public remarks with the evidence they have gathered during the eight-year investigation.

Icopelin@statesman.com; 445-3617

The crux of the case

In 2001, Tom Delay and several Texas officials created Texans for a Republican Majority, a political action committee that raised money to elect Republicans to the Texas legislature.

The purpose: A GOP majority in the Texas legislature would redraw the state's congressional districts to favor Republicans and help Delay maintain his leadership role in Congress.

The hurdle: Texans for a Republican Majority had trouble raising money from Texas business interests because they didn't want to offend Democratic state House Speaker Pete laney, so the GOP committee turned to corporations with interests before the U,S. Congress,

Key players: Delay's chief political aide, Jim Ellis, oversaw the operation in Washington, D.C" while associate John Colyandro ran its Austin-based efforts,

The law. State law forbids corporate money being donated to Texas candidates,

What happened: Colyandro sent a blank check to Ellis, who filled in the amount and gave it to the Republican National Committee after meeting with RNC staffers, An arm of the RNC, in turn, sent the same amount ($190,000) to seven Texas candidates two weeks later.

The legal question: Did Delay conspire with Ellis and Colyandro to launder corporate money into campaign donations, or was Delay just a fundraiser who was briefed about a legal and routine transaction after it occurred?

Find this article at:

http://www.statesman.colll/news/texas-politics/subpoena-list-in-delay-case-reads-like-a-976216.html

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30f3 ]0118/20]02:58 PI\

EXHIBIT J

Page 1

Lexist-lexis'

59 of90 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 The Houston Chronicle Publishing Company All Rights Reserved

The Houston Chronicle

November 22,2005 Tuesday 3 STAR EDITION

SECTION: A; Pg. I

LENGTH: 945 words

HEADLINE: Lobbyist pleads guilty to conspiracy;

Ex-DeLay aide gets jail, fine and agrees to testify in federal probe

BYLINE: MICHAEL HEDGES, Houston Chronicle Washington Bureau, Staff

DATELINE: WASHINGTON

BODY:

WASHINGTON - Lobbyist Michael Scanlon, a former aide to Rep. Tom DeLay, pleaded guilty Monday to attempting to bribe a member of Congress and promised to help federal prosecutors in an investigation in which Washington officials are potential targets.

Scanlon, 35, who parlayed his association with lobbyist Jack Abramoff into a multimillion-dollar public relations business, agreed to testify in the federal probe into the bilking ofIndian tribes that were seeking federal law changes to allow them to set up gambling facilities.

Scanlon agreed to serve between 51 and 63 months in prison and pay a $250,000 fine as part of his guilty plea to the charge of conspiring to commit fraud. He was also ordered to pay restitution of $19.7 million to the defrauded tribes.

The plea agreement filed by federal prosecutors listed 10 actions they said were taken by Rep. Bob Ney, R-Ohio, as part of a conspiracy with Scanlon and Abramoff aimed at passing legislation to help the lobbyists' Indian clients.

In exchange, Scanlon and Abramoff provided Ney and his staff with lavish trips, golf outings, tickets to sporting events and concerts, meals at expensive restaurants and campaign contributions, the plea agreement said.

Scanlon, of Rehobeth, Del., told reporters outside the federal courthouse here, "I really don't have anything (to say) at this moment. You guys will be seeing me around."

His attorney, Plato Cacheris, interjected, "He's been very regretful and is trying to do what is right ... He is very regretful for what happened to the tribes."

The lawyer said Scanlon has been cooperating with prosecutors for months.

Asked if Scanlon's cooperation with prosecutors presented any jeopardy for other members of Congress besides Ney, Cacheris said, "I'd rather not comment on that."

Asked specifically whether he believed prosecutors were probing DeLay, he said, "You'd have to ask (DeLay's) lawyers that."

Page 2 Lobbyist pleads guilty to conspiracy; Ex-DeLay aide gets jail, fine and agrees to testify in federal probe The Houston Chronicle November 22, 2005 Tuesday

Richard Cullen, an attorney for DeLay, said the Sugar Land Republican had nothing to fear from Scanlon's cooperation.

"Mr. DeLay has a strong and clear conscience on this. He has nothing to worry about. He believes when the Department of Justice finishes its investigation, he will be cleared."

Cullen said DeLay has offered his cooperation to federal investigators, but has not been subpoenaed or questioned in the case.

So far, no allegation has been leveled against DeLay in the investigation. Close connections

DeLay had close connections with Scanlon and Abramoff, whom he once called one of his closest friends. Two years before Ney went to Scotland on a golfing trip that included Abramoff, DeLay took a similar trip with the lobbyist. In 1998 DeLay traveled to the Northern Marianas Islands on a trip arranged by Abramoff; in 2000, Ney did the same. Both lawmakers accepted campaign contributions from Abramoff clients.

Tribes from six states, including the Texas Tigua Indians ofEI Paso, paid Scanlon at least $53 million that Scanlon admitted Monday was aimed at enriching him and Abramoff. The tribes hoped to gain the rights to gambling casinos and businesses. But the Indians received little in return for their payments.

Abramoff arranged for Scanlon to do PR work for the tribes, and Scanlon secretly kicked back half of his fees to Abramoff, the government alleged. Abramoff has not been charged in the Indian investigation, but he has been indicted in an unrelated federal probe.

Another Scanlon attorney, Stephen Braga, had a blunt assessment when asked if Scanlon's cooperation represented legal jeopardy for N ey:

"Yes," said Braga.

But Ney's attorney, Mark Tuohey, said, "Representative Ney never did any legislative act in exchange for favors.

He is an upright member of Congress well-respected for his judgment and integrity."

Prosecutors said in Scanlon's plea agreement that Ney agreed to introduce and promote a bill that would lift an existing ban against commercial gambling in Texas as part of an effort pushed by Scanlon and Abramoff to help the Tiguas open a gambling facility in EI Paso.

The federal document said Ney solicited the help of another member of Congress who was not named in the plea deal.

The Ohio lawmaker also placed statements in the Congressional Record that benefited Abramoffand helped him get a contract for a client. In 2002, Ney approved a license for an Israeli telecommunications company to install antennas for the House. That company paid Abramoff $280,000, and donated $50,000 more to an Abramoff charity.

The connection between Scanlon, Abramoff and Ney surfaced in e-mail released by the Senate Indian Affairs Committee. Abramoffbragged in the e-mail that he had persuaded Ney to insert language in a House bill that would have helped the Tigua tribe of EI Paso reopen a gambling facility that the state had closed.

Abramoff then got the Tiguas to make contributions to Ney's re-election campaign and political action committee. Another controversy

Ney also took a role in another controversy involving Abramoffthat has led to his indictment by a federal grand jury in South Florida. Abramoff has been charged with fraud in what prosecutors said was a scheme to gain control of a fleet of gambling boats called SunCruz Casinos.

The Ohio congressman twice put comments in the Congressional Record concerning Sun Cruz, attacking a rival bidder for the gambling boats and praising Abramoffs partner, Adam Kidan, who has also been indicted in the case.

Scanlon will next appear in court March 1, when prosecutors are expected to give U.S. District Judge Ellen Huvelle an update on his cooperation. Until then, he remained free on a $5 million unsecured bond, which basically means that he promised to forfeit the amount if he fled.

Page 3 Lobbyist pleads guilty to conspiracy; Ex-DeLay aide gets jail, fine and agrees to testify in federal probe The Houston Chronicle November 22, 2005 Tuesday

NOTES: michacl.hedges@chron.com

GRAPHIC: Photo: PLEADS GUILTY: Lobbyist Michael Scanlon has agreed to cooperate with a federal investigation into the bilking of Indian tribes (p. 8)

HARAZN.GHANBAN:AP

LOAD-DATE: November 22,2005

EXHIBIT B

U.S. Department of Justice

Criminal Division

Office of Enforcement Operations

Washington, D.C 20530

OCT 222010

CRM-201000773F

Mr. Adam J. Rappaport CREW

1400 Eye Street, N.W. Suite 450 Washington, D.C. 20005

Dear Mr. Rappaport:

The U.S. Department of Justice, Criminal Division (Division) acknowledges receipt of your Freedom ofInformation Act (FOrA) request dated October 19,2010. In that request, you asked for records related to the investigation of former House Majority Leader Tom Delay. Your request has been assigned file number 201000773F. Please refer to this number in any future correspondence with this Unit.

After a careful review of it, your request appears to be broad in scope, and does not clearly identify the records which you are seeking. Records need to be described in reasonably sufficient detail to enable government employees who are familiar with the subject area to locate records without placing an unreasonable burden upon the agency. See 5 U.S.C. § 552 (a)(3)(A). For this reason, the Department of Justice's regulations require that the records requested be described with enough detail to enable Department personnel to locate them with a reasonable amount of time and effort. Whenever possible, the request should include, specific information about each record including the date, title or name, author, recipient, and subj ect matter of the record. In addition, records concerning court cases should include the title of the case, the court in which the case was filed, and the nature of the case. See 28 C.F.R. § 16.3(b).

Here, we seek clarification regarding the investigation to which you refer, including for example, the specific time frames covered by your request and your reference to relationships between Mr. Delay and the other individuals you mentioned, as well as a further description of the specific information that you are seeking.

We want to be responsive to your request; therefore, upon receipt of a clearer request, you will be advised as to its status. In addition, after receipt of your clarified request, we will address your request for expedited treatment.

If we do not hear from you within 30 days from the date of this letter, we will assume you are no longer interested in this FOIA request, and the case will be administratively closed.

Please be advised that this action is not a denial of your request and will not preclude you from filing other requests in the future.

2

Finally, In relation to your request for FBI 302 reports, we have determined that the following component of the U.S Department of Justice may have records responsive to your request. Therefore, we have routed your request to the following office, which will respond to you directly.

DavidM. Hardy, Chief

Federal Bureau of Investigation Record/Information Dissemination Section Records Management Division

170 Marcel Drive

Winchester, VA 22602-4843 540-868-4500

Thank you for your interest in the Criminal Division.

Sincerely,

Rena Y. Kim, Chief

Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Unit Office of Enforcement Operations Criminal Division

2

EXHIBIT C

CREW I citizens _for. respon~ibility and ethics In washington

October 27,2010

By facsimile: 202-514-6117

Rena Y. Kim

Chief, FOIA/PA Section Criminal Division

U.S. Department of Justice

Suite 1127, Keeney Building 950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20530-0001

Re: Freedom of Information Act Request No. CRM-201000773F

Dear Ms. Kim:

By letter dated and submitted on October, 2010, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington ("CREW") requested records under the Freedom oflnformation Act ("FOIA") related to the Department of Justice's ("DOJ") investigation of former House Majority Leader DeLay. CREW specified its request includes, but is not limited to, DOJ's investigation of relationships between Mr. DeLay and Christine DeLay, Dani DeLay, Jack Abramoff, Edwin Buckham, Tony Rudy, Michael Scanlon, Susan Hirshmann, the Alexander Strategy Group, the National Center for Public Policy Research, eLottery, Inc., the U.S. Family Network, Americans for a Republican Majority PAC ("ARMPAC"), Texans for a Republican Majority PAC ("TRMPAC"), and/or the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands. CREW explained that Mr. DeLay was one of the subjects of DOl's extensive investigation into illegal lobbying activities by Mr. Abramoff and others, and described many of allegations DOJ investigated.

Despite this specificity, you advised CREW by letter dated October 22, 2010, that the Criminal Division considers the request "to be broad in scope" and to "not clearly identify the records" CREW is seeking. Accordingly, you requested "clarification regarding the investigation" to which CREW referred, including "the specific time frames covered," CREW's "reference to relationships between Mr. DeLay and the other individuals," and "a further description of the specific information that you are seeking." You also indicated that absent a clarified request, you would administratively close this matter.

On October 27,2010, I spoke by telephone with Kristin Ellis, the Criminal Division's FOIA officer assigned to this request. According to Ms. Ellis, the Criminal Division is unclear about the extent to which CREW seeks records from DOl's investigation into i1legallobbying activities by Mr. Abramoff and others that do not specifically mention Mr. DeLay.

CREW's request stands on its own terms as a reasonably specific request that should enable knowledgeable government employees to locate responsive records. Nevertheless, in an

1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 450, Washington, D.C. 20005 I 202.408.5565 phone I 202.588.5020 fax I www.citizensforethics.org

Rena Y. Kim October 27,2010 Page 2

effort to assist DOl's processing of the request, CREW is willing to accept initially, as a first step toward fulfilling the entire request, a subset of the requested records.

The subset of records CREW will accept initially are witness statements, investigation reports, prosecution memoranda, and FBI 302 reports from DOl's investigation into illegal lobbying activities I in which Mr. DeLay is named or otherwise identified. This includes, but is not limited to, records directly or indirectly related to the individuals and entities specified in CREW's request. To further assist DOJ, CREW will accept responsive records from January 1, 2003 to the present.

After CREW has reviewed the records DOJ produces in response to this portion of the request, CREW will further clarify with DOJ the records needed to fulfill the remainder of the request.

To be clear, CREW is not narrowing the scope of the request. Rather, CREW is willing to accept a subset of records responsive to the request as a first step in DOl's fulfillment of the entire request in stages.

If you have questions or need further clarification, please do not hesitate to contact me at (202) 408-5565 or arappapOli@citizensforethics.org.

,Sl~;.~~ p:;_/iJ

Adam J. Rappapo~/ v

Senior Counsel

I CREW's request assumes DOJ treated the investigation into illegal lobbying activities by Mr. Abramoff and others, including those described in CREW's request, as a single investigation. If DOJ has treated these as multiple investigations, CREW requests records from all of the investigations.

EXHIBIT D

U.S. Department of Justice

Criminal Division

Office of Enforcement Operations

Washington, D.C. 20530

CRM- 201000773F

NOV - 92010

Adam J. Rappaport Senior Counsel

Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 450

Washington, D.C. 20005

Dear Mr. Rappaport:

This is in response to your request dated October 19, 2010, for any witness statements, investigation reports, prosecution memoranda, and FBI 302 reports related to DOJ's investigation of former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay.

We have conducted a search and located records potentially responsive to your request.

However, we have been advised that these records relate to open and on-going law enforcement proceedings, and that release, at this time, could reasonably be expected to interfere with these proceedings by revealing prematurely the nature and scope of the evidence compiled by the government. Therefore we are withholding these records in their entireties pursuant to Exemption 7(A) of the FOIA, 5 U.S.C. § 552(b)(7)(A), which permits the withholding of records or information compiled for law enforcement purposes, but only to the extent that the production of such law enforcement records or information could reasonably be expected to interfere with enforcement proceedings.

You have a right to an administrative appeal of this determination. Department regulations provide that such appeals must be filed within sixty days of your receipt of this letter. 28 C.F.R. 16.9. Your appeal should be addressed to: Office of Information Policy, United States Department of Justice, 1425 New York Ave., NW, Suite 11050, Washington, DC 20530-0001. Both the envelope and the letter should be clearly marked with the legend "FOIA Appeal." If you exercise this right and your appeal is denied, you also have the right to seek judicial review of this action in the federal judicial district (1) in which you reside, (2) in which you have your principal place of business, (3) in which the records denied are located, or (4) for the District of Columbia.

If you elect to file an appeal, please include, in your letter to the Office ofInformation Policy, the Criminal Division file number that appears above your name in this letter.

Sincerely,

~ - A-,~)~.l .

.. ~~ V ¥ _p._

Rena Y. Kim, Chief

Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Unit Criminal Division

2

EXHIBIT E

Page 1

Lexisf-lexis"

22 of 112 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2010 Capitol News Company, LLC All Rights Reserved

Politico.com

August 16,2010 Monday 8:55 AM EST

LENGTH: 997 words

HEADLINE: DeLay 'knew this day would come'

BYLINE: Mike Allen, Josh Gerstein

BODY:

After almost six years of investigation, the Justice Department has decided not to bring corruption charges against former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay over his involvement with disgraced lobbyist Jack Abramoff and other ethics issues, DeLay and his attorneys said Monday.

"I always knew this day would come. My only hope was that it would come much sooner than the six years we've been doing this," DeLay said Monday during a conference call with reporters. "While I will never understand why it took so long for the Justice Department to conclude that I was innocent, I am nevertheless pleased that they have made their determination."

The investigation lasted through two presidents and four attorneys general. Federal prosecutors' decision not to pursue the Texas Republican in court provides a stark footnote to the lobbying scandals that helped Democrats in 2006 regain the House majority they lost in the "Republican revolution" of 1994. That GOP sweep, during former President Bill Clinton's first term, eventually made the pugnacious DeLay - nicknamed "The Hammer" - one of Washington's top power brokers.

DeLay vigorously defended his conduct and insisted that the flurry of inquiries that drove him from office were entirely the product of his political enemies.

"The new politics is, it's no longer good enough to beat you on policy, they have to completely drown you and put you in prison and destroy your family and your reputation [and] your finances and, then, dance on your grave," DeLay said. "I hope that people will look at my case and decide that the criminalization of politics and the politics of personal is not beneficial to the country and our system, and hopefully it will stop."

DeLay said he cooperated fully with the Justice Department inquiry by providing more than 1,000 pages of documents and e-mails to investigators, but prosecutors never talked to him. "The case was so weak that I was never interviewed by the investigators, nor was I asked to appear before the grand jury," DeLay said.

Abramoff pled guilty to at least five felony counts relating to fraud and corrupt dealings with public officials and was sentenced to more than five years in prison. In all, 20 people have pleaded guilty or have been convicted in connection with the Justice Department's Abramoffprobe, which began under the Bush administration.

Two of those convicted, Tony Rudy and Michael Scanlon, were once senior aides to DeLay. However, DeLay insisted Monday that all of his dealings with Abramoffwere above board.

"Abramoff is a friend of mine just as other lobbyists are friends of mine. We worked together professionally," the former majority leader said. "He never asked me to do anything untoward, nor did I do anything untoward or unethical."

Page 2

DeLay 'knew this day would come' Politico.com August 16,2010 Monday 8:55 AM EST

One prominent ethics watchdog group expressed disappointment at the Justice Department's decision.

"It's a sad day for America when one of the most corrupt members to ever walk the halls of Congress gets a free pass," said Melanie Sloan of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. "The Justice Department's decision not to prosecute Mr. DeLay for his actions sends exactly the wrong message to current and future members. The fact that Jack Abramoffand Bob Ney (R-Ohio) are the only two people who went to prison for one of the worst corruption scandals in congressional history is shocking. The Hammer belongs in the slammer."

DeLay still faces criminal charges related to his political activity: In September 2005, a Texas grand jury indicted him on charges of violating campaign finance laws that ban corporate contributions to state political campaigns, as well as conspiracy. DeLay has maintained he is not guilty ofthose charges, which are still pending.

In Monday's call with reporters, DeLay said he has recognized since the mid-1990s that his role in the conservative movement made him a target for liberal political operatives, so he had lawyers carefully vet all of his activities.

"The thing that bothers me the most, frankly, is not that people think I'm corrupt. It's that they think I'm stupid," DeLay said. "I wouldn't even go to the restroom without a lawyer saying that I could .... For 15 years, I have lived by lawyers."

Indeed, first word that DeLay was cleared by prosecutors came early Monday from Richard Cullen, his lead attor-

ney.

"The federal investigation of Tom DeLay is over, and there will be no charges," Cullen said. "This was one of the longest and [most] expensive and thorough investigations in recent memory. DeLay took a tack right from the start that he had nothing to hide, and we have been in a routine and constant dialogue with [prosecutors]."

Cullen said he was pleased there were no leaks from the government as the investigation ground on. "They played fair," he said.

The Justice Department would not comment publicly on the DeLay case Monday, which is its custom if an investigation does not yield charges. Cullen said a prosecutor from the department's Public Integrity Section phoned him with the news last week and said he was free to make it public.

Cullen said investigators talked to witnesses and checked documents overseas and had an "extremely active grand jury" that heard testimony from former aides and others.

"Several members of Congress [accused in related cases] objected to producing official government records under Speech or Debate Clause concems. DeLay took the opposite position, ordering all his staff to answer all questions. He turned over more than 1,000 documents, and several of his aides gave interviews and grand jury testimony," Cullen said.

A state case continues in Texas, with a hearing scheduled for Aug. 24. A trial is expected next spring and could last several weeks.

DeLay started a consulting firm, First Principles, when he left office. He now spends most of his time at his home in Sugar Land, Texas. He frequently travels to give speeches and works with foster children with his wife, Christine.

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August 16,2010 Monday 9:10 PM GMT

SECTION: DOMESTIC NEWS

LENGTH: 688 words

HEADLINE: Ex-Rep. Tom DeLay unsurprised after DOJ ends probe

BYLINE: By JUAN A. LOZANO, Associated Press Writer

DA TELINE: HOUSTON

BODY:

Former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay said Monday he always knew a Justice Department probe of his ties to disgraced ex-lobbyist Jack Abramoff would end without criminal charges being filed against him because he did nothing wrong.

DeLay said he wishes the investigation hadn't taken six years, but added he isn't bitter.

"I know this is the price ofleadership, but it doesn't have to happen this way," the l l-terrn Republican from suburban Houston told reporters during a conference call. "I hope people will look at my case and decide the criminalization of politics and the politics of personal destruction is not beneficial to our country and hopefully it will stop."

Still, Del.ay's legal problems are not over. He and two associates face money laundering and conspiracy charges in Texas connected to 2002 state legislative elections. A court hearing in that case is set for next week.

"I still have a trial to go through," DeLay said, referring to the Texas case. "I'm hoping to win that. I know I will." Prosecutors say DeLay and his co-defendants funneled $190,000 in corporate money through the Republican National Committee in Washington then back to state legislative candidates in violation of state law.

Earlier Monday, one of DeLay's lawyers, Richard Cullen, announced the Justice Department's Office of Public Integrity informed DeLay's legal team last week that it was ending its investigation of his ties to Abramoff. Politico.com first reported the closing of the probe.

Justice Department spokeswoman Laura Sweeney declined to comment on the end of Del.ay's case, which is normal when the department ends a criminal probe without filing charges.

Melanie Sloan, executive director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, said the Justice Departrnent's decision sends the wrong message to current and future Congressional members.

"The Hammer' belongs in the slammer," Sloan said, a reference to DeLay's nickname, which he got for his tenacity and toughness in politics.

The investigation focused on DeLay's ties to Abramoff, who was once one of Washington's leading lobbyists and cultivated relationships with top Republican leaders.

Page 17 Ex-Rep. Tom DeLay un surprised after DO] ends probe Associated Press Online August 16,2010 Monday 9:10 PM GMT

Abramoff became the center of a federal public corruption probe that ensnared lawmakers, lobbyists, Bush administration officials, businessmen and congressional staffers. Two of DeLay's former associates, Michael Scanlon and Tony Rudy, have pleaded guilty to charges in the Abramoff case and have cooperated with investigators.

DeLay said he has no regrets about how he conducted himself with Abramoff, who served about 3 1/2 years in prison for fraud, corruption and conspiracy and currently is working in a kosher pizzeria in northwest Baltimore.

DeLay's political committee used a skybox leased by Abramoffto entertain donors. DeLay also took trips organized or arranged by Abramoff.

On Monday, DeLay continued calling Abramoff "a friend of mine" and said the trips he took while in Congress were not "horrible" and that he wanted these trips to be paid for by private organizations and not taxpayers.

"The thing that bothers me the most is not that people think I'm COITUpt but that people think I'm stupid. I knew the Democrats were going to come after me," he said. "Everything was absolutely above board, transparent, according to the House rules."

At the height of his political career, DeLay was one of the most powerful men in Congress. DeLay was a darling of conservatives, while Democrats largely despised him. But in 2005, he stepped down as majority leader, the No.2 House job, after he was indicted in Texas.

The following year, he resigned from Congress amid the fallout from the charges in Texas and the probe of his ties to Abramoff.

In 2009, DeLay competed on ABC's hit show "Dancing With the Stars." He withdrew from the dance-off after being diagnosed with stress fractures in both feet.

DeLay said he now runs a consulting firm based in the Houston suburb of Sugar Land and is focused on rebuilding the conservative movement, including offering support to the tea party movement.

Associated Press Writer Pete Yost contributed to this report from Washington.

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The Washington Post

August 17, 2010 Tuesday Met 2 Edition

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LENGTH: 841 words

HEADLINE: Justice drops probe of DeLay ties to Abramoff

BYLINE: R. Jeffrey Smith

BODY:

Former House majority leader Tom DeLay (R-Tex.) was both defiant and ebullient on Monday after hearing that the Justice Department had dropped its six-year investigation of his interactions with lobbyist Jack Abramoff and a host of other political contributors for whom he allegedly did political favors.

"I always knew this day would come," DeLay said on the telephone from his home in Sugar Land, Tex. He said he has no regrets about his conduct in Washington, insisted that his actions were always legal, and assailed what he called the "criminalization of politics" by a federal ethics enforcement process he considers deeply flawed.

His celebratory remarks came a week before he is slated to return to a Texas courtroom for a pretrial hearing on allegations of felony conspiracy and money laundering, which still could put the 63-year-old politician behind bars. His 2005 indictment in that Texas case is what short-circuited his three-year tenure in one of Washington's most powerful jobs.

The Justice Department declined to comment about DeLay's claim of exoneration, following its policy of not discussing the status or termination of its criminal investigations. A source familiar with the long-running inquiry, in which many witnesses were brought before one or more grand juries, confirmed that it had ended.

Speaking on the condition of anonymity, he said the main reason for dropping the effort was that prosecutors were unable to compel incriminating testimony by a former DeLay aide, Edwin A. Buckham, and find other witnesses or evidence that could have led to a conviction.

Buckham has similarly been cleared by the Justice Department, a source close to DeLay said. Buckham's attorney, David Geneson, declined to comment.

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Justice drops probe of DeLay ties to AbramoffThe Washington Post August 17,2010 Tuesday

In recent years, DeLay has worked on rehabilitating his public image as well as his career, appearing in a television dancing competition, working as a paid consultant to corporations and advising -- by his own description -- the factions that make up the "tea party" movement.

Asked whether he plans to attempt a return to Congress, DeLay acknowledged that his political effectiveness has been hampered by years of scrutiny. People don't necessarily "want to associate with you" after being under such a heavy legal cloud for so long, he said, explaining why he has declined to endorse candidates.

The Justice Department investigation focused in part on payments made by Buckham, a former adviser who was a registered lobbyist in 2000, to cover some of DeLay's expenses on an overseas golf trip. Doing so violated House rules, but DeLay said he was unaware of the payments. Buckham's now-shuttered firm employed DeLay's wife, Christine, from 1998 to 2002 and set up a retirement account for her. A political action committee that Buckham controlled employed both DeLay's wife and his daughter.

The payments amounted to nearly half a million dollars, drawn partly from revenue from corporations and their officers that had interests in legislation pending before the House.

DeLay and Buckham were at one point two of the principal targets in the department's multifaceted probe of Abrarnoff's lobbying practice that led to the convictions of 19 people, including two DeLay aides. DeLay has maintained he was unaware of their wrongdoing. He said Monday that the department "couldn't find anything" otherwise in the documents, e-mails and computer hard drives that his office had turned over to investigators without protest.

The source familiar with the investigation said that some of those working on the probe had disagreed about the importance of holding out for Buckham's testimony when Abramoff himself was potentially available as a cooperating witness. Abramoffrecently worked in a kosher pizza parlor in Baltimore while wrapping up a four-year sentence for conspiracy, mail fraud and tax evasion.

DeLay referred to Abramoff, who admitted to corrupting public officials and defrauding his clients, as "a friend of mine." He said Abramoffs lavish pay from Native American tribes for lobbying had resulted from inattention by the leaders of those tribes.

Known for a hard-edged, take-no-prisoners political style reflected in his nickname, "The Hammer," DeLay decried what he called "new politics" in which opponents try to "drown you," ruin your finances and then "dance on your grave."

When asked whether he thought the recent House ethics charges against Democratic Reps. Maxine Waters (Calif.) and Charles B. Rangel (N.Y.) also resulted an effort to punish successful fundraising and strong political views, DeLay said their cases are different from his.

DeLay's principal attorney, Richard Cullen of Richmond, said the Justice Department's decision also covered Christine DeLay. "We had conversations off and on during '05, '06, '07 that were across the board," Cullen said of his contacts with the Justice Department. "Prosecutors follow leads and a lot of those leads were in the paper."

DeLay and Cullen said that he was never interviewed during the probe. Staff writer James V. Grimald i contributed to this report,

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The Associated Press

October 23,2010 Saturday 07:20 AM GMT

SECTION: WASHINGTON DATELINE

LENGTH: 819 words

HEADLINE: US courthouse still busy with Abramoff scandal

BYLINE: By PETE YOST and BEN NUCKOLS, Associated Press Writers

DATELINE: WASHINGTON

BODY:

Jack Abramoff, the high-living mastermind of an influence-peddling ring that became a scandal, is working at a pizza shop while the legal system grinds away at the carnage he left behind.

At the federal courthouse in Washington, one former Abramoff associate is being tried for a second time, a former White House official from the George W. Bush administration is appealing his convictions following his second trial and the criminal cases against nine other lesser figures are still pending.

Of the 11 Abramoff scandal figures whose cases are still working their way through federal courts, eight six former ex-lobbyists and two ex-congressional staffers pleaded guilty and await sentencing. A ninth, Fraser Verrusio, a former aide to Rep. Don Young, R-Alaska, faces a trial for allegedly taking a free trip to the 2003 World Series. Justice Department spokeswoman Laura Sweeney declined to comment on whether the investigation is continuing.

Abramoff, meanwhile, reports for work daily at Tov Pizza in northwest Baltimore.

"The guy's way overqualified for what he's doing here," Ron Rosenbluth, owner of the kosher pizzeria, said Friday. A prominent Republican lobbyist who once charged clients $750 a hour, Abramoffpleaded guilty to conspiracy,

fraud and tax evasion in January 2006 and has cooperated with prosecutors in bringing other cases.

He was released from a minimum-security prison camp in western Maryland on June 8 after serving about 3 1/2 years. He spent just three days in a halfway house in Baltimore, then was placed in home confinement, in part because he got ajob.

Abramoff will continue working at Tov Pizza until his supervision by the federal Bureau of Prisons ends in December, Rosenbluth said.

Rather than making pizzas or greeting customers, Abramoff has helped the restaurant keep better track of the results of its advertising and contact with customers through e-mail and Facebook. He's also pushing Rosenbluth to launch a frozen product line and working on a few other projects that haven't yet come to fruition.

"These things sound like they would be simple, but I wasn't doing them," said Rosenbluth. "It's been good."

On Friday in Washington, three federal appeals judges wrestled with whether the George W. Bush administration's former top procurement official, David Safavian, got a fair trial the second time around.

Page 2 US courthouse still busy with Abramoff scandal The Associated Press October 23,2010 Saturday 07:20 AM GMT

Safavian's lawyer argued his case in a fifth-floor courtroom, the day after the retrial of ex-lobbyist Kevin Ring got under way on the fourth floor.

In appealing Safavian's convictions a second time, his lawyers say he was the victim of vindictive prosecution at his retrial, in which he was convicted of obstructing justice and making false statements to investigators.

Safavian provided Abramoffwith information on two pieces of government-controlled property Abramoff wanted, and Safavian accepted a lavish golfing junket to Scotland paid for in part by Abramoff.

The prosecution of Safavian rests in part on new charges that the govemment added after Safavian's successful appeal following conviction at his first trial in 2006.

Prosecutors "upped the ante" and the added charges can only be viewed as vindictive prosecution, complained Safavian attorney Shannen Wayne Coffin.

The U.S. District Court "didn't view it that way," observed appeals court judge Douglas H. Ginsburg, an appointee of President Ronald Reagan.

The judge "was mistaken," replied Coffin, who said the govemment's evidence for the new charges was evidence in support of a charge in the first trial as well.

In the Ring retrial, several former Team Abramoff lobbyists will likely be called to testify in support of the prosecution, including lobbyists Neil Volz, Todd Boulanger and Tony Rudy.

The first trial of Ring ended a year ago with jurors unable to agree on his guilt after defense lawyers argued he was just doing his job by trying to influence policymakers.

Reflecting the unexpected twists and turns in white-collar cases, the Justice Department doesn't plan to call any of the public officials whom Ring is accused of corrupting,

Two of them, former Justice Department official Robert Coughlin and former congressional staffer John Albaugh, pleaded guilty but say after all this time they don't believe they took official actions because of meals and tickets paid for by the Abramoff firm.

One of Abramoff's former associates whose case is pending is Michael Scanlon, who is asking a judge to strike part of Scanlon's plea in light of a Supreme COUli ruling in another white-collar crime investigation, the Enron scandal.

In June, the Supreme COUJi weakened the honest services fraud law designed to criminalize conduct that might be used to deprive the public of the honest services of a government official. Scanlon pleaded guilty to conspiring to violate the honest services law.

Nuckols reported from Baltimore. Associated Press writer Nedra Pickler in Washington contributed to this report.

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September 4, 2010 Saturday

LENGTH: 278 words

HEADLINE: U.S. Ends Six-Year Probe of Ex-Majority Leader DeLay

BYLINE: By CQ Staff

BODY:

The Justice Department's decision not to further pursue a probe of former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, R- Texas (1985-2006), brings to an end a six-year investigation that indirectly led to the lawmaker's departure from Congress. (Probe, 2006 Almanac, p. 4-9)

DeLay was informed Aug. 16 that investigators have dropped the investigation of his ties to disgraced ex-lobbyist Jack Abramoff. "As you can imagine, today is a very happy day for the DeLay family," DeLay said in a conference call with reporters.

DeLay also criticized the investigation. "I know that this is the price of leadership, but frankly, it doesn't have to happen this way," he said. "I hope that people will look at my case and decide the criminalization of politics and the politics of personal destruction is not beneficial to the country or to our system, and hopefully it will stop."

DeLay also said he has not spoken with two of his former aides who pleaded guilty to allegations stemming from the Abramoff investigation. Michael Scanlon, DeLay's former spokesman who later opened his own public relations firm and colluded with Abramoffto overbill American Indian tribes for services, and Tony Rudy, DeLay's former deputy chief of staff who later became a "Team Abramoff" lobbyist, have yet to be sentenced. Abramoff, who was sentenced to four years in prison on fraud and corruption charges, is scheduled for release in December and moved to a halfway house earlier this year.

DeLay said he has no regrets about his relationship with Abramoff, including traveling on junkets. Source: CQ Weekly

The definitive source for news about Congress.

©20 1 0 Congressional Quarterly Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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The Associated Press

November 22,2010 Monday 09:28 PM GMT

SECTION: WASHINGTON DATELINE

LENGTH: 1204 words

HEADLINE: People caught in up the Abramoff corruption probe

BYLINE: By The Associated Press

BODY:

The lawmakers, lobbyists, Bush administration officials, congressional staffers and businessmen caught up in the Jack Abramoffpublic corruption probe:

Abramoffwas sentenced in September 2008 to four years in prison on charges of mail fraud, conspiracy and tax evasion. Since pleading guilty in 2006, the once-powerful lobbyist has cooperated with the federal investigation of influence-peddling in Washington. He was sentenced to a six-year prison sentence in a criminal case out of Florida, where he pleaded guilty in January 2006 to charges of conspiracy, honest services fraud and tax evasion in the purchase of gambling cruise boats. He was released to a halfway house in June 2010 and then home confinement and has been working at a pizzeria.

David Safavian, the former chief procurement officer in the administration of President George W. Bush, was sentenced in October 2009 to a year in prison after being found guilty in a retrial in December 2008 for lying to investigators about his relationship with Abramoff, who provided gifts in return for information from Safavian about government property the lobbyist wanted to acquire. Safavian's 2006 conviction on similar charges was overturned on appeal. The U.S. COUli of Appeals heard arguments in his appeal of his second set of convictions on Oct 22.

Kevin Ring, an ex-lobbyist who worked for Abramoff, was convicted Nov. 15 of bribing public officials with expensive meals and exclusive event tickets. An earlier jury could not agree on a verdict in October 2009 on charges that Ring showered tickets and meals on employees ofthen-Republican Reps. John Doolittle of California and Ernest Istook of Oklahoma and the Justice Department in return for congressional appropriations and other assistance for Abramoff's clients. The second trial found the 40-year-old former Republican congressional aide guilty of conspiracy, honest services fraud and giving an illegal gratuity to an aide of former Attorney General John Ashcroft. Sentencing is scheduled for March 1.

Former Rep. Bob Ney, R-Ohio, served a prison term and was released in August 2008. He acknowledged taking bribes from Abramoff. Ney was in the traveling party on an Abramoff-sponsored golfing trip to Scotland that was at the heart of the case against Safavian.

Fonner Deputy Interior Secretary Steven Griles, the highest-ranking Bush administration official convicted in the scandal, was sentenced to 10 months in prison for obstructing justice. He admitted lying to a Senate committee about his relationship with Abramoff, who repeatedly sought Griles' intervention at Interior on behalf of Indian tribal clients.

Page 2 People caught in up the Abramoff corruption probe The Associated Press November 22, 2010 Monday 09:28 PM GMT

John Albaugh, a one-time top aide to Istook, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to defraud the House. Albaugh admitted in federal court in Washington that he accepted meals and sports and concert tickets, along with other perks, from lobbyists in exchange for official favors. He is cooperating with investigators.

Robert E. Coughlin II, a Justice Department official, pleaded guilty to conflict of interest. He admitted in federal court in Washington that he accepted meals, concert tickets and luxury seats at Redskins and Wizards games from Ring, while helping the lobbyist and his clients. Coughlin is cooperating with investigators. In November 2009, a U.S. District judge said Coughlin did not deserve prison time for his actions.

Italia Federici, co-founder of the Council of Republicans for Environmental Advocacy, was sentenced to two months in a halfway house, four years on probation and a $74,000 fine after agreeing to help federal investigators. She pleaded guilty to tax evasion and obstruction of a Senate investigation into Abramoffs relationship with Interior Department officials.

Tony Rudy, lobbyist and one-time aide to former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, R- Texas, pleaded guilty in March 2006 to conspiring with Abramoff. He is cooperating with investigators and his sentencing is scheduled for Feb. 8.

Michael Scanlon, a former Abramoffbusiness partner and DeLay aide, pleaded guilty in November 2005 to conspiring to bribe public officials through his lobbying work on behalf of Indian tribes and casino issues. He is cooperating with investigators and his sentencing is scheduled for Tuesday.

William Heaton, Ney's former chief of staff, pleaded guilty to a federal conspiracy charge involving a golf trip to Scotland, expensive meals, and tickets to sporting events between 2002 and 2004 as payoffs for helping Abramoffs clients. He cooperated with investigators and was sentenced to two years probation and a $5,000 fine.

Neil Volz, a former chief of staff to Ney who left govemment to work for Abramoff, was sentenced to two years of probation, 100 hours of community service and a $2,000 fine after pleading guilty to conspiring to corrupt Ney and others with trips and other aid.

Mark Zachares, former aide to Rep. Don Young, R-Alaska, pleaded guilty to conspiracy. He acknowledged accepting tens of thousands of dollars worth of gifts and a golf trip to Scotland from Abramoffs team in exchange for official acts on the lobbyist's behalf. He was sentenced to four years probation and 12 weekends in jail.

Trevor L. Blackann, a former aide to Missouri Republicans Sen. Kit Bond and Rep. Roy Blunt, pleaded guilty to not reporting $4,100 in gifts from lobbyists in retum for helping clients of Abramoff and his associates. Among the gifts were tickets to the World Series and concerts, plus meals and entertainment at a "gentleman's club."

James Hirni, a former Republican Senate aide and one-time Abramoff associate, pleaded guilty to using wire communications to defraud taxpayers of congressional aides' honest services. Himi acknowledged providing Blackann with meals, concert passes and tickets to the opening game of the 2003 World Series between the Florida Marlins and the New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium.

Todd Boulanger, a former Abramoff deputy, pleaded guilty to lavishing congressional aides with meals and tickets to sporting events, concerts and the circus in exchange for help with legislation favorable to his clients.

Ann Copland, a former aide to Mississippi Sen. Thad Cochran, pleaded guilty to taking more than $25,000 worth of concert and sporting event tickets in return for helping one of Abramoffs top clients, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians.

Roger Stillwell, a former Interior Department official, was sentenced to two years on probation in January 2007 after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor charge for not reporting hundreds of dollars worth of sports and concert tickets he received from Abramoff.

Former Abramoffbusiness partner Adam Kidan was sentenced in Florida in March 2006 to nearly six years in prison for conspiracy and fraud in the 2000 purchase of the Fort Lauderdale-based SunCruz Casinos gambling fleet.

Horace Cooper, a former Labor Department official and one-time aide to former Republican Rep. Dick Armey pleaded guilty in April 2010 to falsifying a document when he did not report receiving gifts from Abramoff and Volz in 2003.

Page 3 People caught in up the Abramoff corruption probe The Associated Press November 22, 20 I 0 Monday 09:28 PM GMT

Fraser Verrusio, a former aide to Young, is fighting charges for allegedly taking a free trip to the 2003 World Series. His trial is scheduled to begin Jan. 25.

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The Associated Press

June 11,2010 Friday 07:06 PM GMT

SECTION: WASHINGTON DATELINE

LENGTH: 454 words

HEADLINE: Ex-congressman: DOJ has closed case against him

BYLINE: By ERICA WERNER, Associated Press Writer

DA TELINE: WASHINGTON

BODY:

Former California Rep. John Doolittle, who retired from Congress while under investigation in the Jack Abramoff lobbying scandal, said Friday that the Justice Department has closed its case against him and will not pursue charges.

"I have been praying for this day for years," the Republican told The Associated Press by phone from his Virginia home.

Doolittle, who retired two years ago after nine terms in the House, said that a Justice Department official informed his attorney of the development last week. A Justice Department spokeswoman declined comment.

It comes as the years long investigation into the dealings of Abramoff, a former top GOP lobbyist, winds down.

Abramoff himself was released to a halfway house this week after serving nearly four years in federal prison on fraud, corruption and conspiracy charges.

Abramoffs cooperation led to guilty pleas from Rep. Bob Ney, R-Ohio, former Deputy Interior Secretary 1. Steven Griles and more than a dozen others.

Doolittle, who was friends with Abramoff and helped some of the lobbyist's clients, spent years under investigation. The connection the Justice Department appeared most interested in was a $5,000-per-month event-planning job that Doolittle's wife, Julie, did for Abramoffs firm. Her pay totaled $66,690.

After the FBI raided his home in 2007 he was forced to give up his seat on the powerful Appropriations Committee.

With a Democrat mounting a strong challenge in his Northern Califomia district, the pressure became too much and Doolittle decided to step down.

"I finally got to the point I couldn't fight the war on two fronts, waging a campaign against my Democrat opponent coming up, and basically fighting the Justice Department's efforts to wrongly prosecute me," Doolittle said Friday.

He said he did nothing wrong and has no regrets about any of his actions. "I look forward to being able to finally throw offthis uncertainty, get rid of this defamatory cloak that's been cast over me by my own government," he said.

The job for Doolittle's wife figures in an ongoing remnant of the Abramoff scandal: The prosecution of Doolittle's former legislative director Kevin Ring, who later went to work with Abramoff as a lobbyist. Ring was accused of buy-

Page 2 Ex-congressman: DOJ has closed case against him The Associated Press June 11,2010 Friday 07:06 PM GMT

ing government officials expensive meals and tickets in exchange for helping his clients, and of lying about his knowledge that Abramoff arranged the event-planning job. Doolittle was named as an unindicted co-conspirator.

Ring's trial ended in a hung jury and mistrial last year and a retrial is set for next month. He was only the second person implicated in the scandal to fight criminal charges at trial rather than plead guilty and cut a deal in exchange for the possibility of a reduced sentence.

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November 16, 2010 Tuesday Suburban Edition

SECTION: A-SECTION; Pg. A06

DISTRIBUTION: Every Zone

LENGTH: 654 words

HEADLINE: Ring guilty on five counts in Abramoffbribery case

BYLINE: Spencer S. Hsu

BODY:

A federal jury Monday convicted Washington lobbyist Kevin A. Ring on five of eight counts related to the Jack Abramoffbribery and influence-peddling scandal, handing a victory to the Justice Department unit charged with fighting corruption in government.

After a two-week trial and three days of deliberation, the D.C. panel of eight men and four women found Ring guilty on charges of conspiracy, fraud and illegal gratuities related to his work with disgraced lobbyist Abramoff and Ring's former boss, then-Rep. John T. Doolittle (R-Calif).

The jury acquitted Ring, of Kensington, on three counts of fraud in his dealings with John C. Albaugh, chiefofstaff to then-Rep. Ernest 1. Istook Jr. (R-Okla.), who recanted his testimony against Ring shortly before trial.

"Another member of 'Team Abramoff has been held accountable for his actions," Mythili Raman, a senior official for the Justice Department's criminal division, said in a statement. "We are committed to bringing to justice those who seek to corrupt our democratic process."

A downcast Ring and his lead attorney, Andrew Wise, declined comment. U.S. District Judge Ellen S. Huvelle set sentencing for March 1 and allowed Ring to remain free on his own recognizance.

The decision nearly closes the book on a four-year investigation that transfixed official Washington earlier this decade, exposing the excesses and reach of unscrupulous K Street players into the White House, executive branch agencies and Capitol Hill.

The verdict brings to 19 the number of lobbyists, public officials and legislative aides - including an Ohio congressman and a deputy secretary of interior - ensnared by the corruption probe, admitting or being found guilty of trading government favors worth millions of dollars for Abramoff clients in return for an "endless expense account" of lavish meals, tickets to sporting events and luxury vacations.

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Ring guilty on five counts in Abramoffbribery case The Washington Post November 16, 2010 Tuesday

Congress has since adopted clearer disclosure and gift rules. Still, the Ring case showed how legal limits remain murky and prosecutions rare, even as his supporters said he was a peripheral player targeted by overzealous investigators.

Wise argued that Ring was just doing his job as a lobbyist - influencing public officials - using the same tools that were used "all over town" and calling his prosecution "guilt by association."

Prosecutors said Ring and other members of "Team Abramoff" boasted freely in e-mails about using gifts to "thank" or "invest" in officials for taxpayer-funded favors such as a $16.3 million Justice Department grant to build a prison for a client, a Mississippi Choctaw Indian tribe.

The government said Ring helped scheme to provide Doolittle's wife a $96,OOO-a-year job that required little work, and worked with Robert E. Coughlin II, a Justice official who pleaded guilty to criminal conflict of interest for accepting gifts from Ring.

Juror Stephen Baker, a tax accountant, called the government's lengthy pursuit of Ring, a relatively minor figure, "a waste of time and money." But, Baker added, prosecutors flooded jurors with a consistent stream of evidence, concluding, "The law is what it is."

Abramoff investigations are winding down. In June, the Supreme Court forced Ring prosecutors to streamline their case, narrowing the government's use of a 1988 "honest services fraud" statute only to bribes and kickbacks for specific acts, not broader patterns of corruption without an explicit quid-pro-quo.

One-time targets Doolittle and Tom Delay (R-Tex.), former House majority leader, announced this summer that they would not be charged.

One more defendant, Fraser Verrusio, a former aide to Alaska congressman Don Young (R), is scheduled for trial early next year on charges that he allegedly sought and received an all-expenses-paid trip to Game I of the 2003 World Series in New York.

Abramoff is set to complete a four-year sentence in home confinement in Baltimore next month. hsus@washpost.com

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