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Since the invention of luminescent polymers, considerable effort has been made to produce
viable flexible displays using the polymers in thin films. The luminescent properties of these
films depend on the processing conditions of the polymers, and it has been established that the
conformation of the luminescent polymer is directly related to its light emitting properties. This
project studies the properties of MEH-PPV, a common luminescent polymer, by molecule
orientation and single molecule spectroscopy, in order to gain a better understanding of how an
ideal light emitting film can be produced.

This research will assist Australian industries to further advance these processes and devices
leading to better quality, cheaper and more efficient products. The Australian community will
benefit through economic and technological advances. These advanced materials will promote
health and environmental wellbeing.
[1] E.K. Hill, K.L. Chan, A.B. Holmes and D.E Dunstan, ´Rheofluorescence studies of poly(p-
phenylenevinylene) derivatives in simple shear flowµ,Synthetic Metals, Elsevier,  , pp. 213-
216, 2005.
[2] D.E. Dunstan and Y. Wei, ´Compressive Elasticity in Polymer Couette Flow European
Physical Journal Applied Physics, , pp. 93-95, 2007.

St Andrews and Heriot-Watt Physics departments have long been known for their pioneering work in
lasers and optoelectronics. The academic staff teaching on the MSc course are the same people who
lead and work in the research teams at the two sites. We list a few highlights of relevant St Andrews
research here, but more details on research at St Andrews and at Heriot-Watt can be found from the
two links in this sentence. A summary of the Heriot-Watt activities
is also given below.

St Andrews staff lead the 12 million pound collaborative project


"Ultrafast Photonics Collaboration". This involves includes
university research groups at Imperial College, Bristol, Glasgow,
Sheffield and Heriot-Watt universities and eight major industrial
partners (Agilent (formerly Hewlett-Packard), Marconi, Nortel
Networks, JDS-Uniphase, Kymata, Sharp and Vitesse).

One of the research students in the ultrashort pulse group at St


Andrews is shown adusting the pump beam into a KLM
modelockedTi:sapphire laser.

Prof Wilson Sibbett, FRS, invented a new form of modelocking,


which is now widely used in commercial ultrashort pulse lasers. His
group's work in the generation and measurement of ultrashort
pulses has been recognised in various ways, including him being
invited to give plenary and invited papers at European and Global
conferences, the award of the Rank Prize in Optoelectronics, and
a Fellowship of the Royal Society. A new type of device for
measuring ultrashort pulses of light has recently won an
international award. Dr Derryck Reid (now at Heriot-Watt
University) and Prof Wilson Sibbett are shown with a new type of
"autocorrelator" that is much more compact and able to be used
with a wider range of wavelengths than existing designs.

Prof Malcolm Dunn's group has produced tunable coherent light from Optical Parametric Oscillators
from the blue to the mid-infra-red. The St Andrews in this area spans femtosecond, picosecond,
nanosecond, and continuous wave regimes. One of these systems has been engineered for use in
the Photonics Teaching Laboratory.

A "Photonics Innovation Centre" has been set up at St Andrews,


and further strengthens the links between the applicable photonics
research in the School and end-users in industry and elsewhere.
The picture alongside shows an infra-red OPO being developed for
one particular "customer".

Dr Bruce Sinclair's group invented award-winning greenmicrochip


lasers. Recently, in tandem with basic physics investigations,
ultraminiature lasers for remote sensing have been developed, as
featured in the EPSRC Impact magazine.

Prof Ulf Leonhardt joined the School in St Andrews the first part of
2000. His work in theoretical quantum optics recently predicted the
existence of the optical analogue of "black holes". This exciting
discovery hit the international popular press.

New colleagues who arrived in autumn 2003 have starting major


work in quantum computing. Dr Natalia Korolkova works on theory
in this area, while Dr DrFrieder Koenig test some of these and other
ideas experimentally. Quantum Optics and Quantum Information Research.

Lasers can be used to slow down and trap atoms. Prof KishanDholakia's work takes this a stage
further, using a laser beam with a zero intensity on axis to guide cold atomsfrom one place to
another. The arrow alongside points to a clump of cold rubidium atoms in a vacuum cell.
Dr Donatella Cassettari has recently joined the School and is setting up experiments in Bose Einstein
Condensation and related topics.

Prof Alan Miller's team explores the fundamental science of


electrons in low-dimensional semiconductor structures, and how
these interact with light. This work is in collaboration with a wide
range of academic and industrial laboratories, as such studies may
impact on the current and future generations of semiconductor
lasers, detectors, and all-optical
switches.

Prof Ifor Samuel and Dr Graham Turnbull's teams work on the science of light emitting
polymers under both electrical and photo-excitation. These have great potential for use in displays, in
some parts of telecommunications, and also in more general lighting applications.

Photonic crystals have repetitive perturbations engineered into them on the scale of a wavlength of
light. These devices can then be used in guiding and multiplexing applications, amongst others.
Professor Krauss has recently had a new cleanroom built in the School to allow him to manufacture
and investigate these intriguing structures.

Medical and biological applications of lasers and other light sources are being addressed by Profs
Wilson Sibbett and KishanDholakia in collaboration with Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, biologists in St
Andrews and Dundee, and Prof Miles Padgett in the physics department at Glasgow University.
Recent work from St Andrews has produced systems for detecting cancer of the digestive system,
and cancers on the skin. St Andrews biophotonics collaboration.