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TITLE OF THE RESEARCH

Motivation-Morale-Recognition-Rewards

THE IMPACT OF REWARDS AND RECOGNITION ON MOTIVATION AND


MORALE

SUPERTECH LTD.

(REAL ESTATE)

RATIONALE OF THE PROPOSED


INVESTIGATION

To analyze the relationship between motivation and recognition. And to


analyze the impact of recognition and rewards on employee’s motivation
and morale. The organizations which have a health reward system , the
motivation level of the employees is high which results in high level of
productivity.

LITERATURE REVIEW

Patricia Milne ( 2007)


Source: Journal of Knowledge Management Volume: 11 Issue: 6
The purpose of this paper, drawing as it does on earlier research,
is to provide the context for a discussion on the use of rewards and
recognition programmes in knowledge aware organisations.
The purpose of this paper, drawing as it does on earlier research,
is to provide the context for a discussion on the use of rewards and
recognition programmes in knowledge aware organisations.

Alan D. Smith, William T. Rupp


Source: Journal of Knowledge Management Volume: 7 Issue: 1 2003

Historically, performance appraisals were intended to focus on three


areas: development, motivation, and recognition of achievement. One
major purpose of performance appraisals is to determine individual
merit, especially where pay for performance systems are employed.
Based upon expectancy theory, high performance ratings should entail
high merit increases while low performance ratings result in low merit
increases. However, it appears that decoupling performance ratings and
merit increases is common practice. This paper explores the effects of
receiving a low performance rating and high merit increase or a high
performance rating and a low merit increase and empirically investigate
its impact on knowledge workers’ motivational and general morale.
M.T. Hides, Z. Irani, I. Polychronakis, J.M. Sharp
Source: International
Journal
of
Quality
Management Volume: 17 Issue: 4/5 2000

&

Reliability

Examines the impact of introducing TQM on a project-by-project


basis. A framework, suggested by Taylor and Meegan (Taylor, A. and
Meegan, S., “Factors influencing a successful transition from ISO 9000
to TQM. The influence of understanding and motivation”, International
Journal of Quality and Reliability Management, 1997, Vol. 14 No. 2, pp.
100-17) discusses the role of senior executives in the transition from ISO
9000 to TQM. This framework is then used as a means for examining
project management and TQM (particularly the emphasis on continuous
improvement) literature. The critical review of the literature addresses
senior management commitment, development needs of senior directors,
company-wide employee involvement, reward recognition, orientation
towards strategic management and core competencies and organisational
capability. The theory underlying the transition from ISO 9000 to TQM
is then empirically tested within a case study.

Guvenc G. Alpander

Source: Journal of Management Development Volume: 10 Issue: 3 1991

One MNC's attempts to develop empowerment strategies are reviewed.


These strategies are based on a cross-cultural study of employee
needs in the company's Australian, German and Japanese subsidiaries.
Although the need to control stands out in each of the three countries,
employee needs patterns are different. The needs for economic security,
belongingness, recognition, self-worth, and control relate with each in
different configurations and patterns. Because of significant differences
in employee needs patterns, empowerment strategies enabling
employees to fulfil their need to control cannot be transferred from one
culture to another without major adjustments. In some instances very
little is needed to empower an employee while in others almost nothing
works. Some light is shed on why, within an MNC, a similar amount
of control over their work and work environments empowers Japanese
workers much more than their Australian and German counterparts.

: Gordon C. Bruner II, Richard J. Pomazal


Source: Journal of Services Marketing Volume: 2 Issue: 3 1988

Since 1910, when John Dewey first introduced the five-stage decision
process, it has been a widely accepted concept and still serves as the
central pillar of a popular consumer behavior model. These stages are
Problem Recognition, Information Search, Alternative Evaluation,
Choice, and Outcomes. The importance of these stages is attested to
by the considerable attention devoted to most of them in numerous
textbooks and journal articles. Such attention, however, has not
come to the Problem Recognition stage. While some texts provide
hypothetical descriptions of this “trigger” of the decision process,
theoretical discussion and empirical support are surprisingly lacking.
Journal literature fares even worse, with articles on the topic almost non-
existent. Lack of information on the topic is even more ironic when one
considers that a purchase cannot occur unless a problem is recognized!
The purpose of this article is to provide a detailed explanation of the
Problem Recognition process. The results of the few empirical studies
that have been done will be examined. In addition, a proposed model of
the Problem Recognition process is presented. The implications of this
material will be discussed as it relates to marketing.

OBJECTIVES

1. To study the reward n recognition in an organization.


2. To check the level of motivation.
3. To analyze the reward and motivation relationship.
4. To measure the impact of recognition on motivation.

Hypothesis

H0- there will be a significant relationship between reward and motivation.

H1- there will no relationship between reward and motivation.

METHODS AND PROCEDURES

Sample Size: 100 respondents

SAMPLING:

Convenience sampling

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Statistical Tool :

Regression

TENTATIVE CHAPTER WISE DETAILS OF


PROPOSED RESEARCH

Chapter 1- Introduction

Chapter 2- Literature review

Chapter 3- Objectives

Chapter 4 – research methodology

Chapter 5 – Data analysis

Chapter 6 – Findings and results

Chapter 7 – Suggestions

Chapter 8 – References

REFERENCES

by Harvard Business Scho...

by James Rollo

by Robert Bacal

by Irwin L. Goldstein

by Dean R. Spitzer

by Gary Cokins

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/search.htm?
st1=the%20impact%20of%20recognition%20on%20motivation&c
t=jnl&nolog=519251&page=3
http://www.google.co.in/
#hl=en&biw=1280&bih=699&q=impact+of+recognition+on+moti
vation&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=&fp=883a2479982dd322
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motivation
http://humanresources.about.com/od/motivationrewardretention/
Employee_Motivation_Recognition_Rewards_Retention.htm
http://www.1000ventures.com/business_guide/crosscuttings/
motivating_reward_system.html.