You are on page 1of 2

COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA

HOUSE OF DELEGATES
RICHMOND

TIM HUGO

SCOTT A. SUROVELL COMMITTEE ASSIGNMENTS:


POST OFFICE BOX 289 CITIES, COUNTIES AND TOWNS
MOUNT VERNON, VIRGINIA 22121 SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

FORTY-FOURTH DISTRICT

 
 
January 11, 2011 
 
*****FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE***** 
 
Contact:  Christopher Bea, Legislative Assistant 
    DelSSurovell@house.virginia.gov 
    Mobile 571.643.9785 
 
Delegate Scott Surovell spoke today regarding his introduction of House Joint Resolution 604.  
The resolution calls for a constitutional amendment which would authorize counties and cities which 
contain at least two thirds of the Commonwealths population to repeal state legislation.  The 
amendment is similar to the proposed Federal “repeal amendment” which would grant similar power to 
state legislatures to repeal Federal legislation.   
 
Surovell introduced the amendment in response to House Joint Resolution 542, introduced by 
Delegate Jim LeMunyon.  “It’s a check on power and what Delegate Jim Lemunyon and the Speaker 
proposed in the amendment I think opens and interesting discussion.  I think it’s a discussion we ought 
to have at the state level” Surovell said in an interview with Ryan Nobles of WWBT in Richmond. 
 
Surovell was quick to point out that the General Assembly has passed along more and more 
unfunded mandates to localities, while limiting options for increasing local revenue.  Additionally, the 
localities pass their revenue to the Commonwealth for reallocation throughout Virginia.  “Richmond has 
used local governments as a source of funding with little regard to the impact on the cities and 
counties,” Surovell said.  “We require state fiscal impact statements to be attached to legislation, but no 
accounting of the impact to localities.” 
 
Surovell further noted that an amendment to the Commonwealths constitution avoids many of 
the problems he sees the federal amendment having.  “Unlike Congress, the General Assembly doesn’t 
handle national security or foreign policy.  Local government and the General Assembly have access to 
the same information; we just have different areas of responsibility.”   
 
Special interests are likely to oppose such a repeal amendment.  Surovell pointed out that in a 
Dillon Rule state, special interest only need to lobby the 140 members of the General Assembly.  “I think 
this amendment would cut down on the influence of special interests, as it would require lobbyists to 
deal with local government in addition to state legislators.” 
 
Surovell doubts the amendment’s repeal process would be open to abuse.  “Under this 
amendment, repealing legislation passed in Richmond wouldn’t be easy.  You’d need to build a real 

DISTRICT: (571) 249-4484 • RICHMOND: (804) 698-1044 • EMAIL: DELSSUROVELL@house.virginia.gov


coalition of localities and no one region could dominate the process.”  Surovell anticipated that the 
amendment would only come into play in the case of particularly egregious state legislation.  “5.3 
million Virginians won’t mobilize over something that’s not actually a real problem for local 
governments.” 
 
HJ 604 will come before the Constitutional law subcommittee of the House Committee on 
Priveleges & Elections.  Surovell was hopeful that the resolution would provoke discussion amongst his 
colleagues.  “Regardless of how the resolution fares, I think this is the start of an important discussion 
on the relationship between Richmond and local governments.”