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WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - INDEX Page 1 of 2

27 September – 16 October 2005

FIDE World chess championship 2005
San Luis, Argentina / 8 players / XX category
The FIDE World Championship in San Luis is the reality in which nobody believed. The
might-have-been match Ponomariov – Kasparov in 2003 year also scheduled in Argentina
instilled no optimism. Now it is for real. The participants arrived to San Luis; the prize fund is
guaranteed. Three years late Illumzhinov finally managed to follow out FIDE champion cycle.
En route to this final chess lost Kasparov; no one promises Kramnik the match with the
winner... Nevertheless, in Argentina we will be treated with one of the most exciting chess
events of the decade. Most of top players are participating. A thrilling fight awaits us. The
stakes are extremely high!

Player's list
Vishwanathan ANAND (IND) Judit POLGAR (HUN)
Born on 11.12.1969 Elo 1.07.2005 – Born on 23.07.1976 Elo 1.07.2005 –
2788 2735
Champion of the world FIDE Ko 2000 Champion of Hungary 1991
Champion of the world (rapid) 2003 Winner 1st place in Hastings 1992 1st in Madrid
of the World Cup 2000, 2002 Four-times 1994
winner of the Oscar voting 1st in Hoogoven 1998, 2001 and 2003
Best in FIDE Ko – winner in 2000 year Best in FIDE Ko – quarterfinal in 1999 year

Veselin TOPALOV (BUL) Michael ADAMS (ENG)
Born on 15.03.1975 Elo 1.07.2005 – Born on 17.11.1971 Elo 1.07.2005 –
2788 2719
World FIDE Ko semifinalist 2004 World FIDE Ko finalist 2004
1st place in Sofia 2005 1st in Madrid Semifinalist World FIDE Ko 1997, 1999 and
1996 1st in Amsterdam 1996 1st in 2000
Novgorod 1996 1st place in Dos-Hermanas 1999
Best in FIDE Ko – semifinal in 2004 year Best in FIDE Ko – final in 2004 year

Peter LEKO (HUN) Alexander MOROZEVICH (RUS)
Born on 8.09.1979 Elo 1.07.2005 – 2763 Born on 18.07.1977 Elo 1.07.2005 –
World chess championship vs Kramnik 2004 2707
– 7:7 Champion of Russia 1998
Winner of candidates tournament in 1st place in Biel 2003, 2004 1st in
Dortmund 2002 1st in Linares 2003 1st in Kishinev 1998
Wijk aan Zee 2005 1st in Monaco Melody Amber 2002 and 2004
Best in FIDE Ko – 1/16 final in 2000 year Best in FIDE Ko – 1/8 final in 2001 year

Peter SVIDLER (RUS) Rustam KASIMDZHANOV (UZB)
Born on 17.06.1976 Elo 1.07.2005 – Born on 5.12.1979 Elo 1.07.2005 – 2670
2738 Champion of the world FIDE Ko 2004
Champion of Russia 1994, 1995, 1997 and Champion of Asia 1998 vicechampion
2003 2003
World FIDE Ko semifinalist 2001 1st place in Essen 2001 1st in Pune 2004
1st place in Tilburg 1997 1st in Biel 2000
Best in FIDE Ko – winner in 2004 year
Best in FIDE Ko – semifinal in 2001 year

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - INDEX Page 2 of 2

Table & Schedule

1 Peter LEKO 2763 = 0 1 = 1 = 0 0 = = 0 = 1 = 6.5

Alexander
2 2707 = 0 = 1 = = 0 1 0 = = = 1 = 7
MOROZEVICH

3 Peter SVIDLER 2738 1 1 1 = = = 0 = 1 = = = = = 8.5

4 Judit POLGAR 2735 0 = 0 0 = 1 0 = = = 0 = 0 = 4.5
Wishvanathan
5 2788 = 0 = 1 1 0 = 1 = = 1 = 1 = 8.5
ANAND
6 Michael ADAMS 2719 0 = = = 0 = 0 = = = = = = = 5.5
Rustam
7 2670 = = = 0 1 = 0 0 0 = 1 0 = = 5.5
KASIMDZHANOV
Veselin
8 2788 1 1 1 1 = 1 1 = = = = = = = 10
TOPALOV

1st ROUND 2nd ROUND 3rd ROUND 4th ROUND
September, 28 September, 29 September, 30 October, 1
Leko – Topalov 0-1 Kasimdzhanov – Svidler 1/2 Svidler – Leko 1-0 Leko – Polgar 1-0
Morozevich – Kasimdzhanov Adams – Polgar 1/2 Morozevich – Topalov 0-1 Morozevich – Svidler 0-1
1/2 Topalov – Anand 1/2 Anand – Adams 1-0 Kasimdzhanov – Anand 1-0
Svidler – Adams 1/2 Leko – Morozevich 1/2 Polgar – Kasimdzhanov 1-0 Topalov – Adams 1-0
Polgar – Anand 0-1

5th ROUND 6th ROUND 7th ROUND
Otober, 3 October, 4 October, 5
Anand – Leko 1/2 Kasimdzhanov – Leko 1/2 Svidler – Polgar 1-0
Polgar – Morozevich 1/2 Adams – Morozevich 1/2 Morozevich – Anand 1-0
Svidler – Topalov 0-1 Anand – Svidler 1/2 Leko – Adams 1-0
Adams – Kasimdzhanov 1/2 Polgar – Topalov 0-1 Topalov – Kasimdzhanov 1-0

8th ROUND 9th ROUND 10th ROUND 11th ROUND
October, 6 October, 8 October, 9 October, 10
Topalov – Leko 1/2 Morozevich – Leko 1-0 Leko – Svidler 1/2 Polgar – Leko 1/2
Kasimdzhanov – Morozevich Svidler – Kasimdzhanov 1/2 Topalov – Morozevich 1/2 Svidler – Morozevich 1-0
0-1 Polgar – Adams 1/2 Kasimdzhanov – Polgar 1-0 Anand – Kasimdzhanov 1-0
Adams – Svidler 1/2 Anand – Topalov 1/2 Adams – Anand 1/2 Adams – Topalov 1/2
Anand – Polgar 1-0

12th ROUND 13th ROUND 14th ROUND
October, 11 October, 13 October, 14
Leko – Anand 0-1 Adams – Leko 1/2 Leko – Kasimdzhanov 1-0
Morozevich – Polgar 1/2 Anand – Morozevich 1/2 Morozevich – Adams 1/2
Topalov – Svidler 1/2 Polgar – Svidler 1/2 Svidler – Anand 1/2
Kasimdzhanov – Adams 1/2 Kasimdzhanov – Topalov 1/2 Topalov – Polgar 1/2

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 1 REPORT Page 1 of 14

By grandmaster
Sergey SHIPOV

1.e2-e4 and White loses!

My congratulations to all chess fans with a new grandiose event! The tournament in
Argentina will determine the most legitimate World Champion for the last several
years.

There are many excellent GMs who could have joined the battle for the title. I would suggest the
following eight: Kasparov, Kramnik, Shirov, Ivanchuk, Ponomariov, Gelfand, Bacrot and Akopian. I
don’t think that this squad is really inferior to that in San Luis. However it is impossible to embrace the
boundless. Suppose these two “teams” put together play two big rounds. Apart from participants’
fatigue there will be another problem – other discontented GMs, such as Grischuk, Radjabov,
Kamsky, Lautier, Van Wely, etc. It is a real vicious circle.

Personally, I support FIDE decision to resolve the crisis in a good old tried-and-true way. Let’s recall
the match-tournament Hague-Moscow (1948) organized after Alekhine demise. Only five GM took
part in the event, whereas several strong players such as Fine, Najdorf, Boleslavsky, Bronstein, were
left overboard. Despite this drawback nobody questioned the legitimacy of Botvinnik’s title. Mikhail
Moiseevich convincingly proved that he was not an accidental newcomer on chess Olympus but a
great champion.

Two out of second eight that I mentioned, Kasparov and Kramnik simply refused to fight for the title;
others did not score enough two-year aggregative rating. One way or another, the number of
participants had to be limited. It is hardly possible to figure out any criteria which is better than rating
in this situation.

First round lived up to chess fans’ expectations. The participants started right off the bat! It turned
out though that some entrants were not prepared to hit the ground running. Probably high tension and
enormous pressure took their tall. After all, you don’t play in the world championship every day! The
first round games were ridden with, let’s put it this way, surprising moves. That is a well-known
phenomenon when players react on the pressure with jerky, aggressive moves.

There is a well-known expression “1.e2-e4! and White wins”. All the first round games were opened
with the king pawn move. However, only Black won! Actually, Black could have achieved even more.
Let’s check out the games.

Right after the opening moves Black crossed the line of tolerated risk, but White failed to punish his
opponent. One may say that Topalov had a champion’s luck!

Sicilian Defense B90
Peter LEKO (HUN) – Veselin TOPALOV (BUL)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.f3 e6. The Bulgarian keeps gathering the
harvest on this field well-fertilized with a diligent home preparation.
7.Be3 b5.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 1 REPORT Page 2 of 14

8.Qd2! Topalov’s trademarked variation starts with 8.g4 h6 9.Qd2 b4 10.Na4 Nbd7! – Black leaves
the b4-pawn unprotected. I think everyone remember his memorable victory over Kramnik in Wijk aan
Zee 2005: 11.0–0–0 Ne5 12.Qxb4 Bd7 13.Nb3 Rb8 14.Qa3? Nxf3 15.h3 Nxe4 16.Be2 Ne5 17.Rhe1
Qc7 18.Bd4 Nc6 19.Bc3 d5 20.Nbc5 Qa7 and White resigned.
8...b4. Formerly the line 8...Nbd7 9.g4 Nb6 was regarded comfortable for Black. However, the latest
games prove that Black has some problems if White dismisses the plan with castling long – 10.a4!
9.Na4! Recently Topalov scored another victory over the Russian GM in the capital of Bulgaria:
9.Nce2 e5 10.Nb3 Nc6 11.c4 Be7 12.Ng3 g6 13.Bd3 Nd7 14.Rd1 0–0 15.Qf2 a5 16.0–0 a4 17.Nc1
Nc5 18.Bb1 Qc7 19.Nce2 Be6 20.Bh6 Rfe8 21.Nf5 Bxc4 22.Ne3 Ba6 23.f4 exf4 24.Bxf4 Ne5! and
Black prevailed in these complications (Kramnik – Topalov, Sofia 2005).
9...Nbd7 Veselin is moving in the tideway of his favorite line. However, g2-g4 and h7-h6 are not
played yet. This subtlety favors White. It looks like transition to the French pawn structure is no good
for Black: 9...d5 10.e5 Nfd7 11.f4 Qc7 12.Bd3 Nc5 13.Nxc5 Bxc5 14.Qf2 Qb6 15.0–0 Nc6 16.c3 0–0
17.Rae1 – White is clearly better (Fluvia – Ermenkov, Badalona 2005).
10.0–0–0 d5. Black is opening the center in the situation when White’s e-pawn cant advance to e5.

Chess classics would have been shocked had they see Black play. Indeed, Black lags in
development, his king is still in the center, whereas White is fully prepared for the assault.
11.exd5! This excellent novelty is in full compliance with basic chess principles. Quickness and
determination when it comes to an Upper hand in development. In the game of two Asian youngsters
White opted for an inferior 11.Bf4 Bb7 and after 12.e5 Nh5 13.b3 Nxf4 14.Qxf4 Nc5 15.Nxc5 Bxc5
16.Qd2 Qb6 17.Kb1 Black emerged clearly better, although games was drawn (Teo Wei Xing – K.
Wee, Singpore 2004).
11...Nxd5 12.Bc4. White is playing simply and powerfully. Leko is developing pieces aiming at the
e6-pawn which is the last cover for the black king.
12...N7f6. The move 12...Bb7 should be analyzed. Apparently Veselin tried to fortify the e6-square
as much as possible.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 1 REPORT Page 3 of 14

13.Bg5 Qc7. White was threatening with a blow on d5. The continuation 13...Bb7 14.Rhe1 Be7 fails
to 15.Nf5! 0–0 16.Bxd5 Bxd5 17.Nxe7+ Qxe7 18.Nb6 Rad8 19.Nxd5 Rxd5 20.Qxd5+–.
14.Bxd5. The option 14.Qe2!? Bd6! also deserves attention. To prevent Black from completing
development White has to deliver 15.Nxe6 (inferior is 15.Nf5 Bf4+ 16.Kb1 Bxg5 17.Bxd5 Rb8!)
15...Bxe6 16.Bxf6 (obviously not 16.Bxd5? Nxd5 17.Rxd5 0–0 -/+) 16...Nxf6 17.Bxe6 Bf4+ (after
17...0–0 18.Bb3 Bxh2 19.Kb1 White is slightly better) 18.Kb1 fxe6 19.Qxe6+ Kf8 and at this point with
20.g3 Black is forced to move his bishop to h6. White has a good compensation for the piece. Have a
look at the h8-rook, for example...
14...Nxd5 15.Rhe1 (White’s artillery is deployed; Leko is threatening with shooting down the black
king) 15...Bb7 16.Qe2!

How to protect the e6-pawn?
16...Qd6. The only move. It is clear now, that Topalov’s opening experiment failed. Actually is not
even about equalized-did-not-equalized. Black found himself under a crushing attack!
17.Kb1. Leko’s solid, positional style as is. Since the opponent can’t complete development, the
Hungarian decided to make a prophylaxis move. A simple 17.f4! with the idea of f4-f5 also looks
good. Obviously 17...Nxf4 is impossible – 18.Qg4 Nd5 19.Nxe6, etc.
17...h6 (I think 17...g6 with the idea of bringing the bishop to g7 was a more solid move) 18.Bh4
Nf4. Amazing composure! Veselin withstand the pressure of all White’s army with two pieces.
19.Qf2 Qc7. That is the most important, critical moment of the game! Peter should have recalled the
advice of Dr. Tarrasch, who did not like knights on the edge of the board…

20.Nf5. It turned out that this move was no more than a shot in the air. The knight transfer from a4 to
b6 could have brought victory – 20.Nb6! Rb8 (20...Qxb6 21.Nxe6 Qxe6 22.Qa7!!) 21.Nf5 Bc6
(otherwise, the white rook rolls to d7) 22.Qd4 Rg8 (22...Ng6 23.Bg3 Qxb6 24.Qxb6 Rxb6 25.Bc7+–)
23.Nc4 (now White’s knight have the d6-square at their disposal) 23...g5 24.Bg3 Rd8 25.Ncd6+ Bxd6
26.Nxd6+ Rxd6 (26...Kf8 27.Bxf4 gxf4 28.Rxe6! is even worse for Black) 27.Qxd6 Qxd6 28.Rxd6 Bb5

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 1 REPORT Page 4 of 14

– this ending with an extra exchange is far and away winning for White.
20...g5 21.Bg3 Rc8 (how should White proceed? – he can't bring his knight into play through b6 in
view of Bf8-c5) 22.Qd4. Probably White should have doubled the rooks with 22.Rd2! Even in this
position the success Black’s campaign is under question. For example 22...Rd8 (what else?) 23.Bxf4
gxf4 24.Rxd8+ Qxd8 25.Nc5!
22...Rg8. Naturally, the c2-pawn is taboo.

23.c3? (the only explanation of this poor move is White’s time scramble. He should have returned
the queen to f2) 23...Rd8! (Black is forcing a very important rook exchange) 24.Qxd8+ (after 24.Qe3
Bc6! Tarrasch’s knigh gets into a real mess) 24...Qxd8 25.Rxd8+ Kxd8 26.Ne3 Bc6 27.Nb6 bxc3
28.bxc3 Bg7.

Just five moves down the road the positional dramatically changed. Instead of White’s dangerous
attack we see an endgame in which Black has overwhelming advantage. White’s time scrambler
hastened his defeat, but I doubt that even the best defense would have helped in such a position.
29.Bxf4 gxf4 30.Nd1 Bb5 31.a4 Bd3+ 32.Kc1 Kc7 33.a5 Bh8 34.Kd2 Bb5 35.Rg1 Bc6 36.Ke2
Be5 (Black’s bishops are tearing White’s defense to pieces) 37.c4 Bd4 38.Nf2 Bc3 39.Ne4 Bxa5
40.c5 f5.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 1 REPORT Page 5 of 14

White resigns.

Judit was wrong to pull the tiger by whiskers. He got angry!

Caro-Kann Defense B17
Judit POLGAR (HUN) – Vishwanathan ANAND (IND)
1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Nd7 5.Bd3

This contunuation used to be one of the most popular. Times changed. The continuation authoured
by Igor Zaitsev 5.Ng5 Ngf6 (5...h6? 6.Ne6!) 6.Bd3 e6 7.N1f3 Bd6 (7...h6? 8.Nxe6!) 8.Qe2, etc. is the
main line nowadays.
5...Ngf6 6.Nf3 (White could have taken the thoroughfare with 6.Ng5) 6...Nxe4 7.Bxe4 Nf6 8.Bd3
Bg4. Black managed to solve the problem of developing his passive light-squared bishop.
9.Be3 e6 (it is time to lock the gate) 10.c3 Bd6 11.h3 Bh5 12.Qe2. Judit is waiting. If Black castles
short, White will have a clear plan of kingside attack.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 1 REPORT Page 6 of 14

12...Qa5! This innovation makes sense. Anand has prevented White from castling long. Black is
waiting too! He is going to castle the same wing as White does. The game Frajt. – Vacek, Slovakia
2002 saw: 12...Nd5 13.g4 Bg6 14.0–0–0 Nf4 15.Bxf4 Bxf4+ 16.Kb1 Bxd3+ 17.Rxd3 Qd5 18.Rdd1 b5
19.Rhe1 a5 20.Qe4 Qxe4+ 21.Rxe4 Bc7 and Black did a good job losing this roughly equal endgame.
13.a4 (one may think that this venturesome thrust rules out White’s castling short…) 13...0–0. It is
hard for me to tell why Judit decided to play in risky attacking manner. OK, it is her style, but given her
high class she should have realized how dangerous was this approach for White. Apparently, she
was too ambitions that day…

14.Qc2?! (White should have chosen between 14.0–0 and 14.g4) 14...Bxf3 15.gxf3 Qh5 The black
queen is not only protecting her king, but also attacking White’s weak pawns.
16.0–0–0 (White has no choice) 16...Nd5 17.Kb1.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 1 REPORT Page 7 of 14

Judit’s attack might have been rewarded had her a-pawn been on a2 instead of a4. Alas, pawns
can’t move backwards.
17...b5! (of course! Black uses the a4-pawn to launch his own attack) 18.Rdg1 f6 That is an
interesting way to repel the threat Rg1–g5. On the other hand, this pawn won’t linger on f6 for too
long.
19.axb5 cxb5 20.Bc1. After 20.Bxb5? Nxe3 White loses a piece; I think immediate doubling the
rooks with 20.Rg4!? makes sense.
20...Rab8 (the canon is loaded. The b5-pawn is a cannon-ball that should hit the b3-square) 21.Qe2
Rfe8 22.Qe4 Kh8. A cunning move by Black. Vishy is flurting a little bit, pretending that he is not
going to advance his pawn to f5.
23.h4 (in case of 23.Qg4 does not have to straighten out White’s pawn structure – 23...Qf7!) 23...f5
White’s light-squared bishop is caged.
24.Qe2 Qf7! Now Black can transfer his queen to the opposite wing and bring her into attack. The
point is that White has no resources to create real threats at the kingside.
25.Rg2 (better was 25.Rg5!) 25...Bf4. Both opponents missed a blow 25...e5! It looks like Black is
winning. Indeed, after 26.dxe5 Bxe5 he inevitably sacrifices a piece on с3, with a smashing attack.
For example 27.Qc2 Rec8 28.Re1 (28.Bd2 Nb4) 28...Bxc3 29.bxc3 Nxc3+ 30.Ka1 Rb6 and it is all
over for White.
26.Rhg1 Rg8 27.Be3 Qd7 28.Qd2 Bd6

29.Bc2 (White’s attack is at dead-set. There is nothing to undertake) 29...Qb7 (29...b4 30.c4 b3
31.cxd5 exd5) 30.Bg5?! Running out of time Judit made this final blunder in a tough position. White
could have resisted with 30.Qd3. For example 30...b4 31.c4 b3 32.Bd1 but Black should win this
position anyway. One of attracting options is 32...Qb4! 33.cxd5 Qa4 with a devastating attack.
30...b4 31.c4 b3 32.Bd3 Bb4 33.Qe2 (33.Qd1 Qa6 34.Qxb3 Bc3–+) 33...Qa6! 34.Bh6.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 1 REPORT Page 8 of 14

34...Nc3+! (one should not be Anand to deliver this final attack) 35.bxc3 Bxc3 36.Kc1 Qa3+. Black
could have made it shorter 36...b2+ 37.Kc2 Qa2 38.Rb1 Qb3#!
37.Kd1 Qa1+ 38.Bc1 b2 39.Qe3 (39.Qc2 b1Q!) 39...Bxd4 40.Qd2 bxc1Q+ 41.Qxc1 Qa2

The time scrambler is over. White resigns.

The course of this game was disrupted in the time scramble. Instead of building up pressure White
darted into hand-to-hand fight and nearly lost.

Sicilian Defense B92
Alexander MOROZEVICH (RUS) – Rustam KASIMDZHANOV (UZB)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be2 e5 7.Nb3 Be7 8.0–0 0–0 9.Kh1 Nc6 10.f3.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 1 REPORT Page 9 of 14

Virtually all GMs of Tomsk the winner of the Euro Club Team Championship play this variation.
Kasimdzhanov must have checked good games by Yakovenko and Smirnov in this line. No doubt,
Morozevich, as the team leader is fully aware of his teammate’s analysis. Actually, it is a very
important resourse of preparation for a particular opponent. One should check not only the
opponent’s games but also those by his friends and colleagues. They might have analyzed many
positions together…
10...b5. The position emerging after 10...Be6 11.Nd5 a5 12.Be3 a4 13.Nc1 a3 14.b3 Bxd5 15.exd5
Nd4 16.c4 Nd7 occurred in the games (although move order was different) Jakovenko – Volzhin
(Sochi 2005) and Smirnov – Vallejo (San Vincent 2005). The first saw Dmitry play 17.Nd3, in another
Pavel opted for 17.Bd3 and both won! It looks like White is better here. With this in mind,
Kasimdzhanov decision to deviate seem to be the right one.
11.Be3. Somewhere around this move the players got out of books. In the game Palac, M. –
Sutovsky, E., Pula, 2000 White initiated too risky complications – 11.Nd5 Nxd5 12.exd5 Na5 13.Bd2
Nc4 14.Bxc4 bxc4 15.Na5 Bd7 16.b3 Bf6! 17.bxc4 e4 18.Rb1 e3 19.Bb4 Re8 20.Re1 Rb8 and pretty
soon Black won.
11...Na5 (if 11...Be6 very strong – 12.Nd5) 12.Nxa5 Qxa5 13.Qd2 Qc7. White was threatening with
a standard knight thrust on d5.

14.a4. White conducting the game in a solid positional manner. Morozevich is going to exploit the
weakness of Black’s queenside pawns.
14...b4 15.Nd5. After 15.Nd1 Be6 the threat d6-d5 forces White to play 16.c4, but in this case Black
has gets an excellent position with 16...a5 17.b3 Nd7. The knight will take an perfect position on c5.
15...Nxd5 16.exd5 Bf5. Here and several moves down the road Rustam has not advanced his pawn
to a5. Probably he did not want to loosen the b5 square. However, on a6 his pawn will become a real
weakness.
17.Rfc1 Qa5 18.c4 bxc3 19.Rxc3 Rab8.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 1 REPORT Page 10 of 14

20.Bc4. White could have trade pawns with a little combination: 20.b4!? Qxb4 (20...Rxb4?! 21.Rc4)
21.Bxa6 creating a dangerous remote passer. However, in this case Black strike up counterplay in the
center with 21...e4! I think it is sufficient to maintain equilibrium.
20...Bf6 21.b3 e4 (in my opinion Black is in too much hurry to defuse the situation) 22.Bd4 Bxd4
23.Qxd4 exf3 (after 23...Rfe8 24.f4! White has an edge) 24.Rxf3 Bg6 25.Re3. White has an
advantage due to the weakness of Black’s a6-pawn. No sooner the black queen leaves a5, White
proceeds with a4-a5 fixing the target on a6. Theoretically, Black can sacrifice this target. The problem
is that any endgame will be winning for White. His remote passer will reach the last rank.

25...Rfe8 26.h3 h6 27.Ra2 Rxe3 28.Qxe3 Ra8. Black has to make this awkward move. The white
queen was threatening with penetration to a7.
29.Kh2 Kh7 (both opponents were short of time at this point; surprises were quick to come!) 30.Ra1.
White could have obtained a sizable advantage with 30.Qe7! Qb4 31.a5.
30...Kg8 31.Qf4 Rd8 32.Qd4 (from practical standpoint White should have marked time – 32.Qe3)
32...Re8 33.Rf1?! Alexander went too far. Carried away by a fallacious attacking idea he let his
opponent activate pieces and advance his a-pawn!
33...Qb4 34.Rf4 Re5 35.Qf2 (aiming at the f7-pawn) 35...a5! That is a cool reply by an experienced
defender. The discovered attack at the black king is not innocuous.
36.Bd3 With all its flaws it is a consequential move. Otherwise White’s previous play makes no
sense.
36...Qxb3 37.Bxg6 fxg6 38.Rf8+ Kh7. It turned out that “winning” move 39.Qf7 prepared by
Morozevich is met with a simple refutation 39...Qxd5! and the checkmate on g8 is called off.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 1 REPORT Page 11 of 14

39.Rd8 Rf5 (Black must not allow the white queen to f8) 40.Qd4. At this point Rustam let the victory
slip with the last move before the time control.

40...Qxd5 Black should have played 40...Rg5! first, threatening with checkmate in two and only after
41.Qd2 captured the pawn with 41...Qxd5. The point is that in such move order 42.Rxd6 fails to
42...Rxg2+! and Black transposes into a winning queen endgame.
41.Rxd6! Qxd4 (probably the queens on the board offered more practical chances – 41...Qb3!?)
42.Rxd4 g5 43.Kg3.

Although not without some problems White managed to hold this rook endgame. As this outcome
seems logical, I omitted some subtleties.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 1 REPORT Page 12 of 14

43...h5 44.Rc4 Kh6 45.Rc6+ g6 46.Ra6 Rc5 47.Kh2 Kg7 48.g3 g4 49.hxg4 hxg4 50.Kg2 Re5
51.Kf2 Kf7 52.Ra7+ Kf6 53.Ra6+ Kf5 54.Rc6.

54...Re4. Draw.

There was no real fight in this encounter of two friends. Actually friendship has nothing to do with it.
As we all know, friends are OK, when they don’t get in the way, especially at the World
Championship! The reason is quite different. Black played for a very solid, bullet-proof opening,
whereas Peter’s preparation was not sufficient to wrest some advantage.

Petroff Defense C42
Peter SVIDLER (RUS) – Michael ADAMS (ENG)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 I am sure that Michael won’t entertain his opponents with opening surprises at
this event. He has a good lucubrated repertoire which will be a solid basis for his middlegame play.

3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nf3 Nxe4 5.d4 d5 6.Bd3 Nc6 7.0–0 Be7 8.c4 Nb4 9.Be2 0–0 10.a3 Nc6 11.cxd5
Qxd5 12.Nc3 Nxc3 13.bxc3 Na5 14.Rb1 a6 15.Ne5 Bf5 16.Bf3.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 1 REPORT Page 13 of 14

16...Qe6. That is a novelty. It is hard to say how Peter was going to improve White’s play in the
game Blehm – Urban (Koszalin 1998) which saw 16...Be4 17.Bxe4 Qxe4 18.Rb2 Qd5 19.Re2 Bd6
20.Rfe1 b5 21.Re4 Rae8 22.R4e3 f6 23.Ng4 Rxe3 24.Nxe3 Qb3 25.Qg4 Re8 26.Rf1 Qe6 27.Qd1,
draw. The point is that it can be done on every move!
17.Rb2 (this pawn sacrifice is virtually forced as the rook had nowhere to retreat; 17.Ra1? Nb3)
17...Bxa3 18.Re2 Bxc1 19.Nc6. Almost all white pieces are under attack. However, it breath no life in
the position. The result was just opposite – a drought and dead calm.
19...Qf6 20.Nxa5 Bf4 21.Nxb7 (White regains a pawn but his achievements end there) 21...Rab8
22.Rfe1 g6 23.Ra2 c6 24.Nc5.

The opponents signed a piece treaty. After 24...Rb1 25.Qe2 Rfb8! White has no time for capturing
on a6 because of the threats along the fist rank. The draw by perpetual was a quite possible outcome
– 26.Ra1 R1b2 27.Qxa6 Bxh2+ 28.Kxh2 Qh4+ 29.Kg1 Qxf2+ 30.Kh1 Qh4+ 31.Kg1 Qf2+ etc.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 1 REPORT Page 14 of 14

It would be better if the opponents had performed these moves over the board instead of leaving
most of chess funs in bewilderment. On the other hand, it is their right…

There is no point in discussing the standings after the first round. I would like to note, that the main
favorites, Anand and Topalov are determined to win and not inclined to be overcautious. Other
participants are also eager to fight for the title. The tournament distance is long enough; the bad
starters have a chance to catch up.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 2 REPORT Page 1 of 15

By grandmaster
Sergey SHIPOV

Out-and-out Chess!
The encounter of two main favorites in the last round of any event, when tension
comes to a boil is the best scenario for chess fans. However, the draw is inexorable –
Topalov and Anand met head to head in the second round.

Both still have to prove their favorite status. What if the real favorites are in shadows and will come
to a fore closer to the end of the tournament? We can guess as much as we wish… So let’s focus on
chess and leave calculations and praises for the second part of the event.
The game between the favorites was very long and energy-consuming. It was a real attrition war!
The encounter lasted 100 moves and took 7 hours! The opponents played well but failed to avoid
mistakes.
Let me rein up all possible critics first. Have ever seen a soccer player, who never missed a goal?
There has never been such a player and I really doubt that he will be ever born. Don’t tell me that
playing soccer is more difficult than playing chess. Just have a look at soccer goal – it is so big!
However, even Pele, Maradona and Zidan missed. To err is human. The way it is, the way it will be.
From chessic standpoint I like second round better that first one, although all four games were
drawn. The GMs are getting into tournament, warming up. In the second round they demonstrated
high-level, pithy play. Given a long distance of the event, such an energy outburst might have
happened too early. It does not apply to Topalov though. His unique drive and intensity are well-
known.
On the other hand it is noticeable that not all the players are in the same tonus. For example Svidler
is far from his best. Probably his preparation for the even was ideal. Actually, Peter’s play in
Dortmund left a lot to be desired but, as you all remember, it did not prevent him from scoring a
decent result. Leko has been performing unconvincingly so far. I tend to attribute it to tremendous
pressure he is under. After all, the Hungarian was considered as one of the favorites before the event.
He must forget about it and simply do his job – to play chess. Let’s check out the chess stuffing of the
second round.

I had no doubts that Veselin would push as hard as he can. The encounters of main favorites decide
who will win the title.

Queens-Indian Defense E15
Veselin TOPALOV (BUL) – Vishwanathan ANAND (IND)
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.g3 Ba6 5.b3 Bb4+ 6.Bd2 Be7

7.Bg2. It is interesting to note that Veselin turned off the path of lavish sacrifices: 7.Nc3 c6 8.e4 d5
9.Qc2 dxe4 10.Nxe4 Bb7 11.Neg5 c5 12.d5 exd5 13.cxd5 h6 14.Nxf7 Kxf7 15.0–0–0 and White

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 2 REPORT Page 2 of 15

prevailed in a very complicated battle (Topalov – Anand, Sofia 2005). Certainly both opponents
diligently analyzed this game. If you want to know at what point Black could have played better, ask
Vishy.
7...c6 8.Bc3 d5 9.Ne5 Nfd7 10.Nxd7 Nxd7 11.Nd2 0–0 12.0–0 Rc8 13.e4 c5 14.exd5 exd5
15.dxc5 dxc4 16.c6 cxb3 17.Re1 b2 18.Bxb2 Nc5 19.Nc4 Bxc4 20.Qg4 Bg5 21.Qxc4 Nd3 22.Ba3
Nxe1 23.Rxe1 Re8. The opponents played a long theoretical line which was regarded OK for Black.
White has a good compensation for exchange, the c6-pawn looks strong, but it is really hard to score
the victory.

24.Rxe8+. That is a novelty. It is exactly the case when improving a predecessor is not that hard.
The game Sammalvuo – Veingold (Finland 2004) saw 24.Be4?! g6 25.h4?! Bf6 26.Re3 Qd4 27.Qc2
b5 28.Bc5 Qc4 29.Qxc4 bxc4 30.Bxa7 c3 31.Bc5 Re6 32.Kf1 Rce8 33.f3? c2 34.Ba3 Rxc6 and Black
won easily.
24...Qxe8 25.Bd5 (only at this point the opponents sank into reflections) 25...h5. Here and many
moves down the road Anand was trying to do without g7-g6. I am not sure that this is the only correct
approach.
26. Kg2 Be7 27.Bb2 Bf6.

28. Bc1! Even disrupting Black’s pawn structure is not a fair price for the bishop exchange. Thank to
two bishops White can constantly pester Black’s heavy pieces. It is extremely important!
28...Qe7 29.Be3. The move 29.Bf4 provoking 29...g5 also deserve attention. In this case the white
queen has a chance to infiltrate to f5.
29...Rc7 30.h4 Be5 31.Qd3 Bd6 32.Bg5 Qe8 33.Qf3. What to do with the h5-pawn? Black can’t
play g7-g6 in view of the white queen’s invasion to f6.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 2 REPORT Page 3 of 15

33...b5! (correctly played!) 34.Be3 (if 34.Qxh5 then 34...Rxc6! Black returns exchange with a
roughly equal position) 34...Qe5 35.Qd1 Qe8 36.Qxh5! White has turned down a draw which the
opponent silently offered – 36.Qf3 Qe5!
36...Rxc6 37.Bxa7. The endgame arising after 37.Bxc6 Qxc6+ 38.Qf3 Qxf3+ 39.Kxf3 looks drawing
- 39...a5 40.Ke4 Be7 41.Kd5 b4 42.Bc5 Bd8! and so on.
37...Ra6 38.Bd4 Bf8 39.Be5 b4 40.Qf5. White keeps some initiative going. If he advances his pawn
to h5 and sends another one from g3 to g6, Black will be in real trouble. That is why Anand played...

40...g6! 41.Qf4 Qe7! (this way Black transfers his bishop to g7) 42.Bd4 Ra5 43.Qf3 Bg7 44.Bb6
Rb5. That is the first step toward big problems. Better was 44...Ra6!
45.Be3.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 2 REPORT Page 4 of 15

45...Bc3 (at this point Vishy slacked off. He thought his position was safe but did not realize the
shaky position of his rook on b5; 45...Ra5!) 46.Bg5 Qa7? Here came a real mistake! Black could
have held his ground with 46...Qf8!
47.Qd3! (a double attack at b5 and g6!) 47...Rb6. Another option 47...Qa6 fails to 48.Bd8. Then
White removes his king from the h1-a8 diagonal preparing Bd5-c4; 47...Qb6 is also met with 48.Bd8.
48.Be3.

At this point Anand took an interesting decision. I am sure that in this position just a few would make
the move 48...Qa6!? It looks like Black can hold the opposite-color bishop endgame that emerges
after 48...Qc7 49.Bxb6 Qxb6 – indeed in the kingside only Black’s position is defendable. However,
White can play 50.a4! creating a passer at the queenside. This position is much more difficult to hold.

49.Bxf7+! (This elegant blow brings White two extra pawns) 49...Kxf7 50.Qd7+ Kf8 51.Qd8+ Kf7
52.Qc7+ Kg8 53.Qxb6 Qxa2 54.Qxg6+ Kh8.

It looks like Vishy deliberately went for this position. He probably thought that advancing b4-pawn
promised a saving counterplay. Speaking objectively, Black’s position is lost. However, he has some
practical chances and the Indian GM proved it!
55.Qc6 Qf7 56.g4! Bg7 (otherwise Black can’t get his passer advance) 57.h5. Another winning
method is to construct a mate box for the black king – 57.g5 b3 58.g6 Qg8 59.h5 b2 60.Qb7 Qe6 and
here for example 61.Bf4 Qf5 62.Be5!! Qg4+ 63.Bg3 Qf5 64.h6 Qxg6 65.hxg7+ Qxg7 66.Qxg7+ Kxg7
67.Be5+ and Black has to lay down arms.
57...b3 58.Qe4 b2 59.h6 Bf6.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 2 REPORT Page 5 of 15

I think by this moment Veselin got really tired. In the time trouble mutual mistakes crept in.
60.Bd4. White could have closed the game with 60.g5! Qe7 (60...Bc3 61.g6!) 61.Qxe7 Bxe7
62.Bd4+ Kh7 63.Bxb2 Bxg5 64.Bg7. As Black can’t trade the bishops on h6 White has not problems
winning with two extra pawns.
60...Kg8 61.Bxf6 Qxf6
In this position White’s victory is doubt, at least for a human being at the seven hour in the time the
second trouble. Queen endings are very difficult to play. There are too many lines, too many
positional guidelines.
62.Kg3. Better was 62.f3! For example 62...Qb6 63.g5! Kf7 (63...b1Q 64.Qe8+ Kh7 65.Qf7+ Kh8
66.Qg7#) 64.Qh7+ Ke8 65.Qg8+ Kd7 66.Qg7+ Kc6 67.Qg6+ Kc5 68.Qxb6+ Kxb6 69.h7 b1Q
70.h8Q+–.
62...Qb6! 63.Qc4+ (now 63.g5? fails to 63...Qb8+! and that is Black who wins!) 63...Kh7 64.g5.

64...Qg6! (the only move) 65.Qc7+ Kg8 66.Qb8+ Kf7. Another one! Bad was 66...Kh7? 67.Qb7+
Kg8 68.h7+!
67.Qb7+ Kf8 68.Qb8+ Kf7 69.Qb3+ Kf8 70.Qf3+ Ke7. 70...Kg8? is a red herring - 71.Qa8+ Kf7
72.Qd5+ Ke7 73.h7! b1Q 74.h8Q Qg1+ 75.Kf3

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 2 REPORT Page 6 of 15

Two black queens can’t deliver a single check!
71.Qe3+ Kd7 72.Qd4+ Ke6. Black had an elegant saving line at his disposal: 72...Qd6+ 73.Qxd6+
Kxd6 74.h7 b1Q 75.h8Q Qg1+ 76.Kf3 Qd1+! (after 76...Qxg5? 77.Qd4+ White trades the queens and
transposes into the winning pawn endgame) 77.Kf4 Qc1+ 78.Kf5 Qb1+ 79.Kg4 Qg1+ with perpetual.
73.Qxb2 Qxg5+ 74.Kf3 Qh5+ 75.Ke4

75...Qf5+?! (the easiest way to save the game was 75...Qg6+!) 76.Ke3 Qg5+ This is the decisive
mistake. The question mark is inappropriate here because this position is beyond human capacities.
The line 76...Qh3+ 77.Kd4 Qg4+ 78.Kc5 Qh5+ 79.Kc4 Qd5+ 80.Kb4 Qb7+…let me stop here. Black
escapes by narrow margin with many precise moves.
77.f4 Qg3+ (the h6-pawn is taboo due to the queen loss) 78.Ke4 Qe1+ (78...Qg6+ 79.Kf3 Qh5+
80.Kg3 Qg6+ 81.Kf2+–) 79.Kf3 Qf1+ 80.Kg3 Qg1+ 81.Qg2 Qb1 82.Qc6+ Kf7 83.Qd7+ Kf6. This
position is easily winning for White, providing that he does not blunder perpetual…

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 2 REPORT Page 7 of 15

84.Qg7+ Ke6 85.Qe5+ (more accurate was 85.Kh2! Qc2+ 86.Kh3 Qd3+ 87.Kh4+–) 85...Kf7
86.Qh5+ Kf6 87.Qg5+ Kf7 88.Qh5+ Kf6 89.Qh4+ Kf7

90.h7? The last mistake! Let’s refrain from criticizing Veselin. Everyone could be in such a situation.
Nevertheless, a well-known principle of queen endgames read that the party who has some extra
material should keep his queen closer to the center. This approach offers a chance to avoid the
perpetual, whereas at the edge of the board the queen can’t help her king. We see it happen in this
particular case.
90...Qe1+! 91.Kg4 Qd1+ 92.Kg5 Qd8+ 93.Kh5 Qd5+ 94.Qg5 Qh1+ 95.Qh4 Qd5+ 96.Kg4 Qd1+
97.Kg3 Qe1+ Draw! Topalov was fortuned in the first round; Anand had his portion of luck today. Both
are Fortune’s favorites. One of them should grab the title…

Sicilian Defense B90
Peter LEKO (HUN) – Alexander MOROZEVICH (RUS)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6. I think the first round results determined
Morozevich’s opening choice. Alexander wanted to take advantage of Leko’s poor condition after his
vexing defeat from Topalov.
6.f3 e6 7.Be3. The English attack is a very complicated variation requiring deep preparation of both
parties. Otherwise an inglorious defeat is imminent.

7...Be7 8.Qd2 0–0 9.g4 Nc6 10.0–0–0 Nd7 11.h4 (White is first to launch a pawn attack but it is still
a long way to go) 11...Nde5 12.Qf2 Bd7 13.Kb1.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 2 REPORT Page 8 of 15

13...Na5. That is an interesting novelty. Black leaves his knight on a5 for a while. After 13...b5 14.g5
Qc7 15.Qg3 Nxd4 16.Bxd4 b4 17.f4 bxc3 18.fxe5 cxb2 19.exd6 Bxd6 20.Qc3 Bc6 21.Bxg7 Bxe4
22.Qxc7 Bxc7 23.Bxf8 Bxh1 Black transposed into a good ending (Arizmendi Martinez - Stevic,
Istambul 2003). In another new-century game Black did not do nearly as well: 13...Qc7 14.Rg1 Nxd4
15.Bxd4 b5 16.f4 Nc4 17.Bxc4 Qxc4 18.g5 Rfc8 19.Qd2 b4 20.Ne2 e5 21.b3 Qc6 22.Bb2 Ra7 23.Ng3
– White has a powerful attack (Socko - Solodovnichenko, Barlimek, 2002).
14.g5 Nec4 15.Bc1 (Naturally, it makes no sense for White to trade one of Black’s knights. Let them
brawl about the c4-square!) 15...b5 16.f4 b4 17.Nce2 Qb6 18.Rh2.

18...d5! (Just in time! Even a short delay could have cost Black dearly) 19.exd5. The transposition
to the French pawn structure is in Black’s favor – 19.e5 Bc5 20.Qf3 Nc6 21.Nb3 a5 and so on.
19...Bc5! (A pawn here a pawn there – it doest not really matter. It is much more important to grab
initiative.) 20.Qf3 Rad8 21.Nb3 Any deviation from sharp matter-of-principle continuations is an
indicator of poor form. Instead of retrieving his knight from the center Peter should have launched the
attack of his own with 21.f5!
21...Nxb3 22.axb3 Ne3 23.Bxe3 Bxe3 24.Rd3 Bc5 25.dxe6 Bxe6. When the center is open two-
bishop advantage is quite tangible.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 2 REPORT Page 9 of 15

26. Nc1 g6?! Let’s put it this way, the move made by Morozevich was not obligatory. Why to create
a target for the opponent’s attack. The bishop transfer to the queen side 26...Bd7!? deserved a closer
look.
27.Bh3 Naturally, the trade of bishops favors White. One may think that it is inevitable but
Morozevich found a brilliant rejoinder…
27...f5 28.gxf6 Bf7! (The bishop hid from his opponent, whereas White’s f6 pawn is doomed
anyway.) 29.f5 Both opponents were in time trouble by this point. Morozevich did a better job at this
stage of the game.
29...Bd4 30.fxg6 hxg6 31.Qg4 Bxf6 32.Re2 a5 33.Re4 Kg7 34.Qg3 Rh8 35.Bf5 Rh5 36.Rxd8
Qxd8 37.Be6 Bxh4 38.Qg2 Be8 39.Rg4 Re5 40. Bc4 Re1
The dust has settled. Black not only regained the pawn but also obtained a solid positional
advantage. He has the remote passer and two powerful bishops. White can only hope for his active
pieces.

41.Bd3 Qf6 42.Qd2 Qf2 43.Be2! (the queen exchange is deadly for White) 43...Bf6 44.Rc4 Qg3
45.Rc7+ Qxc7 46.Qxe1. White managed to get rid of the pin along the first rank, but after trading the
rooks Black’s king feels much safer.
46...g5 47.Nd3 Bg6
(The white king although covered with pawns feels some discomfort) 48.Qg1 Qe7 49.Bg4 Qe4
50.Qg3 Bf7 51.Qh3 Bd5 52.Bf5. That is the key moment of the game.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 2 REPORT Page 10 of 15

52...Qh4 It is hard to understand why Alexander did not trade the queens. Apparently, he wanted to
do so in a better situation but the opponent was not in the mood to cooperate. I am sure that much
better was 52...Qh1+! with a sizable advantage in the endgame.
53.Qe3 Qd4 54.Qg3 Bf7 55.Qg2 Qd5 56.Be4 As a good Russian bard once said: “Now he can’t do
what he used to be just lazy for” White skillfully avoided exchanging and foiled Black’ active
operations.
56...Qe6 57.Nc5 Qd6 58.Nd3 Be6 59.Qh1 Qd4 60.Qh7+ Kf8 61.Bf5 Bf7 62.Qh6+ Ke7 63.Qh2 Qd6
64.Qh7 Qb8 65.Bg4! Kf8 66.Qh6+ Ke7 67.Qh7 Kf8 68.Qh6+ Ke7.

Draw.

The next game remained incomplete per se. This fact really pleased the fans of four-fold Russian
champion.

Pirc Defense B06
Rustam KASIMDZHANOV (UZB) – Peter SVIDLER (RUS)
1.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.Nc3 d6 4.f4 Nf6 5.Nf3 0–0 6.Be3 b6. That is an interesting variation of the Pirc
Defense. Since White transfer his king to the queenside Black resolutely opens the position to be first
with an attack.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 2 REPORT Page 11 of 15

7.Qd2 Bb7 8.e5 Ng4 9.0–0–0 c5! 10.dxc5 bxc5 11.Bxc5 Qa5 12.Ba3 dxe5. It turned out that this
position occurred in many games. Rustam introduces a new strong move.

13.Nd5!? White stifles the activity of Black’s pieces with exchanges. In the game Illescas Cordoba -
Marin, Monrariz (2002) stormy complications ensued: 13.h3 Bh6 14.Ng5 exf4 15.Nxf7 Rxf7 16.hxg4
Bg5 17.Ne4 Qxd2+ 18.Nxd2 f3 19.gxf3 Bxf3 20.Bc4 Bxh1 21.Rxh1 Nc6 22.Bxf7+ Kxf7 23.Rxh7+ Kf6
24.b3 Bf4. As a result a roughly equal endgame arose.
13...Qxd2+ 14.Rxd2 Bxd5 15.Rxd5 Ne3 (the line 15...Bh6 16.Bxe7 Bxf4+ 17.Kb1 Re8 18.Bg5 does
not offer a complete equality. For example: 18...Ne3 19.Rc5 Bxg5 20.Nxg5 h6 21.Bb5! etc..) 16.Rd2
Nc6 17.Bb5 Rfc8 18.Bxc6 Rxc6 19.Nxe5 Bxe5 20.fxe5.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 2 REPORT Page 12 of 15

20...Nc4 (after 20...Rac8 21.c3 Nc4 22.Bxe7! the consequences are very similar) 21.Bxe7! (it is a
very profitable exchange rather than a sacrifice) 21...Nxd2 22.Kxd2. The bishop with two pawns are
much stronger that a rook. White’s pawn attack at the queenside is inevitable.
22...Rb8 23.Kc1 (the time trouble takes its toll; why not 23.b3?) 23...Rc4 24.Bd6.

Why did opponents seal a draw at this point? Probably Rustam was under impression that the black
rooks engineer some serious counterplay. One way or another, unbiasedly speaking White’s
advantage is undisputable.

Judit’s fans have all the reasons to feel happy. The queen of chess managed to withstand Adams’
pressure after the first round defeat. I think things will sort themselves for Judit down the road.

Sicilian Defense B48
Michael ADAMS (ENG) – Judit POLGAR (HUN)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be3 a6 (that is a modern interpretation of the
Paulsen variation) 7.Bd3 b5 8.Nxc6 Qxc6 9.e5 Bb4 10.0–0.

10...f5. Here comes the first surprise for the opponent. The game Adams - Lutz (Leon, 2001) went
10...Bxc3 11.bxc3 Bb7 12.Qg4 Ne7 13.Bd4 Ng6 14.Rae1 Qc7 15.Re3 h5 16.Qg3 Ne7 17.Qg5 Qd8
18.Rg3 g6 19.Qf6 Rg8 20.Bc5 Rc8 21.Bd6 Nf5 22.Bxf5 Qxf6 23.exf6 exf5 24.Rd1 and White got a
dangerous initiative.
11.Be2 Bb7 12.Bh5+!? With this interesting novelty White forces Black to loosen the dark squares
in her camp. Previously White tried 12.Bf3 Qc8 13.Bxb7 Qxb7 14.Ne2 Ne7 15.a3 Ba5 16.Nf4 Bc7
17.Bd4 0–0 18.Bc5 Bxe5 19.Bxe7 Bxf4 20.Bxf8 Rxf8 but Black get a decent compensation for the
exchange (Baxter - Smith, Whitby, 1962).
12...g6 13.Bf3 Qc8 14.Bd2 (with a simple threat Nc3xb5! followed by the check from d6) 14...Bxc3
15.Bxc3 Ne7 16.Bb4 Bxf3 17.Qxf3 Nd5 18.c3. The d5-knight is a stronghold of Black’s defense.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 2 REPORT Page 13 of 15

Therefore White’s task is to make this knight move.

18...Qc4 19.Rfd1 Qg4 20.Qd3! (obviously, the queens exchange favors Black in this position)
20...Kf7 21.h3 Qf4 22.Qe2 Qc4 23.Qf3 a5 24.Bd6 a4 25.Rd4 Qc6 26.Rad1. White did a good job
dislodging the black queen from the center. How to continue the attack? The sacrifice on d5 suggests
itself, but it is not Michael’s style. As long as White can improve his position Adams will do so with no
commitments. 26...h6 27.R1d3 Kg7 28.Kh2 Rac8 29.Qg3 Kh7 30.Qh4 Rhg8 31.Rg3. Judit decided
to launch some active operations but it just aggravated her problems.

31...g5 32.Qh5 Rg7 33.Qd1 Nf4 34.h4 Rh8 35.Kg1 Kg8 36.b3! (Michael timely opened the second
front) 36...axb3 37.axb3 Rhh7. Black is prepared for opening the g-file.
38.h5! After this strong move the black rooks look comical.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 2 REPORT Page 14 of 15

38...Rh8? (Judit committed this mistake in the time trouble; she should have started this regrouping
with 38...Kh8) 39.Ba3. White could have forced the exchange of minor pieces with an elegant 39.Be7!
For example: 39...Rxe7 (39...Nd5 40.Bf6!) 40.Rxf4 Kg7 41.Rd4 Ra8 42.Rgd3 Ra7. White is clearly
better although he has to work hard to convert his advantage into the victory.
39...Kh7 40.Bc1 Nd5 41.c4. (necessary activity; otherwise White could have found himself in an
inferior position) 41...bxc4 42.bxc4 Nb6.

43.Rd6. The option 43.Rb3! Rc8 44.Be3 deserves attention. In my opinion White have a dangerous
initiative. The black king is vulnerable in some lines, whereas White’s h5-pawn is a great attacking
tool.
43...Qa4! 44.Qxa4 Nxa4 45.Ra3 Nc5 46.Ra7 Rc8. Black is just in time to coordinate his pieces.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 2 REPORT Page 15 of 15

47.Be3 f4 48.Bxc5. Black should hold this rook endgame. Draw.

Standings after the second round: 1-2. Topalov and Anand – 1.5; 3-6. Svidler, Kasimdzhanov,
Morozevich, Adams – 1; 7-8. Leko and Polgar – 0.5.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 3 REPORT Page 1 of 13

By grandmaster
Sergey SHIPOV

Fisticuffs of the top class!
We had a good old custom in Russia – to fight team against team. There was no room
for sloppy endearments; people scuffled zealously, till it bleeds! Usually about 50 good
old friends-scrappers gathered somewhere outdoors and walloped each other with great
enthusiasm. Real fun for the spectators! It was a huge “fighting club” embracing the
whole country.

Nowadays, of course, we are leaving many old traditions behind. That’s why it was even more
interesting to watch the carnage the grandmasters made in the third round of the World Championship.
Just like here, in Russia, say, a century ago. Blood flew like a water! No draws – this record just can’t be
beaten.
In my opinion, despite different scenarios of the games the results were quite logical. The leaders
increased the gap, but they have a dangerous pursuer now, the one “who is far from his best”, quoting
my yesterday’s commentary.

I have a feeling, that the Indian grandmaster won this game at home. His opening preparation was
better. It's not surprising! Adams's opening repertoire makes his opponents' life easier. It's possible to
plant a bomb in one certain place, being absolutely sure that Adams will sooner or later be there.

Ruy Lopez C92
Vishwanathan ANAND (IND) – Michael ADAMS (ENG)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.c3 0–0 9.h3 Bb7 10.d4 Re8
11.Nbd2 Bf8 12.a4 h6 13.Bc2 exd4 14.cxd4 Nb4 15.Bb1 c5 16.d5. The opponents played a sharp line
of Ruy Lopez Defense. It was extremely popular during the WC matches between Kasparov and Karpov.
Since then it is considered as very dangerous for Black. This encounter only proved this verdict.

16...Nd7 17.Ra3 (the rook with a bright future!) 17...c4. Several recent games demonstrated that the
matter-of-principle breakthrough 17...f5 (the way Karpov played against Kasparov) leads to a strong
White's attack after 18.Nh2! with the idea of Ra3-g3. This maneuver is an integral element of White's
plan.
18.axb5 axb5 19.Nd4 Qb6 20.Nf5 Ne5 (Black's main idea is to place his knight on d3) 21.Rg3. All white
pieces are ready to take part in the assault. Bishops on b1 and c1 are going to ambush!
21...g6. In the game Kotronias – Fox (Cork 2005) White's attack decided in five moves: 21...Kh7 22.Nf3

Kid Chaos :)
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Nbd3 23.Be3 Qc7 24.Bxd3 Nxd3 25.Bxh6! g6 (25...gxh6 26.Ng5+) 26.Bxf8 Rxf8 27.Qd2! and Black
resigned.
22.Nf3 (White has attacked the h6 pawn; Black responds with counterattack) 22...Ned3. And here
comes the bomb!!

23.Qd2!! White launches the decisive attack paying no attention to possible losses. No doubt, Vishy
analyzed everything at home. The game-predecessor also saw Black rooted: 23.Be3 Qd8 24.Bd4 Bc8
25.Bxd3 Nxd3 26.Re3 Kh7 27.b3 Ra2 28.Nh2 Nxf2 29.Qf3 Nxe4 30.Nxd6 Rf2 31.Qxf2 Nxf2 32.Nxe8 Be7
33.d6 Bh4 34.Rgf3 Be6 35.Rxe6 fxe6 36.Rf8 Nxh3+ 37.Kf1 Black resigned (Konguvel – Babu, India
1999). But it's clear that this result wasn't logical...
23...Bxd5. Feeling that he has to deal with the line prepared at home, Michael is trying to find a move
which was less-analyzed by his opponent. But it's impossible to escape from omnipotent Vishy. I won't
even try to reconstruct all the lines analyzed by Anand's team. One hour is not enough. I believe, Black is
lost. Take my word on that. After 23...Nxe1 simple 24.Nxe1 is sufficient as Black loses after 24...Ra1
25.Nxh6+ Bxh6 26.Qxh6 Rxb1 due to 27.Rxg6+ fxg6 28.Qxg6+ Kf8 (also bad is 28...Kh8 29.Qxe8+ Kg7
30.Qe7+ Kg8 31.Qe6+! etc) 29.Bh6+ Ke7 30.Bg5+ Kf8 (30...Kd7 31.Qf7+) 31.Qh6+ Kg8 32.Bf6+- Rxe1+
33.Kh2

Black has two extra rooks and a knight, but it's time to resign. 24...Nxd5 looks interesting. The idea
behind this move is to defend the king with heavy pieces, but White can ignore the black knight:
25.Nxh6+ Bxh6 26.Qxh6 and, for example after 26...Re6 27.Nf3 Nf6 28.Ng5 Rae8 29.Be3 Qc7 30.Bd4 –
Black is defenseless. I can point out one more line: 23...Ra1 24.Nxh6+ Bxh6 25.Qxh6 Qxf2+ 26.Kh2
Nxe1 27.Nh4!+–.
24.Nxh6+! (perhaps, Black hoped to seize the initiative after 24.exd5 Nxe1 25.Nxe1 Ra1 and so on)
24...Bxh6 25.Qxh6. White coolly allows Black's queen invasion.
25...Qxf2+ (after 25...Nxe1 26.Nh4! the blow on g6 is irresistible) 26.Kh2 Nxe1. If 26...Bxe4 then 27.

Kid Chaos :)
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Ng5! Nxe1 28.Bxe4 Qf6 29.Nxf7! etc.; the line 26...Nxc1 27.exd5 Ncd3 28.Re6!! was no better for Black.

Michael probably thought that White had to force a draw sacrificing the rook on g6.
But Anand played 27.Nh4! (being down a rook, White is coolly building up the pressure) 27...Ned3. The
path 27...Ra7 28.Nf5 Qxg3+ 29.Kxg3 gxf5 30.Qf6! (30.Qg5+ Kf8 31.Qf6 Re6) 30...Re6 31.Qd8+ Kh7
32.exf5 also leads nowhere as the retreat of the Black's rook from e6 brings the king to a scaffold.
28.Nxg6! (the town gates are broken, there is no defense) 28...Qxg3+ 29.Kxg3 fxg6 30.Qxg6+ Kf8 (or
30...Kh8 31.Bg5) 31.Qf6+ Kg8 32.Bh6. Now after 32...Ra7 White plays 33.Qg6+ winning a rook. Black
resigned.

It wasn't a battle but a massacre!

The game of namesakes demonstrated that there is bad form and there is bad form!

Ruy Lopez C88
Peter SVIDLER (RUS) – Peter LEKO (HUN)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0–0. An intriguing moment! Will
Svidler allow Marshall Counterattack? Do you remember the 5th game of the Brissago match? Kramnik
lost this game to Leko in this very opening, and Svidler was the main analyst in Vladimir's team.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 3 REPORT Page 4 of 13

I thought that Kramnik's team had found a refutation later, but Svidler opted for… 8.h3 – It is a common
way to avoid complications.
8...Bb7 9.d3 Re8 10.a4. Relatively sharp continuation. Cautious players prefer 10.a3, for example:
10...Bc5 11.Nc3 d6 12.Nd5 h6 13.c3 Ba7 14.Be3 Bxe3 15.Rxe3 Nd7 16.Ba2 Ne7 17.Nxe7+ Qxe7 18.Nh2
Nf6 19.Ng4 draw (Kramnik – Anand, Dortmund 2004).
10...h6 11.Nc3 b4 12.Nd5.

12...Na5. This move looks like a novelty although it is a standard maneuver in this pawn structure. Here
is one more example of short "grandmaster draw" – 12...Bc5 13.a5 Rb8 14.Be3 Bxe3 15.fxe3 Nxd5
16.Bxd5 d6 17.Rf1 draw (Grischuk – Tkachiev, New Delhi 2000).
13.Ba2 Bc5 (it seems that a pawn sacrifice 13...b3!? should be analyzed too) 14.Bd2. It's not a bishop,
it's an arrow aimed at the black knight on a5. After exchange in the center the martyr is left alone at the
edge of the board.
14...Bxd5 15.Bxd5 Nxd5 16.exd5. The e5-pawn is under fire. In case of 16...d6 White seizes the
initiative with 17.c3!

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 3 REPORT Page 5 of 13

16...Qf6 (the option 16...c6 trying to get rid of d5 pawn, looks reasonable; for example, 17.Rxe5 Rxe5
18.Nxe5 Qf6! and the evaluation is still unclear) 17.c3! White bishop, this unwanted guest is breaking into
the house of the black knight.
17...bxc3?! (it's pretty hard to explain such a hospitality; I like 17...Qb6 better. Black can play d7-d6
later) 18.Bxc3! Qb6 19.Rxe5 Bxf2+ 20.Kh1.

20...d6? It looks like a decisive mistake. Leko had to bring the Tarrasch knight back to the centre via b7.
This move was possible right now or after 20...f6 21.Re4.
21.Rxe8+ Rxe8 22.b4! Nb7. I can't help crying looking at this poor knight. He would definitely like to
jump to d6, but this square is occupied with Black's own pawn.
23.Ra2 Bg3 24.Re2 Rd8. Black is forced to cede the d-file fight. I wonder why did Leko choose the d8
square? This move makes the following White's maneuver even stronger.
25.Nd4! That is one more drawback of the 20...d6? move. Knight on c6 finishes Leko.

Kid Chaos :)
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25...a5 26.Nc6 Rf8 (26...axb4 27.Bd4+–) 27.Bd4 Qa6 28.b5 Qa8 29.Re7 (it looks more like a slaughter
rather than a battle of two GMs) 29...Be5 30.Nxe5 dxe5 31.Bxe5.

Black resigned. Peter scored an unbelievably easy win.

Sicialian Defence B81
Judit POLGAR (HUN) – Rustam KASIMZHANOV (UZB)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be3 (the move-order 6.f3 is a bit more popular)
6...e6. To avoid the ensuing complications the mighty of the Earth plays 6...Ng4 or 6...e5 here.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 3 REPORT Page 7 of 13

7.g4!? I call this aggressive plan the Hungarian Attack. The players from Hungary worked up and
brought this plan into practice. We can name Sax, Hazai, Tolnai and add Polgar to this list!
7...e5 (this is the matter-of-principal answer. In other lines the position is similar to Keres attack) 8.Nf5
g6 9.g5 gxf5 10.exf5! This very move was introduced by Hungarians. White doesn't want to win a piece
back, but is aiming for the quick development and attack. After 10.gxf6 f4 Black is OK.
10...d5 11.Qf3 d4 12.0–0–0 Nbd7.

13.Bxd4. Judit already won a brilliant game in this variation – 13.Bd2 dxc3 14.Bxc3 Bg7 15.Rg1 0–0
16.gxf6 Qxf6 17.Qe3! Kh8 18.f4 Qb6 19.Qg3 Qh6 20.Rd6 f6 21.Bd2 e4 22.Bc4 b5 23.Be6 Ra7 24.Rc6 –
Black is a piece up, but has no useful moves – 24...a5 25.Be3 Rb7 26.Bd5 Rb8 27.Rc7 b4 28.b3 –
complete zugzwang! – 28...Rb5 29.Bc6 Rxf5 30.Rxc8 Rxc8 31.Bxd7 Rcc5 32.Bxf5 Rxf5 33.Rd1 Kg8
34.Qg2 (Polgar – Anand, Dos Hermanas 1999). I think Anand doesn't like to recall this game. It's no
surprise that he preferred a solid Caro-Kann defense against Polgar here. He was absolutely right!
13...exd4 14.Rxd4.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 3 REPORT Page 8 of 13

14...Bg7. Novelty. It's interesting whether it was prepared at home or born during the game. If the
second is the right and it looks so as Rustam was very thoughtful in the opening, then let me ask a
question: Why didn’t his team analyze this position beforehand? Earlier Black opted for 14...Bc5. For
example: 15.Rd2 Qc7 16.gxf6 Nxf6 17.Bc4 Be7 18.Bb3 0–0 19.Re1 Kh8 20.Qe3 Bd8 21.Qd4 Bxf5
22.Re5 Bg6 23.Nd5 Qd6 24.f4 Rc8 25.f5 Bh5 26.Rg2 Bf3 27.Rg3 Bxd5 28.Bxd5 Bb6, and White resigned
(Pulkkinen – Oll, Helsinki 1990). Of course the result of this game can be attributed to the different level
of the opponents. Polgar would have easily found better options.
15.Rg1! (as usual in the Hungarian Attack White is in no hurry to win anything back. Polgar is
maintaining the tension) 15...Kf8 (the line 15...Rg8 16.Bc4! doesn't look any better) 16.Qe3! White is
going to send her queen to h6 with check in some lines.
16...Qe7 17.Qd2 h6 (it's impossible to recommend Black any worthy alternative) 18.gxf6 Nxf6. After
18...Bxf6 19.Nd5 Qe5 20.Nxf6 Qxf6 White isn't forced to take on d7. She is in no hurry as Black just can't
develop his pieces. White can gradually build up the pressure with 21.Bc4 and so on.
19.Rd8+ Ne8.

20.Bb5! (Polgar clears the way to the centre for her rook a-tempo) 20...axb5 21.Re1 b4. After 21...Bf6
22.Rxe7 Bxe7 23.Qd4! Bxd8 24.Qxh8+ Ke7 25.Qxh6 a typical position for this system arises on the
board. Black has enough material for the queen, but his are uncoordinated. Sooner or later either Black
will lose one of his minor pieces or the h-pawn will become the queen.
22.Nb5? A serious mistake. It was high-time to put an end to Black’s torture with 22.Rxe8+! Kxe8
(22...Qxe8 23.Qd6+) 23.Nd5 Qxe1+ 24.Qxe1+ Kf8 25.Nc7, and White has the decisive advantage.
22...Bxb2+? Black returns a favor. After the correct 22...Be5! 23.Kb1 (23.f4 Rxa2!) 23...Kg7 White has
to prove that her attack is worth sacrificed pieces. In the post-mortem I didn't manage to find such

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 3 REPORT Page 9 of 13

arguments. I can only point out that 24.f4 is refuted with 24...Bxf4!
23.Kxb2 (23.Kb1 was also winning) 23...Qf6+ 24.Qd4! Kg7 25.Rexe8 Rxe8 26.Rxe8 Qxd4+ 27.Nxd4.
The storm subsided and Black found himself in a hopeless. The time trouble aggravated Kasimdzhanov's
troubles.

27...Kf6 28.f4 b6 29.Rd8 Bb7 30.Rxa8 Bxa8 31.Kb3 Bd5+ 32.Kxb4 Bxa2 33.Kb5 Bb1.

34.c3! The last subtlety. There is no reason to allow the bishop sacrifice – 34.Kxb6 Bxc2!
34...Ke7 35.Kxb6 Kd6 36.c4 Bd3 37.c5+ Kd5 38.Nc6 Ke4 39.Ne7 Bc2 40.c6 Ba4 41.c7 Bd7 42.Kc5!
The white king goes to d6, forcing the bishop out from d7.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 3 REPORT Page 10 of 13

Black resigned. Bravo, Judit!

I covered this game in Russian online. As usual I won't repeat myself to annote the game move-after-
move. I'm going to draw your attention only to the key moments of this encounter. Looking at the
opening, it's unclear what did the Muscovite prepare at home? Judge it yourself. White chose a modest
line whereas Black achieved an advantage with WELL-KNOWN, APPROVED BY PRACTICE moves.
Can we explain it? We need some first-hand information.

Sicilian Defence B52
Alexander MOROZEVICH (RUS) – Veselin TOPALOV (BUL)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Bb5+. It's quite interesting, what did Topalov prepare in the English Attack. The
game against Leko revealed a serious flaw in his preparation. Did Topalov's team had enough time to
patch it up? Unfortunately, Alexander wasn't curious enough.
3...Bd7 4.Bxd7+ Qxd7 5.0–0 Nf6 6.e5 dxe5 7.Nxe5 Qc8 8.Qf3 e6 9.d3 Be7 10.Nc3 0–0 11.Bf4.

11...Nfd7! (well-played; Black secures the c6 square for the queen knight) 12.Nc4. In the gamae
Smeets – Karjakin (Wijk aan Zee 2005) Black emerged least equal after 12.Qg3 Nxe5 13.Bxe5 f6
14.Bxb8 Rxb8 15.Rae1 Qc6 16.Qg4 f5 17.Qe2 Rf6 18.Nb1 Rg6 19.f4 Bh4 20.g3 Bf6 21.c3 Qd5 22.Nd2
Rd8 etc.
12...Nc6 13.Rae1. With this novelty White starts a dubious maneuver. White rook should have remained
on the first rank. Another path is 13.Rfe1 Nd4 14.Qd1 b5 15.Ne5 Bf6 and draw was agreed. I can’t bring
myself to call this stump a "game of chess" or a "real test" for this line (Rossmann – Womacka, Eilenburg,

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 3 REPORT Page 11 of 13

1984).
13...Nd4 14.Qd1 Qc6 15.a4 b6 16.Re3 f6 17.Rh3.

17...Rf7! Black knight on f8 kills all White's attacking ideas. The rook position on h3 is silly now.
18.Be3 Rd8 19.Re1 Nf8 20.b3 a6 21.Ne2 b5 22.axb5 axb5 23.Nd2 Qc7. Here the most interesting part
of the game starts.

24.c4!? Nc6! (white was threatening to bring Black's advantage to nothing with the exchange on d4)
25.cxb5. White clears the square for his knight, but his pawn structure is broken into pieces.
25...Nb4 26.Qb1 (26.d4 trying to simplify the position, deserves the attention) 26...Nxd3 27.Rd1 Nb4!
28.Nc4 Nd5 29.Bd2 Qb8 30.Ba5 Rd7 31.b6 Bd8. Black managed to round white pawn up.
32.Rhd3 Nxb6 33.Bxb6 Rxd3 34.Qxd3 Bxb6. White does not have a sufficient compensation for the
pawn. Morozevich's attempts to engineer some counterplay resulted in forming new weaknesses in his
camp.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 3 REPORT Page 12 of 13

35.Qe3 Bc7 36.g3 Qb5 37.h4 Qc6 38.f4 (last two moves don't fit each other...) 38...Rd7 39.Re1 Bd8
40.Nc3 Be7 41.Ne4 Rd4 42.Nf2 Qd5 43.Nb6 Qb7 44.Nc4 f5! 45.Kf1 Bf6 46.Ke2 Rd7 47.Qf3 Qb4
48.Rd1 Bd4.

49.g4!? (a desperate attempt to intercept the initiative) 49...h6 50.h5 Qb8 51.Rd2 Rf7! 52.g5 hxg5
53.fxg5 Qh2 54.Kd3 Qh4 55.g6 Ra7 56.Nd1 Qg5 57.Nc3 Qg1 58.Rd1 Qh2 59.Nb5 Rd7.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 3 REPORT Page 13 of 13

60.Nxd4 Qa2! 61.Nd2 Qb2! (the black queen is doing a filigree work!) 62.Ke2 Qxd4 63.Qe3 Qd6
64.Qf3 Qh2+ 65.Ke1 Rd4 66.Qb7 Rd7 67.Qf3 Rd5 68.Nf1 Re5+ 69.Ne3 f4 70.Rd3 Qg1+ 71.Kd2 fxe3+
72.Rxe3 Qxe3+ 73.Qxe3 Rxe3 74.Kxe3 Nd7. At his point later then he should have done so, Morozevich
resigned.

Will Topalov be able to play all the 14 games “with full kit” – 7 hour-games passing three time troubles in
every encounter or will he got tired? Is the energy conservation law still in force in this world or not?

Standings after Round 3: 1–2. Topalov and Anand – 2.5; 3. Svidler – 2; 4. Polgar – 1.5 (it’s really
strange, but there is only one player with an even score!); 5–7. Kasimdzhanov, Adams, Morozevich – 1;
8. Leko – 0.5.

Leko’s performance is shocking. He just can’t play on a decent level through a single game.
Unfortunately, a strong and usually very stable grandmaster found himself in a deep crisis.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 4 REPORT Page 1 of 16

By grandmaster
Sergey SHIPOV

Derby time
It is very difficult for me to play with the people I know, friends and countrymen. I can’s
help feeling some sort of connection, the common past, prehistory of relations, etc. It is
really hard to fight with determination, put aside the human factor and concentrate solely
on chess.

In the fourth round the participants were paired by territorial criteria so to say: two Russians, two
Hungarians, two East representatives and two Westerners (since Topalov has been living in Spain for a
long time let me call him so). The round set up four derbies and again produced no draws!
Anand’s defeat came as the biggest surprise. Probably the Indian GM thought that he had to beat
Kasimdzhanov given the Uzbek GM’s painful defeat in the last round. Actually, it is the right approach.
One can push for a win regardless of the color of his pieces and tournament situation. However, don’t
underestimate an opponent! Never lose your head. I think that is exactly what happened with Anand.
Good new is that Leko is back. I think he can contest for the highest positions in the final standings,
including the first one!

Recently Veselin has been extremely lucky in the games against Michael. No doubt, he deserves it!
Success goes with the brave. If you work on chess both at home and over the board like Topalov, and
you’ll find your luck too.

English Opening, A30
Topalov (2788) – Adams (2719)
1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c5 4.g3 b6 5.Bg2 Bb7 6.0–0 Be7 7.Re1. Adams doesn’t like to play this
particular version of the Hedgehog System

7...Ne4. I prefer 7...d6! 8.e4 a6 9.d4 cxd4 10.Nxd4 Qc7. You can find the rest in my book “Hedgehog
System” (unfortunately, published only in Russian) 8.d4 Nxc3 9.bxc3 Be4 10.Bf1. Typical maneuver.
White avoids the exchange of white-squared bishops and occupies the center. The bishop retreat to h3 is
also possible: 10.Bh3 Bxf3 11.exf3 cxd4 12.cxd4 Nc6 13.Be3 0-0 14.Rc1 Rc8 15.f4 Na5 16.Qd3 g6
17.Bg2 Qc7 – White is slightly better, but later he didn’t play at his best – 18.c5 d5 19.cxd6 Qxd6 20.Qa6
Qd7 21.h4 Bf6 22.Bf3 Rfd8 23.h5 Nc6 24.Qa4 Ne7 25.Rxc8 Nxc8 26.Qxd7 – draw (Kramnik – Yudasin,
Yerevan 1996).
10...d6!

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 4 REPORT Page 2 of 16

I like this novelty. The exchange on f3 is standard move here, but the bishop also deserves a better fate!
Black usually played 10...Bxf3 11.exf3 cxd4 12.cxd4 0-0 13.f4 Nc6 14.Be3 Rc8 and White stands slightly
better (Malaniuk – Koziak, Mielo 2005).
11.h4. Typical “Topalov move”. Just the same as “Gucci dress” or “Cardin suit”. This is a move from the
most popular and the most stylish chess couturier! Veselin is advancing a pawn on the king side with the
idea to launch an attack later on. This plan was yielded dividends, this very “h”-pawn had a leading role in
Veselin’s scenario. A usual plan – 11.Nd2 Bb7 12.e4 – was also possible, but the question is – what
White should do after 12...0-0? Black’s position is quite solid in this line.
11...Nd7 12.d5 (I don’t want to judge the winner, but the White’s play is not perfect from the positional
standpoint. Black obtains a comfortable position.) 12...0–0 13.a4 h6 14.Bh3. White forces the opponent
to seize the initiative. This psychological stunt proves to be correct.
14...exd5 15.cxd5 Bf6 16.Ra3. White has to put his rook in such an embarrassing position.

16...b5! Nice combo. Black knight on d7 becomes more active and transposes into Modern Benoni-like
pawn structure.
17.axb5 Nb6 18.c4! (The only worthy response. Without d5-pawn Black will be definitely better)
18...Bxf3. I think, in the line 18...Nxc4!? 19.Ra4 Bxf3 20.Rxc4 Bh5 Michael doesn’t like the possibility of
21.Bf5, but, frankly speaking, there is no real threats for Black there. It’s possible to play 21...Rb8, for
example.
19.Rxf3 (After 19.exf3 Nxc4 Black has a slight but steady advantage) 19...Nxc4 20.Qa4. In case of
20.h5 Black is at least equal after 20...a5 21.bxa6 Rxa6, and 22.Qd3 isn’t dangerous in view of 22...Qa5!
20...Ne5 21.Ra3. The key moment. As the ex-fan of Modern Benoni system I migh be biased … I think

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 4 REPORT Page 3 of 16

Black has the upper hand here. His minor pieces are strong, pawn structure is good. The c-pawn pawn
may become a strong passer. Black should start from restricting opponent’s possibilities...

21...Re8?! One may think that such a move just can’t be bad. But it gives the opponent some extra
attacking possibilities. Better was 21...h5! followed by Black’s operations in the center.
22.h5! Veselin is exceptionally resourceful. He can begin his attack out of nowhere. He spotted the
weakness of the b1-h7 diagonal and prepared his field gun.
22...Re7 23.Bf4 Rb8 24.Bf5! (the first warrior has come) 24...Qe8. Black’s moves are fine and correct.
Adams attacks pawn b5 eying its colleague on e2.

25.Bc2! (White has already forgotted about the pawns! Topalov is going to send his queen to h7)
25...Qd7. Of course, we should figure out what did White prepared for a cold-blooded 25...Rxb5!? 26.Qe4
g6 – the key line, probably, starts with 27.Bxe5 (27.hxg6 fxg6!) 27...Bxe5 28.hxg6 Rb4 29.Qh1!? Kg7
30.gxf7 Qxf7 31.e3 – White has a small edge as his king is better defended. The capture with the queen
is no good – 25...Qxb5?! 26.Qe4 Reb7 27.Rb1 Qd7 28.Rxb7 Rxb7 29.Qh7+ Kf8 30.Ba4 Qd8 31.Bc6!
Rc7 32.Bxe5 Bxe5 (32...dxe5 33.d6) 33.Re3! and there is no defense against the f2-f4 threat.
26.Qe4 Ng6 27.Qd3. White insists on rendez-vous of his queen with black king. Adams doesn’t want to
place the knight on f8 – it’s too passive. Michael tries a deceptive maneuver.
27...c4!? 28.Qxc4 Nxf4 29.Qxf4 Re5 30.Qf3! White fully realizes, that without pawn on h5 his attack is
futile.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 4 REPORT Page 4 of 16

30...Qh3?! Poor maneuver, Adams clearly missed something. The line 30...Qxb5 31.Rb1 Qe8 32.Qd3
Rxb1+ 33.Bxb1 Kf8 34.Qh7 Qd7 35.Qh8+ Ke7 36.Qa8! Qd8 37.Rxa7+ Kf8 38.Qc6 Re8 also doesn’t
allow Black to build a fortress. White will either win the d6 pawn or send his queen on h7 once again.
Probably, 30...Rc8! was the best option. Trying to find a forced win, I found the following nice variation –
31.Qd3 Kf8 32.Qh7 Ke7 33.f4!? Rxh5 34.Re3+ Kd8 35.b6! axb6 36.Ba4

and here instead of resigning Black forces a draw with a rook sacrifice – 36...Rh1+! 37.Kxh1 Qh3+
38.Kg1 Bd4 39.Qg8+ Kc7 40.Qxf7+ Kb8 41.Kf2 Rc3 42.Qe8+ Kc7 43.Qe7+ Kc8 – White has nothing but
perpetual.
31.Rxa7 Rxh5 32.e3 Qh2+ 33.Kf1 Qh3+ 34.Ke2. (черные Black pieces get stuck on the king side)
34...Re5 35.Rc7! White doesn’t allow Black queen out of cage.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 4 REPORT Page 5 of 16

35...Rc8! The last mistake of the old soldier. However, Black is lost even after the best 35...Qh5, for
example, 36.Qxh5 (we can also expect from Topalov a vigorous attack – 36.g4 Qg5 37.Rh1 g6 38.Rxh6!)
36...Rxh5 37.Rb1 Rxd5 38.b6 Rc5 39.Bb3! – and Black is losing the f7 pawn as 39...Rxc7 is impossible
in view of 40.bxc7 Rc8 41.Bc2! and 42.Rb8.
36.Bf5! Rxf5 37.Rxc8+ Kh7 38.Rh1! Black resigns.

In the following game Black launched active operations too early. He should not have tried to pluck a
green fruit.

Sicilian Defense B90
Rustam KASIMDZHANOV (UZB) – Vishwanathan ANAND (IND)
1.e4 c5. The opening choice speaks for itself – Indian grandmaster was in aggressive mood. When he
is OK with a draw, he opts for Caro-Kann defense.
2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be3. What did Rustam prepare for 6...e6? Yesterday he
was crushed after 7.g4!? May be, Judit convinced him of the White’s attack power in this line...

6...Ng4 7.Bg5! They say that after 7.Bc1 the knight’s retreat is mandatory. And what can Vishy do after
7...Nf6 8.Be3? It does not necessarily means that White is be happy with a draw – in case of 8...Ng4 they
still can play 8.Bg5!
7...h6 8.Bh4 g5 9.Bg3 Bg7 10.h3. (after 10.Be2 White should be ready for 10...h5) 10...Ne5 11.Nf5
Bxf5 12.exf5 Nbc6 13.Nd5.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 4 REPORT Page 6 of 16

13...e6. Many believes that the white knight should be dislodged from d5. I like the way another Asian
player solved this problem: 13...Nd7 14.c3 Nf6 15.Nxf6+ Bxf6 16.Bd3 Ne5 17.Be4 Qc7 18.Qa4+ b5
19.Qd1 Rb8 20.0–0 h5 21.Re1 g4 22.h4 Qc5 23.Bd5 Kf8 24.Qb3 Nc4 25.Rad1 Kg7 26.Re2 Rhc8 27.Kh1
b4, and Black is definitely better Yeo Min Yang – Wynn Zaw Htun, Bangkok, 2004. Of course, White’s
play in this game leaves a lot to be desired...
14.fxe6 fxe6 15.Ne3 0–0 16.Be2 Qe7. Black’s difficulties in this live can be illustrated by the game
Shirov – Gelfand (Monako 2000): 16...d5 17.0–0 Ng6 18.c4 Nd4 19.cxd5 exd5 20.Bg4 Nf4 21.Bxf4 Rxf4
22.Qd3 Qd6 23.Rad1 Raf8 24.Rd2 Kh8 25.Rfd1 a5 26.Qa3!, and d5 pawn was lost in the endgame.
17.0–0 Rad8 18.Bh5!? Novelty. As this bishop hampers White Kasimdzhanov decides to move this
piece to the far corner and play with the rooks in the center. The encounter Dolmatov – Sakaev (Moscow
2003) went 18.c4 Ng6 19.Qd2 Nf4 20.Rab1 Qf7, and draw was agreed. I believe Black has nothing to
worry about here.
18...Kh8 19.Re1 d5. Anand arranged his pieces pretty well and built a strong center. On the other hand
there is no weaknesses in White camp. Besides, Kasimdzhanov has two strong bishops. In such a
situation any risky attempt by Black can be fatal. Black should calculate all the lines with utmost
presicion.

20.a4 (Rustam was probably a bit afraid of the black pawns’ advancement on the queen side) 20...Nc4!
It’s a beginning of Black’s suicidal activity. Anand opens up the centre and attacks the b2 and f2 pawns
only to discover that weakness of the black king is much more important factor.
In the middle of the night (when I am writing this commentary, all the Muscovites are already asleep) I
could recommend Black a fantastic continuation – 20...Nd7 with the main idea – 21.c3 Be5!? One bishop
is not two bishops, it’s twice as less! After this exchange it will be easier for black knights to find suitable

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 4 REPORT Page 7 of 16

squares. It also offers some opportunities to launch an attack on the king side. 20...Nd7 also sets a nice
trap – 21.Nxd5 (why not?) 21…Qc5! 22.Ne3 Nf6 23.Qe2 Nd4! – the knights finds the bishop hiding in the
corner and devour it! Probably, after 20...Nd7 White should play 21.Ng4, and Black can’t take on b2.
21...Nc5, aiming at e4, is definitely better.
21.Nxc4 dxc4 22.Qg4 Qb4 (22...Nd4 doesn’t work in view of 23.c3! Nc2 24.Rxe6 Qxe6 25.Qxe6 Nxa1
26.Be5+–) 23.Qxe6 Rd2. (inferiour is 23...Qxb2 24.Qxc4! or 23...Nd4 24.Qe4 Qxb2? 25.Be5!) 24.Rad1!
White’s play is simple – the pieces are going to attack the black king through the center.
24...Nd4 25.Qe4. (25.Bd6 is also good) 25...Nf5 26.Be5! (White pays no attention to f2 weakness)
26...Rxf2 27.Bf3. White liquidates all Black’s active ideas.
27...Rd2 (27...Qb6 28.a5! Qa7 29.Kh1+–) 28.Bxg7+ Kxg7 29.Qe5+ Rf6 (the rook exchange on d2 and
capture on b7 was also possible) 30.a5. Surprise. White advances his just in case. In the endgame it
might become a queen.

At this moment Kasimdzhanov was in a serious time trouble already, and Anand as usual decided to be
quick and aggressive – this style makes him phenomenally successful in active chess. But in this game
the trick did not work.
30...Nh4! (after 30...b5! Black still has chances to save a game) 31.Qc7+ Rf7 32.Qe5+ Rf6. After
repetition Rustam finds the way to victory...

33.Bh5! The bishop returns to its favorite position. But it’s not a far corner anymore, but an alight
corridor leading to the black king. Check from g2 is not dangerous at all.
33...Ng6 (33...Rxg2+ 34.Kh1 Rd2 35.Rxd2 Qxd2 36.Qc7+!) 34.Bxg6 Rxd1 35.Rxd1 Kxg6 36.Qe4+
Kg7 37.Rd7+ Kg8 (37...Rf7 38.Qe5+; 37...Kf8 38.Qe5!) 38.Qh7+.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 4 REPORT Page 8 of 16

Black resigns one move before the checkmate.

What’s wrong with the Sicilian defense for Black? The price of mistake is extremely high! And what’s
good about the Sicilian defense for Black? Price of mistake is extremely high for White! In this game
Black was first to make a mistake and lost without resistance...

Sicilian Defense B48
Peter LEKO (HUN) – Judith POLGAR (HUN)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7. (a modern way to play Paulsen System) 6.Be3 a6.

7.Qd2! (The plan with the queen side castling is Leko’s trademarked weapon) 7...Nf6 8.0–0–0 Bb4 9.f3
Ne7 10.Nde2 b5 11.g4. Judit has good memories of this line: 11.Kb1 Ba5 12.Qd4 Nc6 13.Qc5 Bb4
14.Qg5 0–0 15.Qg3 Ne5 16.h4 Bb7 17.h5 Ne8 18.a3 Bd6 19.Bf4 f6 20.Na2 Rc8 21.Nec3 Bc6 22.Be2 a5!
– Black seized the initiative and was close to vistory (Topalov – Polgar, Sofia 2005), though the game
ended in a draw.
11...h6. Black keeps the knight on f6 but loses her right to castle short as White is always ready to open
the “g”-file with g4-g5.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 4 REPORT Page 9 of 16

12.Rg1! Good novelty. White is always ready to bring the rook into play through g5. The standard plan
with h2-h4 and g4-g5 is also good. The game Naiditch – Nisipeanu (Warsaw 2005) saw 12.h4 Ba5 13.a3
b4 14.axb4 Bxb4 15.Bh3 Qa5 16.Kb1 d6 17.Nc1 Rb8 18.N1a2 Ba3 19.b3 Nd7 20.g5 h5 21.f4 Qc7
22.Bd4 0–0 23.g6 and Black prevailed in the complications. The encounter L'Ami – Van der Elburg,
Amsterdam 2005 followed absolutely different scenario: 12.a3 Ba5 13.b4!? Bb6 14.Bxb6 Qxb6 15.Nd4
Bb7 16.h4 Nc6 17.Nb3 Ne5 18.Be2 0–0–0 19.g5 Nh5 20.f4 Nc4 21.Bxc4 bxc4 22.Na5 and White won
pretty soon.
12...Ng6 13.a3 Be7 14.f4! If h2-h4 isn’t possible, White moves another pawn. From this moment Judit
was playing poorly.

14...b4?! In my opinion being severely underdeveloped Black is not ready for an active counter-play.
Judit had to choose between 14...Bb7 and 14...d6, and this choice should have been made at home! It’s
pretty hard to make the right decision over the board. That’s why it’s even more surprising that Hungarian
chess-player made this move almost immediately, without any doubts. She probably thought, that
opening the queen side is in her favor in any case...
15.axb4 Bxb4 16.Qd4! (White defends e4 pawn and prepares its advancement) 16...Qa5 17.Kb1. Of
course. 17.e5 was premature in view of 17...Nd5!, and White can’t take on d5 because of the mate on a1.
17...Rb8. One more step to abyss. Black should have ventured upon 17...d6!, creating some kind of
defense in the center. The possible continuation in this case is 18.g5 hxg5 19.Rxg5 e5. I course of the
battle in the center Black at least can castle, removing the king from under the fire. I didn’t find a clear
refutation of this line. It’s unbelievable, but Black holds everywhere...
18.g5. Peter continues his plan – g1 should be brought into play, and it will clarify the matter.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 4 REPORT Page 10 of 16

18...Nh5! Last slip. Realizing that the carped is being pulled from Judith is trying lure her opponent into
promising complications, hoping to outcalculate Leko! But there will be no complications... Judit could
have resist with 18...Ba3! 19.b3 hxg5 20.Rxg5 Qc7, though Black is in for tough defense here.
19.gxh6 Rxh6 20.Rg5! The most efficient way. Leko doesn’t want to calculate long variations! Of
course 20.f5 was also winning, as an attempt 20...Ngf4 is refuted by a brilliant 21.Rxg7!
20...Qc7.

21.Nb5! (White greatly benefits from this exchange) 21...Rxb5 22.Rxb5 axb5 23.Qxb4 (the d6 square
is very week) 23...Nhxf4 24.Nc3! ... and white knight is making its way there.
24...Rxh2. Last hope.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 4 REPORT Page 11 of 16

25.Bg1! Judith resigns.

Sasha and Peter are the old rivals. For many years they has been fighting for the leading position in
Russian chess. The GM from St-Petersburg is ahead of Muscovite in terms of winning Russian champion
titles so far. On the other in the Russain team they get along just perfectly. Both GMs worthily uphold the
honor of Russia in team events.

King’s Indian Defense E81
Alexander Morozevich (RUS) – Peter Svidler (RUS)
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 (I was pretty sure that we would see the Groenfeld Defense on the board as Peter
Svidler is the best expert in this opening) 3.f3!? Making an ambush!

3...Bg7! Black has experienced some problems in the line 3...d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nb6 6.Nc3 Bg7
7.Be3. Most likely Peter knows the survival remedy but he decided to avoid the opponent’s home
preparation just in case. Svidler has a great experience in the King’s Indian Defense whereas Alexander
played this opening on the white side just a few times. That is why I put the exclamation mark to Peter’s
move.
4.e4 0–0 5.Nc3 d6 6.Be3 a6. Svidler has no desire to check his opponent’s preparation. Peter avoids all
the sharp lines banking on his excellent positional touch.
7.Nge2 c6 8.Qd2 b5. Black is demonstrating his aggressive intentions on the queen side but the Whie’s
king is not scared at all.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 4 REPORT Page 12 of 16

9.h4. A spectacular game between top Dutchmen ednded in a draw: 9.Bh6 e5 10.0–0–0 Bxh6 11.Qxh6
Qa5 12.g4 b4 13.Nb1 Qxa2 14.Ng3 Nbd7 15.Nf5! gxf5 16.gxf5 Kh8 17.dxe5 dxe5 18.Rg1 Rg8 19.Rxd7!
Nxd7 20.Rxg8+ Kxg8 21.Qg5+ 1/2 (I. Sokolov – Van Wely, Wijk an Zee, 1997).
9...h5. (the white pawn must not be allowed to h5) 10.Bh6 e5. That is a standard reaction on the white
bishop’s sortie to h6. Bearing in mind a possible exchange of dark-squared bishop Black should arrange
his pawns on the dark squares.
11.0–0–0! This novelty is the matter-of-principle move in this position. The exchange approach is
absolutely innocuous: after 11.Bxg7 Kxg7 12.dxe5 dxe5 13.Qxd8 Rxd8 14.Nc1 Be6 15.Nb3 (Cooke –
Bogdan, Harkany 2000) Black should have develop his queenside with an excellent position.
11...Nbd7 12.Kb1 Qe7 13.Bxg7 Kxg7.

14.Nc1. It is too early to dart into hand-to-had fight! Indeed, 14.g4 does not offer a winning attack
whereas the sacrificed pawns might not be regained.
14...Bb7 15.Nb3 (threatening with Nb3-a5) 15...Rac8. I am not sure that it is the best square for the
queen side rook. I suggest placing it on b8 to harass the white king in some lines.
16.a3. White played a good temporizing move at least judging from Black’s reaction…

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 4 REPORT Page 13 of 16

16...Qd8! This move is way too subtle to figure it out. Besides, it looks like Black overlooked something.
Peter could have made a temporizing move of his own such as 16...Ba8 although one of the rooks’ move
16...Rfe8 or 16...Rfd8 looks even more natural.
17.dxe5 dxe5 18.g4! (it turns out that the f6-knight is tied to defense of his d7-fellow) 18...bxc4 19.Bxc4
Nb6. The only way to avoid an immediate defeat.
20.Qg5. I think that the endgame emerging after 20.Qxd8 Rcxd8 21.Be2 is very promising for White.
Black’s queenside pawns are very weak.
20...Qc7 21.Be2 c5 22.Na5 Rb8. Any annotator is always right as he knows the result. It is very easy for
me to lecture the participant of the World Championship.
23.gxh5. (White could have obtained steady advantage with a trite 23.Nxb7 Qxb7 24.Rd2 – he controls
the only open line; Black’s pawns are weak) 23...Nxh5.

24.Nxb7. The line 24.Rdg1 Nf4 25.h5 f6 26.hxg6 fxg5 27.Rh7+ Kxg6 28.Rxc7 Nxe2 29.Nxe2 Ba8
30.Rxc5 Na4 31.Rxe5 Rxb2+ 32.Ka1 Rxe2 33.Rgxg5+ Kh7 34.Rh5+ results in a draw by perpetual.
Naturally Morozevich wanted more.
24...f6! (With this in-between move Black holds his e5-panw) 25.Nxc5! (a good riposte) 25...Qxc5
26.Qg1 Qc6. Black got a decent counterplay for the pawn in form of open files against the white king and
a good f4-square for his knight.
27.Rc1 (I can’t see the refutation of a greedy 27.Bxa6!?) 27...Qb7 28.Rh2 Kh7 29.Bf1 Nf4 30.Rhc2.
Both opponent took a slippery time scramble path.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 4 REPORT Page 14 of 16

30...Ne6! (30...Rf7!?) 31.Nd5 (the surest way to the victory was 31.Qg4! Nd4 – 31...Nf4 32.Nb5! –
32.Rg2 Rg8 33.f4 and so on) 31...Nxd5 32.exd5 Qxd5 33.Bc4 Qd7 34.Bxe6 Qxe6 35.Qa7+ Kh6 36.Rc7
Rh8 37.Qe3+ Kh5. The black king miraculously survived.

38.R1c6 Qf5+ 39.Ka1 (better was 39.Ka2! Rbc8 40.Rxc8 Rxc8 41.Rxa6) 39...Rbc8 40.Rxc8 Rxc8
41.Rxa6 Rd8! (Black is just in time to create couterplay. He is OK!) 42.Qe2. The endgame after 42.Qe4?
Qxe4 43.fxe4 f5! Is unacceptable for Whtie. On 42.Ka2 Black has an unpleasant rejoinder 42...Rd3!
42...Qf4 43.Ra7 Kh6.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 4 REPORT Page 15 of 16

44.Rc7! Alexander keeps pressing for a win by inertia and gradually loses the game. 44.Ka2! was a
good alternative. The endgame arising after 44...Rd2 45.Qe4 Qxe4 46.fxe4 is about equal. My rough
extimations suggest that in this case the game would have been drawn. 44...Rd2 45.Qe1 (with the king
on the first rank the queen exchange is bad for White as the black pawns will queen with check…)
45...Rd3 46.Ka2 (too late!) 46...Qxf3 47.Qc1+ Kh5! Tanks do not suffer from mud; the black king takes
not heed of White’s checks.

48.a4?! Finding problem-like subtleties such as 48.Qc4 Rd4 49.Rh7+ Kg4 50.Qe6+ Qf5 51.Qb3! are is
beyond human capacities. Actually, it is impossible to win such a position against computer!
48...Qd5+ 49.Rc4 (49.Qc4 Qxc4+ 50.Rxc4 f5–+) 49...e4. The black passers are advancing much faster.
Besides, the white king fell under attack.
50.b3 Rd2+ 51.Ka3 (51.Rc2 e3!) 51...Qd6+ 52.Rc5+ f5 53.Qg1 Kxh4! 54.a5 Rc2 55.b4.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 4 REPORT Page 16 of 16

55...Qd3+. White resigns.

Standings after the fourth round: 1. Topalov – 3.5 (Veselin is advancing with an impressive speed!); 2.
Svidler – 3 (Peter took a slow start but managed to pace up); 3. Anand – 2,5 (Vishy should leave his
defeat behind. It is still a long way to go); 4. Kasimdzhanov – 2 (Rustam deserved some credit and who
knows…); 5-6. Polgar and Leko – 1.5 (Peter is the leader in this duet. I believe in him!); 7-8. Adams and
Morozevich – 1 (Michael and Alaxander will have problems making up for their losses in the start).

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 5 REPORT Page 1 of 17

By grandmaster
Sergey SHIPOV

“Hare” is running too fast!

In middle and long distance race of field athletics there is a good method to show good
results. One of athletes leads about half of the distance sets up a high pace, whereas the
main favorites hide behind him sparing energy and spurt closer to the finish, when the
exhausted “hare” (it is a universally recognized term) drops out of the race.

In San Luis Topalov is running through the tournament distance faster than the quickest hare in the
world. The Bulgarian has no desire to make way for other contenders. Nobody can keep up with Veselin.
None is capable of fighting with such commitment and determination! Kasparov, Fischer and Alekhine
played so at their best! Many dream about joining such high ranks but where to refuel so much energy?
Peter Svidler did his best to beat the leader. It became clear that the only chance to outdistance Topalov
was to win over him. However, Peter did not succeed…

In the game of two leaders White had some problems right in the openings. Although the battle could
have gone either way, the opening handicap redounded upon Peter.

Sicilian Defense B90
Peter SVIDLER (RUS) – Veselin TOPALOV (BUL)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be3 Ng4 7.Bg5 h6 8.Bh4 g5 9.Bg3 Bg7 10.h3
Ne5 11.Nf5 Bxf5 12.exf5 Nbc6 13.Nd5. I was sure that Peter was going to follow the track of the fourth
round encounter Kasimdzhanov – Anand, but his last move came as surprise.

13...e6 14.Ne3. In most cases it is just a harmless transposition but why should why give the opponent
some extra options? Whatever Peter’s ideas could be, he failed to implement them… It is clear that the
following game was the basis of Topalov's novelty – 14.fxe6 fxe6 15.Ne3 Qa5+ 16.c3 Nf3+!? 17.Qxf3
Bxc3+ 18.Kd1 Bxb2

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 5 REPORT Page 2 of 17

19.Rc1! Bxc1 20.Nc4! Qxa2 21.Qf6 Qb1 22.Qxe6+ Kf8 23.Qxd6+ Kg7 24.Bd3 Bf4+ 25.Bxb1 Bxd6
26.Nxd6 Rhd8 27.Kc1 Rd7 28.h4 Rad8 29.Nf5+ Kf8 30.hxg5 Rd5 31.Rxh6 Rd1+ 32.Kb2 R8d2+ 33.Bc2,
and Black resigned (Cheparinov – Ibarra Jerez, Roquetas de Mar 2004). Probably Ivan Cheparinov
pointed out to his teammate that White’s posiiton was not so great in this line. It looks like Peter
swallowed the outcome of this game and did not analyze it in depth.
14...Qa5+. Nominally, that is a novelty. As a matter of fact, the pawns f5 and f7 does not change the
situation very much. Black also tested 14...0–0 15.c3 d5 16.fxe6 fxe6 17.Be2 Qe7 18.0–0 Rad8 19.Qe1
Ng6 20.Rd1 Nf4 with a good position (Bromberger – Berczes, Budapest 2004); and 14...Qe7 15.Be2 0–0
16.0–0 d5 17.c3 Rad8 18.fxe6 Qxe6!? 19.Nc2 d4 20.cxd4 Nxd4 21.Nxd4 Rxd4 22.Qc1 Rc8 23.Qe3 Rc2
24.Rad1 Nc6 25.Bg4 Qxe3 26.fxe3 Rdd2 27.Rxd2 Rxd2 28.Bh5 Rd7 29.b3, with an roughly endgame
(Spasov – Elsness, Gothenburg 2005).
15.c3. The most aggressive continuation; the queen exchange on d2 results in a roughly equal ending.

15...Nf3+! (Topalov played this move straight off; no doubt, it was his home preparation) 16.Qxf3. The
line 16.gxf3 Bxc3+ 17.bxc3 Qxc3+ 18.Ke2 (18.Qd2 Qxa1+) 18...Nd4+ is unacceptable for White as he
loses his queen.
16...Bxc3+ 17.Kd1. The only way to maintain material equilibrium.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 5 REPORT Page 3 of 17

17...Qa4+! Here comes the real novelty, most likely found by Cheparinov in the post-mortem. Actually,
after 17...Bxb2 18.fxe6 Black does not have to capture on c6 transposing into the above mentioned game
Cheparinov – Ibarra Jerez. Much better is 18...Qa4+ 19.Kd2 Qb4+ (the only move) 20.Kd1 and only here
20...fxe6 – White does not have the maneuver Ne3-c4xd6.
18.Nc2. After 18.Kc1 Bxb2+ 19.Kxb2 Qb4+ 20.Kc1 Nd4 21.Qd1 Black can deliver perpetual with his
queen on с3 b4. A more aggressive line 21...Rc8+ 22.Bc4 Qc3+ 23.Kb1 Rxc4 24.Nxc4 Qxc4 also
deserves attention as White has some problems bringing his a1-rook into play. Actually, the perpetual
seems to be inevitable even in this variation.
18...Bxb2 19.fxe6 fxe6 20.Qb3. In case of 20.Qg4 could have kept the queens on the board – 20...Nd4!
21.Rc1 Rc8 22.Bd3 Kd7 , with a dangerous intitative
20...Qxb3 21.axb3 Bxa1 22.Nxa1. So what are Black’s achievements? He has 20 extra minutes on his
clock! In this his roughly equal position both opponents should play with precision. What does it take?
Exactly, energy and time! Topalov was better in both components.

22...Ke7. The black rooks do not have the maneuver room. Black should quickly launch active
operations as White’s numerous pieces are uncoordinated. Any delay gives white an upper hand. Both
opponents were fully aware of that.
23.Bd3. In course of on-line coverage and right know I think that White should have started with a more
precise 23.Kd2! His further arrangement of the pieces depends on Black’s next move. For example if the
knight goes to d4, the White can start transferring his bishop from g2 to f2. After 23...Rac8 the move 24.f3
deserves attention. By the way in this case White can develop his h1-rook with h3-h4.
23...Rac8. The continuation 23...Nb4 with the idea of 24.Bb1 a5! followed by a5-a4 suggested itself.
Opening the a-file would be very useful for Black. Probably White should retreat his bishop to either e4 or

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 5 REPORT Page 4 of 17

g6. There are many subtleties in this position…
24.Re1. White deliberately leaves his knight at the edge of the board. Peter hopes that sooner or later
he will brings it to play. However it was not such an easy task. It looks like White missed a good moment
to do it right now. Probably Peter discarded 24.Nc2!? in view of 24...Na5. I think that White has a good
counterplay in the line 25.Nd4! e5 26.b4 Nc4 27.Nf5+ Kf6 28.Ke2 – at least all white pieces participates in
the battle.
24...Nd4! Plugging up the rook in the corner.

25.f3 (right decision; the bishop is heading to f2. After 25.Nc2 Nxb3 26.Bf5 e5 27.Bxc8 Rxc8 Black has
good chances in the endgame with tree pawns for a piece) 25...Rc3 26.Kd2 Rhc8 27.Rb1. Again, Black
had nothing against trading his rook for the bishop and the pawn – 27.Bc4 R8xc4 28.bxc4 Rxc4. In this
line his is not worse to say the least.
27...R3c5 28.b4 (28.Bf2 is also met with 28...Rd5!) 28...Rd5. Black has no fear of the white’s bishops
attacks. The discovered check is a good antidote in all the lines.

29.Bf2 (here is the tactical ground of the black rook’s maneuver – 29.Be4? Nxf3+ 30.Ke2 Rd2+ 31.Kxf3
Rc3+ 32.Kg4 Rd4 33.Re1 Rxb4!–+) 29...Kd7. From this moment both opponents started surprising the
spectators and annotators with every move! I considered the sequence 29...Nc6 30.Ke2 Ne5 31.Be4 Rb5
32.Nc2 d5 33.Bh7 a5 as the main line. It is very hard to evaluate this position. White managed to bring
the knight into play. It is a weighty counterargument.
30.Be3. Alas, the pawn sacrifice in the line 30.Nb3 Nc6 31.Ke2 Nxb4 32.Be4 with the idea of 32...Re5
does not work in view of 33.Bg3 Rb5 34.Nd4 Rb6 35.Bf2! and the black rook on b6 falls under fire. Much
better is 32...Na2! and Black forces favorable exchanges with the knight infiltration to с3. The variations

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 5 REPORT Page 5 of 17

with the black rook taking up d5 are more complicated here – 30.Be4 Nxf3+ 31.Ke3!? Rc3+ 32.Ke2 Rd2+
33.Kf1 Rxf2+! (33...Nd4 34.Be1!) 34.Kxf2 Nd2 35.Re1 Nxe4+ 36.Rxe4 d5 37.Re2 Kd6 38.Nc2 Rc4 –
White should think how to save the game and probably it is too late! Black’s pawn advancement is very
difficult to contain.
30...Nf5 31.Bf2. At this point Veselin displayed the maximalism of a real champion. He decide to push
for win running risks of losing the game. His gambling paid off!

31...Nh4 (after 31...Nd4 the most likely would have been drawn by repetition) 32.Bxh4 gxh4. Black has
traded White’s powerful bishop and opened the file for his rooks to attack the g2-pawn. It is not bad, but
White is bringing one piece into play…
33.Nc2! h5. Black’s desire to restrict the knight is quite understandable.

That is the most important moment of the game!
34.Re1. Wrong implementation of a sensible plan. White is going to advance his rook to the fourth file
and snatch the h4-pawn. However, this plan if foiled by the force of circumstances. Much better was
34.b5! In my opinion Black would have play with accuracy to save the game. The move 34...a5 does not
promise much. Black’s passer is not that dangerous when White’s pieces are no far away – 35.Ra1 b6
36.Ra4. Then White transfers the knight to e3, advances his pawn from f3 to f5 with a slight advantage.
34...Rg8 35.Kc3. It looks like miscalculation. White is going fork the black rooks with the knight. 35.Re2
is bad simply because it is inconsistent with White’s last move. His plan was to place the rook to e4.
There is a lot of fight there, but Black is just slightly better.
35...a5! A highly unpleasant surprise for White. Black is clearing the c5-square to retreat from the rook
with check.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 5 REPORT Page 6 of 17

36.Bc4? White made his first and last serious mistake in the game. Being in the time trouble Peter lost
his head and failed to put up resistance. He should have played 36.bxa5 with poker face and in case of
36...Rxg2 quickly react with 37.Nd4! – with active pieces a draw was quite attainable. Check out the
following entertaining line – 37...Rc5+ 38.Kb4 Rb2+ 39.Ka3 Rf2 40.Bb5+ Rxb5 41.Nxb5 Rxf3+ 42.Kb4
Rxh3 (42...Rf4+ 43.Kb3 Rf3+ 44.Kb4=) 43.Rc1! and it is Black who has to look for a safe harbor.
36...Rc8! (this pin is deadly for White) 37.Ne3 (other options are no better;37.Kb3 a4+! or 37.bxa5 Rdc5
38.Ne3 d5) 37...Rb5! The most precise move.
38.Kd3 Rxb4.

39.Bxe6+ (It is impossible to stop so many passers by the ordinary means) 39...Kxe6 40.Nc2+ Kd5
41.Nxb4+ axb4 42.Re7 b5 43.Rh7 Rc3+. Simpler was an immediate 43...Rc4!
44.Kd2 Rc4! That is not bad either! Against the opponent’s pair you don’t really care what to have three
of the kind or street. The b4-pawn is unstoppable. Svidler resigned.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 5 REPORT Page 7 of 17

After 45.Rxh5+ Kc6 46.Rh8 b3 47.Re8 Black don’t even need to calculate the pawn ending arising after
the rook exchange on c1. The rook endgame is even easier to win – 47...Kc5! and the king shepherd the
pawn to the first rank

The next game is very interesting from theoretical standpoint.

Sicilian Defens B33
Vishwanathan ANAND (IND) – Peter LEKO (HUN)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 e5 6.Ndb5 d6. The Sveshinikov variation is the
perdition of modern chess. Theoretical mining is extremely deep for simple mortals. To play this variation
one must know and remember tons of concrete lines. Not many are capable of it.

7.Bg5 a6 8.Na3 b5 9.Nd5 Be7 10.Bxf6 Bxf6 11.c3 0–0 12.Nc2 Bg5 13.a4 bxa4 14.Rxa4 a5 15.Bc4
(Let me gallop through all these theoretical moves) 15...Rb8 16.Ra2 g6 17.0–0 Kh8 18.b4 axb4 19.cxb4
Be6 20.b5. Looking at the position outline White made huge progress. He took control over the d5 and
created a passer on the queenside.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 5 REPORT Page 8 of 17

20...Bxd5. A novelty. In the game Korte – Siegmund, Arco 1998) Black went down meekly 20...Ne7
21.Ncb4 Bxd5 22.Nxd5 f5 23.Ra7 fxe4 24.Nxe7 Bxe7 25.Qd5 Bg5 26.Qxe4 Qc8 27.Bd3 Rf6 28.h4! Bd2
(28...Rf4 29.Rxh7+!) 29.h5 and so on. Naturally, serious analysts don’t take such games as serious
theoretical basis
21.exd5! Very interesting positional decision. Vishy has created an for his pieces on c6. Peter’s idea lay
in the following line: 21.Qxd5 Ne7 22.Qd3 f5! And in some variations Black could breakthrough in the
center. Even if White controls the situation at this front, Black has a good counterplay. For example
23.Rd1 Qc7 (the line 23...fxe4 24.Qxd6 Qxd6 25.Rxd6 Nf5 followed by e4-e3 also should be analyzed)
24.f3 fxe4 25.fxe4 Nc8! – the knight goes to b6, the b5-pawn is weak, the d6-d5-breakthough is still
possible.
21...Na5. Frankly, I don’t know what to recommend Black. Maybe he should transfer his knight to b6 –
21...Ne7 22.Nb4 Qd7 23.Nc6 Rb7, followed by Ne7-c8-b6.
22.Be2 Ra8 23.Nb4 Nb7. Black’s only chance is to “flow around” the c6-knight. The exchange of this
knight lead to a losing position after White’s capturing with d-pawn. It is possible to stand against one
passing pawn, but two passers – not a chance.

24.Ra6! (White has changed his plan; his rook is heading to c6) 24...Nc5 25.Rc6 (White’s knight is
going to a6 to dislodge his black colleague) 25...Ra4 26.Qb1 Qa5 27.Na6 Ne4! As Black has completely
lost the battle on the queenside, his only chance is to counterattack at the opposite win.
28.b6 Qxd5 29.Qb5! Qd4! That the key moment of the game. Up to this point Anand has played
marvelously.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 5 REPORT Page 9 of 17

30.Rc4. In my opinion this move reveals some Anand’s diffidence. Probably he failed to shake off all the
negative emotions after his last round defeat and unconsciously wanted to play it safe. As a result he
missed a well-deserved victory. The straightforward line 30.b7 Nxf2! 31.Qb6 brings about unclear
consequences which is very hard to evaluate over the board. – 31...Qxb6 32.Rxb6 Be3 33.b8Q Rxb8
34.Rxb8+ Kg7 35.g3 (35.Rxf2? Ra1+ 36.Bf1 Ra2!; 35.h3 Nxh3+ 36.Kh2 Nf4) 35...Ra2 36.Kg2 Ne4
37.Kf3 (37.Re1 Nc3 38.Kf1 Bd2) 37...Ba7 38.Kxe4 f5+ 39.Kd3 e4+ 40.Kc3 Bxb8 41.Bc4 Rxh2 42.Nxb8
Rg2

Those who are able calculate the line up to the position on the diagram deserve the GM-title. I doubt
that White can win this phantasmagoric position. Much better is 30.Qd3! Qb2 31.g3!

Nipping Black’s counterplay in the bud. For example 31...f5 32.Qb5 Qd4 and here it is time to advance

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 5 REPORT Page 10 of 17

the pawn – 33.b7 Nxf2 34.b8Q! Black’s discovered check is a mere pop-gun at White’s fiesta.
30...Rxc4 31.Qxc4 Nc3! (forcing exchanges Black is making anther important step toward a draw)
32.Bd3 Qxc4 33.Bxc4 d5. Another important moment in the game.

34.Bxd5?! White simplifies the opponent’s problem. By the way Leko was in a severe time trouble! After
34.Bb3 Black faces more much more serious problems. For example 34...e4 35.b7 Bf4 36.Ra1! (in case
of 36.Nb4 Ne2+! 37.Kh1 d4 38.Ra1 Kg7 39.Nc6 d3 Black has a sufficient conerplay) 36...Kg7 37.Nb4
Rb8 38.Bxd5 Nxd5 39.Nxd5

Can Black hold this endgame? The question remains open. It looks like Black should snatch the h2-
pawn and then capture on b7. Another continuation 39...Bd6 40.Rb1 f5 41.Rb6 Bc5 42.Rb5 Bd6 43.Kf1
offers White good winning chances.
34...Nxd5 35.b7 e4! 36.b8Q Rxb8 37.Nxb8 e3 (the fewer pawns on the board the easier to make a
draw) 38.fxe3 Bxe3+ 39.Kh1 Kg7. Vishy tried to play this ending just in case, but White had no real
winning chances. It is not that difficult to defend this position on the black side.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 5 REPORT Page 11 of 17

40.Nc6 h5 41.Rd1 Nf6 42.Rb1 Ng4 43.g3 Bg5 44.Kg2 Bf6 45.Re1 Nh6 46.Kf3 Nf5 47.Rd1 Nh6 48.h3
Nf5 49.Rd7 Kf8 50.Na5 Nd4+ 51.Kg2 Nf5 52.Nc4 Kg7 53.g4 hxg4 54.hxg4 Ne7 55.Nd6 Be5 56.Ne4
Ng8 57.g5 Kf8 58.Rb7.

58...f6 59.Nc5 Ke8 60.Nd3 Bd6. Draw.

In the following game the opponents tried to rock the boat but to no effect. The mutual inaccuracies
balanced the situation and resulted in an equally unwanted draw.

Philidor Defense C41
Judit POLGAR (HUN) – Alexander MOROZEVCH (RUS)
1.e4 d6 (Black’s desire to swerve from standard theory is quite understandable) 2.d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 e5
4.Nf3 Nbd7 5.Bc4 Be7 6.0–0 0–0. The Philidor Defense is a rare opening in elite tournaments.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 5 REPORT Page 12 of 17

7.Qe2 exd4 8.Nxd4 Nb6 9.Bb3 Nfd7. I barely could guess right a couple of moves in the game of two
extremely creative players: 9...c5 10.Nf3 Bg4 11.a4 Rc8 12.h3 Bxf3 13.Qxf3 c4 14.Ba2 Qe8 15.a5 Na4
16.Ne2 Qc6 17.Ng3 Rfe8 18.Bg5 h6 19.Be3 Bf8 20.Bxa7 Nxe4 21.Bd4 d5 22.Nxe4 Rxe4 23.Rad1 Bc5
24.Bxc5 Qxc5 25.b3 Nb2 26.b4 Qc6 27.Rd2 d4 28.b5 Qg6 29.c3 Nd3 30.cxd4 Ne1 31.Qg3 Qxg3 32.fxg3
c3 33.Bxf7+ Kh8 34.Rd1 c2 35.Rdxe1 Rxe1 36.Rxe1 c1Q 37.Rxc1 Rxc1+ 38.Kf2 and Black found himself
in a hopeless endgame (Kotronias – Conquest, Kavala 1991).
10.Be3. Novelty. Judit playing simple solid moves. White tested 10.a4 a5 11.Nf5 Bf6 12.Nb5 Nc5 13.Qf3
Bxf5 14.Qxf5 c6 15.Nc3 Nxb3 16.cxb3 Qd7 17.Qxd7 Nxd7 but Black got upper hand (Lauk – Tratar, Dos
Hermanas 2003); after 10.Nf5 Bf6 11.Be3 Bxc3 12.bxc3 Nc5 13.Qg4 Bxf5 14.Qxf5 Qe7 15.f3 Ncd7
16.Rfd1 Qe5 17.Qh3 Kh8 18.Bd4 Qg5 19.a4 a5 an equal position arose. (Poecksteiner – Tratar, Dos
Hermanas 2003).
10...Nc5. Black is tradition White’s potentially dangerous bishop.

11.Rad1 Bf6 12.f4 Qe7 13.Qf3 Bd7. In case of 13...Re8 14.Bf2 Black can’t swallow the bite on e4.
Indeed after 14...Nxe4 15.Rfe1 Bg4 16.Qxg4 Nxf2 17.Rxe7 Nxg4 18.Bxf7+ Kf8 19.Rxe8+ Rxe8 20.Bxe8
Kxe8 Black’s is in shambles.
14.Rfe1 Rae8 15.Bf2 g6 16.Qg3 (although Black did a good job arranging his pieces, he has no
proactive plan in sight) 16...Nxb3 17.axb3 Bg7 18.Nf3.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 5 REPORT Page 13 of 17

18...f6!? (Black demonstrates his unwillingness to release tension) 19.Ra1 Nc8 20.Nd5. I can’t see a
refutation of greedy 20.Bxa7!? The point is that after 20...c5 (20...b6? 21.Nd5 Qd8 22.Bb8!) 21.Bb8
(21.b4 b6 22.Bb8 Qf7) 21...Bc6 (21...Nb6 22.Nd5!) 22.Rad1 the locked white bishop shatters his cage
from inside! The ram from outside is f4-f5 on menu as well. Probably 21.b4! is even better. On the other
hand, it is hard to believe that something of this sort could have happened on the board.
20...Qd8 21.c4 c6 22.Nc3 c5 23.Nd5 Ne7 (Black ignores the threats to his a7-pawn) 24.b4! (and so
does White!) 24...Nxd5 25.cxd5.

25...cxb4! (to get some counterchances Alexander ceded the d4-square; 25...Qb6 26.bxc5 dxc5 27.e5
fxe5 28.fxe5) 26.Rxa7 Qc7 27.Raa1. In case of 27.Bd4 Black has an interesting trick 27...Bg4! although
White just ignore it with 28.Raa1.
27...f5 (that is the only way to counter White’s activity in the center) 28.e5 Qc4 29.Rad1. Black’s
position looks bad and probably it is! However Alexander found a good way to complicate issue in the
mutual time trouble.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 5 REPORT Page 14 of 17

29...Ba4! 30.Rd2 Bc2 (the bishop is transferred to e4) 31.h4? This attack did not attain its objective.
Better was 31.Ng5! and facing the threat of the white knight’s penetration to e6 Black has to sacrifice an
exchange 31...Be4 32.Qh4 (an unexpected capture 32.exd6 also deserve attention. The d6-pawn is really
annoying in some lines) 32...h6 33.Ne6 (another interesting option is 33.Nxe4 fxe4 34.exd6) 33...Rxe6
34.dxe6 dxe5 35.e7 Re8 36.Rd8 Kf7 37.Rxe8 Kxe8 38.Rd1 Bd5 39.fxe5 and Black’s defensive recourses
are gradually wearing out.
31...Be4 32.Rd4 Qb3 (Black have serious counterchances here) 33.Ng5 Qxb2 34.Nxe4 fxe4 35.Rdxe4
dxe5.

36.Qd3 (in the line 36.fxe5 Rxe5 37.Rxe5 Bxe5 38.Rxe5 Rxf2 39.Re8+ Rf8 40.Rxf8+ Kxf8 White has to
deliver perpetual – 41.Qd6+ and so on) 36...Qc3. Black could have tried to intercept the initiative with
36...Rc8!
37.Qb5 b3? (it is very difficult to calculate all the line in the time trouble) 38.R4e3 (both opponents
missed 38.Bc5!) 38...Qc2 39.Rxb3 Rd8 40.Bb6 Qd2 41.Rbb1 Rxd5. Draws was agreed here.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 5 REPORT Page 15 of 17

The point is that after 42.Qb3! Black has to trade queens as his d5-rook is under attack – 42...Qd3
43.Qxd3 Rxd3 44.fxe5 This roughly equal endgame is drawing.

The ideas of Sveshnikov variation pervaded the following game, although the opponent played a
different line.

Sicilian Defense B92
Michael ADAMS (2719) – Rustam KASIMDZHANOV (2670)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be2 e5 7.Nb3 Be7 8.0–0 0–0 9.Kh1.

9...Bd7 (the bishop transfer to c6 looks but it has one drawback...) 10.Bg5! (it is time to exchange on f6
since Black can’t develop his knight to d7) 10...Bc6 11.Bxf6 Bxf6 12.Bc4. White is taking control over the
d5-square but it does not offer him a big advantage.
12...Be7

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 5 REPORT Page 16 of 17

13.Qe2. A natural novelty. In the game Janturin – Grachev (Essentuki 2003) White placed his queen to
a different square – 13.Qd3 Nd7 14.Rad1 Rc8 15.Bd5 Qb6 16.Qe2 Nf6 17.Rd3 Qc7 18.Bxc6 bxc6
19.Nd2 Rfe8 20.Rd1 d5! but experienced real problems and lost.
13...Nd7 14.Rfd1 Kh8 (Black is preparing counterplay with f7-f5) 15.Nd2 (the transfer of the knight from
b3 to e3 is a standard maneuver in this pawn structure) 15...Nf6 16.a4. Earlier the move b7-b5 was taboo
for Black in view of Bc4-d5. In the current situation White has to prevent this advancement.
16...g6! (there is no point in explaining this move to all the adepts of the Sveshnikov line) 17.Bb3 Qc7
18.a5 Rad8 19.Nf1 Nh5 20.Ne3 Bg5. This move requites no explanation either!

21.Ned5. White’s problem is that he has TOO MANY candidates for the d5-square. On the other hand
he can’t trade his extra-candidates.
21...Qb8 22.Rd3 Ng7 23.Qg4 Ne6 (Black is prepared for the counterattack) 24.Nb6. White could have
kept the playable position with 24.Rh3, although there are no real threats in sight. Take for example a
simple reply 24...Kg7!
24...f5! (Rustam demonstrate precise calculation) 25.exf5 gxf5 26.Qg3. On 26.Qh5 highly unpleasant is
26...Be8! and the knight jumps out from the corner to f4 with tempi.
26...Bf4. It turned out that the parties had to repeat their moves.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 5 REPORT Page 17 of 17

27.Qh4 (27.Qh3? Nc5) 27...Bg5 (27...Nc5? 28.Rh3) 28.Qg3 Bf4 29.Qh4 Bg5. Draw.

Standings after fifth round: 1. Topalov – 4.5 (usually top players score so many points in weak Swiss
system tournaments); 2–3. Svidler and Anand – 3 (hare’s back is still in sight, but both have to speed
up!); 4. Каsimdzhanov – 2.5 (Rustam is gathering himself up for a spurt…); 5–6. Polgar and Leko – 2 (I
positive Judit and Peter want to part at the tournament distance); 7–8. Adams and Morozevich – 1,5 (both
are too far behind the leader…).

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 6 REPORT Page 1 of 17

Сергей ШИПОВ,
гроссмейстер

Recital goes on!
It goes beyond all the limits! Who could ever imagine before the event that one of the
participants would be head and shoulders above the others? Moreover, many experts
believed that the winner would be just first among equals and his victory would not be a
solid basis for reigning in the world of chess. They were wrong…

Topalov demonstrated a phenomenal performance in the first six rounds. Actually, nobody have heart to
tell that the Bulgarian was lucky; the opponents did play their best against him, etc. He fully deserved this
amazing score! The two-point distance mirrors the real difference between the leader and his pursuers.
Having beaten Polgar in the sixth round, Veselin proved once again that he is a versatile all-round chess
player. There were neither complications nor attacks in this game. The Bulgarian scored the full point in
the positional fight thank to his fine touch and excellent technique.

Ruy Lopez C67
Judit POLGAR (HUN) – Veselin TOPALOV (BUL)
1.e4 e5! Black took a wise practical approach. It is much better to play solid positional chess against
such a brilliant tactician as Judit. Everyone remember Kasiamdzhanov’s fate!
2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6. More than a century ago many masters played this way. The system was
particularly popular among German chess players such as Adolf Anderssen, Zigbert Tarrasch and young
Emmanuel Lasker, who lived in Berlin for some period of time. Thus, the line was called Berlin system. A
century later after the Germany reunification, during the match Kasparov – Kramnik (2000) another name
sprang up – Berlin wall! Indeed, the system did not enjoy a great deal of popularity in the second part of
the last century. Only GM Alexandrov played it on regular basis in the 90s. Others GM used the Berlin as
a weapon against particular opponent. Zoltan Almasi made a great contribution into the development of
the system on the top level. Summing up, before 2000 just a few played the system, after Kramnik’s
victory in the match everyone does!

4.0–0 Nxe4 5.d4 Nd6. Anderssen preferred 5...Be7. Nowadays this continuation brings about the –
6.Qe2 Nd6 7.Bxc6 dxc6 8.dxe5 Nf5 9.Rd1 Bd7 10.e6 fxe6 11.Ne5 – this is just the beguining of theory.
Actually the ensuing game is in the spirit of XIX century.
6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Nf5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8. This position became a real nightmare for Kasparov in the
London match. He managed to break Kramnik’s defense a little bit later at the tournament in Astana
(2001). However he had been already lost the match…

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 6 REPORT Page 2 of 17

9.Nc3 Ne7! The classics of XIX century did not know this maneuver, introduced by Almasi. Black clears
the way for his light-squared bishop and transfer the knight to g6 to attack the e5-pawn.
10.h3 Ng6 11.Ne4 h6 12.b3. The Bulgarian GM many times played this variation on the both sides.
Check out the firework he made together with another chess pyrotechnic: 12.Re1 Be6 13.Nd4 Bd5
14.Nf5 Nxe5 15.Bf4 Nd7 16.Nc3 g6 17.Nd4 Bb4 18.Nxd5! Bxe1 19.Bxc7+ Kc8 20.Rxe1 cxd5 21.Bd6 a5
22.Re7 Ra6 23.Nb5 a4 24.Ba3 f6 25.Nc3 Ne5 26.Nxd5 Rd8 27.Ne3 Rc6 28.b3 axb3 29.axb3 Rd7
30.Re8+ Rd8 31.Re7 Rd7 and the opponents had to seal a draw. (Topalov – Shirov, Prague 2002).
12...c5. I should note that not always Black manage to counter White’s simple strategy. I mean the
pawn attack on the kingside. For example 12...Ke8 13.Bb2 a5 14.a4 Nf4 15.Rfe1 Bb4 16.c3 Be7 17.Rad1
Ne6 18.c4 Bb4 19.Re3 Bd7 20.Nh4 Rd8 21.Nf5 Bc8 22.Rxd8+ Kxd8 23.Rd3+ Ke8 24.g4 Bf8 25.Bc1 b6
26.Nfg3 c5 27.Be3 Bb7 28.f4 and White gradually won. (Karjakin – Kramnik, Dortmund, blitz 2004)
13.Be3. Novelty. Actually, it is very difficult to come up with a new idea in this system. Correcting the
move order is quite a different matter… I think White should develop the dark-squared bishop to b2. In
this case White has more chances to launch operation on the kingside as the f3-knight is not tied to
defense of the e5-pawn. A recent game of two top Ukrainian women was drawn after 13.Bb2 Be6 14.c4
Be7 15.Ng3 h5 16.Rad1+ Ke8 17.Bc1 h4 18.Ne4 Rh5 19.Rfe1 Rd8 20.Rxd8+ Kxd8 21.Nfg5 Bxg5
22.Bxg5+ Kc8 23.f4 b6 24.Rf1 Bd7 25.Kf2 Nf8 26.Ke3 Ne6 27.Rd1 Bc6 – the position is about equal
(Lahno – Zhukova, Sochi 2005).

13...b6 14.Rad1+ Bd7. That is an interesting moment of the game.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 6 REPORT Page 3 of 17

15.Nc3. White could have advanced her pawn to h5 15.h4 Kc8 (15...h5? 16.Neg5!) 16.h5 Ne7 but what
is next? Black plans to capture this pawn with the bishop. White does not what to place his knight to h2.
Stopping the g2-pawn with the g3 knight does not look particularly appealing either.
15...Kc8 16.Nd5 Be6 17.c4 (that is a standard pawn arrangement in the system) 17...Kb7 18.Bc1
(White admitted to being in the wrong) 18...a5! 19.a4. White should not allow a5-a4. On the other hand
the b3-pawn became a permanent weakness. Black can transfer his bishop to c2 in some lines.
19...Rd8.

20.g4? After this serious mistake White fall into troubles. Her attack at the queenside is absolutely
unprepared. Actually, White has no advantage. Moreover, Judit had to play with accuracy to maintain
balance.
20...h5! (the white hunters became the prey) 21.Ne3 Re8! (Black should avoid exchanges in this
position) 22.Rfe1 Nf4 23.Ng5 Be7 24.Nxe6 fxe6. Now the h3 pawn inevitably falls.
25.gxh5 Nxh3+ 26.Kf1 Rxh5 27.Ng4. Black emerged with an extra pawn and incessant initiative. Judit
mounted a stubborn resistance but failed to hold her position.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 6 REPORT Page 4 of 17

27...Bg5 28.Bxg5 Rxg5 29.f3 Rf8 30.Kg2 Nf4+ 31.Kg3 Rh5 32.Kf2 (32.Rh1 Ne2+ 33.Kf2 Rxh1
34.Rxh1 Nd4–+) 32...Ng6 33.Rd7 Rh3 34.Re3 Nh4 35.Rdd3 (35.Rxg7? Nf5–+) 35...Kc6 36.Rc3 Rh1
37.Red3 Nf5 38.Ne3 Nd4. The Black knight took up an ideal position. Both White’s weaknesses are
under fire.
39.Nf1 Rh5 40.Re3 Rf4 41.Rcd3 g5 42.Re4 Kb7 43.Kg3.

43...Rxe4. Black had a shorter path to the victory: 43...Nxf3! 44.Rxf4 Nxe5 and White attempt to keep
her extra piece with 45.Rff3 fails to 45...g4 46.Rfe3 Rh3+ 47.Kg2 Nxd3 48.Rxh3 gxh3+ 49.Kxh3 Kc6. This
endgame is winning for Black.
44.fxe4 Rh4 45.Nd2 Kc8 46.Re3 Kd7 47.Re1 Ke7 48.Nf3! (the transposition into a rook endgame
offers the best chance to escape) 48...Nxf3 49.Kxf3 Kf7. After 49...Rh3+ 50.Kg4 Rxb3 51.Rh1 White has
a good counterplay.
50.Rd1 Rf4+ 51.Ke3 Kg7! 52.Rd7+ Rf7 53.Rd1 (naturally, White avoid rook exchange as the pawn
ending is hopeless) 53...Kg6 54.Rd8 g4 55.Rg8+ Kh5 56.Rh8+ Kg5 57.Rg8+ Kh4 58.Rg6 Rf3+ 59.Ke2.
One may think that Black gradually played it to a draw. However a fine maneuver by Topalov dispels this
illusion.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 6 REPORT Page 5 of 17

59...Kg3! 60.Rxe6 Kf4! 61.Re8 Re3+ 62.Kf2 (the sequence 62.Kf1 Kxe4 63.e6 Kd3! 64.e7 Kc3 65.Kf2
Re4 is no better for White) 62...g3+ 63.Kg2 Kxe4 64.e6. At this point the jokers from ICC entered the
move 64...Ke5? and displayed the result 0–1. This “joke” stirred up chess fans all around the world, as
White can save the game after 65.Rg8! Did Judit resing in the drawing position?

The explanation is very simple. In reality Veselin played 64...Kd3! The black king is heading to the b3-
pawn. White resign

Next encounter saw another important step to explore the most complicated variation of modern chess
theory.

Ruy Lopez C89
Vishwanathan ANAND (IND) – Peter SVIDLER (RUS)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0–0 8.c3! It is always nice to see
feisty guys who dare play the Marshall attack.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 6 REPORT Page 6 of 17

8...d5 9.exd5 Nxd5 10.Nxe5 Nxe5 11.Rxe5 c6 12.d4 Bd6 13.Re1 Qh4 14.g3 Qh3 15.Re4 (currently it
is the main path for White) 15...g5 16.Qf1. This position has been in focus of all theorists before, in
course and after the match Kramnik – Leko (2004). The verdict has not passed yet

16...Qxf1+. The fifth game of the above mentioned match saw 16...Qh5 17.Nd2 Bf5 18.f3 Nf6 19.Re1 (I
think 19.a4 is more logical) 19...Rae8 20.Rxe8 Rxe8 21.a4 Qg6 22.axb5 Bd3

Here the error in preparation of Kramnik’s team (Peter was a member of this team) was revealed.
Instead of repeating moves with 23.Qd1 Be2 24.Qc2 Bd3 25.Qd1 Kramnik and his assistants decided to
push for a win with 23.Qf2? Re2 24.Qxe2 Bxe2 25.bxa6 – the white pawn is advancing to the eight rank.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 6 REPORT Page 7 of 17

One may think that Black is in deep trouble, but Leko found 25...Qd3!! It turned out that Black had an
irrefutable attack (Kramnik – Leko, Briissago 2004). Since Peter did follow Leko’s track, we can suppose
that a better continuation was found for White.
17.Kxf1 Bf5 18.f3! (this exchange sacrifice is a typical maneuver in this variation) 18...h6.

19.Nd2! This novelty is unquestionably the most consistent and strong move. In the game Peng
Xiaomin – Grischuk (Shanghai 2001) White sheepishly swerved from the warpath – 19.Re1 Rfe8 20.Bxd5
cxd5 21.Rxe8+ Rxe8 22.Kf2 a5 23.a3 Bd3 and the parties signed a piece.
19...Bxe4! (Black picked up the gauntlet) 20.fxe4 Nc7 21.Kg2. Vishy made this move very quickly. Most
likely he discarded the variation 21.e5 Be7 22.Ne4 in view of 22...Nd5 and Black gets counterplay
chipping away at the center with f7-f6!
21...c5! Peter also responded immediately. Starting from this point and up to 28th move that was only
the Indian GM who thought on this position! Russian was coming back and making his moves without
hesitations. It was really impressive! However, in my opinion, Black failed to completely equalize the
position.

22.e5 Be7 23.Ne4 cxd4 24.cxd4 a5 25.Be3! Precise move. Opening new files does not favor White.
That is exactly what happen in case of 25.a3 a4 26.Ba2 b4!
25...a4 26.Bd1 Nd5 (I think an immediate 26...f6 deserves a close consideration) 27.Bf2 Rac8 28.Rb1.
This move is really hard to foresee in home preparation. Note the number of the move, it is 28th! Imagine
how many lines every GM fighting on the top level has to keep in his mind! Besides, there is a throng of
sub-variations and reasonable alternative on every move. One should be prepared for each and any of
them. The exchange of blows is unacceptable for White – 28.Be2 Rc2 29.Bxb5 Ra8 30.Rb1 a3 and Black

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 6 REPORT Page 8 of 17

grabs advantage.

28...f6. That is the most conceptual continuation. Black should shatter White’s fortification in the center.
On the other hand Black had another good option, namely, 28...Rfd8. It is very difficult for White to make
progress. For example, 29.Be2 b4 (29...f5?! 30.Nc3! Nxc3 31.bxc3 Rxc3 32.Bxb5+/-) 30.Bd1 Nb6
(30...a3 31.Bb3!+=) 31.d5!? Nxd5 32.Bxa4 f5! 33.exf6 Nxf6 34.Re1 Kf8 and Black has nothing to
complain about.
29.exf6 Bxf6 (inferior is 29...Nxf6 30.Nc3!) 30.Nd6.

30...Rc6. Peter seeks after trading pieces. He succeeded but in my opinion not without cooperation of
his opponent. Probably better was 30...Rb8 and any White’s attempt to snatch the b5-pawn backfires:
31.Bf3 (31.Be2 Rb6! 32.Nxb5 Rfb8) 31...Ne7 32.Be2 Rb6! 33.Nxb5 Rfb8 and Black captures on b2. With
this in mind, the continuation 31.Bf3 Ne7 32. Re1 or 32.b3 with a complicated position seems more
logical.
31.Nxb5 Rb6. The sequence 31...Rb8 32.Bxa4 hardly makes any difference. White has some new
options at the cost of others, but the evaluation remains the same.
32.Bxa4 Rfb8. After 32...Ra8 33.b3 Ra5 the best option is 34.Rc1 (not so clear is 34.Na3 Nc3 35.Rc1
Nxa4 36.Rc8+ Kf7 37.Nc4 Rd5) 34...Rbxb5 35.Bxb5 Rxb5 36.Rc5! Rxc5 37.dxc5 Kf7 38.Kf3 Ke6 39.a4

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 6 REPORT Page 9 of 17

It is not that easy for Black to reach a draw in this position. In addition to advancing queenside pawns,
White may launch active operation on the opposite wing…
33.Na3 Rxb2. That is the last interesting moment of the game.

34.Rxb2. It is hard to understand why Vishy made this move so quickly! He had enough time. It was
worth calculating the line – 34.Bb3! Rxb1 35.Nxb1 Kg7 36.Kf3 and White can play for win running no
risks. Supported by the king, the white pawns have a chance to advance.
34...Rxb2 35.Nc4 (now total exchanges are imminent) 35...Rxa2 36.Bb3 Rxf2+ 37.Kxf2 Bxd4+ 38.Ne3
Bxe3+ 39.Kf3.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 6 REPORT Page 10 of 17

Draw.

The opponents failed to complicate the issue in the next game. Their desire to play it safe was
ineradicable…

Sicilian Defense, B33.
Rustam KASIMDZHANOV (UZB) – Peter LEKO (HUN)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 e5. Leko opted for the Sveshnikov variation again.
Apparently the opening failure in the game with Anand was not a great problem for him.
6.Ndb5 d6 7.Bg5 a6 8.Na3 b5 9.Nd5 Be7 10.Bxf6 Bxf6 11.c3 0–0 12.Nc2 Bg5 13.a4 bxa4 14.Rxa4
a5 15.Bc4 Rb8 16.Ra2 g6 17.0–0 Kh8 18.b4.

18...Bd7! (here comes the improvement; against Vishy Peter played 18...axb4 19.cxb4 Be6 but did not
manage to equalize) 19.Qe2. That is a novelty. Black staged an exemplary play in the following game –
19.Qa1 Qc8 20.Bd3 axb4 21.Ba6 Qd8 22.Ncxb4 f5 23.exf5 gxf5 24.Nxc6 Bxc6 25.Nb4 Ba8 26.Rd1 f4
27.Bc4 f3 28.g3 e4 29.Nc2 Qf6 30.Re1 Bd2 31.Nd4 Bxe1 32.Qxe1
(д)
32...e3! 33.Qxe3 Bd5! and White resigns (De Firmian – Scandorff, Denmark 1997). That is how Black
should play in this line. Active operation in the center evolved into a crushing attack at the white king.
19...axb4 20.Ncxb4. White is trying to squeeze through the eye of a needle. It is not the way to obtain a
sizeable advantage. First of all White should analyze the move 20.cxb4!? – and the passer on the
queenside might become White’s big trump.
20...Na5 21.Rfa1 Nxc4 22.Qxc4.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 6 REPORT Page 11 of 17

22...Rc8. The continuation 22...f5! striking up counterplay suggested itself. Black carried out this
breakthrough only ten moves down the road.
23.Qe2 Rc5 (it is not that difficult to reconstruct Leko’s train of thoughts; after f7-f5 the d5-knight falls
under attack) 24.Ra7. The seventh rank is a very promising direction of White’s activities.
24...Be6 25.h3 Bh6. Probably, initially Peter was planning 25...f5 but when the game came to this point
realized that White could transfer his knight to the center with tempo by 26.Na6!? Most likely he figured
out that White could take no heed of Black’s threats to his d5-knight: 26.exf5!? and the knight is immune
– 26...Bxd5 27.Nxd5 Rxd5 in view of 28.fxg6 hxg6 29.Qe4!
26.Na6 Ra5 27.Nac7 Rxa1+ 28.Rxa1 Bc8 29.c4 (White’s knights dominates the board) 29...Qg5
30.Kh2 Rd8 31.Nb5 Bf8.

32.Qf3. Probably better was 32.Ra7! keeping Black in the corner. Indeed, 32...f5 fails to 33.f4! exf4?
34.Qb2+ Kg8 35.Nf6+ and Black loses his queen.
32...f5 33.Ra7 (now this move is nearly as efficient) 33...Be6 34.g3 fxe4 35.Nf6! Bg8! (fortunately,
chess is not checkers. It is not mandatory to capture the opponent’s queen) 36.Nxe4 Qf5 37.Qe2 d5
38.cxd5 Bxd5 39.Nbc3 Bg8. The position get equalized once and for all.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 6 REPORT Page 12 of 17

40.h4 Bg7 41.Qe3 Rf8 42.Kg2 Qe6 43.Rc7. Draw.

All Morozevich’s games in this event are long, complicated, and double-sided. The problems is that I
have time and energy to analyze them in depth. Unfortunately, my countryman can’t win a single game in
San Luis. Neither can the best British GM. Obviously, the draw equally upset both fighters.

Sicilian Defense B 45
Michael ADAMS (ENG) – Alexander MOROZEVICH (RUS)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 d6 6.Be3 Nf6 7.Be2 Be7 8.0–0 0–0. Sheveningen
variation. Michael has been playing this system for many years, whereas Alexander is a rare guest there.

9.f4 Bd7 10.Kh1 (White could have kept the black bishop on d7 with 10.Nb3) 10...Nxd4 11.Qxd4 Bc6
12.Rad1 Qc7 13.Bf3 Rfd8. The opponents do without a7-a6 and a2-a4. On one hand, Black avoids
loosening b6-square. On the other hand, White has some extra opportunities.
14.Qc4! Good maneuver. White is threatening with the knight’s thrust to b5.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 6 REPORT Page 13 of 17

14...Rac8 (Black has to leave his a7-pawn unprotected) 15.Nb5 Qd7. Novelty. I wonder whether the
opponents studied this position before the game. After 15...Bxb5 16.Qxb5 a6 17.Qb6 Qxc2 18.Qxb7 Rb8
19.Qa7 Qxb2 20.Bd4 Qb7 21.e5 Nd5 22.Qxb7 Rxb7 23.f5 dxe5 24.Bxe5 Rb4 25.Rfe1 Kf8 White got
initative for the pawn (Findlay – Taylor, Ottawa 1984).
16.Nxa7 Bd5. The exchange sacrifice is hardly sufficient for equalizing – 16...Bxe4 17.Nxc8 Rxc8
18.Qd4 Bxf3 19.Rxf3 Rxc2 20.Rf2 – White’s queenside pawns will have a decisive impact.
17.Qxc8. I think the following line leads to a roughly equal position – 17.Qe2 Bc4 18.Qf2 Bxf1 19.Nxc8
Rxc8 (19...Bxg2+ 20.Qxg2 Qxc8 21.e5 +/=) 20.Qxf1 (20.Rxf1 Qa4!) 20...Rxc2 (20...Qa4?! 21.c3 Qxa2
22.Qb5 +/-) 21.e5 Nd5! and so on.
17...Rxc8 18.Nxc8 Bxe4 19.Nxe7+ Qxe7. White emerged with two rooks for the queen. I think he is
better here.

20.c4 h5! Starting from this moment Alexander skillfully maintains tension and poses various problems
to his opponent. Michael failed to demonstrate his best game in the time trouble. As a result instead of
converting his advantage he had to undergo a long and painful process of saving the game.
21.b3. If 21.Bxe4 Nxe4 22.f5 then 22...e5!; the variation 21.Bd4 Bxf3 22.gxf3!? looks too risky. In case
of 22.Rxf3 Ne4 Black fortifies his knight in the center with f7-f5.
21...h4 (what to do with this brazen pawn? it really irks White as he has to recon with h4-h3...) 22.Rd4
d5. Black opens the position and starts incursion in White’s camp.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 6 REPORT Page 14 of 17

23.cxd5 (not so clear was 23.Bxe4 dxe4 24.Bf2 h3! 25.gxh3 Qa3 26.Rd2 Qa5 etc.) 23...exd5 24.h3
(just in case Michael fixates the pawn structure) 24...Qc7 25.Kh2 Qc3. The black queen is a blood-thirsty
pirate who relentlessly attacks White’s pieces.
26.Bg1 Qc2 27.Bxe4 dxe4 28.Bf2 Qe2! (useful insertion) 29.Kg1 Qxa2 30.Bxh4. The sequence 30.b4
Qe2 31.Bxh4 Qe3+ 32.Bf2 Qxf4 33.Rd8+ Kh7 34.Bd4 Qc7 35.Bxf6 gxf6 brought no luck. White will have
problems regaining the pawn.
30...Qxb3.

31.Kh2. White is trying his last chance to outplay Black’s corsair. After 31.Bxf6 Qe3+ 32.Kh1 gxf6
33.Rb4 Qe2 34.Rfb1 f5 35.Rxb7 Qf2 36.Re7 e3 37.Rbb7 Qf1+ 38.Kh2 Qxf4+ 39.Kh1 Qf1+ 40.Kh2 e2
41.Re8+ Kg7 42.Rbe7 draw is inevitable as Black delivers perpetual.
31...Nd5 (naturally Morozevich was also playing this position for win!) 32.Rxe4 Qd3 33.Rfe1 b5 (this
pawn will be the main character in the second part of the game) 34.Bf2! Qd2 35.R1e2 Qd1 36.Ra2 Qb1
37.Ra8+ Kh7 38.Rd4.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 6 REPORT Page 15 of 17

38...Nc7! (good knight’s transfer) 39.Rb8?! This move incurs problems. White had some practical
winning chances after 39.Ra7 Ne6 40.Rxf7! (absolutely harmless is 40.Rdd7 Qf1! 41.Be3 Nxf4=). It looks
like Black should turn down this exchange sacrifice. Better is 40...Qa2 41.Rd6 (the line и 41.Re4!? Ng5
42.Rxg7+ Kxg7 43.Bd4+ Kg6 44.fxg5 also should be analyzed) 41...Kg8 42.Rf5 (42.Re7 Nxf4 43.Rdd7
Qxf2 44.Rxg7+ Kh8=) 42...Qc2 43.Rxb5 Nxf4 44.Kg3 Qe4 – it is really hard to finish this variation. Let me
just prolong it – 45.Rb3 Qxg2+ 46.Kxf4 Qxf2+ 47.Rf3 Qh2+ 48.Rg3

And here it is OK to announce a draw.
39...Ne6 40.Rd7 Nxf4 41.Rxf7 Qe4! (Black is first to create serious threats) 42.Rxf4 Qxf4+ 43.Bg3. Is it
possible to win this position on the black side? In order to do so, Alexander has to trade his b-pawn for
the white rook. However, it looks like Black can’t cut off the white bishop from this pawn.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 6 REPORT Page 16 of 17

43...Qg5 (43...Qc4 44.Rb7 b4 45.Be5 Qd5 46.Rxg7+ Kh6 47.Re7=) 44.Re8! b4 45.Re2 b3 46.Be5 Qh5.
What can I tell about the position arising after 46...Qe7 47.Kg1 b2 48.Rxb2 Qxe5? It is a dead draw!
White has no problems holding this position. Try to explain it to computer…
47.Re3 Qd1 48.Rg3 Qd5 49.Bxg7 Qd6 50.Bb2 Kh6. To get rid of this pin White has to return the loot
(i.e. the pawn).
51.h4 Kh5 52.Kh3 Qe6+ 53.Kh2 Kxh4 54.Rh3+ Kg4 55.Rg3+ Kf5 56.Rf3+ Ke4 57.Kg1 Qd6 58.Bf6.
The rest requires no explanations. White’s fortress is indestructible.

58...Qd1+ 59.Kh2 Kd5 60.Bb2 Qc2 61.Bf6 Kc4 62.Kg1 Kb4 63.Rf4+ Ka3 64.Rf3 Qc5+ 65.Kh2 Qc1
66.Be7+ Ka2 67.Bf6 Qd1 68.Rf2+ Kb1 69.Rf3 Qd6+ 70.Kg1 Qb6+ 71.Kh1 Kc2 72.Rc3+ Kd2 73.Rf3
Ke2 74.Kh2 b2 75.Bxb2 Qxb2 76.Rh3.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 6 REPORT Page 17 of 17

76...Qe5+. Draw.

Standings after sixth round: 1. Topalov – 5.5 (Topalov’s fans more and more often brings up the victory
he missed in the game with Anand); 2–3. Svidler and Anand – 3.5 (Peter and Vishy should forget about
the leader, its to depressing to think about his performance; they would rather concentrate on their own
games and close their eyes on the tournament standings); 4. Kasimdzhanov – 3 (Rustam is next in the
line against the Bulgarian puncher; let’s wish him to avoid knock-out…); 5. Leko – 2,5 (Fans are tired of
waiting Peter among the leaders); 6–8. Polgar, Adams, Morozevich – 2 (it is nice to be in such a cozy
little gathering!)

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 7 REPORT Page 1 of 17

Сергей ШИПОВ,
гроссмейстер

Snow White and Seven Dwarfs

You know, this title is better than. The Wolf and the Seven Young Kids! I don’t mean
offending anyone. There is one problem though. It is hard to imagine Topalov in the role
of Snow White. He is rather a real sharp-toothed, fierce wolf! He devoured all his seven
rivals. I don’t think Anand took comfort in the fact that he was the only participant to
withstand the predator’s aggression. This half point will make him no good.

On the other hands dwarfs are sturdy guys, not easy to beat. They work slowly but diligently and can
pick up. By the way, seven young kinds from Grimm Brother’s fairy tale stood up for themselves and
rebuffed the wolf! It is too early to drop the curtain. Let’s wait for the second part of the event.
The GMs celebrated the end of the first round with an impressive performance. It was another round
with all decisive games. This time White “whitewashed” black 4-0.
The number of pursuers is reduced to just one. Only Peter Svidler has a chance to fight for the title if he
has very good cards in hand and luck on his side.

Vengeance is unworthy of a noble man, but how sweet it is! Veselin was eager to gain revenge for his
defeat in semi-final of FIDE Championship (2004) in Livia at the hands of Kasimdzhanov. All four
classical games were drawn whereas the rapid chess mini-match saw Rustam win. Ultimately, he won
the event. The retribution time came…

Ruy Lopez C88
Veselin TOPALOV (BUL) – Rustam KASIMDZHANOV (UZB)
1.e4 e5 (as Topalov is extremely good in the Sicilian Defense on both sides, it was not very difficult to
predict that Rustam would play some more solid opening) 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7
6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0-0.

8.h3 (the Anand – Svidler game demonstrated that in the Marshall attack Black is safe and sound)
8...Bb7 9.d3 d6 10.a3 Na5 11.Ba2 c5 12.Nbd2 Nc6 13.Nf1. White follows well-knon patterns. His pieces
are slowly but surely flowing to the kingside.

Kid Chaos :)
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13...Bc8! This transfer of the light-squared bishop to e6 became Black’s stronghold in this line. The
white light-squared bishop pressure on d5 square is offset by his Black colleague.
14.c3 Be6 15.Bxe6 fxe6 16.b4. If White does not launch active operation on the queenside, Black
breakthroughs in the center: 16.Ng3 Nd7 17.Be3 d5!? 18.exd5 exd5 19.a4 Rb8 20.axb5 axb5 21.b3 Ra8,
draw Kasparov – Topalov (Linares 2005)
16...Qd7. Formally speaking that is a novelty. In the game (Adams – Kasimdzhanov, Linares 2005)
Black took and different approach but in my opinion failed to equalize completely: 16...Nh5 17.N1h2 Nf4
18.Bxf4 Rxf4 19.Qb3 Qd7 20.a4! bxa4 21.Rxa4 cxb4 22.cxb4 Rb8 23.Rea1 Rb7 24.Rxa6 Nxb4 25.Ra8+
Rf8 26.Rxf8+ Bxf8 27.Rb1 Rb8 28.Qc4 d5 29.Qc3 Rc8 30.Qb3 – despite numerous exchange Black still
have some problems, as his central pawns are vulnerable.
17.Qb3.

17...Rfb8!? The game is taking an interceding turn. Black manifest his intentions. He is going to strike
on the queenside first. Although he eventually lost the game, I like this idea.
18.N1h2 (With the black pawn on e6 transferring the knights to e3 or g3 makes no sense) 18...a5
19.Bd2! Correct reaction! The wave of black pawns is stopped on b4. This breakwater is as hard as a
rock. The sequence 19.bxc5 a4! 20.Qa2 dxc5 favors Black.
19...h6 20.Ng4. Starting from this moment the questions arise. I can’t understand why should Black
trade the knights on g4. Let White do so on f6!

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 7 REPORT Page 3 of 17

20...Nxg4. Immediate exchanges deserved a closer look: 20...axb4 21.axb4 cxb4 22.cxb4 and here
along with 22...Kf7 Black has one more option – 22...Nh7!? – transferring the knight to f8 and freeing the
queen for more important business.
21.hxg4. Now White has a structural advantage on the kingside. The blow g4-g5 will be a constant
threat. Besides, Veselin convincingly proved that White can employ the open h-file quickly and effectively.
21...axb4 22.axb4 cxb4 23.cxb4 Bf6 24.Rec1 (Whtie is doing good job pretending that he has no
interests on the kingside) 24...Kf7. Quite reasonable decision. As a defender the queen is good-for-
nothing. It is much better to use this powerful piece for creating threats. In this particular case with the
help from his queen Black can trade the rooks.
25.g3! Qb7 26.Kg2 Rxa1 27.Rxa1 Ra8.

Frankly speaking, I was under impression that with such a huge gap between the leader and his closest
pursuers Topalov would not break a lance in this game. All the more I was impressed when I saw
28.Rh1! That is what I call champion’s maximalism!
28...Nd4?! (another inaccuracy: removing the f3-knight Black is playing into White’s hands) 29.Nxd4
exd4 30.Bf4 (Black did not pass this test) 30...d5?! This move leads to big troubles. More stubborn was
30...Be7! For example 31.Rh5 Qc6 and the check from f5 is not dangerous for Black.
31.e5! The pawn structure has changed to White’s favor. Probably Rustam counted on something like
31.exd5 Qxd5+ 32.Qxd5 exd5 33.Rc1 Ra3= or 31.Rc1 Rc8 32.Rxc8 Qxc8 33.exd5 e5! Indeed, Black is
OK in these lines.
31...Be7 32.Qd1! (Black is threatened with g4-g5! In some lines White may sacrifice the bishop for a
dangerous attack) 32...Bg5. I don’t know whether I should put the mark "?!" for the third time in a row.
Black has problems in all the lines. For example 32...Kg8 33.g5 hxg5 34.Qg4! Qc6 35.Bxg5 and the

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 7 REPORT Page 4 of 17

capture 35...Bxb4 fails to 36.Qh5 Bf8 37.Qh7+ Kf7 38.Rh4!; The solid shield 32...g5 is shattered with an
impressive 33.Rxh6! gxf4 34.Qh1 and the black king has to runaway leaving his subjects to the mercy of
fate – 34...Ke8 35.Rxe6 Qc8 (35...Kd7 36.Rxe7+!) 36.Qh5+ Kd7 37.Qf7 Qf8 38.Rxe7+! Qxe7 39.Qxd5+
and the curtain falls.
33.Bxg5 hxg5 (Black has three weaknesses: the pawn g5, d4, and his own king; naturally first of all he
had to take care of his monarch) 34.Rh5 Qe7 35.Qh1! The h-file became the road to victory for White. I
am sure that at this point Rustam recalled his trade of the knighst on g4.
35...Rf8 (the black king is ready for an escape) 36.Rh7 Ke8/ That is one of the critical moments. I think
too much time on the clock did the Bulgarian GM a disservice. He wanted to play the best move, but
committed an inaccuracy.

37.Qa1. Wrong direction of the attack. Had been White in time trouble he would have stuck to the main
attacking line – 37.Qh5+ Kd8 (37...Kd7 38.Qg6 Rg8 39.f4!) 38.Qg6 Rg8. Here White should insert 39.Kh3
and then carry out f2-f4-f5.
37...Kf7 38.Qc1 Ke8 39.Qa1 Kf7 40.Qxd4 (Topalov made his choice with the last move before the time
control; it was not too late to return to the right path – 40.Qh1! Ke8) 40...Kg8 41.Rh1 Qf7. Somewhat
unexpectedly it turned out that Black had perfectly arranged his pieces and launched a dangerous
counterattack.
42.Qe3. There is no White’s victory in sight after 42.Rf1 Qf3+ 43.Kg1 Kh7! Check out a possible
although not compulsory line – 44.Qb6 Rf4! (Black reacts the same way on 44.Qc5) 45.Qxe6 Rxg4
46.Qd7 (46.Ra1 Rxg3+!=) 46...Rxb4 47.Re1 (47.Qh3+ Rh4 48.Qg2 Qxg2+ 49.Kxg2 Rd4=) 47...Rb2!
48.Qa7 Qxd3 49.e6 Rb1 50.Rxb1 Qxb1+ 51.Kh2 Qg6 52.e7 (52.Qf7 b4!; 52.Qd7 Qc2 53.Qf7 Qg6!=;
52.Qe3 d4 53.Qe5 d3 54.e7 d2=) 52...Qe8 53.Qe3 (53.Qc5 Kg6!) 53...g4 54.Qe5 g6 55.Qf6 Kg8

Black king is just in time to support his queen. There won’t be any third queen on the board! Certainly,
there are many other options…

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 7 REPORT Page 5 of 17

42...d4! 43.Qe2 Qb7+ 44.Qe4. It is hard to venture upon loosening the second rank. After 44.f3 Ra8
(44...Qc6!?) 45.Rc1 Qd5 46.Rc2 Ra1 Black has a good counterplay.
44...Qxe4+ 45.dxe4 Rc8. Black is first to activate his rook. Therefore he equalizes the position. From
this moment on Topalov played extremely well and figuratively speaking won the game for the second
time!

46.Rb1. Woeful necessity. In the line 46.Ra1 Rc4 47.Ra8+ Kf7 48.Ra7+ Kf8 49.Rb7 Rxb4 50.f4 Black
easily holds: 50...d3 (или 50...Rb2+ 51.Kf3 Rb3+ 52.Kf2 Rb2+ 53.Ke1 Rg2) 51.Rd7 Rxe4 52.Kf3 Rc4
53.Rxd3 g6!? and so on.
46...Rc3. This natural move is not the only one. Probably it is even better to keep the rook on the
second rank – 46...Rc2!? 47.Kf1 (47.Rb3 Re2 48.Kf3 Rc2) 47...Kf7 (47...d3? 48.Kg2!) 48.Rb3

At this point Black should lure the white king to e1 – 48...Rd2! (выжидать королем опасно – 48...Ke7
49.f4!) 49.Ke1 (inferior is 49.f4 d3! и Rd1-e2; the sequence 49.f3 Kf8 50.Ke1 Rc2! is no better for White)
49...Rc2, and White can’t breakthrough with 50.f4 in view of 50...gxf4 51.gxf4 g5! 52.f5 Rg2 with a totally
equal position. With the rook on f1 this trick does not work as the black rook has no access to g2-square.
47.Rb2! (now White can transfer his king to the center) 47...Kf7 (47...Rc1 48.Kf3!) 48.Kf1.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 7 REPORT Page 6 of 17

48...Rc1+. I think Black should have advanced his pawn to g6. In this case White’s plan that he
implemented in the game does not work – 48...g6! 49.Ke2 Kf8 50.Ra2 Rb3 51.Ra8+ Kf7 52.Ra7+ Kf8
53.Rb7 Rxb4 54.Kd3 Rb2 55.f4 gxf4 56.gxf4 Rf2! – and the f5-square is under Black’s control. Draw is
inevitable.
49.Ke2 Rc3 50.Ra2! (the only but good chance to push for victory) 50...Rb3 51.Ra7+ Kf8 52.Rb7 Rxb4
53.Kd3. White had enough time to bring his king into play.
53...Rb2 (temporizing tactics does not help – 53...Kg8 54.f4 Rb3+ 55.Kxd4 Rxg3 56.f5 Rxg4 57.f6!)
54.f4.

54...Rb3+. Rustam complicated this task in the time trouble. It looks like better was 54...gxf4! 55.gxf4
Rg2 and here 56.f5 (the following variation lead to a simple draw 56.g5 Rg4 57.Kxd4 Rxf4 58.Kc5 Rg4!
59.Kd6 Rxg5 60.Kxe6 Rg6+ 61.Kd5 Ra6 etc.) 56...Rxg4 57.Rxb5 exf5 ( 57...Rg5? is a wrong track
58.Kxd4 exf5 59.Kd5!+-; there is no refutation of 57...Rf4) 58.exf5 Rf4 59.e6

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 7 REPORT Page 7 of 17

Here Black just wait as White can’t make further progress – 59...Ke8 60.Kc4 Kf8 61.Rb8+ Ke7 62.Rb7+
Ke8 63.Rf7 Rg4! (63...Kd8? 64.Kd5 d3 65.Rxg7 Rxf5+ 66.Kd6+-) 64.Rb7 Rf4=
55.Kxd4 Rxg3 56.f5! Rxg4 57.f6! Rg1! (the continuaiton 57...gxf6? 58.exf6 is hopeless. Black can’t
allow the white king to e5) 58.Rxg7.

58...b4? Probably only this move changed the evaluation of this position. Black’s last chance lay in
58...Rc1! For example 59.Rxg5 Rc4+ 60.Kd3 (60.Ke3 b4 61.Rg7 b3 62.Rb7 Rc3+ 63.Kd4 Rh3 64.Kc5
Rd3 65.Kc4 Re3=) 60...Rc5 61.Rh5 (61.Ke3 Rc3+ 62.Kf4 b4=) 61...Kg8! (61...b4? 62.Kd4 Rc1 63.Rh8+
Kf7 64.Rh7+ Kf8 65.Rb7+–) 62.Ke3 Rc3+ 63.Kf4 b4! and Black holds the position.
The winning method that brought White victory in the game does not work here – 58...Rc1 59.Rb7 Rc4+
60.Ke3 Rc3+ 61.Kf2 Rc5 62.Kf3, it is very important to get rid of the g-pawn – 62...g4+! 63.Kxg4 (63.Kf4
g3 64.Rg7 Rc3) 63...Rxe5 64.Kf4 Rc5 65.Re7 (65.e5 Rc4+ 66.Kg5 b4=) 65...b4 66.Rb7 (66.Rxe6 Rb5=)
66...Rh5! 67.Kg4 (67.e5 Rh4+ 68.Kg5 Re4=; 67.Rxb4 Kf7=) 67...Re5 68.Kf3 Rc5 69.Kg4 Re5 70.Kf4 Rh5
and White can’t do anything.
59.Kc5! (Black is losing his passer) 59...b3 60.Rb7 Ra1 (60...Rg3 61.Kd6!) 61.Rxb3 Ra5+.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 7 REPORT Page 8 of 17

62.Kd4! White took the shortest path to the victory. There was the longer one – 62.Kd6 Ra6+ 63.Kd7
Kf7 64.Rg3 Ra7+ 65.Kc6 Kg6 66.Kd6 Ra6+ 67.Ke7 Ra7+ (67...Rb6 68.Rf3!) 68.Kxe6 Ra6+ 69.Kd5 Ra5+
70.Kd4 Ra4+ 71.Ke3 Ra3+ 72.Kf2 Ra2+

73.Kg1! (but not 73.Kf3? Ra5) 73...Ra1+ (73...Ra5 74.Rf3 Kf7 75.e6+!) 74.Kh2 and the game is over.
62...Ra4+ 63.Ke3 Ra5 64.Rb8+ Kf7 65.Rb7+ Kf8 (65...Kg6 66.Rg7+ Kh6 67.Rg8 Ra7 68.Re8+–)
66.Kd4 Ra4+ 67.Kc5. This repetition does not change anything
67...Ra5+ 68.Kd4 Ra4+ 69.Ke3 Ra3+. It is time to execute the plan.

70.Kf2! Ra5 71.Kg3 Rxe5 (the material is equal but it is poor consolation for Black) 72.Kg4! Rxe4+

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 7 REPORT Page 9 of 17

73.Kh5! The white king is marching to g6. Black will have to give up his rook for the f6-pawn. His own g5-
pawn screens the white king from the rear check. Black resigns

This grandiose battle took the whole night of my life. I did not have enough time for detailed annotation
of other games!

Caro-Kann Defense B12
Alexander MOROZEVICH (RUS) – Vishwanathan ANAND (IND)
1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 Bf5 4.Nf3 e6 5.Be2 Ne7 6.Nbd2 h6 7.0-0 Nd7 8.c3 a6 9.Nb3 Rc8. It’s one of the
most popular lines of Caro-Kann Defense with heavy French accent. The pawn structure resembles that
of the French Defense.

10.Nh4. Novelty. Blitz-game between two popular players saw 10.g3 Bh7 11.h4 c5 12.Nxc5 Nxc5
13.dxc5 Rxc5 14.Qb3 Qd7 15.Be3 Rc8 16.c4 Be4 17.Nd2 Nf5 18.Nxe4 dxe4 19.Rfd1 Qc6 20.Bg4 Nxe3
21.Qxe3 Bc5 22.Qe2 0-0 and Black equalized (Rublevsky – Bareev, Internet, 2004)
10...Bh7 11.f4 c5 12.Bh5 Nf5 13.Nxf5 (it’s impossible to avoid knight exchange – 13.Nf3? c4! 14.Nbd2
Ne3–+) 13...Bxf5 14.Be3 g6 15.Be2 h5 16.dxc5 Nxc5 17.Nd4 Be4 18.a4 h4 19.a5. Here Vishy started
to play sharply making his opponent very happy!

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 7 REPORT Page 10 of 17

19...h3 20.g3 Bg2 21.Rf2!? (good exchange sacrifice) 21...Ne4 22.Rxg2 hxg2 23.Kxg2. I believe in
this position black rooks are no better than white light pieces as the pawn fences stretch all-over the
board.
23...Bc5 24.Bd3 Qd7 25.Qf3 Bxd4 26.Bxd4. Here Anand probably miscalculated something as his
ensuing moves led to a collapse.

26...f5? (26...Qc6!) 27.exf6 e5 (this is Black’s idea – his queen is going to visit white king) 28.Bxe4
Qh3+ 29.Kf2 Nobody dies from a check!
29...Qxh2+ 30.Qg2 (and from two checks…) 30...exd4 (the best option) 31.Bxg6+ Kf8 32.Re1! Black’s
attack is over; it’s time to sober up. White bishops and pawns are much stronger than a black rook.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 7 REPORT Page 11 of 17

32...d3 33.Bxd3 Rc6 34.Re5 Rd6 35.Kf3 Qxg2+ 36.Kxg2 Rh6 37.g4 Rhxf6 38.f5 Rf7 39.Kg3. White
pawns are unstoppable. Black’s counterplay on the queen side can’t change anything.

39...b5 40.axb6 Rxb6 41.g5 Rd7 42.f6 d4 43.Bg6 Rb8 44.cxd4 Rxd4 45.Re7 Rdb4 46.Rf7+ Kg8
47.Rg7+ Kh8.

48.Bf7! (last subtlety; White is sewing the checkmate shroud to the black king) 48...Rd4 49.Rg6 Rd3+

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 7 REPORT Page 12 of 17

50.Kg4. Black resigns.

Sicilian Defense B90
Peter SVIDLER (RUS) – Judit POLGAR (HUN)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be3 Ng4 7.Bg5 h6 8.Bh4 g5 9.Bg3 Bg7. This
variation of Najdorf surprisingly became one of the most popular in this tournament. Make no mistake,
everybody will start playing this line after the event. Top players kings set trends and dictate chessic
fashion...

10.h3 Ne5 11.f3 (another try. Svidler played 11.Nf5 against Topalov bad had no luck) 11...Nbc6 12.Bf2
Ng6. White got the upper hand after 12...Be6 13.Qd2 Qa5 14.Nb3 Bxb3 15.cxb3 Nb4 16.a3 Ng6 17.Rd1
Nc6 18.Nd5 Qxd2+ 19.Rxd2 0-0 20.b4 in the Leko – Kasparov (Linares 2000) game.
13.Qd2 Qa5 14.0-0-0.

14...Bd7. Novelty. A new plan, a new setup. Earlier Black placed the bishop on e6 and reached quite
comfortable positions. For example, 14...Be6 15.Kb1 Rc8 16.Nb3 (or 16.Nd5 Qxd2 17.Rxd2 Nxd4
18.Bxd4 Bxd4 19.Rxd4=) 16...Bxc3 17.Nxa5 Bxd2 18.Nxc6 Rxc6 19.Rxd2 f6 20.b3 Kf7, and White has
only a slight advantage (Tiviakov – Dominguez, Wijk aan Zee 2004).
15.Kb1 Rc8 16.g3! Slowly Svidler starts active play. Or just pretends that he is going to be active! Black
has only one problem – there is no safe place for the king. And it’s impossible to find it!
16...Nxd4 17.Bxd4 Bxd4 18.Qxd4 Qe5 19.Qf2! Of course, White shouldn’t exchange queens.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 7 REPORT Page 13 of 17

19...Rxc3. Polgar has no desire a passive defense. She opted for an exchange sacrifice, but she
doesn’t obtain sufficient counterplay.
20.bxc3 Qxc3 21.Rd3 Qa5 22.Qe3 Be6 23.Ra3 Qb4+ 24.Ka1 Kd7 25.Be2 Qc5 26.Rb1 Qxe3 27.Rxe3.
The endgame was played brilliantly by Svidler.

27...Rb8 28.Bxa6 Ra8 29.Bb5+ Kd8 30.a3 h5 31.Bf1 Ra7 32.Rb4 Bc8 33.Kb2 f6 34.h4!? gxh4
35.gxh4.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 7 REPORT Page 14 of 17

35...Bd7 (there was a nice line here – 35...Nxh4 36.e5 Nf5 37.exf6! Nxe3? 38.f7+–) 36.Reb3 Bc8
37.Rb5 Nf4 38.Bc4 Kc7 39.Bf7 Bd7 40.Rc3+ Kd8 41.Rxh5! (classical example of converting) 41...Nxh5
42.Bxh5. White passer is extremely dangerous.

42...e6 43.Bg6 Bc6 44.h5 Ke7 45.f4 Ra8 46.h6 Rh8 47.h7 f5 48.exf5 Kf6 49.Rd3 Be4 50.Rxd6 Bxf5
51.Bxf5 Kxf5 52.Rd7 b6. Don’t believe Tartakower! There are rook endgames that can be won. For
example, those with two extra pawns...

53.Rf7+ Kg6 54.Rb7 Kf5 55.c4 Kxf4 56.Rxb6 e5. After 56...Rxh7 57.Rxe6 the endgame with “a” and
“c” pawns arises. With a king on b7 it will be a draw, but in this case black king is cut off by a white rook.
57.Rh6 e4 58.Kc2 Ke3 59.Rh2.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 7 REPORT Page 15 of 17

Black pawn can’t advance. White places its king in front of it and easily wins. Black resigns.

Where did Polgar make a mistake? She made no real mistakes! The choice of the opening was wrong,
Peter played well and the queen of chess herself got a bit tired...

Petroff Defense C42
Peter LEKO (HUN) – Michael ADAMS (ENG)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nf3 Nxe4 5.d4 d5 6.Bd3 Nc6 7.0-0 Be7 8.c4 Nb4 9.Be2 0-0 10.a3 Nc6
11.cxd5 Qxd5 12.Nc3 Nxc3 13.bxc3 Na5 14.Ne5. This position is quite popular.

14...Bf5. Strangely enough, but such a natural move is a novelty. However, after this game nobody will
dare to repeat it. There are plenty possibilities for Black here – for example, 14...Bf6, 14...Qb3 or 14...c5.
15.c4 Qd6 16.c5. Black should be cautious here and retreat the queen to f6. But Michael wanted to
know what trap had been prepared for his queen in the centre…
16...Qd5? (16...Qf6!) 17.Bf3 Be4 18.Bxe4 Qxe4.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 7 REPORT Page 16 of 17

19.Bd2! (probably, the Englishman overlooked this move; it turned out that White can leave d4 pawn
without defense) 19...Nc6. After 19...Qxd4? 20.Nf3 Qxc5 21.Bb4 Black loses a piece.
20.Re1 Qh4 21.Nf3 Qh5 22.Rb1! Bf6 (22...b6 is bad in view of 23.cxb6 cxb6 24.Rc1 Rac8 25.Rxc6
Rxc6 26.Rxe7) 23.Rxb7 Nxd4 24.Nxd4 Qxd1 25.Rxd1 Bxd4 26.Be3 Bxe3 27.fxe3. Once again a
winning rook endgame. It was not a Tartakower’s day…

27...c6 28.Rd6 Rae8 29.Kf2 Re5 30.Rxc6 Rfe8 31.Rcc7 Rxe3 32.Rxf7 Re2+ 33.Kg3 R8e3+ 34.Rf3
Rxf3+ 35.Kxf3 Rc2 36.Rc7 h5.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 7 REPORT Page 17 of 17

37.c6! Kh7 38.h3 Kh6 39.Ke4! Kg6 and Black resigns in view of obvious 40.Kd5.

Standings after seventh round: 1. Topalov – 6.5 (Kasparov’s rating record is in danger); 2. Svidler – 4.5
(Peter – is a modest person, but he should forget about this feature); 3–4. Leko and Anand – 3.5 (these
guys have a good position for a spurt, but they should hurry up…); 5–6. Morozevich and Kasimdzhanov –
3 (Alexander as a noble person must win all seven games. Otherwise why did he stop Vishy? ); 7–8.
Polgar and Adams – 2 (Michael and Judit can relax and enjoy chess. To go down in history it is enough
for them to beat Topalov in the second round.)

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 8 REPORT Page 1 of 13

By grandmaster
Sergey SHIPOV

Infinite harmony of the world
As physicist and materialist I am glad that it has finally happened. The train slowed
down! The energy conservation rule works, perpetum mobile does not exists, the
harmony is resorted. It is absolutely unbelievable that a human can play eight full-scale
games against elite players on the highest possible level and win them all!

On the other, hand it is very hard to measure the reserves of human organism. Formerly it was a
common belief that jumpers would never surmount the 240-cm barrier, but it actually happened. It is
funny to recall the time when 10-second mark was regarded unbreakable for 100-meter sprinters. As for
chess, it is very difficult to draw the line between possible and absolutely unreal. Great players keep
raising the bar higher and higher. Topalov has all the rights to be included in this list, especially if he
retains his leading position.
Currently is looks like the intrigue of the event is dead. The pursuers have not shined; the finish is
nearing. Such a tight schedule suggests that sooner or later the recession is inevitable. Therefore, some
mistake and lack of aggression are explainable and forgettable. All these factors play in Topalov’s hands.

Queen’s Indian Defense E15
Veselin TOPALOV (BUL) – Peter LEKO (HUN)
1.d4 (Probably, Veselin decided not to reveal his novelties in the Sveshnikov system of the Sicilian
Defense; if he has them…) 1...Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.g3 Ba6 5.b3 Bb4+ 6.Bd2 Be7 7.Bg2 c6 8.Bc3 d5
9.Ne5 0–0 10.0–0.

10...Bb7! The exclamation mark does not imply that this move is the best in this position. The official
theory prefers 10...Nfd7. However, Peter’s choice is very good from the practical standpoint. Veselin
introduced new strong move and nearly beat Anand in 10…Nfd7 line. Black’s strategy with the
development of the knight to a6 came as an unpleasant surprise to the Bulgarian. His long reflextion on
every move suggest that his preparation in this line was not deep enough.
11.Nd2 Na6! (Karpov proved on many occasions that the knight position on a6 is very promising) 12.e4
Rc8. Immediate opening the center is also possible: 12...c5 13.exd5 exd5 14.Re1 cxd4 15.Bxd4 Nc5
16.Ng4 dxc4 17.Nxc4 Bxg2 18.Kxg2 Nxg4 19.Qxg4 Bf6 20.Rad1 h5! 21.Bxf6 hxg4 22.Bxd8 Raxd8 and
Black equalized (Kamsky – Karpov, Elista 1996).
13.Re1. It is interesting to note that the white knight spectacularly placed on e5 hampers White’s pieces.
For example the e4 pawn can’t advance to e5; the e1-rook can’t x-ray the black bishop on e7.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 8 REPORT Page 2 of 13

13...Rc7! Excelelnt maneuver. Black is going to transfer his queen to a8, the rook to d8 and to open the
center with c6-c5.

14.Nd3. Here comes a novelty. Black had no problems in the primary source game: 14.a3 c5 (White
was threatening to put a clamp on the queenside with b3-b4) 15.dxc5 Nxc5 16.exd5 exd5 17.b4 Ne6
18.Bb2 dxc4 19.Bxb7 c3 20.Bxc3 Rxc3 21.Bg2 b5! – Whit’s initiative petered out (Chernin – Georgiev,
Spain 1997).
14...dxe4! 15.Nxe4 c5. This breakthrough in the center brings about an equal position.

16.Nxf6+. Veselin keeps creating over the board rather by inertia. However, he did not go too far! In the
line 16.dxc5 Nxe4 17.Bxe4 Bxe4 18.Rxe4 Black should not engage into complications with 18...Rd7
19.Qg4 Bg5 20.Ne5 f5 21.Qh5 fxe4 (21...g6 22.Nxg6!) 22.Nxd7 Qxd7 23.Qxg5 Nxc5 as his active pieces
hardly offset the flaws of the pawn structure. Simpler and better is 18...Nxc5 with an equal position; In the
starting rounds Topalov could have opted for an unclear 16.d5 exd5 17.Nxf6+ Bxf6 18.Bxf6 Qxf6 19.cxd5
where the d5 may be either White’s trump or weakness. However, there is no need for the leader to
overcommitt in first round of the second part of the event.
16...Bxf6 17.Bxb7 Rxb7 18.Ne5 Bxe5. The option 18...cxd4 19.Bxd4 is risky from the strategic
standpoint. As the e5-knight is impossible to bear, Black has to trade it. In this case the white bishop is
more powerful in the game on two wings.
19.dxe5 Rd7 20.Qe2 Qc7 (Leko skillfully develops his pieces. In some lines the a6-knight may jump to
b4) 21.Rad1 Rfd8 22.Rxd7 Qxd7. Although Black controls the only open file it does not promise no
tangible advantage.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 8 REPORT Page 3 of 13

23.Qe4 (now white is prepared to carry out the maneuver Re1-e2-d2) 23...Nb8. After 23...Qd3 24.Qxd3
(24.Qh4!?) 24...Rxd3 White can place his rook to с1 and transfer the king to e2. Even simpler is 25.Re3
Rxe3 26.fxe3 – neither party can lose this endgame. Black could have tried to play for win with 23...Nb4!?
as the exchange of minor pieces favors Black.
24.Kg2. Draw.

Peter did his best. Well, almost! He opted a sharp risky variation, outplayed his opponent with many
subtle moves, but… run out of steam to convert it into the victory.

Sicilian Defense B80
Michael ADAMS (ENG) – Peter SVIDLER (RUS)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 d6 6.Be3 Nf6 7.Qd2! Let’s give the English GM full
credit. After several painful defeats he did not lose confidence. Michael keep playing in aggressive style.
Usually Adams castle short in the Sicilian Defense but this time he ventured upon the sharpest plan with
castling long.

7...Be7 8.f3 0–0 9.0–0–0 a6 10.g4 (a well-known theoretical position of the English attack emerged on
the board) 10...Nxd4 11.Qxd4 Nd7 12.h4 b5 13.g5 Qa5 14.Kb1 b4 15.Ne2 Bb7. Black also tested the
lunge 15...Nc5 followed by e6-e5, clearing the e6 for his light-squared bishop.
16.h5! White takes forestalling approach which in the spirit of the opening. It is very important to launch
an attack as soon as possible!

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 8 REPORT Page 4 of 13

16...Ne5. This novelty is on the verge of utmost jeopardy. Black provokes White – go ahead, attack,
deliver checkmate… Previously Black took the g5-pawn and undeservedly survived: 16...Bxg5 17.Bxg5
Qxg5 18.h6 Rfd8 (совсем не смотрится 18...e5 19.Qxb4 Nc5 20.Rxd6 Qe3 21.Qc3 Qxc3 22.Nxc3
Vasiesiu - Navrotescu, Romania, 2001) 19.hxg7 Qf6 20.Qe3 Ne5 21.Nd4 Ng6 22.Bd3 Qf4 23.Qf2 d5
24.e5 Qxe5 25.Rdg1 Qxg7 26.f4 – it is hard to believe that Black can withstand this attack, but it is
exactly what happened in the game De la Villa Garcia – Bauer (Lausanne 2001).
17.f4. We can only guess what did Peter prepared for a natural 17.h6! In this case the attack on g7 pins
down the e5-knight. The knight can’t capture on f3, whereas White threatens with f3-f4 winning this piece.
Whatever his idea might be 17...Qc5, 17...Rfc8 or something else it will remain a mystery for a while.
17...Ng4. During the game I was under impression that Black had to play 17...Nf3 18.Qd3 d5, but when I
started analyzing his position quickly lost its luster: 19.Bg2! Rad8! (19...dxe4? 20.Qd7 Bd5 21.Rxd5!)
20.e5 d4 21.Nxd4 Nxe5 (21...Nxd4 22.Bxb7) 22.Qe2 Bxg2 23.Qxg2 Nc4 24.Bc1 – White is threatening
not only with g5-g6 but also with his knight’s infiltration to c6.
18.Bh3 (here 18.h6 fails to 18…e5! 19.Qd3 g6 and Black is better; as an old proverb reads “every fuite
has its own season”) 18...Nxe3 19.Qxe3 Qc5! 20.Qd3. White can’t win a piece with 20.Qxc5 dxc5
21.Rd7 in view of 21...Bxe4!
20...Qb5 21.Qe3 Qc5! (I think Black checked the opponent’s intentions...) 22.Qf3! Which turned out to
be very serious. After 22.Qd3 Black can avoid repetition and continue his risky pushing for a win. How? It
is a tough question. White threatens with g5-g6, Black does not have many options. I can suggest a
desperado 22...Kh8 23.g6 f5!?, but let me refrain from analyzing this line.

Have a look at this position. I give you five shots to guess the move made by Svidler.
22...h6!? That is one of the most impressive moves of the eight round the whole tournament. Black is

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 8 REPORT Page 5 of 13

opening the position to secure his king!
23.gxh6 gxh6 24.f5 Qe5! As Black’s dark-squared bishop has no opponent, Peter set up flexible
defense keeping counterattacking ideas on the back of his mind. Note that the checkmate on b2 is just
two moves away.
25.Rhg1+.

25...Kh7. Another unexpected decision. The move 25...Kh8 suggested itself as the attempt of direct
attack 26.Qe3 Bg5 27.Rxg5 hxg5 28.Qxg5 is met with an icy 28...Kh7!!
26.fxe6 Bxe4 27.Qb3 a5. This excellent idea was not materialized. However, I think even better was
27...Rac8 28.Nd4 (28.Rd2 f5!) 28...d5 29.Rge1 (29.exf7 Rc4!) 29...f5 – Black build solid fortifications and
gets an upper hand.
28.Bg2. Heavenly variations arise after 28.Ng3! a4! (in case of 28...f5 29.Nxe4 fxe4 30.Rd5 Qf4 31.Bg2
Black can’t hold the e4-pawn) 29.Qxb4 d5! (this piece sacrifice is the only Black’s chance) 30.Qxe7 Rab8
31.Qa3 Rxb2+ 32.Qxb2 Rb8 33.Qxb8 Qxb8+ 34.Kc1 Qf4+

This line is force. Here trying to avoid one perpetual White falls into another one – 35.Rd2 Qf6 36.Kd1
Qa1+ 37.Ke2 Qxg1 38.e7 Qxg3 39.e8Q Qf3+ 40.Ke1 Qe3+ 41.Re2 Qc3+ 42.Kd1 Qa1+ 43.Kd2 Qd4+
44.Ke1 Qc3+ 45.Kf2 Qf3+ 46.Kg1 Qh1+ 47.Kf2 Qf3+ 48.Ke1 Qc3+ and Black being the rook down gets
off the hook. Such a draw would deserve the brilliancy prize.
28...Bxg2 29.Rxg2 fxe6 (Black won a pawn, but with the queens on the board safety of the kings is
much more important; Black has nothing to brag about here) 30.Qd3+ Qf5 31.Nd4?! Adams took a
surprising decision. He preferred an inferior endgame to a sharp middle game! After 31.Qd4 Qe5
32.Qd3+ Qf5 33.Qd4 Black had to find the continuation 33...e5! (33...Rf7 34.Qc4!) 34.Qg1 Bg5, which
gave them advantage.
31...Qxd3 32.cxd3. Why did not Peter play simply 32...e5! – I don’t know, ask me an easier question.
Probably he got sick of defense and wanted to attack at any cost. I think Black had good winning chances

Kid Chaos :)
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with an extra pawn.

32...Rg8 33.Rxg8 Rxg8 34.Nxe6 Rg2 35.Rf1 Kg8. The rest is the time scramble. All sarcastic
annotators are better to shut up. I just suggest them recalling themselves in the time trouble…
36.a4?! (36.b3! Rh2 37.Rf5!=) 36...b3 (36...Rh2! 37.Rf5 b3–/+) 37.Nd4! Bf6 38.Nxb3 Rxb2+ 39.Kc1
Rxb3 (39...Bc3 40.Nxa5!) 40.Rxf6 Rxd3.

Draw.

The chess queen offered too generous odds to his opponent in the opening. Later on she fought like a
lioness, but failed escape.

Sicilian Defense B48
Vishwanatan ANAND (IND) – Judit POLGAR (HUN)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be3 a6 7.Qd2 Nf6 8.0–0–0 Bb4 9.f3 Ne7
10.Nde2 b5. Even after painful defeat in the game against Leko Polgar still believes in this line. She is
probably wrong.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 8 REPORT Page 7 of 13

11.Bf4. This rare move wasn’t regarded dangerous for black. Other possible continuations are 11.Qe1
and 11.Kb1. Leko – Polgar game saw 11.g4.
11...e5 12.Bg5 Bb7 13.Kb1 Ba5.

14.Bxf6! Novelty which can be easily found in the home analysis. This move just suggests itself! White
disrupts Black’s pawn structure and sends his queen to the king side to launch an attack. The game
Akopian – Nisipeanu (Gothenburg 2005) ended in a bit strange draw after 14.Qd6 Nfd5 15.Qxc7 Nxc7
16.Ng3 f6. It was a team tournament, probably there were some special circumstances...
14...gxf6 15.Qh6 Qb6 16.g3! White bishop is going to appears on h3 with a strong effect. It’s hard to
understand what did attract Polgar in such a dubious position in home preparation. In the course of the
game she of course did realize that her cheese is hard.
16...Qe6. After 16...b4!? White can avoid the knight exchange on d5: 17.Na4 Qc6 18.b3 0–0–0 (18...d5
19.Bh3) 19.Qh5, retaining serious advantage. 16...f5 didn’t work in view of 17.Qg7 Rg8 18.Qxe5 Qe6
19.Qf4!
17.Bh3 f5 (resourcefully played, but still insufficient for equalizing) 18.Qh4! f6 (after 18...d5 19.Bxf5
Nxf5 20.exf5 Black can’t hold the d5 square) 19.exf5 Qf7 20.Ne4 Bxe4 21.fxe4.

Kid Chaos :)
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Black is hopeless. Judit is down a pawn and under attack. Unlike Anand, she was already in time
scramble also. That’s why it was even more surprising too see how the position got more and more
complicated, and it was a moment when it seemed that there would be no win for White...
21...Nc6 22.Rd6 0–0 23.Rhd1 Ra7 24.Bf1 Rc7 25.Nc1 (let me not to go into details commenting this
part of the game) 25...Bb4 26.R6d5 Rfc8 27.Nb3 Bf8 28.c3 Kh8 29.g4 Qg7 30.Qg3 Ra8.

One of the moments, when Vishy didn’t choose the best option: 31.a3. Direct attack leads to a simple
win – 31.h4! h6 32.Qf3, for example: 32...b4 33.g5! bxc3 34.Qxc3 hxg5 35.hxg5 fxg5 36.Bc4!, and black
king is dead.
31...Rac8 32.Nc1 Na5 33.Na2 Nb3 34.h4 Nc5 35.Bd3 Na4 36.Bc2 Nb6 37.R5d3.

Kid Chaos :)
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37...d5! (a powerful blow; Black sacrifices another pawn, achieving an ideal setup of her pieces)
38.exd5 Bd6 39.Bb3 a5 40.Qf2 Nc4. Here I thought that Anand would have another setback. However,
he managed to brace himself up and finished the game worthily.
41.Qe2 Rg8 42.Rg1 Qh6 43.Rdd1 a4 (43...Qxh4!? was worth trying) 44.Bxc4 Rxc4.

45.g5! fxg5 (45...Qxh4 46.g6!) 46.hxg5 Rxg5 47.Qe3 Rf4 48.Qb6 (White manages to clear the queen
side from the black pawns) 48...Rgxf5 49.Qxb5 Rf8 50.Nb4 e4 51.Rde1 Rh4 52.Ka1 e3 53.Qxa4 Re4
54.Qa6 Rfe8 55.Re2 Qf8 56.Qd3 Qf6 57.Nc2 Bc5 58.Rge1 Qe5.

Kid Chaos :)
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59.b4! Bb6 60.Kb2 h5 61.d6 Qf5 62.Rxe3! White pawn goes to d7, disrupting the coordination of black
pieces. Black resigns.

In the following game in his quest for the victory Black allowed White to start a menacing attack! Black’s
plan proved right: in the time-trouble White let the advantage slip away and then missed a draw.

Sicilian Defense B83
Rustam KASIMDZHANOV (UZB) – Alexander MOROZEVICH (RUS)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 d6 6.Be2 Nf6 7.Be3 Be7 8.0–0 0–0 9.Kh1 Nxd4
10.Bxd4 e5 11.Be3 Be6 12.f4 exf4 13.Rxf4.

13...a6. As usual Morozevich conducts the middle game in his trademarked original style. His plan with
a black-squared bishops exchange is absolutely new. He has a knack for inventing something new in old,
half-forgotten lines! It’s a rare talent… It’s well-known that in this type of positions Black should try to
bring his black-squared bishop into play through f6. For example, there is a standard way - 13...Ne8! –
the bishop goes to e5, and then a knight returns from e8 – 14.Bd4 Bg5 15.Rf1 Bf6 16.Bxf6 Nxf6, and
Black has sufficient counterplay (Onischuk – Leko, Tilburg 1997).
14.a4 Qa5 15.Qd2 Rfc8 16.Rd1.

Kid Chaos :)
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16...Bd8! (well-done! – bishop goes to b6) 17.Rff1 Bb6 18.Bd4 Bxd4 19.Qxd4 Rc6 (Black succeeded
in trading the bishops, but Morozevich’s heavy pieces are too far away from the king) 20.Nd5! Another
move order was also possible – 20.Rxf6 gxf6 21.Nd5 Bxd5 22.exd5.
20...Bxd5 21.exd5 Rcc8. Of course, it’s pretty hard to dare sacrifice a tempo for a one poor pawn:
21...Rxc2!? 22.Bd3 Rcc8 23.Rxf6 gxf6, and White has several promising continuations. I didn’t find a
clear win here, but Black hangs by a thread...
22.Rxf6! (there is no time for reflections) 22...gxf6 23.Bd3 Re8! (the only defense; the threat of
checkmate on the first rank keeps White back) 24.Qh4. After 24.b4 Qc7 25.Rf1 Qe7 26.Rxf6 the black
queen is already in the thick of things. That’s why Black can escape – 26...Qe1+ 27.Rf1 Re7! etc.
24...Kf8.

25.Rf1! After 25.Bxh7 White has a strong passer. This move deserved attention and was even probably
winning, but it’s not human-like! Any grandmaster rejects such a move during the game without
hesitations – there is no piece coordination, no guidelines.
25...Qxd5 (and here comes Kasimdzhanov’s time trouble) 26.Qh6+. There is no point in pushing out the
black king when his only dream is to run away like a hare. 26.Qxf6 Qe6 27.Qh8+ Ke7 28.Qd4! was
definitely stronger – in several lines White wins a pawn (f7 or h7) and keeps pushing for a win without any
risk.
26...Ke7 27.Qxf6+ Kd7 28.h3 h5. Have a look! White just can’t lose here! Even after exchange on f7
White runs no risk having a strong bishop on d3 and no pawn weaknesses. 29.b3 was a perfect starter.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 8 REPORT Page 12 of 13

29.b4 (White is carried away with attacking ideas) 29...Re3 30.Rf5 Re5 31.Rxe5. Up to downstairs! I
prefer 31.Qxf7+ Qxf7 32.Rxf7+, though after inaccurate b2-b4 White already has some problems on the
queen side.
31...dxe5 32.Qf5+? A serious mistake. After 32.Bf5+ Kc7 White has a nice trick 33.c4!, and Black loses
one of its central pawns. But Black has the upper hand anyway. He will keep the e5 pawn, that can
become a real power.
32...Qe6 33.Qxh5 e4! (the passer is advancing; at the same time Black cuts down the white bishop,
who has no good berthing) 34.Be2 Rf8 35.b5 f5! It’s all over now. Black has a clear plan of advancing his
central pawns.

36.bxa6 bxa6 37.Qh7+ (White’s active queen is harmless; it buzzes, but can’t bite) 37...Qf7 38.Qh6 Qf6
39.Qh7+ Rf7 40.Qg8 Ke7 41.Bc4 Rf8 42.Qh7+ Kd6 43.Qb7 Qa1+ 44.Kh2 Qe5+ 45.Kh1 a5 46.Qb6+
Ke7 47.Qb7+ Kf6 48.Qb6+ Kg7 49.Qb7+ Kh6 50.Qb6+ Rf6 51.Qd8 Rd6 52.Qf8+ Kg5 53.Be2.

Kid Chaos :)
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53...Kf4! Black king heads his attacking forces. He goes to f2 to complete weaving the checkmate net.
White resigns.

Standing after the eighth round: 1. Topalov – 7 (all quiet on the Western front…); 2. Свидлер – 5 (the
distance to the peak is no shorter but Peter still has some chances!); 3. Anand – 4.5 (I hope Vishy will get
second breath. It is about time given his next round encounter with the leader); 4–5. Leko and
Morozevich – 4 (having started with –2, both Peter and Sasha got out from under; let’s wait and see what
happen in the next round); 6. Kasimdzhanov – 3 (I have no words of consolation for Rustam – he missed
his chance.); 7. Adams – 2.5; 8. Polgar – 2 (the outsiders are worthy of sympathy).

Kid Chaos :)
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By grandmaster
Sergey SHIPOV

The Leader is Replaced

Announcing his resignation from chess at the press-conference in Linares, Garry
Kasparov told Anand: “Vishy, you are in charge now!”

The tired Leader left his Pack, the Council Rock emptied. Unfortunately, the appointed successor can’t
be new Leader. Vishy obviously lacks energy . He has no punch, no speed.
In fact, the 9th Round of the WC saw the birth of a new Leader of the chess world. Anand abdicated. He
wasn’t ready for a real struggle against Topalov in a complicated position. The draw was agreed
immediately after the opening. This result opened the way to the Council Rock for his younger and more
vigorous opponent.
The fight for the title shouldn’t overshadow another important phenomenon – Morozevich’s unexpected
ascent! The most unpredictable grandmaster recovered after a poor start, gathered momentum and
reeled off three wins in a row! It’s hardly feasible to catch up with Topalov, but scoring the second place
in the final standing is a realistic task.

In the leader’s game there was an interesting start, but the plot didn’t have any logical outcome.

Ruy Lopez C65
Vishwanatan ANAND (IND) – Veselin TOPALOV (BUL)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.d3! A good opening choice for the game you have to win. Tough slow
play perfectly fits such a situation. The endgame in the Berlin Defense is too scrutinized. Besides Veselin
is too good in this line with Black.

4...Bc5 5.c3 0–0 6.Bg5 h6 7.Bh4.

Kid Chaos :)
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7...g5. Novelty. It’s a risky move! Black gets rid of the knight f6 pin, but weakens the fortress of his king.
Only the one who has great self-confidence can play so boldly and aggressively in the game when draw
and win are all the same for him. That is the champion’s nature! The game Shaughnessy – McMahon
(Dublin 1992) saw 7...d6 8.Nbd2 Bd7 9.Nf1 Ne7 10.Bxd7 Nxd7 11.Bxe7 Qxe7 12.Ng3 g6 13.0–0 Bb6
14.d4 c6, and Black equalized.
8.Bg3.The piece sacrifice doesn’t promise White anything: 8.Nxg5 hxg5 9.Bxg5 and in addition to a
calm 9...Be7 Black can also play 9...Bxf2+!? (9...d5 10.Qf3) 10.Kxf2 Nxe4+ 11.dxe4 Qxg5 and then d7-
d6, with roughly equal chances.
8...d6 9.Nbd2 a6 10.Bxc6. Quickly played. Probably, this line was prepared at home. I like 10.Ba4 too.
After the center opens up White will need the light-squared bishop.
10...bxc6 11.0–0 Ba7. This moment seems mysterious to me after the game.

12.d4!? Vishy made this important decision very quickly! He could not miss Black’s logical response.
What did he hope for? What were his intentions? His ensuing actions gave no response to this question.
12...g4! 13.Bh4. Knight sacrifice suggests itself. Pawn sacrifice also deserved attention – 13.Nh4!?
exd4 (otherwise there was no point in g5-g4) 14.cxd4 Bxd4 15.Qc1! – in fact, it’s a double blow on c6 and
h6. However, 13.Bh4 looks more like a matter-of-principle move to me.
13...gxf3 14.Qxf3 (an attempt to bring the rook into play - 14.Re1 – can be parried with 14…Bg4!)
14...Kg7. The f6-knight needs constant care from more valuable black pieces.
15.Qg3+ Kh7. The Indian grandmaster thought about half an hour here. Unfortunately, the outcome of
his internal struggle wasn’t in chess favor.

Kid Chaos :)
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16.Qf3?! Anand can continue the battle in this game and in the tournament with 16.Qd3! with the idea of
f2-f4 breakthrough. Of course White runs some risk, being down a piece. Those who take no risk drink no
champagne! But what was the risk for Anand? What’s the difference – will he finish the event with an
even score or with a small plus? And after a win he got real chances to win a world title....
This position is so complicated that I see no point in analyzing it now! Black also runs risks as his king is
vulnerable. It’s absolutely clear that Anand must have played this way. And I’m sure that Topalov will
never agree to a draw in such a position. He is not of the same kidney! Topalov never hide from
interesting and promising complications.
Just for information I will point out several interesting lines after the best 16.Qd3: 16...c5 17.f4 cxd4
18.c4! (weaker is 18.Kh1 dxc3 19.bxc3 Rg8! and Rg8-g4 threat makes White to win a piece back,
heading to an inferior endgame – 20.fxe5 dxe5 21.Qxd8 Rxd8 22.Nb3 и т.д.) 18...Bg4 19.Kh1! (19.fxe5?
Be2!) 19...Qb8 20.Bxf6 Qxb2 21.Rac1! (21.fxe5 Qc3!)... and Black finds himself in a deadlock.

Black’s bishops have no room to move, White plans to suppress Black with f4-f5, black king is still under
fire. A retreat 21...Bd7 (21...Rae8 22.f5!) leads to a collapse in the center – 22.fxe5 etc.
It is only a sketch, an illustration! I’m sure that in a long analysis we’ll find some good ways for Black.
But it’s not an easy task at the board under stare of your opponent and with the clock tickling!
16...Kg7 17.Qg3+. Draw.
The game of the main pursuer was much more interesting. Peter went through a dubious position,
obtained some advantage but missed his opponent’s brilliant saving combination.

Sicilian Defense B90SVIDLER (RUS) – Rustam KASIMDZHANOV (UZB)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.f3 e5. Let me skip the opening. The theoretical tree
spread out. There are the layers of ideas on every move. 7.Nb3 Be6 8.Be3 Be7 9.Qd2 0–0 10.0–0–0
Nbd7 11.g4 b5. The war broke out simultaneously on both wings.

Kid Chaos :)
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12.g5 b4 13.Ne2 Ne8 (that is the price for the speed of attack. Black has to retreat his knight to a poor
position) 14.Ng3 a5 15.Kb1 a4 16.Nc1 Qb8 17.f4! White can hope for success only after obtaining
advantage in the center.
17...exf4 18.Bxf4 b3 19.cxb3 axb3 20.a3. Black was first to launch active operations, but White
managed to repel the first waive of the onslaught. To resume the attack Black should bring his pieces into
play. The b3-pawn creates prerequisites for various combinations, first of all a sacrifice on a3. Which
piece will be sacrificed, you may ask? Any piece, including the queen! Check out the game and you will
see…

20...Qb7. This move is an novelty. Frankly speaking, it is very hard to weight various moves in such a
complicated play. The position requires deep and precise calculation which is beyond human capacities.
In the following game Black played very remorsefully and in my opinion was very close to the victory.
20...Bd8!? 21.Nf5 Nc5 22.Qd4 Qc8 23.Bxd6 Nxe4! 24.Bxf8 Kxf8 25.Bd3 Nc5 26.Ng3 Bxg5 27.Bc4 Bf6
28.Bxe6 fxe6 29.Qb4 (29.Rhf1! Kg8 30.Qf2) 29...Rb8 30.Qd2 Na4 31.Nd3.

Kid Chaos :)
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31...Nxb2 (better was 31...Bxb2! with the idea of 32.Nxb2 Nc3+ 33.Ka1 Qc5!–+) 32.Nxb2 Qc2+
(32...Qc5!?) 33.Qxc2 bxc2+ 34.Kxc2 Rxb2+ 35.Kd3 Rb3+ 36.Ke2 Rxa3 37.Rd7 Ra2+ 38.Kf3 Be7 39.Ne4
Ra3+ 40.Kg2, and draw was agreed (Anisimov – Loginov, St-Petersburg 2002).
21.Nce2! Bd8! 22.Nd4! (the domination in the center is the best defense against the opponent's threats
and a good foundation for White's own attack) 22...Ba5 23.Qe2 Nc5 24.Bg2! Highlighting a bad position
of the black queen. However, Rustam had no desire to recede…

24...Bc3! (this move deserved an exclamation mark not only for its strenghth but also for the creative
impulse) 25.e5. I don’t think that it is the best way to open the center. First, note that Black’s gift can’t be
accepted: 25.bxc3 Rxa3 26.Bc1 (26.Nb5 Bc4! 27.Qxc4 Ra1+ 28.Kb2 Ra2+ 29.Kb1 Qa6–+) 26...Ra2
27.Bb2 (27.e5 Qa7) 27...Na4 28.Rd2 Rxb2+! 29.Rxb2 Nxc3+ and White loses his queen. In the line
25.Nxe6 fxe6! (25...Nxe6? 26.e5) the combination 26.Bxd6 (26.Rhf1 Na4 27.Bc1 Be5) 26...Nxd6 27.e5
Qa6 28.Qxa6 (on 28.Rxd6 Black reacts with the queen sacrifice that promised above – 28...Qxa3!!–+)
28...Rxa6 29.Rxd6 Rxd6 30.exd6 Rf2! 31.bxc3 Rxg2 does not offer much. Black can play for a win with a
draw in his hand as his knight goes to a4 whereas the rooks deliver checks to the white king. Probably
more promising is 26.Rhf1!? Na4 27.Bc1 as Black has problems reinforcing his attack. Finally, a reserved
prophylaxis 25.Bc1!? looks reasonable. In some lines White may strip the black king with g5-g6!
25...d5! (Black stabilized the center and now has time to bring his e8-knight into play) 26.Qb5?!
Apparently, that is Svider’s idea. Indeed, the exchange of the queens favors White.

Kid Chaos :)
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26...Qc7?! Bad reaction. The queen took up a wrong square. Much better was 26...Qa7! with the idea…
you are right! Black is going to sacrifice the queen for a couple of pawns on a3. For example 27.Nc6?
(27.Bc1 Nc7 28.Qe2 Bxd4 29.Rxd4 Ne4 30.Rb4; 27.Qe2) 27...Qxa3! 28.bxa3 Rxa3 29.Qxb3 (what else?)
29...Rxb3+ 30.Kc2 Nc7 and Black has a strong attack and an extra pawn. So what should White do after
26...Qa7? I failed to found a reasonable way to mount defense. The moves 27.Bc1 and 27.Qe2 have
their own drawbacks. Black transfers the e8-knight to c7, and then sends his c5-knight to e4 or a4. In
other worlds, he has a very powerful attack.
27.Nge2! (good consolidating move) 27...Bd7. This move brings up complications and leads … to a
draw! The continuation 27...Bxd4 28.Nxd4 Rb8 29.Qc6 Qa7! keeping the queens on the board deserves
attention.
28.e6! Bxb5 29.Bxc7 Bxd4

30.Nxd4 I was under impression that White had a winning position. However, the postmortem did not
bear it out this evaluation. The following line did not change the situation: 30.exf7+ Rxf7 31.Nxd4 Nxc7
(after 31...Bd3+ 32.Rxd3! Nxd3 33.Bg3 Black faces some problems in the endgame, despite his extra
exchange.) 32.Nxb5 Rf2! 33.Nxc7 Rxg2 and Black saves the game by analogy with the line that
happened in the game.
White’s passers on the queenside will be a decisive factor in this position.
30...fxe6! First, it was just impossible to believe that Black really played this move in the game. All other
continuation did not help.
31.Nxb5 Nxc7 32.Nxc7 Rf2! Only at this point the situation cleared up. Black launches the attack along
the second rank and attains a draw. It is worth mentioning that Kasimdzhanov was in time scramble.
Nevertheless, he did not lose composure and found this brilliant defense.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 9 REPORT Page 7 of 13

33.Nxa8 Na4! (Although White has two extra pieces he can’t protect his king; 33...Rxg2? 34.Nb6+–)
34.Rd3. Black must deliver the perpetual. Draw was agreed, as pushing for win is too dangerous for
White – 34.Be4 dxe4 35.Ka1 Rxb2 36.Rd8+ Kf7 37.Rc8 (The perpetual does not work here) 37...Ra2+
38.Kb1 Rb2+ 39.Kc1 Ra2! (but Black has other trumps) 40.Re1? (40.Kb1!=) 40...b2+ 41.Kc2 Ra1 42.Rb1
e3!

White can stop the black pawns only at the cost of material concessions. Draw.

In the encounter of two players from the middle part of the tournament standings the time trouble
mistakes decided the outcome. Peter played better than Alexander, but he was too slow. He didn’t have
enough time to take the situation under control at the critical moment of the game and lost almost winning
position...

Sicilian Defense B33
Alexander MOROZEVICH (RUS) – Peter LEKO (HUN)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 e5 6.Ndb5 d6. Leko held the ground twice in
Sveshnikov Variation. As a proverb promises, for the third time there was no draw.
7.Bg5 a6 8.Na3 b5 9.Nd5 Be7 10.Bxf6 Bxf6.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 9 REPORT Page 8 of 13

A usual continuation here is 11.c3, that’s why Morozevich opted for 11.c4!? As it was expected,
Alexander tries to play originally from the very beginning. However, only the 15th White’s move is a
novelty.
11...b4 12.Nc2 Rb8 13.b3 Bg5 14.g3 0–0 15.h4 Novelty. It’s not only a new move, but the beginning of
an interesting plan. The game Wittmann – Lenz (Austria 1991) saw simple 15.Bg2 Be6 16.0–0 Qd7
17.Qd3 Bd8 18.Rad1 g6 19.Kh1 Rb7 20.f4 with a bloody battle.
15...Bh6 16.Bh3 Be6! 17.Kf1 a5 18.Kg2 Rb7 19.Bf5!? That is Morozevich’s style. He provokes the
opponent to start active operations.

19...Kh8 20.Qd3 Nb8! (masterful knight maneuver) 21.Rad1 Na6 22.Qf3 g6 23.Bh3 f5! Black’s strategy
is more effective. 24.exf5 suggests itself, the queen is peering at the rook on b7.
24.h5!? (the move from a great optimist; in general, opening of the “h” file is one of the elements of
White’s plan, but...) 24...fxe4 25.Qxe4 Nc5 26.Qe2 Bxd5+! 27.Rxd5 Rbf7 (White doesn’t have enough
time to enjoy the fruits of his play) 28.Rf1. Black bishop and king take a long breath. After 28.hxg6?
Rxf2+ 29.Qxf2 Rxf2+ 30.Kxf2 Qf6+ 31.Kg2 Qxg6 black queen bursts into White’s camp.
28...gxh5 29.Qxh5 Qf6 30.Bg4 (Being in severe time trouble Peter was accurate for a long time)
30...Ne4! 31.f3 Qg7! It looks like 32.Qh3! is better.
32.Rdd1?! Black is dazzled – there are too many promising possibilities. To find the best way and to
focus on one line is not an easy thing to do in the time trouble!

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 9 REPORT Page 9 of 13

32...Nf6. A march to nowhere. It’s unbelievable, but Black can sacrifice the knight here and continue the
attack with slow play: 32...Nxg3!? 33.Kxg3 Rf6! – white queen position is too bad – 34.Qh3 (or 34.Kf2 Bf4
35.Qh4 e4! 36.Nd4 exf3 37.Rg1 Rh6 38.Bh5 Qe5 39.Rge1 Qxh5–/+) 34...Bf4+ 35.Kf2 Rh6 36.Bh5 e4
37.Rd4 Qe5 38.Rxe4 Qc5+ 39.Ke1 Rxh5 40.Qe6 Rhf5 – Black’s advantage is obvious.
Probably, 32...Nd2! 33.Rf2 Rf6 is even stronger. The idea is the same – to catch the white queen:
34.Qh3 Bg5 35.Bh5 (35.Rdxd2 Bxd2 36.Rxd2 Rh6 37.Bh5 Qg5–+) 35...Ne4 36.Rff1 Nc3 37.Rde1
(37.Ra1 Bf4 38.Kh2) 37...Bd2 38.Ra1 (the board is large, and still there is nowhere to escape) 38...Rg8
and White is unable to defend.
33.Qh3 Nxg4 34.Qxg4.

34...Qf6?! Leko overestimates his position. Peter goes too far in the quest for the victory. This move is
bad from practical point of view, though it’s not losing yet. It was high time to subdue his pride.
34...Qxg4 35.fxg4 Rxf1 36.Rxf1 Rxf1 37.Kxf1 Kg7 38.Ke2 e4 39.Nd4 Kf6 led to an equal endgame as
White can’t take Black poisonous pawn: 40.Nc6 Ke6 41.Nxa5? Kd7! – the catcher is caught himself.
42.c5 d5! doesn’t help.
35.Qe4 Bf4 36.Kf2! (36.gxf4? Qh4!) 36...Qh6! (the bishop’s retreat was psychologically unbearable)
37.gxf4 Rxf4 38.Rh1 Qg7 39.Qd5. Here, one step before the control move, Peter made a fatal flow.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 9 REPORT Page 10 of 13

39...e4? The correct line was 39...Rxf3+ 40.Qxf3 e4! 41.Qxf8+ Qxf8+ 42.Ke1 Qf3 43.Rf1 (43.Kd2 Qf4+!)
43...Qc3+ 44.Ke2 Qxc2+ 45.Rd2 Qc3 46.Rxd6 – White can’t win this position.
40.Rdg1! (Morozevich has enough time to reorganize his pieces and contaign Black’s attack) 40...Rxf3+
41.Ke2 Rf2+ 42.Kd1 Qe5 43.Rh5! Rf1+ 44.Rxf1 Rxf1+ 45.Ke2 Qf4 46.Qd4+ Kg8.

47.Rg5+! Qxg5 48.Kxf1 Qc1+ 49.Ne1 Qf4+ 50.Kg1 Qg5+ 51.Ng2 Qc1+ 52.Kh2 Qh6+ 53.Kg3 Qg5+
54.Kf2. There are no more checks. It’s well-known that the king interacts perfectly with the knight at a
short distance.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 9 REPORT Page 11 of 13

Black resigns!

The game between outsiders was overshadowed by the other events of the day. Judit and Michael play
by inertia. The only remaining task is not to lose again, to save the reputation. A draw was a logical
outcome of their game. The position was roughly equal throughout the game.

Ruy Lopez C89
Judit POLGAR (HUN) – Michael ADAMS (ENG)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0–0 8.c3.

8...d5 9.exd5 Nxd5 10.Nxe5 Nxe5 11.Rxe5 c6 12.d4 Bd6 13.Re1 Qh4 14.g3 Qh3 15.Be3 Bg4 16.Qd3
Rae8 17.Nd2 Re6 18.a4 Qh5 19.axb5 axb5.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 9 REPORT Page 12 of 13

20.Qf1 Rfe8 21.Bxd5 Qxd5 22.h3 Bh5. In Leko – Kasimdzhanov (Linares 2005) game Black didn’t
manage to equalize: 22...Bf5 23.Qg2 Qxg2+ 24.Kxg2 R6e7 25.b3 f6 26.Ra2 Be6 27.c4 Bb4 28.Rc1 Bf5
29.g4 Bd3 30.Nf1 Be4+ 31.Kg1 f5 32.Ng3 fxg4 33.Nxe4 Rxe4 34.hxg4 Rxg4+ 35.Kf1 Bd6 36.Ra6!, but
the game ended in a draw also.
23.Qg2.

23...Qxg2+. Novelty. Gurevich,I-Benjamin,J/New York 1992 saw 23...f5 24.Qxd5 cxd5 25.Nf1
(25.Ra5!?) 25...f4 26.Bd2 Rxe1 27.Rxe1 Rxe1 28.Bxe1 Be2 29.Nh2 Kf7 30.Kg2 Kf6 31.f3 h5 32.g4 g6
33.Nf1 hxg4 34.hxg4 g5, and Black held the position.
24.Kxg2 f5 (even without queens Black has a strong pressure in the centre) 25.Nf3 f4 26.Bd2 fxg3
27.Rxe6 (27.fxg3? Re2+) 27...Rxe6 28.Ra8+ Bf8.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 9 REPORT Page 13 of 13

29.Ne5! Well-played. There was no point in trying to save the pawn. In the end let me amuse you with
the following variation: 29.Kxg3? Rg6+ 30.Ng5 h6 31.Kh4 Bd1 32.Nh7! Kxh7 33.Rxf8 Rg2! 34.Rf7 –
otherwise g7-g5 mating – 34...Kg8 35.Rf5 Bc2! 36.Re5 Kh7 37.Re7 Rxf2 and Black has a big plus in the
endgame.
29...gxf2 30.Kxf2 Re8 31.Ra6 Bd6 (I would have tried to play for a win – 31...c5!?) 32.Bf4 Bxe5
33.Bxe5 Re6 34.b4 Kf7.

35.Ra7+ Re7 36.Rxe7+ Kxe7 37.Bxg7. Draw.

Standings after Round 9: 1. Topalov – 7,5 (this is a typical result for a winner of Swiss system
tournament with players of different class including amateurs …); 2. Svidler – 5,5 (the gap is still too big,
a suite should be closer to the king!); 3–4. Anand and Morozevich – 5 (Alexander has already caught up
with the vanguard; it’s a pity that tournament is so short…); 5. Leko – 4 (everything is over for Peter; even
if Leko finishes well, we can say that it was a bad tournament for him); 6. Kasimdzhanov – 3,5; 7. Adams
– 3; 8. Polgar – 2,5.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 10 REPORT Page 1 of 17

By grandmaster
Sergey SHIPOV

Si vis pacem, para bellum!

“If you want peace prepare war” a well-known Latin expression says. Actually, it is the
best motto for those chess players who are OK in a particular tournament situation. One
should never purposely play for a draw!

It is particularly important for aggressive, attacking players. Betraying one’s own credo, self-limitation
and constraint are fraught with sad consequences. Tournament practice illustrated it on many occasions.
To reach any positive outcome one should play his or her own chess, play as you can!
Veselin Topalov, who is leading the field with an impressive margin, strictly follows this rule. He fights for
victory in every game, runs risks, maintain tension on the board. The lady-luck has guarded Veselin so
far. As all ladies she likes brave guys!
As for of the tournament itself, the players look very tired. It is noticeable even from the distance; the
games speak for themselves very eloquently. Since Vishy Anand gave up his ambitions, he has no desire
to play every game all out. To their credit, Svidler and Morozevich keep fighting, but to no effect. Human
energy is limited.
Judit Polgar completely fell through. It is pity to see this excellent player at the bottom of the standings.
Her poor shape is aggravated by insufficient opening preparation. It does not meet the high standards of
the event.

The Muscovite wins in San Luis in his trademarked style. This approach has been known for a century;
the first person that came to my mind is the great Emmanuel Lasker. Alexander creates complicated,
strategically risky position and incites his opponents to active operations. When the opponent launches
an attack (most often it happens closer to the time trouble) Alexander mount a very resourceful defense!
As a result the opponent commits a mistake, the position drastically changes, Morozevich intercepts the
initiative and closes out the game. The trick did not work this time though. The chess fakir was lucky
enough to avoid the defeat. Even in this game his agility in wielding the pieces impresses. Alexander
juggle with elegance – hides an ace and quickly takes it out from the sleeve!

Queen’s Gambit D37
Veselin TOPALOV (BUL) – Alexander MOROZEVICH (RUS)
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bf4 0–0 6.e3 c5 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8.a3 Nc6 9.cxd5 Nxd5 10.Nxd5
exd5 11.Bd3 Bb6 12.0–0. The opponents played a well-known and deeply analyzed variation of the
Queen’s Gambit.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 10 REPORT Page 2 of 17

12...d4! A subtle psychological approach. Sasha fully realized that Veselin was up to a real fight and
thus would not trade pieces on d4. The popularity of 12...Bg4 drastically decreased after a well-known
game Kramnik – Leko (Bressago, 2004) which went 13.h3 Bh5 14.b4 Re8 15.Rc1 a6 16.Bxa6! Rxa6
17.b5 Rxa3 18.bxc6 bxc6 19.Rxc6 Ra7 20.Rd6 Rd7 21.Qxd5 Rxd6 22.Qxd6 Qxd6 23.Bxd6 and here
Vladimir probably should not have traded his f3-bishop. For example Vishy managed to hold this
endgame against Karpov in 2002. One way or another no one wants to go for such unpromising variation
on the black side.
13.e4! After 13.exd4 Nxd4 14.Be5 Nc6 15.Bc3 Bg4 16.h3 Bh5 17.Be4 Re8 18.Qc2 Bg6 19.Bxg6 hxg6
20.Rad1 Qe7 a boring roughly equal position arouse (Gustaffson – Kasimdzhanov, Germany 2004).
13...Bc7. That is a novelty. It is really strange that no one came up with this such a natural move. Black
is trading his passive bishop.

There are 53 games in which this position emerged in my database. All the encounters saw Black play
13...Bg4. Here is a fresh example: 14.h3 Qf6 15.Bg3 Bh5 16.Re1 Rfe8 17.Rc1 Bxf3 18.Qxf3 Ne5 19.Qxf6
gxf6 20.Bxe5 fxe5 21.g3. White obtained a slight edge in the endgame but did not manage to convert it
(Christiansen – Onischuk, Minneapolis 2005).
14.Bxc7 Qxc7 15.h3 Qb6 (the continuation 15...a5 fails to 16.Bc4; on the other hand 15...Be6!?
deserves a closer look because on 16.Ng5 there is a good reply 16...Ne5) 16.b4 Be6 17.Rc1! White has
no reason to calculate the complications after 17.Ng5 Ne5! 18.Nxh7 Nxd3 19.Nxf8 Bc4 20.Qc2 (or
20.Nd7 Qe6 21.Qc2 Nf4!) 20...Rc8 21.Nd7 Qe6 22.Rfd1 Nf4 23.Nc5 Qg6 24.g3 Be2! – Black has a very
strong attack here. By the way, Black has a strong positional rejoinder at his disposal – 18... Rfd8
(instead of capturing on) 19.Ng5 Rac8, and the d6-pawn is set to start its triumphant march.
17...h6 18.Qd2 Rfd8 19.Qf4! The black king is in jeopardy. White is going to send his queen to h7 with

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 10 REPORT Page 3 of 17

e4-e5 и Qf4-e4. I think it is about time to review the opening results. Black failed to equalize!

19...Ne7! 20.Rc5. It is not a mistake but a mere introduction to the error. A simple centralizing move
20.Rfd1!? looks very solid. After the c6-knight retreat d4-pawn is very vulnerable.
20...Ng6 21.Qg3?! White does not feel the danger. He should have played 21.Qd2 although after
21...Rac8 22.Rfc1 Rxc5 23.Rxc5 Qd6! Black is just in time to build a firm line of defense.
21...a5! Powerful blow! Owing to the rook’s position on c5 Black managed to open the position on the
queenside having avoided the b4-b5 clamping up. Judging from Veselin’s long reflections he realized all
the dangers only after Black’s 21st move.

22.Rb5 (after 22.e5 axb4 23.axb4 Nf8! Black has a strong initiative) 22...Qc6 23.e5. In case of 23.bxa5
Qc3 24.Rd1 Rxa5 (24...Bb3 25.Rd2!) 25.Rxb7 Bb3! Black faces serious problems as 26.Rd2 fails to
26...Ne5!
23...b6. I think better was 23...Bf5! 24.Rc5 Qe6 или 24...Qd7, forcing black to raise the blockade of the
d4-pawn. For example 25.Bxf5 Qxf5 26.bxa5 Rac8! 27.Rxc8 Qxc8 28.Re1 Nf8 29.Qf4 Ne6 30.Qd2 d3

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 10 REPORT Page 4 of 17

Black has a powerful initiative for the pawn. White has no other choice but to struggle for survival.
24.bxa5 bxa5 25.Rfb1 (finally, White managed to coordinate his rooks) 25...Nf8 26.Nd2! (White is
going to transfer his knight to e4) 26...Bd5! (whereas Black’s knight is heading to e6) 27.f4!

That is Topalov’s style. Veselin does not like holing up in defense. He prefers head-on fight. Possible
weaknesses in his own camp never abash the Bulgarian GM.
27...Qc3 (the black knight’s bringing into play is postponed in view of 27...Ne6?! 28.f5! Ng5 – 28...Nc5
29.Rc1 – 29.h4 и т.д.) 28.R1b2. that is an interesting way to guard his pieces against the exchanges.
After 28.Rxd5 should not capture on mechanically capture on – 28...Rxd5?! 29.Ne4! Qc6 30.Nf6+ Kh8
31.Nxd5 Qxd5 32.f5 – as White has a strong initiative here. He should proceed with 28...Qxd2! with a
better position.
28...Qc1+! An interesting position arises in the line 28...Ng6 29.Rc2 Qxa3 30.Kh2! a4 (30...Nxf4?
31.Bh7+) 31.Rcc5 (31.f5? Nxe5!) 31...Qa2 32.Rc2 Qa3 33.Rcc5 – neither party can avoid repetition.
29.Kh2 Rac8 (Black warded off the Rb2-c2 threat; now his rook can settle down on the c3-square)
30.f5. Counterattack is the only defense here! Alexander hastened at this point.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 10 REPORT Page 5 of 17

30...Rc3?! Much better was 30...a4!, creating an outpost on b3. In this Black’s bishop can immediately
take up this square separating White’s rooks. The lunge Rc8-c3 is possible in some lines. On Nd2-b1
Black has a good rejoinder Rc3-b3! 31.f6 g6.
31.Nb1 (probably this “ugly” move came as an unpleasant surprise to the Muscovite) 31...Rc5. In case
of 31...Rc6 the transfer of the white rook 32.Re2!? looks very strong. The e5-e6 breakthrough becomes a
real threat. On the other hand there is no clear win in sight: 32...Bc4! 33.Re1 Bxb5 34.Rxc1 (34.Bxb5 Qc5
35.Bxc6 Qxc6) 34...Rxc1 35.e6 (35.Bxb5 Rxb1 36.Bc4 Rc1 37.Bb3) 35...Bxd3 (35...fxe6? 36.Bxb5 Rxb1
37.f6+–) 36.e7 Re8 37.exf8Q+ Kxf8 38.Qxd3 Ree1! 39.f6! Rxb1 40.Qxd4 gxf6 41.Qxf6 Re6 42.Qd8+ Kg7
43.Qxa5 – this endgame is drawing.
32.Rxc5 Qxc5 33.Rc2 Qb6 34.Nd2! (34.e6 fxe6 35.Rc7 fails to 35...Rd7!) 34...Re8? Apparently
Morozevich was upset with this unexpected turn of events. To make things worse Alexander was in time
trouble. As a result White made a serious mistake. After 34...Qb8 35.Rc5 Qb6 36.Rb5 Qc7 White gets an
upper hand, but there is a lot of fight.

35.e6! (now Black is unable to protect his seventh rank) 35...Nh7 (35...fxe6 36.Rc7+–) 36.Rc7 Rf8
(36...Ng5 37.h4!) 37.Nc4! It took this passive knight just to jumps to become very active.
37...Bxc4 (after 37...Qb8 38.e7 Re8 39.Nd6! Qxc7 40.Nxe8 Qxg3+ 41.Kxg3 Bc6 42.Nd6 Nf6 43.Bc4
Black can resign with unclouded conscience) 38.Bxc4 Nf6 39.Qe5! d3.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 10 REPORT Page 6 of 17

40.exf7+. This time trouble decision is quite understandable. There is a well-known practical rule that
reads: If you have the choice between a checkmate combination and an extra pawn, choose the latter, as
there might be no checkmate! Veselin followed this rule but complicated his task. The shortest winning
path was 40.e7! Re8 41.Bxd3 – threatening with Bd3-b5, whereas the counterblow 41...Nd5 fails to
42.Rc8! Rxc8 (42...Nf6 43.Qxf6!) 43.e8Q+ Rxe8 44.Qxe8+ Kh7 45.f6+ g6 46.Qxf7+ Kh8 47.Qg7#.
40...Kh7 41.Bxd3. Certainly White has a winning position. However in order to capitalize on his
advantage White should make several accurate moves. It looks like Veselin relaxed a little bit lost
concentration whereas Alexander pulled himself together and defended with devilish resourcefulness.
41...Qb3 42.Qd6 (42.Qe7! Qb8 43.Kh1+–) 42...Qb8! 43.Bc4 Ne4! 44.Qe5 (44.Qe7! Nd2 – 44...Rc8
45.f8N+! – 45.Bd3+–) 44...Nd2! Now Black has some problem-like saving ideas. The tandem queen +
knight is very effective.

45.Ba2. Had Veselin anticipated what he was in for he would have gladly “blundered” a pawn with
45.Bd3! Rxf7 46.Re7 (or 46.f6+ Kg8 47.Re7 Qxe5+ 48.Rxe5 Rxf6 49.Rxa5 – White’s remote passer
decides the game as White’s bishop is much stronger that Black’s knight.) 46...Qxe5+ 47.Rxe5 Rd7
48.Be2!

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 10 REPORT Page 7 of 17

The a5-pawn is weak; the black king is in the checkmate box. Neither Lord nor Devil can help Black to
save this endgame.
45...Qb6! (Black has created the threat 46...Nf3+! followed by perpetual.) 46.Rc2? Not as convincing
was 46.Qc5 Qb2 as 47.Qc2? is met by 47...Qe5+. On the other hand 46.Rc5! was the simplest solution.
Black can’t get to the white king. On 46...Ne4 White coolly reacts with 47.Rc2!
46...Qf2! 47.Rxd2 (Black has to annihilate Black’s dangerous knight 47.Kh1 Qf1+ 48.Kh2 Qf2!)
47...Qxd2 48.Bd5 Qg5! Here White is win is questionable.
49.Qd6 Qd8 50.Qxd8 Rxd8.

51.Bc6 (after 51.Kg3?! g5! 52.fxg6+ Kg7! 53.Be4 Rd4 54.Kf4 Ra4 55.Ke5 Rxa3 that is White who has to
think about salvation. Actually it is still there – 56.Kd6 Re3 57.Bc6 and so on) 51...g6! One step farther
51...g5? would be a fatal mistake in view of 52.f6 Rf8 53.Be4+! Kh8 54.Bg6! – the black king is in
captivity. He can’t do anything against his white colleague’s visit to e7.
52.Be8. In the course of the game I thought that there was a win for White in the line 52.f6 Rf8 53.Be8
(the sequence 53.Bd5 h5! 54.h4 g5 55.hxg5 Kg6 is dangerous only for White) 53...g5 54.Kg3 Kg6 55.Kf3
Kxf6 56.Ke4

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 10 REPORT Page 8 of 17

However, the following analysis disprove my assumption: 56...Rh8 57.Kd5 h5 58.Kc5 Ke7 59.Kb5 Rh6
60.Kxa5 Rf6 61.a4 Rf2 62.Bc6 (62.g4 Rf3) 62...Kxf7 63.Kb6 Rb2+ 64.Kc7 Ke7 (64...Ra2? 65.Bd5+)
65.a5 Ra2 66.Kb6 Rb2+ 67.Kc7 (67.Bb5 Rxg2 68.a6 Ra2 69.a7 Rxa7=) 67...Ra2 68.Kb6 Rb2+ a draw by
repetition.
52...Kg7 53.fxg6 h5! (preventing possible advancement of White’s pawns) 54.a4 (or 54.h4 Rd4 55.g3
Rg4 56.Kg2 Kf8 57.Kf3 Rxg6=) 54...h4! 55.Kg1 Rd2 56.g3! White is fighting to the last soldier!
56...hxg3 57.h4 Rh2 58.h5.

58...Kf8! (avoiding the last mine: 58...Rxh5? 59.f8Q+! Kxf8 60.g7+ Kxg7 61.Bxh5+–) 59.Kf1 Kg7
60.Kg1 Kf8 61.Kf1. Draw!
I think, we should thank both GMs for this very interesting, pithy encounter.

Rustam managed to take revenge. Although his redemption was not as spectacular as Judit’s victory,
he leveled the score in their micro-match.

Sicilian Defense B83
Rustam KASIMDZHANOV (UZB) – Judit POLGAR (HUN)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be2 e6. Sheveningen variation.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 10 REPORT Page 9 of 17

7.a4 Be7 8.0–0 Nc6 9.Be3 0–0 10.f4 Bd7 (this move order is the most popular one; the main tabia
arises after 10...Qc7 11.Kh1 Re8) 11.Nb3! That is the White’s best response. Black was going to trade
the knights and transfer his bishop to c6 – 11.Kh1 Qc7 12.Nb3.
11...b6 (White was threatening with clamping the queenside a4-a5!) 12.Bf3 Qc7 13.g4! (Black has
launched a dangerous attack) 13...Bc8! Black has to return the bishop to the initial position. The point is
that the f6-knight has to retreat to d7.
14.g5 Nd7 15.Bg2! Another typical maneuver. White is clearing the way for his pieces to the h-file.
Objectively speaking, all these moves do not deserve explamation marks because the opponents are still
in the book, namely they follow the historical 24th game of the match Karpov – Kaspaov. Having won this
game Garry became the World Champion. I sure that most of chess players are familiar with this
encounter and understand what is going on.

15...Re8 (the f8-square is for one of minor pieces) 16.Rf3 Bf8. Sometimes Black transfers the knight to
this square. Here is a fresh example – 16...Na5 17.Nd2 Bb7 18.Rh3 g6 19.Qg4 Rac8 20.Rf1 Nc4
21.Nxc4 Qxc4 22.Rd1 Nf8! 23.Qh4 d5 24.Bd4 Bc5 25.Qf2 dxe4, and at this point the opponents
somewhat unexpectedly signed a piece treaty (Alekseev – Golod, Biel 2005)
17.Rh3 g6 (The white queen is not allowed to h5...) 18.Qe1 ... So, she is heading to h4.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 10 REPORT Page 10 of 17

18...Nb4?! This novelty does not look particularly good. Certainly, White feels some discomfort
protecting his c2-pawn. He has no desire to place his rook to c1. However, White regrouped his pieces
very well, combining offense and defense. Probably Black should fortify his kingside first. In the old game
Popovic – Kirov (Hamburg 1977) after 18...Bg7! 19.Qh4 Nf8 the white army darted into fight with drawn
swords but underestimate Black’s defensive resources: 20.e5 dxe5 21.fxe5 Bb7 22.Rf1 Ne7 23.Bxb7
Qxb7 24.Ne4 Nf5 25.Rxf5 exf5 26.Nf6+ Bxf6 27.gxf6 h5 28.Qg5 Rad8 29.Qh6 Rd1+ 30.Kf2 Ne6 31.Rg3
f4 32.Rxg6+ fxg6 33.Qxg6+ Ng7! and Black won.
19.Qf2. The white queen has to linger in his camp. She will have plenty of time participate in the battle.
After 19.Qh4 h5 White can’t capture en-passant as he has to spend a tempi on protecting the c2-pawn.
19...Rb8. This move looks too sluggish. Another setup looks more promising – 19...Bb7 20.Rf1 Nc5 with
the idea of breaking through in the сenter with d6-d5 at some point. On the other hand, Black has to
recon with 21.f5!? The move 21.Bd4 also looks promising. I don’t like 19...Bg7 in view of 20.f5.
20.Rf1. White’s army is fully prepared for attack.

20...f5. Many old-generation spectators felt nostalgia after this move! The challenger Kasparov won the
game and changed his status with a similar counterblow f7-f5. However, comparing to this encounter his
pieces were better arranged. After 20...Bg7 White gets a crushing attack with 21.f5! For example
21...exf5 22.exf5 Nf8 (22...gxf5? 23.Qh4 Nf8 24.Qxb4) 23.f6! Bxh3 24.fxg7 Bxg2 25.gxf8Q+ Kxf8 26.Kxg2
– White’s two minor pieces are much stronger that Black’s rook.
21.exf5! This exclamation mark goes directly to Rustam Kasimdzhanov! Inferiour was 21.gxf6 Nxf6, and
Black has a good position.
21...gxf5 22.Bd4 (White is threatening with g5-g6) 22...Re7! That is what I call mysticism! Garry also
played Re8-e7! Let’s check out whether White’s threats are really dangerous: 22...Bb7 23.g6 hxg6 (after

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 10 REPORT Page 11 of 17

23...h6 24.g7! Bxg7 25.Bxg7 Kxg7 26.Qd4+ Black loses a piece) 24.Qh4 (24.Rh8+ Kf7 25.Qh4 e5!)
24...Re7 25.Bxb7 Rxb7

So, what is next? White’s attack looks menacing, but there is no forced win in sight. You want the feast
to be continued? No problem: 26.Qh8+ Kf7 27.Qh7+ Ke8 28.Qxg6+ Kd8 29.Rh8 Re8 30.Re1 Qc4 31.Bf2!
Rb8 32.Nd4 and White wins.
23.Re1 (if 23.g6 then 23...h6!) 23...e5. Valor of a cornered person! Judit has only one choice – to
honorably fall in action! The continuaiton 23...Bb7 24.Bf6 (24.Bxb7 Qxb7 25.g6) 24...Bxg2 25.Qxg2 Ree8
26.Nd4! does not help Black either.
24.Nd5 Nxd5 25.Bxd5+ Kh8 26.Bc3! (White is in no hurry) 26...Bb7 (more stubborn was 26...Rg7)
27.Bxb7 Qxb7.

28.Nd4! (excellent move! White redoubles his attack by bringing his passive knight into action) 28...Rf7
(28...exd4? 29.Rxe7 Bxe7 30.Qxd4+ Bf6 31.gxf6 Rg8+ 32.Rg3+–) 29.Qh4! (the d4-knight is left under
attack) 29...b5. In case of 29...Kg8 White delivers the same blow. Another option 29...exd4 30.Bxd4+ Kg8
fails to 31.g6!
30.Nxf5 (White’s position is overwhelming; the following moves were played in the mutual time trouble)
30...d5.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 10 REPORT Page 12 of 17

31.g6?! (31.Qh5!) 31...Qb6+! 32.Kh1 Qxg6 33.Rxe5 (33.fxe5! Rxf5 – 33...b4 34.Bd4! – 34.e6+ Nf6
35.Rg1!+–) 33...Nxe5 34.Bxe5+ Bg7 35.Bxg7+ Rxg7 36.Nxg7.

36...Qxg7. Judit missed her chance of waging terror by her queen: 36...Qe4+! 37.Kg1 Qd4+ 38.Kf1
Qc4+ 39.Rd3 (39.Ke1 Qe4+) 39...Qxc2! 40.Rg3 bxa4 41.Qf6 (41.Nh5 also should be analyzed)
41...Qb1+ 42.Kg2 Qxb2+ 43.Qxb2 Rxb2+ 44.Kh3 Rb3

Is this endgame is winning for White? I am not so sure. Black’s remote passer will hobble the white
knight…
37.axb5 axb5 38.c3 Qg6? 39.f5! Qg7 40.Re3 Ra8. The opponents finally caught their breath and

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 10 REPORT Page 13 of 17

analyzed the position. Black’s position is hopeless again.

41.Qe1 Qf7 42.Qd1 Qg7 43.b4 h6 44.Qe1 Ra7 45.f6! (final blow!) 45...Qxf6 46.Re8+ Kh7 47.Qb1+.

White either delivers checkmate or wins the queen. Judit acknowledged her defeat.

The encounter of the namesakes won’t be included in the collection of their best games.

Ruy Lopez C88
Peter LEKO (HUN) – Peter SVIDLER (RUS)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0–0 8.a4 b4 9.d3 d6 10.a5 Be6
11.Nbd2 Qc8 12.Nc4.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 10 REPORT Page 14 of 17

12...h6. Novelty. 12...Rb8 was played earlier, for example: 13.Bg5 (probably, Peter didb’t like this
possibility) 13...h6 14.Bh4 Bg4 15.Ne3 Bxf3 16.Qxf3 Nd4 17.Qd1 Nxb3 18.cxb3 Nd5 19.Nxd5 Bxh4
20.d4, and White is slightly better, Paehtz – Kasimdzhanov (Greece 2003).
13.c3 Rb8 14.d4 Bg4 15.Ba4 Qb7 16.d5 Na7 17.Ne3.

17...Bc8?! (this retreat looks like self-disrespect; probably, it was high time to break out from the cage –
17...c6!) 18.Qd3 Ng4 19.c4 Nxe3 20.Bxe3.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 10 REPORT Page 15 of 17

20...c5 (otherwise Black will be suffocated) 21.dxc6 Nxc6 22.Qd5 (22.Bb6 Be6!) 22...Bd7 23.c5! dxc5
24.Bxc5 Bxc5 25.Qxc5 Rfc8. Peter’s next move is somewhat sheepish. Feeling despondent after
several defeats he lost his confidence!

26.Qe3?! After 26.Bb3! White keeps advantage as 26...Nd4 is dangerous only for White in view of
27.Bxf7+! Kh8 (27...Kxf7? 28.Nxe5+ and 29.Qxd4) 28.Qd6 Nxf3+ (28...Nc2? 29.Nxe5!) 29.gxf3 etc.
26...Be6! (Black is OK now) 27.h3 b3 28.Bxc6 Rxc6 29.Nxe5 Rc2 30.Rab1 Qb4 31.Nf3 Rd8. Black’s
initiative becomes threatening.

32.Qb6! (Leko is a master of such tricks) 32...Qxb6 33.axb6 Rb8 34.Nd4 Rd2 35.Red1 Rxd1+
36.Rxd1.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 10 REPORT Page 16 of 17

Draw. There is no more fuel in the tanks...

In the following game both opponents were in a peaceful mood. That’s why it doesn’t deserve detailed
comments.

Ruy Lopez C88
Michael ADAMS (ENG) – Vishwanatan ANAND (IND)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0–0 8.a4 b4 9.d3 d6 10.a5 Be6
11.Nbd2 Rb8 12.Nc4 h6 13.h3 Qc8 14.Be3 Rd8 15.Qe2 Bf8.

16.Nfd2. Novelty. There were other colorless draws in this line earlier: 16.Red1 Ne7 17.Nfd2 g6 (or
17...Ng6 18.d4 exd4 19.Bxd4 Nh7 20.Be3 d5 21.exd5 1/2 Anand – Shirov (Monaco 2004) 18.d4 exd4
19.Bxd4 Nh5 20.Nf3 d5 21.exd5 Nxd5 22.Be5 Nhf4 23.Bxf4 Nxf4 24.Qe4 g5 25.Nce5 Bxb3 26.cxb3 Qe6
27.Qc4 Qxc4, and a long-awaited draw was agreed (Lutz – Almasi, Germany 2005).
16...Ne7 17.d4 Ng6 18.d5 Bd7 19.Ba4 Bb5 20.b3 Be7 21.Rec1.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 10 REPORT Page 17 of 17

21...c6 22.Bxb5 Rxb5 23.Nb6 Qb7 24.dxc6 Qxc6 25.Qc4.

Draw. Hurray!

Standings after tenth round: 1. Topalov – 8 (the finish and cherished title are nearing); 2. Svidler – 6
(frankly speaking, I don’t believe that Peter will be able to speed up); 3–4. Anand and Morozevich – 5,5.
(Alexander is given one more chance. He should seize this opportunity!); 5–6. Leko and Kasimdzhanov –
4,5; 7. Adams – 3,5; 8. Polgar – 2,5.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 11 REPORT Page 1 of 16

By grandmaster
Sergey SHIPOV

Pursuit begins! Isn’t it too late?

At last, the situation changed a bit! The gap between a leader and his pursuers shrank.
But the finish is too close – only three rounds to go. Svidler and Anand can only reckon
on Topalov’s defeat. Vishy can’t help it anymore whereas Svidler still has a chance to
heighten the tension at the finish. But he has to beat the invincible Topalov with Black to
achieve this goal.
It’s clear how important the first game between Svidler and Topalov was. Just imagine for a moment
that its result was not 0-1, but 1-0…
In this case the Russian grandmaster would have been a leader now with the Bulgarian trailing a half
point behind. Of course this is a mere idle fancy as the other results of the games between competitors
could have changed too. Everything would have been different: their attitude, opening choice, standings
etc.
It’s pretty hard to predict how something insignificant in the past may affect the future. That is a well-
known butterfly effect: flapping of its wings in Tokyo can cause a disaster in New York…

The leader’s game was quite important for the opening theory. Black succeeded in holding the position.

Sicilian Defense, B85
Michael ADAMS (ENG) – Veselin TOPALOV (BUL)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be2 e6 7.0-0 Be7 8.a4 Nc6 9.Be3 0-0 10.f4 Qc7
11.Kh1 Re8 12.Bf3. This is the main line of the Scheveningen System.

12...Bf8 (Kasparov’s efforts made this continuation highly popular recently) 13.Nb3 (one of the most
interesting ways to refute Black setup; White is threatening with a4-a5) 13...b6 14.e5. After 14.a5 Black
has two options – very sharp one 14...bxa5 15.e5 dxe5 16.fxe5 Rd8! and a calm 14...Nd7 with good
counter-chances.
14...dxe5 15.fxe5 Nd7 16.Bxc6 Qxc6 17.Nd4 Qb7! Black has to keep the diagonal h1-a8 under control.
17...Qc7? is bad in view of the double attack – 18.Qf3!

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 11 REPORT Page 2 of 16

18.Qh5. A tempting blow 18.Rxf7 Kxf7 19.Qh5+ is refuted with an elegant 19...Kg8 20.Qxe8 Qxg2+!
21.Kxg2 Bb7+ Black wins the queen back and emerges better thank to two strong bishops.
18...g6 19.Qh4 (19.Qg5 Bg7 20.Nf3 Qc7!=) 19...Nxe5! (forced boldness; otherwise White has a strong
attack for free) 20.Ne4 Be7.

21.Ng5. I perfectly remember Dolmatov – Shipov (St.Petersburg 1998) game. White played 21.Qf4 f5!
22.Qxe5 Qxe4 23.Qxe4 fxe4 24.Nc6 Bc5 25.Bxc5 bxc5, and this endgame turned out to be slightly better
for Black. Of course, I had a lot of weak pawns, but I was a pawn up and black bishop could become
really strong. Unfortunately, I didn’t realize it during the game, and the draw was agreed several moves
later.
21...Bxg5. 21...h5?! 22.Qg3 doesn’t work because Black has to exchange the knight on g5 anyway as
White is ready to deliver a thunderous blow on e6.
22.Bxg5 f5. The only way to save a king. Black can’t refrain from this move.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 11 REPORT Page 3 of 16

23.Rae1 Qd5! The game Almasi – Ribli (Hungary 1999) saw 23...Nf7 24.Bf6 Bd7 25.Re3 Bc6, and he
draw was agreed. I believe Michael would have continued the battle in this position: 26.Nxc6 Qxc6
27.Rh3 h6 28.Rc3 Qd6 (28...Qb7 29.Qg3! g5 30.Rc7) 29.Rd3 Qc6, and here comes the time for
reflections... White can avoid repetition with 30.c4!? planning Rf1-d1 and Rd3-d7. Or Bf6-c3 and Qh4-f6.
24.Ne2! A very interesting novelty. The knight transfer to f4 is good from all points of view. In the game
Zelcic – Vovk (Cappelle la Grande 2005) White did a poor job: 24.Rd1 Bb7 25.Qg3 Nf7 26.Bf6 Rac8
27.c3 Rc4 28.h3 Rxa4 29.Nf3 f4 30.Rxd5 fxg3 31.Rd7 Bxf3 32.gxf3 Rf4 33.Bd4 e5 34.Bxb6 Rb8 35.Be3
Rxb2! 36.Rd2 Rxd2 37.Bxd2 – and deservedly lost.
During the game I analyzed 24.c4

I have no doubts that grandmasters in San-Luis also thoroughly calculated the variations. Apparently
bad is 24...Nxc4? 25.Nxf5! gxf5 26.Rf3! (26.Bh6 is not so dangerous in view of 26…Ne5! 27.Qf6 Ra7=)
26...Ra7 (26...Ne5 27.Rxe5 Qxe5 28.Bf6+–) 27.Bf6 Kf7 28.Rg3 e5 29.Rg7+ Ke6 30.Rxa7 Bb7, and here
White has simple 31.Rxb7! Qxb7 32.Qh6 with a menacing attack. In some lines he plays b2-b3 that
completely ruins black pieces coordination.
But this line a mere give-away game! After 24.c4 Black should react with 24...Qxc4! and I can find no
promising lines for White. For example, 25.Bf6 Nd7 26.Rxf5!? (26.Nxf5 Qxh4 27.Nxh4 e5–/+) 26...Bb7
27.Rf4 Nxf6 28.Qxf6 Rf8 29.Qxe6+ Qxe6 30.Nxe6 Rxf4 31.Nxf4 Rf8 32.Nd3 Rd8! – and White practically
has no chances to save the endgame. His knight looks ridiculous in comparison with Black’s powerful
bishop.
24...Nf7 I’m not sure that this retreat is a must. It’s pretty hard to find anything serious for White after
24...Bb7!? 25.Nf4 Qd6 For example, 26.Bf6 Ng4 (26...Nd7? 27.Nxg6!) 27.h3 e5 28.hxg4 exf4 29.gxf5
Rxe1 30.Rxe1 Qd2 31.Rg1 f3 32.fxg6 fxg2+ 33.Kh2 Qd6+ 34.Kh3 Qd7+ 35.Kh2

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 11 REPORT Page 4 of 16

A draw is leaking White’s lips, but Black fearlessly continues: 35...Qc7+ 36.Kh3 Re8! 37.gxh7+ Qxh7
38.Qxh7+ Kxh7, and White has to struggle to save a half point…and work both on himself and on the
opening repertoire!
But let’s go back to the position after 24...Bb7 25.Nf4 Qd6. There is another intriguing line: 26.Rxe5!?
Qxe5 27.Bf6 Bxg2+! (27...Qc7 28.Nxg6!; 27...Qe4? 28.Qh6!) 28.Nxg2 Qc5

What’s the evaluation? I think the detailed analysis is needed. Black central pawns can start moving
ahead and White will face serious problems.
25.Nf4 Qc6.

26.Nh5! (White’s knight immediately rushes into attack on the black king fortress) 26...Nxg5! Right
decision. Committing a mistake when calculating the lines after 26...gxh5 27.Bf6! is as easy as pie. I think

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 11 REPORT Page 5 of 16

nobody can find all the following lines at the board – 27...Qc7 (bad is 27...Nh8 28.Bxh8 Kxh8 29.Qf6+
Kg8 30.Re3 h4 31.Rxf5 exf5 32.Qxc6 Rxe3 33.Kg1! Bb7 34.Qxb7 Rae8 35.Qxb6+/–; 27...f4?! is even
worse: 28.Rxf4 Qxc2 29.Qxh5 e5 30.Rf3 Ra7 31.Rg3+ Kf8 32.Bg7+ Ke7 33.Bxe5+–) 28.Rxf5 Nh8
(28...Bb7 doesn’t work in view of 29.Rg5+! Nxg5 30.Qxg5+ Kf8 31.Rf1!) 29.Bxh8 Kxh8 30.Qxh5 Bb7
31.Rf7

And here, on the verge of defeat, Black delivers a counter-blow: 31...Bxg2+! 32.Kg1 (32.Kxg2 Qxc2+
33.Re2 Rg8+ 34.Kf2 Qc5+) 32...Qc5+ 33.Qxc5 bxc5 34.Kxg2 Rg8+ Black has good chances for a draw.
27.Nf6+ Kf7 28.Nxe8 Bb7 (it’s impossible to make a mistake in this line – there is no deviations)
29.Nd6+ (29.Qxg5 Rxe8 is no better) 29...Qxd6 30.Qxg5. Black has a sufficient compensation for the
exchange – a pawn, the pressure on g2 and a mobile pawn chain.

30...Rc8 (in case of 30...Rd8 31.Qh4! Black is forced to play 31...h5 as 31...Kg7? 32.Rxe6! loses on the
spot) 31.Rf2 Rc4 32.Qh6 Kg8 33.Rd2 Bd5! 33...Rd4? is a serious mistake in view of 34.Red1 Rxd2
(34...e5 35.Rxd4 exd4 36.Qd2 Qc6 37.Qf2+–) 35.Qxd2 Qxd2 36.Rxd2 Bd5 37.Rd4 b5 38.axb5 axb5
39.Rb4 Bc6 40.c4, and Black is lost in the endgame.
34.b3 Rc3 35.Qh4 Qc5. Black successfully fenced the whole board. Here Michael realized that he
should be active to secure himself. Slow play may lead to the black’s advantage as they have a clear
plan of advancement in the center and on the king side. It will be even more dangerous after the queen
exchange.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 11 REPORT Page 6 of 16

36.Rxe6 This sacrifice leads to a forced draw. After 36.b4 black queen can retreat to c4 or c6 – in both
cases White has no way to continue his attack.
36...Bxe6 37.Qf6! Bd5! 38.Qd8+! Kg7! 39.Rxd5! Qf2! (the opponents reeled off the series of the only
moves) 40.Rd7+ Kh6 41.Qf8+ Kg5 42.Qe7+ Kf4! Played in Bent Larsen’s style – the black king defends
itself.

43.Qd6+ (43.Qb4+ Kg5 44.Qxc3? Qf1#) 43...Kg5 44.Qe7+ Kf4 45.Qd6+. Draw. One more flashy game
from Topalov. This time, however, his opponent Adams was at his best too.

The mini-match between two friends-opponents from Russia ended with 2-0 Svidler’s victory. In the first
game he was lucky, but this time everything was quite logical. Probably, the Muscovite had a chance to
escape, but nothing more ... I annotated this game on-line (in Russian), so I won’t go into details now.

Petroff Defense C42
Peter SVIDLER (RUS) – Alexander MOROZEVICH (RUS)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6. The Petroff Defense is not always just a dull equal game. It depends on the
opponents’ state of mind. If you want you can play as sharply as any fan of the Sicilian...
3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nf3 Nxe4 5.d4 d5 6.Bd3 Bd6 7.0-0 0-0 8.c4 c6.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 11 REPORT Page 7 of 16

9.Re1. The continuation 9.Qc2 is out of fashion – the effect of the following brilliant game is too strong:
9...Na6 10.a3 Bg4 11.Ne5 Bf5 12.b4 f6 13.Nf3 Qe8 14.b5 Qh5!! (one of the best novelties of the year!)

15.bxa6 Bg4 16.Re1 Bxf3 17.gxf3 Qxh2+ 18.Kf1 f5! 19.cxd5 cxd5 20.fxe4 fxe4 21.Bxe4 dxe4 22.Be3
Bg3 23.Ra2 Rf3!! White resigns (Shirov – Bluvshtein, Edmonton 2005). In the analysis it was found that
White could have saved the game. But nobody wants to recall these lines trying to repeat them with
White.
9...Bf5 10.Qb3 Na6 11.Nc3 dxc4. After 11...Nec5?! 12.dxc5 Nxc5 13.Bxf5 Nxb3 14.axb3 three white
minor pieces are definitely stronger than the black queen.
12.Bxc4 Nxc3 13.bxc3 b5 14.Bf1 Nc7.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 11 REPORT Page 8 of 16

15.Bg5. Good novelty. Previously White tested 15.Ba3 Be6 16.Qb2 Bd5 17.Ne5 Re8 18.Bxd6 1/2
(Serper – Akopian, Adelaide 1988) and 15.a4 a5 16.Bg5 Qd7 17.Ne5 Bxe5 18.dxe5 Be6 19.Red1 Bxb3
20.Rxd7 Rfc8 21.axb5 cxb5 22.g3 Ne6 23.Be3 Rxc3 24.Bxb5 a4, and Black has nothing to complain
about in the endgame (Oll – Rozentalis, Klaipeda 1988).
15...Qc8 (I think, Rozentalis’ move – 15...Qd7! – was better) 16.Bh4! Svidler’s plan is based on the
dark-squared bishops exchange. The pawn structure suggests this idea.
16...a5 17.Bg3 a4. There was no point in stopping in the middle of the road. But one more black pawn is
on the light square now. Such setup is always risky if only white-squared bishops remain on the board.
18.Qb2 Bxg3 19.hxg3 Nd5?! In my opinion, this is already a mistake. Black had to bring a bishop into
play: 19...Be6!, simultaneously trying to prevent White’s breakthrough in the center.
20.c4! (in the game White has no problem with his plan realization) 20...bxc4 21.Bxc4 Rb8 22.Qd2.
And it becomes clear that Black is in a deadlock. Morozevich can’t get rid of the weakness on c6, and he
has no counterplay. White keeps pressuring Black and achieves a stable advantage.

22...Qb7 23.Ne5 Qb6 24.Rac1 Be6 25.a3 Rfc8 26.Ba2 h6 27.Rc2 Bf5. Starting from this moment Peter
handles his position as if it was a cup with very expensive wine – he is afraid of spilling it over!

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 11 REPORT Page 9 of 16

28.Rc5 (I tried my best, but didn’t understand why 28.Rb1! wasn’t played) 28...Qb2 29.Qxb2 Rxb2
30.Bc4 Kf8 31.Rc1. Simple 31.Nxc6 Nf6 (31...Nb6 32.Bxf7!) 32.Rxf5 Rxc6 33.Ra5! is also winning. The
a-passer will be a decisive factor in the endgame.
31...Nb6.

32.Nxf7! Rb1 (32...Nxc4 33.Rxf5 g6 34.Rf4 g5 35.Rf5!+–) 33.Rxb1 Bxb1 34.Ne5 Ke7 35.Ba6 Rc7
36.Be2 Kd6 37.Bf3 Ba2. Being short of time Peter didn’t even try to calculate the lines after taking a
pawn.
38.Be4 Bd5 39.f3 Re7 40.Rc3 Rc7 41.Rc5 Bb3. One more interesting moment.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 11 REPORT Page 10 of 16

42.Kf2. The pawn is forgiven one more time. White has enough time already, and the lines is very
promising for him: 42.Bxc6! Nc8 43.Kf2 Ne7 44.Bxa4! Bxa4 45.Nc4+ Kd7 46.Nb6+ – White has too many
extra pawns.
42...Nd5 43.Ke2 Ne7 44.Ra5 Rb7 45.Ke3 Bd5 46.Nd3 Bc4 47.Nb4 Bb5 48.g4 Nc8 49.Kd2 (49.Bd3! is
an easy win) 49...Ra7! That is Black’s best chance as there is no way to bring his rook into play.
50.Rxa7 Nxa7 51.Nc2.

51...c5! 52.Kc3 Bf1 (52...Ba6!?) 53.dxc5+ Kxc5 (the number of pawns is decreasing; it indicates the
drawing tendencies of this position) 54.Ne3 Ba6 55.Bc2 Nb5+ 56.Kb2. Since White can’t allow
exchanging all the pawns on the queen side, Svidler has to move his king out of the center.
56...Nd6 57.Bxa4 Kd4. Black is two pawns down, but his king is very active.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 11 REPORT Page 11 of 16

58.Nf5+. I don’t want to point out mistakes on this stage of the game. It’s pretty hard to calculate all the
lines to the very end, especially in time trouble. But it looks like this move lets the victory slip away. After
58.Nc2+ Ke5 59.Kc3! Kf4 60.Kd4 with an idea to place a knight on e3 I didn’t find a defense for Black.
58...Nxf5 59.gxf5 h5! The basis of Black’s counter-play is the attack on g2 and creation of the passer.

60.g3. The bishop transfer to h3 doesn’t win: 60.f6 gxf6 61.Bd7 Bf1 62.Bh3 h4 63.a4 (63.f4 f5 64.a4 Ke4
65.Kc3 Kxf4 66.g3+ Kxg3 67.Bxf1 h3=) 63...Ke3 64.a5 f5! (64...Kf2 is dangerous in view of 65.f4!) 65.Kc3
f4 66.Kb4 Kf2 67.Kc5 Bxg2 68.Bxg2 Kxg2 69.a6 h3 70.a7 h2 71.a8Q h1Q, and that is White who has to
escape with a series of precise checks.
60...Be2? Here comes the decisive mistake. Black should have attacked the pawn from b7: 60...Bb7!
The following line looks possible: 61.Bd1 Ke3 62.f4 Kf2 63.Bxh5 Kxg3 64.Bd1! (64.Be2 Be4!=) 64...Kxf4
65.Bc2 Ke5 (65...Bc8 66.a4!) 66.Kc3 Kd5 67.Kb4 Bc8 68.a4 (68.Kb5 Bd7+! 69.Kb6 Ke5=) 68...Kc6! 69.a5
Kb7 70.Bd3 Ka7 71.Kc5 Kb7

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White can’t make any progress. If the king runs to a g7 pawn, Black will sacrifice a bishop on f5 and
eliminate last white pawn with a king. It looks like a draw.
61.Bc6! (now White’s win is unquestionable) 61...Ke3 62.Kc3 Kf2 63.Kd2 Ba6 (63...Bc4 is more
precise, but it didn’t change the evaluation) 64.g4 h4 65.g5 h3 66.f6 gxf6 67.gxf6 Bb5 68.Be4 Be8
69.f4.

69...Bg6. A typical move from an Internet blitz-game. However in real chess you have enough time to
see what was the opponent’s move and refrain from a “mechanical” response.
More resilient was 69...h2 70.a4 Bh5 – Black’s idea is to transfer a bishop to f3. White brilliantly refutes
this plan: 71.Bh1! Bf3 72.f7 Bxh1 73.f8Q Bf3 74.Qh6 h1Q 75.Qxh1 Bxh1 76.f5

White pawns are unstoppable: 76...Bd5 77.f6 Kf3 78.Kd3! Kf4 79.Kd4 Be6 80.a5 Kf5 81.a6 Kxf6 82.a7

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and here comes a new queen! Same line is possible in case of 63...Bc4 instead of 63…Ba6.
70.Bxg6! Black resigns.

Vishy managed to level the score in his match with the FIDE champion. The difference in the quality of
the home preparation was the decisive factor.

Sicilian Defense, B90
Vishwanatan ANAND (IND) – Rustam KASIMDZHANOV (UZB)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.f3 e5 7.Nb3 Be6 8.Be3 Nbd7 9.Qd2 b5 10.0-0-0
Nb6 11.Qf2 Nc4 12.Bxc4 bxc4. The opponents played a topical line of the Sicilian.

13.Na5!? White makes commitment with this rare continuation. It will be hard to take the white knight
out from a5. It’s obvious that such a decision can be made only after diligent home analysis.
A usual continuation is 13.Nc5; the game Anand – Svidler (Dortmund 2004), for example, saw 13...Be7
14.h4 Qc8 15.N5a4 Rb8 16.g4 Qc6 17.Nb6 Bd8 18.Ncd5 0-0 19.c3 Nxd5 20.Nxd5 and Black is OK,
although the rest of the game was not as good for Peter.
13...Rc8?! Even the first Black response is dubious. Rustam probably didn’t pay enough attention to this
line at home.
Definitely stronger was 13...Nd7. The game Bologan – Gelfand (Merida, 2005) went 14.Nc6 Qc7 15.Nb4
Qb7 16.Nbd5 Rb8 17.b3 cxb3 18.cxb3 Be7 19.Kb2 Bd8 20.Rd3 0-0 21.g4 Kh8 22.Rc1 Ba5 23.Rc2 Rfc8,
and Black emerged better. Probably, Anand prepared some improvement in this line, but there was no
need for it this time.
14.Bb6 Qd7 15.g3! White prepares the pawn advancement in the center.

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15...g6. Houdini-like defense: 15...Be7 16.f4 Bh3! 17.fxe5 Ng4! – is easy to recommend, but impossible
to find at the board. Furthermore, White can stop great “escaper” with 16.h3! followed by f3-f4.
16.Rd2 Bh6 17.f4 Ng4? This move leads to a disaster. Black should have evacuated his king from the
center: 17...0-0 18.Rhd1 Ne8, though his position isn’t a bed of roses in any case.
18.Qf3 Rb8 That is Rustam’s idea – he wants to get rid of the b6-bishop and then attack the a5-knight .
It’s always hard to admit one’s own mistakes: 18...Nf6!?
19.h3!

19...Nf6 (Houdini would definitely play 19...Nh2!, but Anand would react with a cold-blooded 20.Qf2!)
20.Bc5! Now no one can get out from this deadly trap.
20...exf4 21.gxf4 Rc8 22.Bxd6 Qd8 23.Bb4 (the bishop helps the knight once again) 23...Qb6 24.a3
Nh5 25.Kb1 Bxf4 26.Nd5 Bxd5 27.Rxd5. Black king has remained in the centre. There is no chance to
stay alive for Black.

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27...Bb8 28.Rhd1 c3 29.Rd7. Black resigns. Now I have a question for those who analyzed this game –
WHAT DID THE KNIGHT DO ON a5? I failed to figure it out.

In the game of two Hungarian grandmasters there was not a single new move. I’m not going to annotate
it.

Caro-Kann Defense, B13
Judit POLGAR (HUN) – Peter LEKO (HUN)
1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 cxd5 4.c4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Nf3 Bg4 7.cxd5 Nxd5.

8.Qb3 Bxf3 9.gxf3 e6 10.Qxb7 Nxd4 11.Bb5+ Nxb5 12.Qc6+ Ke7 13.Qxb5 Qd7 14.Nxd5+ Qxd5
15.Bg5+ f6 16.Qxd5 exd5 17.Be3.

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17...Ke6 18.0-0-0 Bb4 19.Rd3 Rhd8 20.a3 Rac8+ 21.Kb1 Bc5 22.Re1 Kf7 23.Red1 Ke6 24.Re1 Kf7.

In the game Ionescu – Mateuta, Romania, 2005 a draw was agreed right now. Judit and Peter finished
the game after 25.Red1. Draw.

Standings after Round 11: 1. Topalov – 8,5; 2. Svidler – 7; 3. Anand – 6,5; 4. Morozevich – 5,5; 5. Leko
– 5; 6. Kasimdzhanov – 4,5; 7. Adams – 4; 8. Polgar – 3.

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By grandmaster
Sergey SHIPOV

Look from the screen
Drop your back-sit driver criticism. It is very easy to urge chess players to fight for
victory to the very end in any position looking at the monitor, drinking tea and patting
your cat. I am sure that the participants of the World Championship are doing their best.
After all the stakes are too high; everyone wants to win. Given the long distance with just
a few days off and extensive time control it is very important for GMs to evenly distribute
the energy along the tournament.

I see many critics stride around the room, rend the air and lament over the leaders’ draw. They will
quickly get back to their couches to have a rest from chess and their own emotions. As for the GMs, they
have to prepare for next games, play and fight.
My greatest impression of the recent Olympics 2004 in Athens is the 50km foot-race. The Pole Robert
Korzhenevsky and the Russian Denis Nizhegorodov were walking head to head for quite a while but
Robert speeded up at the second stage of the distance. Denis stubbornly held out, but finally had to slow
down and let the great footman to increase the distance. The race was decided. Indeed the Pole finished
first and won the gold medal. As for the Russian, he nearly lost everything. Walking under the scorching
sun, with about one kilometer to go, he virtually stopped then staggered, and zigzagged slowly advancing
in sinusoid curve. Usually referees are very strict about the racers not switching from walking to running,
but this time they watched Nizhegorodov not to fall. I think if the Russian had fallen, he would not have
got up. The guy plucked up his spirit, made it to the silver medal, but had to spend several days in
hospital. He could not recall what happened at the second stage of the distance! That is what I call
squeezing out 101 percent, doing more than one can.
Let’s face it. Topalov is better now. He is the best of all active players. Svidler never could boast of his
stamina. It is really hard to compete with the Bulgarian “energizer”. Don’t forget that the tournament is not
over yet. Svidler is in for the games with Polgar with black and vs. Anand on the white side! I am sure the
Russian GM will show his worth. He has to reach the finish and remain on his feet!
Svidler failed offer to impose a real fight on the leader after his tough seven-hour game with Morozevich.
Peter has a classical chess education; bluffing is not his style. Do you remember his game with
Kasimdzhanov in the fist part of the event? That was the case. Let me mix different proverbs and word it:
What is good for Morozevich bad for Svidler! That is why the GM from St-Petersburg played the game
with Topalov in a solid manner, trying to equalize first. When the leader started trading pieces it was just
impossible to change the course of the battle. I dare say that it was up to Veselin. If he had run risks
pressing for win, Peter would have had his chances.
As for Topalov’s decision, it is not worth discussing. Having his coveted goal in sight he advances with
inexorability of a heavy tank. Among other events I should bring your attention to Anand’s acceleration. A
couple of rounds ago many experts (including your truly) thought that Vishy had thrown in the towel. We
were all wrong! This experienced fighter is playing to the best of his abilities. He tries to score the
maximum FINAL result not just an to stage an impressive performance at a particular stage of the
tournament.
Now we may muse over the hypothetical situation with White’s playing 16.Qd3! in the Anand – Topalov
game and winning the encounter. First, it is not chiseled in stone that White would have won this game.
Based on the latest information, Topalov was familiar with this position, whereas Vishy saw it for the first
time. Second, what would have been Vishy condition after this hypothetical victory? Would he have been
able to play as well as he actually did, tomorrow and one day after tomorrow? There are many questions
but unfortunately no answers. OK, enough words. For some reason I am in talkative mood today. Let’s
check out the games.

Even those who followed the game in the Internet felt the tremendous tension in the air. Both players
put their best in every move. However, the chessic content of the encounter is equal to zero. The

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opponents made two new moves in the equal theoretical position and drew the game.

Ruy Lopez C88
Veselin TOPALOV (BUL) – Peter SVIDLER (RUS)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0–0.

8.h3! The game Anand – Svidler convincingly proved that the Marshall attack was still alive. It also
demonstrated that Svidler was one of the best experts in this line.
8...Bb7 9.d3 d6 10.a3 Qd7 11.Nc3 Nd8 12.d4 exd4 13.Nxd4 Re8 14.Nf5.

14...Ne6! The retreat of the black bishop was refuted in the game Anand – Shirov (Mainz, 2004):
14...Bf8? 15.Bg5 Bxe4 16.Nxe4 Rxe4 17.Rxe4 Qxf5 (17...Nxe4 18.Qg4! Nxg5 19.Nh6+) 18.Bxf6 Qxe4
19.Bd5 Qf4 20.Bxa8 Qxf6 21.c3 c6 22.Qd4 Qe6 23.Qb6 Qc8 24.Re1! and White won soon.
15.Nxe7+ Rxe7 16.f3 Rd8 17.Bxe6 fxe6 18.e5 dxe5 19.Qxd7 Rdxd7 20.Rxe5.

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20...Rd6. The sequence 20...h6 21.Be3 Nd5 22.Nxd5 Rxd5 23.Rxd5 Bxd5 24.a4 Kf7 25.axb5 axb5
26.Ra7 c6 27.Rxe7+ leads to the same result. The game Anand – Shirov (Mainz, 2004) was drawn at this
point.
21.Bf4. Black can play 21...Nd5, forcing further exchanges. The opposite-colored bishops leave no
chance for the decisive outcome. Draw.

The old rivals produced the only decisive game of the round. The opponents made an important
contribution to the opening theory, pleased the connoisseurs and entertained the spectators. Everyone
enjoyed it except Leko…

Petroff Defense C42
Peter LEKO (HUN) – Vishvwanathan ANAND (IND)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6. When and who brought into fashion all these talks about the Petroff Defense being a
boring drawish opening? This statement sounds old and amateurish. This opening offers many lines with
complicated play and immense room for creativity! Work on, play and enjoy it!

3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nf3 Nxe4 5.d4 d5 6.Bd3 Nc6 7.0–0 Be7 8.c4 Nb4 9.Be2 0–0 10.a3 Nc6 11.cxd5 Qxd5
12.Nc3 Nxc3 13.bxc3 Bf5 14.Re1 Rfe8 15.Bf4 Rac8 16.h3.

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16...Be4! Bologan’s idea. What is behind this move? The point is that White has a promising plan – to
retreat the knight to d2, transfer the bishop to f3 putting pressure on Black’s queenside. Then White’s
knight advances to e4 or c4. Black’s plan is aimed at foiling this regrouping by putting pressure on the g2-
pawn. After the promulgation of this novelty analysts asked themselves whether 16…Be4 really prevent
17.Nd2. This problem has been analyzed in home laboratories for a whole year. Finally, the results were
disclosed.
17.Nd2!? In the games Leko – Bologan (Dortmund, bltiz 2004) and Leko – Kramnik (Bressago, 2004)
the Hungarian GM played an unassuming 17.Be3, but to no effect. To make it worse, he fell into real
trouble at the start of the match in Switzerland: 17...Na5! 18.c4 Nxc4 19.Bxc4 Qxc4 20.Nd2 Qd5 21.Nxe4
Qxe4 22.Bg5 Qxe1+ 23.Qxe1 Bxg5 24.Qa5 Bf6 25.Qxa7 c5! – Black got excellent compensation for the
queen. Peter did not feel the danger and lost. The tournament practice showed that 17.Bd3 was not
dangerous for Black either. For example 17...Bxf3 18.Qxf3 Qxf3 19.gxf3 Bd6 20.Rxe8+ Rxe8 21.Be3 Na5
22.Rb1 Rc8 23.Bf5 Rb8 24.Bd3 Rc8 25.Bf5 1/2 Akopian – Bacrot (San-Vincent, 2005).
17...Bxg2 18.Bg4 (after 18.c4 Qf5! 19.Bg4 Qxf4 20.Bxc8 Rxc8 21.Kxg2 Qxd4 Black has more than
sufficient compensation for the exchange.) 18...Bh1! The bishop gets from under fire with tempi, which
nothing more than the checkmate threat! Alexander Huzman in his comments for ChessBase mentioned
this move as deserving attention. He focused on the continuation 18...f5 gave the following lines: 19.Be2
b5 20.c4 (20.a4 a6 21.axb5 axb5 22.c4 Qxd4 23.Be3 Qd6 24.Kxg2 f4 25.Ne4 Qxd1 26.Rexd1 fxe3
27.cxb5 Nb4=) 20...Qxd4 21.Be3 Qd6 22.Kxg2 f4 23.Ne4 Qg6+ 24.Ng3 Rcd8 25.Qb3 Qf7 26.Bh5 g6
27.Bf3 bxc4 28.Qb5 Nb8 29.Bxa7 fxg3 30.fxg3 Rd2+ 31.Re2 c6 32.Rxd2 cxb5 33.Bd5 Nc6 34.Bg1 Rb8=

Appearently Vishy and Peter took some bias of this analysis by the Israeli GM and concluded that White
was better in this line.
19.f3 (the black bishop is trapped) 19...Bh4!? Here comes the improvement (I doubt that it is an
impairment) of Huzman’s analysis who recommended 19...f5 20.Bh5 g6 21.Kh1 gxh5 22.Qb1 “with

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compensation for White”.

20.Rf1!? Cunningly played. After 20.Rxe8+ I hoped to give a short, plausible line. However I bogged
down and now you can see the result: 20...Rxe8 21.Qb3 (21.Kxh1? Re1+ 22.Qxe1 Bxe1 23.Rxe1 f5)
21...Bxf3 22.Bxf3 Qf5 23.Qxb7! (23.Bxc6 Qxf4 24.Bxe8 Qg3+ 25.Kh1 Qxh3+ 26.Kg1 Qg3+ 27.Kh1=)
23...Nxd4! 24.Bxc7 Qc5! 25.Kh1 Qxc3 26.Rd1 Be1! 27.Bd5! Qxh3+ 28.Bh2 Qf5 29.Nf3 (29.Be4!?)
29...Nxf3 30.Qc6 Rf8 31.Bxf3 Bf2

I reached some sort of comprehensive position only here. White has some (probably sizable)
advantage. Consequently, the exchange on e8 (after somewhat artificial retreat of the white rook)
deserves a closer look and maybe even the practical test.
20...f5! 21.Bh5 g6 (the white bishop is trapped too) 22.Kxh1 gxh5 23.Rg1+. That was Leko’s idea. He
believes that the g-file is more important than the e-file. I think both black and white kings share this
opinion.
23...Kh8 (here the white queen transfer to the center on d3 via b1 with tempi) 24.Qf1.

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The opponents sank into reflections. Up to this moment they confidently made the moves on the board.
All we have left is to admire the workload both GMs did in their preparation. Remember that it is just of
side variations of the optional opening. How many lines they have to work on? Just think about it! All
these lines have to be stored in memory; the opponents like openings surprises!
24...Bf6. Black is consolidating his position. Naturally, his extra pawn at the edge of the board is of no
importance. However, after spring comes the summer and then fall. Drawing analogy with chess, one
should remember about endgame when playing the opening.
25.Rb1. Probably that is the first inaccuracy. The white rook’s activity on the queenside does not bother
Black. Actually White has no advantage in any case. White could have dislodge the black queen from her
excellent position only with 25.Qc4!?, but apparently the queen exchange was in conflict with Leko’s
aggressive intentions.
25...Ne7! (good maneuver; the knight is heading to g6 to patch up Black’s shattered kingside) 26.Bg5.
On 26.Qc4 Black has a strong rejoinder 26...c5! After 26.Be3 (with the idea of c3-c4) White should reckon
with the same 26...c5!?
26...Bxg5 27.Rxg5 Rg8! (Vishy joins the ranks of the g-file’s fans) 28.Rxg8+ Rxg8 29.Qe2 Ng6 (the
black pieces are gradually flowing closer the kings) 30.Rb5. Whereas White’s pieces are trying to go
through the center.
30...Qc6! It became clear at this point that White’s strategy failed. I mean strategy, not just some
separate move.

31.Rxf5. Looking for practical chances Peter is trying to complicate the position. On 31.Rc5 Black reacts
with 31...Re8! It turned out that in many lines White’s first rank was very weak. This weakness is caused
by the trip of White’s rook.

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31...Qxc3 32.Rd5 Qxa3! (extra pawns will serve Black a good stead on a rainy day!) 33.Kh2. Revealing
move. Being two pawns down White has to defend.
33...Qf8! The final portion of the game is Black’s confident conversion of his advantage in White’s time
trouble.

34.Qe6 Qf4+ 35.Kh1 Rf8 (even better was 35...c6! 36.Rxh5 Qxd4) 36.Qe2 h4 37.Rd7 Rf7 38.Rd8+
Kg7 39.Ne4 Qxf3+ 40.Qxf3 Rxf3. Three extra pawns is way too much. Peter’s disappointment is the only
explanation of Black’s long and useless resistance.

41.Nc5 b6 42.Ne6+ Kf6 43.Nxc7 Rxh3+ 44.Kg1 Rd3 45.Nb5 Kg5! 46.Nxa7 h3 (this very doubled
pawn that Black won in the opening brings him the victory) 47.Nc6 Kg4 48.Ra8 Kg3 49.Ra1 h2+ 50.Kh1
Nf4 51.Ne5 Re3 52.Rd1 Kh3 53.Nf7.

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53...Rg3! The black knight heads to e2, the rook goes g1 and the hero-pawn is promoted with
checkmate. Repair your sleigh in July, provision yourself with extra pawns in opening!

If someone asked me before the event what game would not be drawn for sure, I would not hesitate to
point out this encounter. Sasha is known for his fighting temper, whereas Judit is not someone to be
invited twice to dart into a scuffle. It is beyond belief that these two chess gladiators drew in the round
when usually careful and solid Leko lost with White! As for the game itself, it was quite interesting. The
fighters swept off most of the pieces; they did not have enough resources to continue the battle.

Sicilian Defense B90
Alexander MOROZEVICH (RUS) – Judit POLGAR (HUN)
1.Nc3. This first move brought Alexander luck at the blitz tournament organized by the newspaper
“Vechernyaya Moskva” (actually he ironically called this continuation his secret weapon for Argentina). In
the real serious game it came down to a simple transposition.

1...c5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.e4 d6 4.d4 cxd4 5.Nxd4 a6 6.Be3 Ng4. Agaign we see the Najdorf variation with the
knight’s lunge to g4. I don’t know how most of the participants called this system, but I think it should be
something with the worlds Argentina, San Luis, Topalov, etc. On the other hand it sound like oxymoron.
After all Najdorf was from Argentina! There problems is that after 5…a6 there are too many different
systems and each of them deserves a name: Najdorf 1, Najdorf 2, etc.

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7.Bg5 h6 8.Bh4 g5 9.Bg3 Bg7 10.Be2 (Prior to this game the participants tested 10.h3 Ne5 and here
either 11.Nf5 or 11.f3) 10...h5 11.h4 gxh4 12.Rxh4 Nc6 13.Nb3 Be6 14.Qd2.

14...Rc8. After 14...Qb6 15.Nd5 Bxd5 16.exd5 Nce5 17.c3 Ng6 18.Rh3 h4 19.Bxg4 hxg3 20.Rxh8+
Bxh8 21.Qe3 gxf2+ 22.Kxf2 Qxe3+ 23.Kxe3 Ne5 Black transposed in a better endgame and gradually
won (Topalov – Kasparov, rapid chess,Geneva 1996). I think Topalov-2005 would be able to improve
White’s play.
15.0–0–0 Qb6. Interesting novelty. Previously Black tried 15...Bf6 16.Rhh1 h4 17.Nd5 Bxd5 18.exd5
Nce5 19.Bxe5 Nxe5 20.Qb4 Qc7 21.c3 Rg8 22.Rhg1 Kf8 23.Kb1 Qd7 24.Qf4 Rg5 25.Nd4 and White
emerged clearly better (Movsesian – Kalod, Olomouc 1997). Black’s king is very vulnerable whereas the
queens are still on the board.
16.f3. Only diligent home preparation can one venture upon a hurricane-like 16.Kb1!? Nxf2 17.Rf1 Ng4
18.Nd5 Bxd5 (18...Qa7 19.Qg5!) 19.Qxd5 (надо смотреть и 19.exd5 Nce5 20.Bxe5 Nxe5 21.Bxh5)
19...Nf6 20.Qf5 Qc7 21.e5!? (it is just my fantasy) 21...dxe5 22.Nc5 and, as my old friend Nikolai Vlassov
likes to say, then somehow… Actually White has a dangerous initiative in this line.
16...Qe3! Insidious reply. Judit managed to repeat Garry’s feat. By trading queens she take out the
opponent’s sting. Black’s king has nothing to worry about.

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17.Bf4. Naturally, Black’s dark-squared bishop should not be left without the opponent: 17.fxg4 Qxg3
18.Rxh5, bearing in mind, that it can immediately leave the board disrupting White’s pawn structure –
18...Bxc3!? 19.bxc3 Rg8 и т.д.
17...Qxd2+ 18.Rxd2 Nge5 Black demonstrates her aggressive intentions. I think from the standpoint of
equalizing sufficient was 18...Bxc3 19.bxc3 Nge5 20.Be3 Ng6 21.Rh1 Nce5. Black pieces occupy the c4-
square.
19.Be3 Bf6 (Black can’t take control over the f4-square: 19...Ng6 20.Rh1 Be5 – 20...h4 21.Nd5 –
21.Nd5!) 20.Rh1 Nc4 21.Bxc4 Bxc4.

22.Na4! Sometimes the c3-knight gets to d5 in a roundabout way with several jumps in the Sicilian
Defense. Check out how skillfully Morozevich carried out this strategic maneuver.
22...b5 (that is the best way to protect the c4-bishop) 23.Nb6 Rb8 24.Kb1 (probably at this point Black
should have urgently activate her knight - 24...Ne5!?) 24...h4 25.f4! I was under impression here that
Sasha had intercepted the initiative and would gradually press his opponent down. The first assumption
was correct, the send proved wrong. 25...Rb7 26.Nc1!? Maybe it is not the best but for sure the most
consistent continuation. White’s task is to drive Black’s light-squared bishop out from the center.
26...Rg8 27.Rh3 (27.b3 Rg3!) 27...Rg4 (that is the flip side of f3-f4) 28.b3 Be6 29.Ne2 (interesting pawn
sacrifice) 29...Rxg2 30.f5. One of the key moment in the game. What to do? This questions sounds so
simple…

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30...Bd7 Apparently Judit did not bother mulling over this simple question. Am I under attack? OK I am
retreating! First, Black had an interesting exchange sacrifice at her disposal, namely – 30...Rxb6 31.Bxb6
Bd7, and then rook goes to g4. Another option is the piece sacrifice – 30...Ne5!? 31.fxe6 fxe6. Black has
two pawns for the prodigal knight. Besides, this knight will end up badly anyway. 31.Nd5 (the knight
reached the peak! ) 31...Ne5 Judit lures Alexander into trading on f6. The d5-knight is too strong! After
31...Be5 32.Rxh4 White is slightly better.
32.Nxf6+ exf6 33.Nc3 Rg3.

34.Rxg3 (in case of 34.Rxh4 Bc6 – 34...Rxe3? 35.Rh8+ Ke7 36.Nd5# – 35.Bd4 Ke7 Black obtains a
very solid position) 34...hxg3 35.Nd5 Bc6! 36.Nxf6+ Ke7 37.Nh5 f6. In the opponent’s time trouble
Polgar missed the line 37...Nf3! 38.Re2 g2 39.Rxg2 Bxe4 with an immediate equalizing. 38.Nxg3 Rb8
39.Rh2 Rg8 40.Rh7+ Nf7 The activity of the black pieces offset White’s extra pawn.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 12 REPORT Page 12 of 15

41.Bf4 Rg4 42.Nh5 Bxe4 43.Bxd6+ Kxd6 44.Rxf7 Rg2 45.Rxf6+ Ke5 46.Re6+ Kxf5 47.Rxa6 Bxc2+
48.Kc1 Be4. My previous words can be applied here.

49.Ra5 Bd3 50.a4 Rc2+ 51.Kd1 Ra2 52.Kc1 Rc2+ 53.Kd1 Ra2 54.Kc1 Rc2+.

Draw.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 12 REPORT Page 13 of 15

We have to give credits not only to the leaders, but to the outsiders of the WC. They keep fighting and
try to change their ill fate. In the following game Rustam and Michael managed to transform a dull
maneuvering position into a bloody battle-field. However, the outcome was the same – neither opponent
scored the victory...

Ruy Lopez C88
Rustam KASIMDZHANOV (UZB) – Michael ADAMS (ENG)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0–0 8.a4 Bb7 9.d3 d6 10.Nbd2
Qd7 11.c3 Rfe8 12.Nf1 h6 13.Ne3.

13...Na5. Black’s knight starts a risky maneuver. Black can equalize with a standard 13...Nd8, for
example: 14.Nf5 Bf8 15.N3h4 Kh8 16.axb5 axb5 17.Rxa8 Bxa8 18.Qf3 Ng8 19.Ne3 Ne6 20.Nhf5 Nc5
21.Bc2 g6 22.Nh4 Bg7 23.Nd5 Rf8 24.Be3 c6 25.Nb4 Na4 26.Bxa4 bxa4 27.d4 Qe7 (Zhang Zhong –
Hebden, Hastings 2002).
14.Bd5! Bxd5 15.exd5 Nb7 (the black knight strives for freedom) 16.d4 e4 17.Nd2 c6 18.dxc6 Qxc6
19.axb5 axb5.

20.d5! (White plays in an aggressive style; he lets the knight out but cuts off e4 pawn from Black’s
troops) 20...Qc7. One can’t calculate all the lines after the pawn capture. The feeling of White’s initiative
being too strong comes immediately, so it’s pretty hard to venture upon such a decision. The following
line seems possible: 20...Nxd5 21.Rxa8 Rxa8 22.Nf5! (inferior is 22.Nxe4 Nxe3 23.Rxe3 Ra1) 22...e3!
23.fxe3! Re8 (or 23...Bf8 24.Qg4 Kh8 25.Nd4 Nf6 26.Qe2 followed by the capture on b5) 24.Qg4 Bg5
25.Ne4 Qc4 26.Nd4! Nf6 27.Nxf6+ Bxf6 28.Qd7, and White is a pawn up.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 12 REPORT Page 14 of 15

21.Rxa8 Rxa8 22.Qe2. Rustam wants to win a flank pawn by all means. Michael readily cooperates.
22.Ng4!, deploying the white pieces for an attack, looks promising.
22...Nc5! 23.Qxb5 Nd3 24.Rd1 Ra5 25.Qc4.

25...Qb7?! This pawn sacrifice did not pay off. It looks like Black should have opted 25...Qxc4 26.Ndxc4
Ra1 27.Bd2 Rxd1+ 28.Nxd1 Nxd5 and accurately played for a draw with equal material.
26.Nxe4 Nxc1 27.Rxc1 Qxb2 28.Rf1?! Both opponents didn’t notice that after 28.Qc8+! Kh7 29.Rf1
Black has no way to simplify the position as 29...Nxe4? is refuted by 30.Qf5+ Kg8 31.Nc4! and Black
loses an exchange.
28...Nxe4 29.Qxe4 Ra7 30.c4 g6. Now Black is just in time to mount defense.

31.g3 Kg7 32.Rb1 Ra1 33.Rxa1 Qxa1+ 34.Kg2 Bf6 35.Qd3 Qb2 36.Nc2 h5 37.h4 Kf8 38.Qe4 Qb1
39.Qe2 Qb2 40.Qd3 Qb1 (White’s main problem is that his knight can’t find a good place) 41.Qf3 Be5
42.Ne3 Bd4. This attempt of breakthrough brings about inevitable drawing exchanges.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 12 REPORT Page 15 of 15

43.g4 hxg4 44.Nxg4 Qc1 45.Qd3 Ba7 46.Ne3 Bxe3! 47.fxe3 Qe1 48.Qd4.

The opponents can’t avoid perpetual. Draw.

Standing after twelfth round: 1. Topalov – 9; 2–3. Svidler and Anand – 7,5; 4. Morozevich – 6; 5–6. Leko
and Kasimdzhanov – 5; 7. Adams – 4,5; 8. Pogar – 3,5.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 13 REPORT Page 1 of 14

By grandmaster
Sergey SHIPOV

Nascence of Supernova!
Human intellect can’t embrace this grandiose space phenomenon. The explosion of an
old star, shedding off old its old shell entails large-scale substance dilation and colossal
energy outburst (about 10 raised to power 46) begetting nebulas, neutron stars and black
holes. Nascence of supernova is such an outstanding phenomenon that it overshadows
whole constellations and galaxies.

Doesn’t it remind you anything? That is Veselin Topalov! Nowadays, when 18-year old guys become
world champions, 30 can be called the veteran age. Veselin has many tournaments behind him with the
results ranging from brilliant to bad. As a chess player Topalov molded many years ago. Never
dissembling his ambitions he fought hard but failed to reach the very top. He just could not make it…
All of the sudden Topalov exploded! Having raised his game to a new level, he astonished chess world
with fantastic energy outburst, brilliant opening, physical and psychological preparation. Let’s recall his
amazing 9.5 out of 10 in Tripoli on the road to the final. This year we saw his tie with Kasparov in Linares
(Veselin beat Garry in the head to head encounter) and outstanding finish in Sofia (the victories over
Anand and Kramnik). Finally, the time came for Vaselin’s triumph at the World Championship.
Chess world got the worthy champion. Now Veselin is in for a tough glory test. I hope Topalov will bear
this heavy load and become a historical figure. He is a natural born fighter. The Bulgarian has a character
of a real champion. Hunger for victories, he strives for the maximum result. Chess needs such a leader.
Don’t you forget the consequences of supernova nascence? I am talking about nebula covering our
future. Further FIDE’s actions and Tolapov’s steps are unclear. What will happen next? The match with
Kramnik or Kasparov, a new cycle involving all chess players? Let’s hope that all these projects
(particularly the third one, which, I am sure, many will vote for) won’t sink into oblivion and vanish in the
haze of anarchy and lack of will.

In 13th round all games were drawn, although the encounter followed different scenarios. Naturally, the
leader’s board was in the limelight.

Ruy Lopez C67
Rustam KASIMDZHANOV (UZB) – Veselin TOPALOV (BUL)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6. The latest games proved reliability of the Berlin system. Let well alone,
there is no need to run risks – I think that is what Topalov thought when choosing the opening.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 13 REPORT Page 2 of 14

4.0–0 Nxe4 5.d4 Nd6 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Nf5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8 9.Nc3 Ne7 10.h3 Ng6.

11.Be3!? It looks like developing the bishop to this square is getting popular. Formerly White mainly
fianchettoed this piece to b2. From this position the bishop covers the e-pawn and does not stay on the
way of White’s rooks. As this game demonstrated the e5-pawn does not need protection. The bishop will
protect another white infantryman on f4. There is no pawn on this square? Don’t worry it will advance
there pretty soon.
11...Be7 12.Rad1+ Ke8 13.a3. Frankly speaking this move looks somewhat strange after Black’s
developing the bishop to e7. On the other hand this move is quite possible as well as the sortie Be7-b4 if
it is not made.

13...h5. This new move is a clear improvement comparing to the game Parligras – Postny (Budapest,
2005) which saw13...Be6 14.Rfe1 h5 15.Nd4 Bd7 16.Bc1 Nf8 17.Ne4 c5 18.Ne2 Bc6 19.Nf4 Ne6 20.Nd5
h4 draw. The position is about equal here.
14.Rfe1 (Black is in no hurry to determine the position of his light-squared bishop) 14...h4 15.Nd4
(White has made an important step toward fulfillment of his plans; the e5-pawn is left under attack)
15...a6. Black is preparing c6-c5. Obviously 15...Nxe5 16.Bf4 f6 17.Bxe5 fxe5 18.Nf3 etc. was too risky
as White has an active play.
16.f4 Rh5. Black opted for the most solid move. Probably after 16...c5 17.Nd5 Bd8 White has some
concrete ideas, but they are no evident. On the other hand Black’s bishop on d8 is not something to brag
about. Dangerous was 16...Bd7 17.f5! Nxe5 18.Bf4 Nc4 19.Bxc7 Kf8 20.b3 Rc8 (20...Nxa3 21.Rxe7 Kxe7
22.Re1+ Kf8 23.Bd6+) 21.Bf4 Nb6.
17.Ne4. Black has many options here.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 13 REPORT Page 3 of 14

17...Bd7 (I can’s see why Black refrained from 17...c5!? followed by b7-b6) 18.c4. White has conceived
an interesting plan to put a clamp on Black’s position. Usually White advances the pawn to c4 only after
its black colleague’s appearance on c5.
18...a5. The following line illustrates White’s important tactical resource: 18...Nf8 19.f5! Bxf5 (19...c5
20.f6!) 20.g4! – White’s pawn takes no heed of en passant rule – 20...hxg3 21.Nxg3 and Black loses
material.
19.c5 a4 (Black has fixed White’s queenside but weakened his a4-pawn.) 20.Rc1! White immediately
jumps on Black’s last move. As soon as White’s rook has reached c4, one of the knights has taken up the
c3-square Black will lose his pawn broken away from the main forces.

20...f5! (a courageous move by the person who is used to defying danger) 21.exf6 (After 21.Nf2 Nf8!
Black has no problems as he transfer one of the pieces to e6 blockading the white pawn) 21...Bxf6!
Precise calculation. In the line 21...gxf6 22.f5 Ne5 (22...Bxf5 23.g4!!) 23.Nxf6+ Bxf6 24.Bf4 Kf7 25.Bxe5
Black does not have sufficient compensation for the pawn. 22.f5. It looks like White has nothing better.
Actually in this particular position it is noticeable that the e3-knight really hampers its own rooks.
22...Ne7 23.Nxf6+ gxf6 24.Bf4 Kf7 25.Bxc7 Nxf5 26.Rc4! Nxd4 27.Rxd4 Be6 28.Bd6. Evidently,
Black has to struggle in the opposite-colored bishop endgame down a pawn. Had Rustam known what he
was in for IN REALITY! I am sure he was looking forward to playing for win for 100 moves running no
risks…

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 13 REPORT Page 4 of 14

28...Ra5 (the rooks has made first step toward its glorious demise) 29.Rde4. I could not figure out
during the game I don’t understand it right now Veselin was going to activate his forces after the
prophylaxis move 29.Re2!
29...Bd5 (Black has created a tangible counterplay as the g2 pawn is really weak) 30.Re7+ Kg6
31.Rxb7 Rb5! 32.Rb6. White’s reluctance to simplify the position is quite understandable. After 32.Rxb5
cxb5 White has problems advancing his passer.
32...Rg5 33.Re2 Rb3 34.Kh2?! Apparently, Rustam underestimated the opponent’s chances. White
should have traded the rooks and transferred his king to h2. Indeed after that White can attack or at least
exchange the h2-pawn. In this case slow pressing is quite possible.
34...Re3 35.Rd2. Topalov demonstrated his subtle positional touch. As the white rook has lingered on
b6 Veselin resolutely capitalize on his temporary advantage a narrow section of the front.

35...Reg3!! This grandiose move drastically changes the turn of the battle. Black intercepts the initiative.
The effect of this move was amplified by Kasimdzhanov’s time trouble.
36.Bxg3 hxg3+ 37.Kh1. White can’t solve his problems with 37.Kg1 Re5 38.Rd1 (38.Kf1? Bc4+)
38...Re2 – the g2-pawn falls.
37...Rf5 (Black’s powerful bishop looks really impressive) 38.Rd1 Rf2. Probably at this point Rustam
realized that the planned 39.Rg1 is met with the pawn lunge to f3 – 39...f5! etc.
39.Rb8! (right decision; only active rooks can help White save the game) 39...f5 40.Rd8 (White has to
eliminate this killer-bishop as soon as possible) 40...Bxg2+ 41.Kg1. By this moment it became clear that
the draw secures Veselin the title. That is why he decided to play for win with a safety margin.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 13 REPORT Page 5 of 14

41...Bd5. The line 41...f4 42.R1d6+ Kf5 43.Rf8+ leads to an immediate draw by perpetual. I think in an
ordinary game free from the pressure and the responsibility for the result Veselin would have played
41...Kg5! (pointed out by Alexey Shirov in our forum) with good practical chances for the victory and
some chances to lose the game. Who knows what may happened in the heat of the battle?
Thus, Black is going to gradually build up the pressure and promote his pawns. The analysis of this
position is very complicated. There are many long variations and sub-lines. Check out what I managed to
dig out forthwith: 42.R1d3! All other continuation are inferior. Now innocuous is 42...f4 43.Rg8+ as Black
can’t advance his king – 43...Kf5 44.Rdxg3! Therefore he should play 42...Kf4!

White faces a serious problem. How should he defend? The active operations with the rooks results in
Black’s surprising victory: 43.Rh8 Rc2 44.Rc3 Rd2! 45.Rh4+ Kg5 46.Rh8 f4 47.Rg8+ Kf5 48.Rf8+ Ke5
49.Rc1 (49.Re8+ Kd4!) 49...Be4 50.Re1 Rg2+ 51.Kf1 Rf2+ 52.Kg1 Kd4 53.Ra8 Rg2+ 54.Kf1 Rh2
55.Rxa4+ Kxc5 56.Rexe4 f3!

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 13 REPORT Page 6 of 14

How do you like this picture? White has no escape. Let’s get back to the key position – 41...Kg5
42.R1d3 Kf4 – it looks like White should trade the rooks – 43.Rd2!? Rxd2 44.Rxd2

There are three sub-lines this time by Black: 44...Bxh3 45.Rd8 Kf3 (the line 45...Kg4 46.Rg8+ Kf3
47.Rh8! does not change much as 45...Bg4 46.Ra8 Ke3 47.Rg8! leads nowhere) 46.Rh8 Bg4 – it is time
for a breakthrough – 47.b3! axb3 48.Rb8 f4 49.Rxb3+ Ke4 50.Rb4+ Ke5 51.a4 Bh3 52.Rb3 Ke4 53.Rb4+
Kf5 54.Rb3 Kg4 55.Rb4

Draw! Lets return to the crossroads one more time: 41...Kg5 42.R1d3 Kf4 43.Rd2 Rxd2 44.Rxd2, and
make the most consistent move 44...Be4 45.Rd8 Ke3 46.Rg8 f4 White has the only salvation 47.Kf1!
(47.h4? f3! 48.Rxg3 Ke2–+) 47...Bd3+ 48.Kg2 Be4+ 49.Kf1

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 13 REPORT Page 7 of 14

49...Bf5 (49...Bd5 50.Rg7) 50.Kg2 – Black can’t make progress.
Let me repeat that these variations are the result of my FIST analytical exploration. Probably further
research will change the verdict.
42.R8xd5! (precise path to the draw) 42...cxd5 43.Rc1 Rxb2 44.c6 Rb8 45.Kg2 f4 46.Kf3 Kg5.

Rustam played 47.h4+ and offered a draw which was accepted.
The opponents could have proceed with 47...Kxh4 48.Kxf4 g2 49.Ke5 Kh3 50.c7 Rc8 51.Kxd5 Kh2
(51...Rxc7? 52.Rxc7 g1Q 53.Rh7+ Kg2 54.Rg7+ Kh2 55.Rxg1 Kxg1 56.Kc5+–) 52.Kd6 g1Q 53.Rxg1
Kxg1 54.Kd7 Rh8 55.c8Q Rxc8 56.Kxc8

56...Kf2 57.Kc7 Ke3 58.Kc6 Kd4 59.Kb5 Kd5 60.Kxa4 Kc6 and the result is obvious.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 13 REPORT Page 8 of 14

Vishy failed to take revenge for his first round defeat. He sacrificed the bishop but the attack was
sufficient only for a draw.

French Defense C11
Vishwanathan ANAND (IND) – Alexander MOROZEVICH (RUS)
1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e5 Nfd7 5.f4 c5 6.Nf3 Nc6 7.Be3 cxd4 8.Nxd4 Bc5 9.Qd2 0–0 10.0–0–0
a6 11.Nb3 Bb4 12.Bd3 b5 13.Rhf1 Nb6. Let me omit the opening subtleties. The French Defense has a
heavy Sicilian accent here. The opposite wing castles dictate the strategies of both opponents. Their
plans are identical – fighting for the center followed by h the attack on the opponent’s king. Needless to
say, that latter is unfeasible without the former.

14.a3!? White has introduced a very creative novelty. Probably Anand wanted to first to surprise his
opponent. Previously White employed a very logical move 14.Qf2. Here is an example: 14...Nc4 15.Bxc4
bxc4 16.Nd4 Ne7 17.g4 (or 17.Nb1 Rb8 18.c3 Bc5 19.Nc2 Bxe3+ 20.Qxe3 Qb6? 21.Qxb6 Rxb6 22.Nd2
– and White gradually obtained a sizable advantage (Rowson,J-Hoang Thanh Trang, Budapest 1996)
17...f6 18.exf6 Rxf6 19.Nde2 Rb8 20.Ne4 Rf8 21.c3 Ba5 22.Qg3 Bb6 23.a3 Qc7 24.Ng5 h6 25.Nh3 Bd7
26.Nd4 Bc5 27.Rf2 Qa5 28.Rdd2 Rb6, and here came a real showtime 29.Kd1 Rb7 30.Ke2 Nc8 31.f5 –
White opened the center with his own hands and were punished for this ill-founded action (Cabrilo –
Bareev, Belgrade 1988).
14...Be7 15.Nd4 (control over the center is of paramount importance...) 15...Qc7 16.Nxc6 Qxc6.

17.Bd4. Here an attacking attempt deserved a closer look – 17.f5!? – it looks like Black end up in an
inferior position as he is tardy with counterplay: 17...b4?! 18.axb4 Bxb4 19.Bxb6! Qxb6 20.f6! White has a

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 13 REPORT Page 9 of 14

crashing attack.
17...Nc4 18.Qe2 Rb8. Black has prepared b5-b4. White can’t delay his active operation anymore!

19.Bxh7+! Kxh7 20.Qh5+ Kg8 21.Rd3. Was it the right rook? It was very hard to consider all the
nuances. In the line 21.Rf3!? f5 22.Rh3 the rook is better placed on d1 than on f1 as actually happened in
the game. In addition, this rook might find something to work on along the d-file.
21...f5 22.Rh3 Bc5. I did not find a winning path for White after 22...b4! 23.Qg6 Rb7!, whereas 23. Rff3
also leads to a draw. The move that Black made in the game is probably is not as good.

Here Vishy did not venture upon the matter-of-principle continuation – 23.Rff3. This move forces a
draw. White could have stayed in the battle with 23.Qg6. The d4-bishop is taboo in view of the regrouping
Rh3-h7 and Qg6-h5. Black proceeds with 23...Rb7 24.Bxc5 (24.Rh7? Qe8!) 24...Qxc5 25.Rh7 and here
he has to make several precise moves to avoid checkmate, namely: 25...Nxe5! (25...b4? 26.Qh5;
25...Qe3+ 26.Kb1 Qa7 27.Ka2!) 26.fxe5 Qe3+ 27.Kb1 Qxe5 28.Qh5 g6 29.Qxg6+ Rg7 30.Rxg7+ Qxg7
31.Qh5

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 13 REPORT Page 10 of 14

It is hard to evaluate this position straight off. Black has a strong center but his king is vulnerable. I think
that this playable position offers a lot of fight. 23...Bxd4 24.Rfg3 Rb7 25.Qh7+ Kf7 26.Qxg7+ Ke8.

27.Qxf8+! The opponent inked the peace treaty facing the inevitable perpetual.

Two great opening experts prepared virtually whole game in their home laboratories. The draw came as
a logical outcome.

Ruy Lopez C89
Judit POLGAR (HUN) – Peter SVIDLER (RUS)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0–0.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 13 REPORT Page 11 of 14

8.c3! d5 9.exd5 Nxd5 10.Nxe5 Nxe5 11.Rxe5 c6 12.d3!? Bd6 13.Re1 Bf5 14.Qf3.

14...Qh4! 15.g3 (15.Qxf5 Qxh2+ 16.Kf1 Qh1+ 17.Ke2 Rae8+ 18.Be3 Nxe3!) 15...Qh3 16.Nd2 Rae8
17.Ne4 Bg4 18.Qg2 Qxg2+ 19.Kxg2 f5. One of the key positions of the system arouse.

20.Bf4. With this interesting novelty White forces the exchanges and transposes into a better endgame.
Note that the pawn is on h2, not h3 as before. What a subtlety!

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 13 REPORT Page 12 of 14

The game Nakamura – Aronian (England, 2005) saw a fighting draw: 20.h3 Bh5 21.Bf4 Bxf4 22.gxf4
fxe4 23.dxe4 Bf3+ 24.Kxf3 Rxf4+ 25.Kg3 Rfxe4 26.Rxe4 Rxe4 27.f3 Re2 28.c4 bxc4 29.Bxc4 Rxb2
30.Bxa6 g5 31.a4 Kg7 32.a5 Nf4 33.Bf1 Kg6 34.h4 Kf5 35.a6 Ke5 – that is the final position.
20...Bxf4 21.gxf4 fxe4 22.dxe4 Bf3+ 23.Kxf3 Rxf4+ 24.Kg3 Rfxe4 25.Rxe4 Rxe4 26.f3.

26...Re5 (somewhere around this point Judit and Peter got out of their preparation and started thinking
seriously) 27.c4 bxc4 28.Bxc4 a5 29.Rc1. Although I prefer White’s position, there is no path to obtain a
real advantage in sight. Summing up, White has some practical chances but hardly more.
29...Kf8 30.Bxd5 (30.Bd3 Rg5+ 31.Kf2 Rh5! 32.Kg1) 30...Rg5+! 31.Kf4 Rxd5 32.Rxc6 Rd2.

33.Ra6 Rxh2 34.Rxa5 Rxb2 35.a4 Kf7 36.Kf5 g6+ 37.Ke5 Re2+ 38.Kf4 h5 39.Ra7+. Draw.

There was no fight in the between two players from the bottom of the standings. There is no point in
analyzing the encounter of two tired unmotivated GMs.

Sicilian Defense B30
Michael ADAMS (ENG) – Peter LEKO (HUN)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 e5 4.Bc4 d6 5.d3 Be7.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 13 REPORT Page 13 of 14

6.Nd2 Nf6 7.Nf1 Bg4 8.f3 Be6 9.Ne3 0–0 10.0–0 Nh5 11.Ned5 Bg5.

12.Bxg5. Novelty. Previously played 12.f4 is so unconvincing that I am not going to refer to the game)
12...Qxg5 13.Qc1 Qd8 14.a4 h6 15.Rf2 Ne7 16.Qd2 Nxd5 17.Nxd5 Nf6 18.Nxf6+ Qxf6 19.b3 b6 20.Raf1
Rad8 21.Qc3 Qg6 22.a5 Rb8 23.f4 exf4 24.Rxf4 Qg5.

25.axb6. Draw.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 13 REPORT Page 14 of 14

Don’t forget that the tournament is not over. The question, who will take the second place is yet to be
resolved. Standings after 13 round: 1. Topalov – 9,5; 2–3. Svidler and Anand – 8; 4. Morozevich – 6,5; 5–
6. Leko and Kasimdzhanov – 5,5; 7. Adams – 5; 8. Polgar – 4.

In the last round the spectators will focus on the encounter Svidler – Anand. The champion will face the
best women-player.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 14 REPORT Page 1 of 15

Сергей ШИПОВ,
гроссмейстер

Last Round: Bulgarian Fiesta

I’m very glad for Topalov’s fans. I’m really glad for Bulgaria! It’s always a pleasure to
witness a grandiose triumph of your compatriot, to read thousands of panegyric
comments from allover the world, to be proud of your country. As far as I know there are
not so many famous sportsmen in Bulgaria. It’s not like in the US or in Russia where fans
are literally spoiled by sport thriumphs of their compatriots. Bulgarians honor Khristo
Stoichkov and the soccer team of 1994, their weight-lifters, the high-jumper Stefka
Kostadinova and… I don’t know anybody else.

But I know for sure that now this small Balkan country can proud itself of a bunch of world chess
champions. Antoaneta Stefanova is a women world champion. Recently Liuben Spassov won the senior
title. Finally Veselin Topalov becomes the real gem of this collection. No doubt that Bulgarian boys and
girls will go in for chess with greater enthusiasm now. They have the example to follow. They know the
way! So if in 5-10-year time we can expect the surge of the Bulgarian waive in chess world.
Before analyzing the games of the last round I want to say a couple of words about every player.
TOPALOV. There is nothing to add. A brilliant and a deserved success! Those, who analyzed Veselin’s
games, would agree that his result could have been even better. So the champion still has some
potential!
ANAND. The Indian GM staged an average performance. He visibly lacked drive, energy, ambitions.
Maybe Vishy got sick of the victories. It’s pretty hard to make himself try hard when the motivation is low.
It’s a usual problem of chess veterans. In San Luis Anand only confirmed his high class, which nobody
questioned anyway. I can also point out his excellent opening preparation.
SVIDLER. Peter keeps progressing. I have a feeling, that many foreign experts underestimated him.
And they were wrong! Unfortunately, Svidler is not invited to super tournament very often. Once again I
can’t see his name in the list of participants of Wijk-aan-Zee 2006. Judge it yourself whether it’s right or
not …
MOROZEVICH. He played in his usual style and always fought till the very end. The spectators were
happy with his play. Alexander’s result is in line with his style.
LEKO. The main disappointment. Everyone expected him to be one of the main contenders. Of course,
a vexing defeat in the first round against a future champion was a had blow. Probably, Peter just wanted
to be the first too much but failed to cope with the pressure…
ADAMS. He didn’t surprise us. Absolutely! Michael is not ready to conquer chess heights. He has talent
(a peculiar talent!), but this is not enough: one should have a trainer, go in for sports, dream about high
goals etc…
KASIMDZHANOV. Despite several defeats, Rustam deserves some good words. The progress in his
game and preparation is obvious. Rustam is short of just a couple years of regular participation in the
super tournaments. He lacks the experience of playing on elite level, the might-have-been match versus
Kasparov. It’s hard to succeed without this background.
POLGAR. A brilliant chess Queen was out of form. Polgar can play better which she previously
demonstrated on many occasions. Her opening preparation also let her down. Anyway Judit is the best!

The etiquette ruled in the main game. The King and the Queen were mutually courteous and obliging.

Queen’s Indian E15
Veselin TOPALOV (BUL) – Judit POLGAR (HUN)
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.g3 Ba6 5.b3 Bb4+ 6.Bd2 Be7 7.Bg2 c6 8.Bc3 d5 9.Nbd2 Nbd7 10.0–0 0–
0 11.Re1 Bb7.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 14 REPORT Page 2 of 15

12.e4 dxe4 13.Ne5 c5 14.Nxe4 Nxe4 15.Bxe4 Bxe4 16.Rxe4 Nxe5 17.dxe5 Qxd1+ 18.Rxd1 Rfd8.

Draw.

The game of the prize-winners wasn’t long either. I believe that Peter wanted to offer a real fight and win
the second place, but in the course of the game he felt run out of steam and didn’t make himself
continue.

Petroff Defense C42
Peter SVIDLER (RUS) – Vishwanatan ANAND (IND)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nf3 Nxe4 5.Nc3 Nxc3 6.dxc3 Be7 7.Be3 Nc6 8.Qd2 0–0 9.0–0–0 Ne5
10.Kb1. A well-known opening position of the Petroff defense with opposite wing castling. Such setup
doesn’t lead to a sharp play automatically. Since the center is wide open it’s difficult to organize an
attack. In such positions everything should be prepared through the center.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 14 REPORT Page 3 of 15

10...Re8. A new move order. Popular 10...a6 has an unpleasant psychological aftertaste – 11.Be2 Be6
12.Nd4 Nc4 13.Qd3 Nxe3 14.Nxe6 fxe6 15.Qxe3 e5 16.Bd3 c6 17.h4 Rf6 18.g3 d5 19.Qxe5 Rxf2
20.Rhf1 Rf6 21.Qh5 g6 22.Qe2 Qd6 23.h5, and White launched a winning attack (Anand – Kramnik,
Monte Carlo, 2005.
The experiment of the leader of French chess have followers so far: 10...Bf6!? 11.Nd4 Nc6 12.h3 Nxd4
13.cxd4 Bf5 14.Bd3 Bxd3 15.Qxd3 Re8 16.Rhe1 Qd7 17.g4 g6 18.g5 Bg7 19.h4 Qg4 20.Rh1 Qe4 21.Qf1
c5 22.dxc5 dxc5 23.Qd3, and a draw was agreed in this equal position (Naiditsch – Bacrot, Dortmund,
2005). 10...Be6 was also played.
11.Nd4 a6. It’s very important to check out 11...c5 here, as sharp actions do not work – 12.Nb5 (12.Ne2
Ng4!; 12.Nf3!?) 12...Be6 13.Nxd6? Bxd6 14.Qxd6 Qa5, and there is no defense against two threats
Qa5xa2 and Ra8-d8. To finish the line of White’s cooperative play I can “recommend” 15.Qxe5? Bxa2+
and capture on e5.
I think Vishy didn’t even look at 11...c5. He wasn’t going to take any risks and probably understood that
Peter wasn’t in the fighting mood too.
12.f4 Ng4 13.Bd3.

13...d5 (here 13...c5 doesn’t work anymore in view of 14.Nf3) 14.Rhe1 Bh4. A subtle maneuver. Vishy
thought that weakening of the white squares on the king side is in his favor. Let’s put it this way, it is non-
obvious decision. On the other hand, he might have been in a hurry to exchange more pieces…
15.g3 Nxe3 16.Rxe3 Rxe3 17.Qxe3 Bf6 18.Nf3 Qe7. I think White is slightly better. He can retreat his
queen to f2 or even to g1 and try to organize a pawn attack on the black king’s fortress. Another fighting
line is 19.Ne5 with Rd1–e1 to follow. After building a strong position in the center, White can advance
pawns on the king side. However, fatigue took its tall.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 14 REPORT Page 4 of 15

19.Qxe7. Draw.

Now you should relax, take a cup of tea and prepare yourself for a real pleasure! Enjoy the last San Luis
show…

Ruy Lopez C77
Alexander MOROZEVICH (RUS) – Michael ADAMS (ENG)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6.

5.d3! Well-done! We don’t want to see these computer lines in Marshall Attack or Zaitsev Variation.
What’s the point in these memory competitions when the spectators gape and the commentators say
after 30 moves: “these moves are well-known” or “a novelty will follow later”? One should make a modest,
but useful move as soon as possible to turn off the theoretical roads as soon as possible. It’s more
interesting even for the commentators. I wish you knew how sick I am from adoring and painting the
same openings and lines over and over again!
5...d6 6.c3 g6 7.0–0 Bg7 8.Re1 0–0 9.Bg5.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 14 REPORT Page 5 of 15

9...b5. Adams pays tribute to his classical chess background. He wants to drive the bishop away from
a4. A hand is involuntarily held out to the b7 pawn... Usually Black doesn’t commit on the queen side and
tries to launch an attack on the opposite wing. For example, 9...h6 10.Bh4 Qe8 (or 10...g5 11.Bg3 Bg4
12.h3 Bh5 13.Nbd2 Nd7 14.Qb1 Nc5 15.Bd1 Bg6 16.b4 Ne6 17.Bb3 Kh7 18.Nf1 Bh5 19.N3h2 Nf4
20.Ne3 a5 21.b5 Ne7 22.a4 Qd7 23.Ra2 Bg6 24.h4 f5 and Black won. (Matulovic – Karaklajic, Skopje
1956) 11.Nbd2 Nd7 12.Bg3 f5 13.exf5 gxf5 14.d4 e4 15.Nh4 Nb6 16.Bb3+ Kh8 17.f3 f4 18.Rxe4 Qh5
19.Bf2 d5 20.Re2 Bf6 21.Qe1 Bd7 22.Bc2 Rg8 – Black has sufficient compensation for the pawn thanks
to the pressure on "g" file and vulnerability of the h4-knight (Iordachescu – Krasenkow (Warsaw, 2005).
10.Bc2 Bb7 11.Nbd2.

11...Nb8! Novelty. Conditioned reflex once again! Michael has used this Breuer maneuver so often that
he just can’t resist the temptation now. And why not? This maneuver is quite logical. In Palac – Rogic,
Pula, 2000 game Black chose another route for the c6-knight: 11...Qd7 12.Nf1 Rfe8 13.Ne3 Nd8!?
14.Nd2 Ne6 15.Bh4 h6 16.a4 c6 17.Nb3 and in this fighting position an unexpected draw was agreed...
By the way, during the long years of a commentator work I noticed that a lot of games, important for the
opening theory, abruptly ends in a draw. When the opponents play creatively, work out new ways on the
final frontiers the chess theory, they got tired pretty soon and feel wary of the surprises from the
opponent. That’s why they seize the opponent’s hand and shake hands as soon as such the first
opportunity to burry the hatchet presents itself. Then they run away and analyze self-made novelties at
home. But let me go back to our game.
12.a4 Nbd7 13.b4 c5. The opponents fight for more space on the queen side. Both were successful!

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 14 REPORT Page 6 of 15

14.Nb3 Qc7 15.Na5. It’s difficult to resist a temptation to make black bishop return to the initial position.
However, both black knights the bishop will find suitable and comfortable squares later.
15...Bc8 16.axb5 axb5 (attention now...) 17.Bb3 Nb6 18.h3. Two last moves are simple, but they
present the essence of Morozevich’s favorite strategy. He provokes an opponent to launch active
operations. He have it his way once again...

18...c4! 19.dxc4 bxc4 20.Bc2 Be6 21.Nd2!? That’s right. If White continues pressure on e5, Black
won’t even consider the possibility of d6-d5 breakthrough! The bait should be tasty and appetizing.
Otherwise an opponent won’t bite!
21...Nfd7.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 14 REPORT Page 7 of 15

22.Nb1! Did you think, that white knight was going to f1 and e3? You were wrong. Simple moves are not
for Alexander. Besides he doesn’t want to be inferior to the opponent in any domain. If Black can return
its pieces to initial positions, why White can’t transfer his knight via b1? By the way, is this a queen-side
knight or a king-side? I didn’t have time to mark them with different crayons before the game and already
forgot who is who...
22...Bf6 23.Be3! (apotheosis of White’s provocative policy; Black just have to attack such White’s
setup!) 23...d5! 24.Na3. Morozevich moves his pieces to untapped, unexplored lands.
24...Rac8 25.Qf3 Bg7 26.Rad1. The tension in the center reaches its peak. No, this is just an illusion.
Then peak is ahead!

26...f5! (strong blow; Black pawns conquer the center) 27.Nb5?! Bad decision. The knight gets into a
mess and perishes on b5. A bishop sacrifice for three pawns will be interesting… only for Adams’s fans –
27.exd5 e4 28.Bxe4 fxe4 29.Qxe4, and Black should not engage into complications – 29...Bxd5 30.Rxd5
Rce8 31.Bxb6 Rxe4 32.Bxc7 Rxe1+ 33.Kh2 Nf6 34.Rd8, and White takes no risks in the endgame. After
simple 29...Bf5 30.Qh4 Bd3 in my opinion Black has the upper hand.
The immediate exchange on f5 looks better – 27.exf5 Bxf5 28.Bxf5 Rxf5 29.Qe2 – may be the knight
from a3 should return to с2 to take control over the central squares. In some lines White plays b4-b5 with
the idea of Na5-c6.
27...Qb8 28.exf5 (28.exd5 e4!) 28...Bxf5 29.Bxf5 Rxf5 30.Qe2. Same blow with similar ideas would
have been delivered after 30.Qg3.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 14 REPORT Page 8 of 15

30...d4!! White sow the wind and to reap the whirlwind. With three drastic blows (d6-d5,f7-f5 и d5-d4)
Black won the battle in the center. Morozevich played the rest of the game in accordance with his plan
and mounted stubborn resistance. He managed to save half a point, but it was a minimum task. A
maximum task wasn’t achieved – White’s position was too bad! Besides, Adams didn’t make serious
mistakes.
31.cxd4 Nd5 (the knight on b5 is under fire!) 32.Nxc4 (other moves are simply bad) 32...Qxb5 33.Nd6
Qxe2 34.Rxe2 Nc3. Black is one step ahead in capturing the pieces. It reminds me the TV-shows “Best
Eaters”. Have you seen one? Big, fat men and women eat sandwiches at full speed, washes down with
beer, and the strict arbiters state the results. The winner usually is… a sickly student in eye-glasses with
a face of an intellectual! He needs these calories to pass his exams...

35.Nxc8! (35.Rc2 Nxd1 36.Nxc8 Nxe3 37.fxe3 Bf8–+) 35...Rf8? This move looks too subtle for such a
“rough” position. Time for subtleties didn’t come yet! Adams should take all pieces he can as soon as
possible. He could put on an intelligent face and eye-glasses later. For example, after 35...Nxe2+ 36.Kf1
Nc3 37.Ne7+ (37.Rd3 Nd5 38.dxe5 Nxe3+ 39.Rxe3) 37...Kf7 38.Nxf5 (38.Rd3) 38...Nxd1 39.Nxg7 Nxe3+
40.fxe3

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 14 REPORT Page 9 of 15

Here Black can suddenly change its appearance: to wipe off a ferocious grin from his face and ignore
the knight on g7 for a while. Because capture on g7 will be a mistake! It leads only to a draw. Smart
40...e4!, retaining the important e-pawn, is much stronger. Knight has no chance to run away. Black has
a winning position. However, White’s play in this line wasn’t perfect. After the correct 37.Rd3! there is no
straight win for Black. One way or another, it was better than 35…Rf8.
36.dxe5. Probably, these moves were made in the time-trouble. Both opponents’ play is far from
perfect. Definitely stronger was 36.Ne7+ Kf7 37.Red2! Nxd1 (37...Kxe7 38.Re1! is dangerous only for
Black) 38.Nxg6! hxg6 39.Rxd1 – and White doesn’t take any risk of defeat in the endgame.
36...Nxd1 37.Ne7+ Kf7 38.Nc6 Nxe5 39.Nxe5+ Bxe5. However, this position is probably drawish too.
Black hasn’t enough pawns to convert his extra piece. One shouldn’t also forget that h1 square is white –
that’s important as Black has dark-squared bishop.

40.Bc5 Re8 41.Kf1 Nb2 42.f4! Bc3 (rook exchange starts a series of exchanges) 43.Rxe8 Kxe8
44.Ke2 Kd7 45.Ke3 Na4 46.Ke4 Nxc5+ 47.bxc5 Kc6.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 14 REPORT Page 10 of 15

48.h4 (48.f5 is met with 48...g5! but the best decision lay in 48.g4 Kxc5 49.g5! and f4-f5 – further
exchanges and a draw are inevitable; after 48.h4 there was one more intriguing moment) 48...Kxc5. After
48...Be1! White should be accurate – 49.h5! gxh5 50.g3! Kxc5 (50...Bxg3 51.Kf3 h4 52.Kg2=) 51.Kf5 Kd4
(51...Bxg3 52.Ke4 h4 53.Kf3=) 52.Kg5 Bxg3 53.f5 (but not 53.Kxh5? Bxf4 54.Kg4 Ke4 55.Kh3 Kf3–+)
53...h4 (53...Ke5 54.Kxh5 Kxf5 55.Kh6=) 54.Kg4 Ke3 55.f6 Kf2 56.f7 Bd6 57.Kxh4 Kg2 58.Kg4

Black doesn’t let the white king in a saving corner. But white pawn on f7 doesn’t let him to advance his
own passer. Draw!
49.f5 Kd6 (both grandmasters play till the board empties up) 50.fxg6 hxg6 51.h5! gxh5 52.g4! hxg4.
After 52...h4 the color of h1 square secures a draw for White. White plays 53.Kf3, moves his king to h1
and stands there right up to stalemate.
53.Kf4 g3 54.Kxg3. Draw.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 14 REPORT Page 11 of 15

That was an interesting game from both chess and psychological standpoints!

The following game was the one-way traffic.

Sicilian Defense B42
Peter LEKO (HUN) – Rustam KASIMDZHANOV (UZB)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 a6 5.Bd3 Bc5 6.Nb3 Ba7 7.Qe2 Nc6 8.Be3 d6 9.f4.

9...Qc7. A subtle, non-obvious move. Black dodges postponing the development of the g8-knight.
Depending on the situation it can be placed both on e7 and f6. In the game Karjakin – Rublevsky (Mainz
2004) the Russian GM skillfully arranged his pieces in the hedgehog formation: 9...Nf6 10.Bxa7 Rxa7
11.c4 0–0 12.Nc3 b6 13.0–0 Nd7 14.Rad1 Nc5 15.Bb1 Rd7 16.Nd2, which bit White really hard – 16...b5!
17.cxb5 axb5 18.Qe3 b4 19.Ne2 Ba6 20.Rfe1 Qb6 21.Nf3 Rc8 22.b3 Na7 23.Ned4 Nb5 24.Nxb5 Bxb5
25.Kh1 Bc6 26.f5 exf5 27.exf5 f6 28.Nd4 Bd5 29.Qg3 Qb7 30.Re3 Ne4 31.Qh4 Re7 32.Rde1 Rce8
33.Bxe4 Bxe4 34.Kg1 d5 – Black is clearly better. He won several moves down the road.
10.0–0 Nf6 11.Bxa7 Rxa7 12.Nc3 (Peter follows the traditional Sicilian Defense standards; he always
leaves the c-pawn on c2) 12...b5?! It looks like the first inaccuracy.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 14 REPORT Page 12 of 15

13.a4! This logical novelty is very strong. Black’s premature activity on the queenside is punishable. The
following game can be treated only like a joke – 13.Qe3 b4 14.Ne2 Ra8 15.Kh1 Bb7 16.Rae1 a5 17.Ned4
Nxd4 18.Nxd4 Qb6 19.Bb5+ Kf8 20.Nxe6+! (Nevanlinna – Lahti, Jyvaskyla,1997). These Finnish guys
are such jesters! Another game between two Portuguese fellows (Padeiro – Galego, Portugal, 2002) was
very entertaining The first one had more than 300 point rating advantage. Galego tried to complicate the
game so hard that literally beat himself – 13.a3 h5 14.Rae1 Qb6+ 15.Kh1 h4 16.Nd1 Nh5 17.Ne3 e5
(what if White get lured by the lunge on d5!) 18.f5 Qd8 19.Qg4 Kf8 20.Rf3 Nf6 21.Qh3 d5 (let's have
some fun!) 22.Nxd5 Nxd5 23.exd5 Nd4 24.Nxd4 exd4 25.Rf4 Re7 26.Rfe4 Rxe4 27.Bxe4 Rh5? 28.g4!
Rh6 29.Qd3 Qf6 30.Rd1 White coolly snatched another pawn and won pretty soon.
13...b4 (after pawns exchange Black goes weapon on a6) 14.Nd1 a5 (on 14...0–0 White can play
15.a5!?) 15.Ne3 0–0. White is better on both wings, let alone the center!

16.Kh1 Bb7 17.Ng4! (trading White’s best piece) 17...Nxg4 18.Qxg4 Raa8 19.Rae1 Qe7 (Black has no
counterplay; the forecast is not particularly favorable for him) 20.Re3. White are building up pressure with
standard maneuvers.
20...g6 21.Qg3 Rfe8. All spectators thought that Peter was going to launch a direct attack. However, he
decided to extend attacking front to the maximum. Ironically it triggered the mating attack. That was a
play in the spirit of great Alekhine!

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 14 REPORT Page 13 of 15

22.Bb5! Rac8? (22...Red8!?) 23.c3! Red8 (it is high time now) 24.f5! (Black can transfer his knight to
e5 because in this case he loses his a5-pawn) 24...bxc3 25.bxc3 Ra8. The maneuvers of Black’s rooks
illustrate his severe problems.

26.f6! (this pawn became a real thorn in Black’s camp; Rustam failed to take it out in this game)
26...Qf8 27.Qf4 h6 28.Rh3.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 14 REPORT Page 14 of 15

28...g5. Forced temerity. After 28...Kh7 29.Qg5! White's attack decides. For example 29...e5 30.Rh4
Na7 31.Rf3 Bc8 32.Bc4 Rb8 33.Bxf7! and so on.
29.Qe3 Ne5 30.Rh5! (White's pieces are gradually infiltrating Black's fortress through the breaches)
30...Ng6 31.Qh3.

31...Bxe4 (inferior was 31...Kh7 32.Nd2 Nf4 in view of 33.Rxf4 gxf4 34.Rg5!+-; let alone 31...Nf4?
32.Rxf4 gxf4 33.Rxh6) 32.Nd2 Bc2 (32...Bb7 33.Rxh6 Rac8 34.Bd3+–) 33.Rxh6 Rac8 34.Rh5 Rc5
35.Rc1? White could have taken his time – 35.c4!
35...g4 36.Qxg4 Bf5? (only 36...Rxc3! offered some practical chances) 37.Qg3 d5 38.Nb3 Rcc8
39.Nd4 Be4. It is time slaughter the prey.

40.Nc6 (more merciful to opponent was 40.Qg5! with the idea of Rh5-h3 and Qg5-h5-h7 with
checkmate; 40...Rc7) 40...Rxc6 41.Bxc6 Qd6 42.Qg5 Qf4 43.Qxf4 Nxf4 44.Rg5+ Kh7 45.Bb5 Kh6
46.h4. White is ready to attack on the kingside and in the center with c3-c4. Black ventures upon
desperado sacrifice.

Kid Chaos :)
WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2005 - ROUND 14 REPORT Page 15 of 15

46...Nxg2 47.Rxg2 Rg8 48.Rcc2. Black resigns.

Final Standings: 1. Topalov – 10 (a nice, round number; Bull’s eye!); 2–3. Anand and Svidler – 8,5; 4.
Morozevich – 7; 5. Leko – 6,5; 6–7. Adams and Kasimdzhanov – 5,5; 8. Polgar – 4,5.

I want to thank all who read my reviews. See you later!

Kid Chaos :)