S E R V I N G T H E L I B E R T Y, S T A L E Y, J U L I A N , C L I M A X A N D S N O W C A M P A R E A

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The Liberty Leader
Free Community Paper By The Community And For The Community
Free Monthly Newspaper January 2011 Volume 7 * Issue 1
Liberty Gets New Business
    Governor Beverly Perdue announced today
that Americhem Inc. will locate a major new
manufacturing operation at Liberty Business
Park in Liberty, North Carolina.  The company
will acquire three manufacturing facilities total-
ing 183,000 square feet and create a campus site
for multiple manufacturing facilities in Randolph
County to enable it to grow its North American
operation.  Americhem will create 71 new jobs
and invest $22,600,000 in the Liberty operation.   
Americhem is a private company headquartered
in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio and founded in 1943. 
Americhem is a global company specializing in
custom color and additive master batch
solutions.  They supply plastic colorants to sec-
tors that include packaging and containers, syn-
thetic fibers, building products, automotive and
transportation, engineering resins, and film and
sheet.  The company operates six manufacturing
operations worldwide including a plant in Con-
cord, North Carolina.  Growing demand for their
product and service has generated the need for
additional production capacity.   Over the last
year, the company conducted a multi-state area
search to establish a new manufacturing
operation.  They looked at sites from Ohio to
Alabama along major north/south interstate
corridors.  They identified several sites that offer
rail access, a skilled labor pool and proximity to
their customers.  They also considered expansion
of an existing operation in Georgia.  The Liberty
buildings and site met all of the key criteria listed
above and offered expansion capabilities for fu-
ture growth.   Access to a skilled manufacturing
workforce, customized training support from
Randolph Community College, and the business
friendly attitude of state and local government
officials were all important factors in Liberty’s
favor as the company narrowed their options.  
The project is made possible by incentive grants
totaling $515,000 from the Town of Liberty and
Randolph County and a $225,000 One NC Fund
grant from the State of North Carolina.  Incentive
grants will be paid over eight years as the com-
pany creates and retains jobs and meets invest-
ment targets.  The jobs will pay an average wage
of $35,437 per year, over $6,200 more than the
average wage for Randolph County. “This is
fabulous news for Liberty and Randolph
County,” said Liberty Mayor Jim Parker. 
“Americhem will bring new
life to Liberty Business Park
and needed jobs and in-
vestment to our
community.”  The company
will purchase two buildings vacated by Times
Fiber Communications when it ceased operation
in February 2009.  They will also purchase an
unfinished shell building and complete it to their
specifications.  In 1998, the Town of Liberty and
Randolph County partnered with the Randolph
County Economic Development Corporation to
extend infrastructure and create a new rail
served industrial park.  Randolph County Com-
mission Chairman Harold Holmes welcomed the
good news.  “This is great news for our county. 
We are so pleased to see quality job growth in
rural Eastern Randolph County.  That area has
been hard hit by job loss over the last five
years.”    Randolph County Economic Develop-
ment President Bonnie Renfro thanked all of
partners that worked hard to make the project a
reality.  She singled out the NC Department of
Commerce and Secretary Keith Crisco along with
Randolph Community College, Progress Energy,
and especially the Town of Liberty and Randolph
County.  “Liberty has always been very proactive
in economic development.  They have consis-
tently invested in all of the fundamentals for
economic growth.  Our town and county have
worked together to make this a reality.” 
Americhem expects hiring to begin in the sum-
mer of 2011.
Santa Hits Hurricane Jane’s
Well, the holiday feel was in the air at Hurricane Jane’s
on Thursday Dec 23. Jan and Ron wanted to give back
to the community that has given them so much this
past year. The held a special night for all. From the din-
ing area, you could kick back with friends and family
and enjoy a great meal while listening to the talented
local, Keith Bartell, as he filled the air with wonderful
Christmas favorites.  The staff was all decked out in
their matching Tie Dyed outfits and full of smiles and
cheer. In the other half of the establishment, that is al-
lowed to be used by the community from dance classes,
to painting classes and home for Sunday Night Teen
Gathering by Freedom Family Church for the entire
community was the place do be if you where a kid. As
you walked in the room, the wall was lined with 150
treat back, that would go home to all the children. Filled
with fruits and candies, these bags hit a home run. The
big screen was up and I (Liberty Leader) was lucky
enough to be allowed to sponsor the movies for all the
children to enjoy. From Charlie Brown to Frosty the
Snowman was the features of the night. Prior to the
movie it was overwhelming to hear all the commotions
as these kids funneled in the room. But just like magic,
when the movie started, the kids all fell into place on
the floor and you could have heard a pin drop, as they
eagerly looked at the shows. Hurricane Jane’s provided
free hotdogs and drinks to all the children. They had a
special guest that brought in a real manager with hay. I
was amazed at how the kids could not stop touching
the hay, it was like a new found item. The speaker went
on  to give the true meaning of CHRISTmas. Wait, what
is that I see.... in walked Santa...so much for the peace
and order. The kids jumped to attention and fell in line.
Each child got an opportunity to set with Santa and
give him his wishes. Each child got to pick a free boy or
girl toy to take with them. I love seeing how a commu-
nity pulls together and shows their love for each other.
Well with most hurricanes there is mass destruction,
but with Liberty's very own Hurricane, nothing but
goodness and smiles was left by this Hurricanes effect.
Pictures on page 2
Gwen Taylor - Owner / Preparer
728 S Greensboro St, Liberty
(Former Video Villa Location)
Happy moments, PRAISE GOD.
Difficult moments, SEEK GOD.
Quiet moments, WORSHIP GOD.
Painful moments, TRUST GOD.
2
Back To The Town With Our
Famous Old Style
Bring This Ad
Coupon
Receive 10%
We Deliver
Check out Our Great $ 3.99 Lunch Special
And Other Lunch Special Call For Details
Sanitation
Score 100
Tons Of Bags
Great Movies, Stories and Gifts Thanks !!
Free Hotdogs
Great Music
Big Smiles
Photos From Christmas At Hurricane Jane’s
Now Open Saturday Night’s 5 to 9
Come Visit
Us For All
The Great
Live Music
Drop In
For The
Schedules
A Message From Liberty Mayor....
Dear neighbors, On behalf of the Liberty Town Council, I would
like to let you know about a few good things that have happened
in Liberty during 2010. At the corner of Old  Hwy 421 (Greensboro
St) and W Swannanoa Ave (Downtown), the vacant lot has been
beautified by a gazebo, flowers , trees and tables. Thanks goes out
to Mr Ron Moore for letting the town use his property. Also pots
with trees have been put along the side walk on main street of Lib-
erty to help beautify our town more.  The town has been blessed
by several new business downtown. Another big thing is the in-
dustry, Americhem, that is coming to Liberty and will be bringing
71 new jobs.  I do hope this is the beginning of good things hap-
pening in Liberty.  If there are any suggestions that anyone can
help with, please let us know. Welcome to Liberty, where progress
is unlimited.  Sincerely, Jim Parker, Mayor.
Notice to Public
The Town of Liberty will be doing a Water Leak Detection Study
and Water and Sewer System Mapping over the next four months.
The Town has contracted with the engineering firm of Alley, Wil-
liams, Carmen & King, Inc to provide these services. Representa-
tives from the firm will be checking the entire water system for
possible leaks. The leak detection study will be done during low
water usage times and representatives may be on site during early
morning hours. Surveyors will also be locating water valves, fire
hydrants, and sewer manholes of our entire water and sewer sys-
tem. If anyone has any questions concerning this notice, please
contact the Town Manager at 336-622-4276.
T H E L I B E R T Y L E A D E R
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January 2011 Nurse’s Notes
Reminder:
Office hours are Tuesday from 9:30 to 12:30. If you need to reach
me at other times you can leave a message in my voice mail box
at the 622-4682 and I will check messages daily. The best
time to be able to go straight into my voice mail will be after
1:00 Monday through Wednesday and after 2:00 on Thursday. If
you are unable to meet with me on Tuesday please call me and
set up an appointment. Also just to remind everyone if the
school’s and/or the senior center is closed due to inclement
weather then my office is also closed. If the weather is that bad
then no one needs to be out taking a chance on getting hurt.
I would like to thank everyone who has helped support this
ministry, by their donations. We are trying to keep this ministry
alive well into the future to help everyone and all age groups.
God Bless and Happy New Year.
Lori Ann Cobb RN, FCN
 
 
 Flu? Or Cold?
Your child is sent home from school with a sore throat, cough,
and high fever — could it be the flu that's been going around?
Or just a common cold?
Although the flu (or influenza) usually causes symptoms that
make someone feel worse than symptoms associated with a
common cold, it's not always easy to tell the difference between
the two.
Symptoms
Guide
The answers to these questions can help determine whether a
child is fighting the flu or combating a cold:
Flu vs. Colds: A Guide to Symptoms
If most of your answers fell into the first category, chances are
that your child has the flu. If your answers were usually in the
second category, it's most likely a cold.
But don't be too quick to brush off your child's illness as just
another cold. The important thing to remember is that flu symp-
toms can vary from child to child (and they can change as the
illness progresses), so if you suspect the flu, call the doctor. Even
doctors often need a test to tell them for sure if a person has the
flu or not since the symptoms can be so similar!
Some bacterial diseases, like strep throat or pneumonia, also can
look like the flu or a cold. It's important to get medical attention
immediately if your child seems to be getting worse, is having
any trouble breathing, has a high fever, has a bad headache, has
a sore throat, or seems confused.
While even healthy kids can have complications of the flu, kids
with certain medical conditions are at more of a risk. If you
think your child might have the flu, contact your doctor.
Treatment
Some kids with chronic medical conditions may become sicker
with the flu and need to be hospitalized, and flu in an infant
also can be dangerous. For severely ill kids or those with other
special circumstances, doctors may prescribe an antiviral medi-
cine that can ease flu symptoms, but only if it's given within 48
hours of the onset of the flu.
Most of the time, you can care for your child by offering plenty
of fluids, rest, and extra comfort.
And if the doctor says it's not the flu? Ask whether your child
should get a flu shot.
 
Now serving meats and vegetables, Weds thru Sat!
Salad bar Mon thru Sat!
New Winter Hours Mon thru Thurs 7am-8pm,
Friday 7am-9pm, Saturday 8am-3pm Closed Sunday
Thank You For All Your Support
March 5
KIDD’s
Drive-In
171 S Greensboro St - Liberty, NC
Ph 622-4338
(A Liberty Tradition)
Breakfast - Lunch - Dinner
All Your Life Time Favorites
Plus New Additions:
Chef Salads Everyday
Homemade Vegetable Soup on
Tuesday and Thursdays
See you there!!!!
T H E L I B E R T Y L E A D E R
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Found Memories A Great Liberty Man
Never have done a story like this one, but after all the conversa-
tions I have heard over the past week, I felt lead to put it down in
writing. James Lee Humble made an impact more on the com-
munity than I think he would have ever comprehended. I re-
member growing up and calling him Egg Man, for he was the
one that brought fresh eggs to my grandmothers. He later became
a friend as I got to know him in so many different avenues. The
joy he use to give and receive while he filled in for Santa at the
annual Christmas Tree Lighting in his very one red suit. Right by
his side was his love of live, Ms Becky. I think she enjoyed the
event just as much as he did. He did this part for several in the
area, from the Lions Club to the Rotary Christmas Parties.  I got
to know he more when it was time for the historical fire truck to
be restored, but that opened more doors as he wheeled that prize
jewel of his eye and the community fire engine the Chamber Car
Show.  Let's not forget the times he was smiling as you pulled up
to give money at the Lions Club Cane Drive in town. Then it
comes to the town council. I had several conversations with him
on my thoughts and concerns over the town. From that light I
had three items that shined out to me that I remember.  The first is that he was not quick with a
response. Now I do not know where his thinking spot was, but it must have been wore down,
because he would put careful thought in to his decisions. Once it was made he stood strong on
it and for that we should be glad. The second point was the fact of our civic duty. James said if
everyone did their part it would be less on those that do their part in the community. That has
been my driving force for being so active in community. The third point James brought out to
me to remember was that everyone thinks they are right in their thoughts on an issue and to
never tell anyone they were wrong. You see a coin has two sides. One is heads and ones is tails.
Each side looks different , but it is still the same coin. I try to not react so fast to see my point,
for the other may have a few I do not see. Heck, their has been time me and friend both are in
disagreement but we are both still correct. Thanks you for these life lessons James.  If you did
not get to attend the funeral service, you missed three great talks about James life. They were
done by his pastor, Rev Marion Smith, Town Manager Roger Davis and Past Mayor John Stan-
ley. Each gave points of how he stood strong on several decisions that helped Liberty in the
long run.  He truly deeply loved his Church and his Town. I got to know James more by being
lucky enough to attend several cookouts under some big oak trees. He pulled up his yard chair
and enjoyed family and friends to the full extend. Now one secret I never could figure out is
how he could take a nap so fast and in just about any location. Hey, may that is where he did
his great thinking.  Well I was blessed greatly to be able to help the family out during the week
of his celebration of life. That is where I was amazed at all the stories and great memories and
great impacts James had on so many. I hope in my day of celebration, I could be as fortunate to
have great stories talked about me. I got to get to know another of his great friends very
closley. I have to put this story in here for I know James would love to have people get a
chuckle out of it. You see, one of his close friends was Bud. Now Bud is a Canadian Goose. I
was given an assignment that I took on. Ms Becky and his brother David wanted a picture of
Bud for the funeral home. Now that does not sound so hard does it. Well, the one trick that
James would get Bud to do is to spread his
wings on command. I was told as I
rounded the corner of the building to start
calling Buds name. When I got to the cage
to say , "Ok Bud...Spread your wings... Let
me see your wings" Well here comes the
fun part. Here I am standing in the yard
with a camera in the middle of the day
talking to a goose, moving my arms up 
and down and saying the phrase. That
goose cocked his head at me and looked at
me like I was crazy. Well, it gets better, as
soon as I walked off, that crazy goose
would raise his wings straight out in the
air, as proud as a peacock. I would turn
around to take the pictures and boom, the
wings went down. Never did get the per-
fect picture, but even with him not here,
James created another memory for me. His
life truly is a celebration of life. I could fill
the pages with stories of all the fond and
great stories I have heard over the past
week. Thank you James for all the great
impacts you have made in this community.
 
LIBERTY
DRAFT of Minutes of the Meeting of
The Liberty Town Council
Held on December 28, 2010 at 7:30 pm
(Not Officially Adopted by Council)
Present :Mayor: The Honorable Jim S. Parker , Council: Shane
Isley, Terry Caviness, Pike Johnson, and James Lee Humble
,Town Manager: Roger Davis , Town Clerk: Bridget Langley
,Staff: Police Chief, Jerry Brown; Public Works Director, Chris
Taylor; Recreation Director, Martin Rierson
To Order :The Mayor called the meeting to order at 7:30pm.
Council Member Shane Isley led the Pledge of Allegiance fol-
lowed by the invocation, given by Council Member Pike John-
son.
Minutes : Council Member Pike Johnson made a motion to ap-
prove the minutes of the November meetings. Council Member
Shane Isley seconded the motion, which passed unanimously.
ABC Compliance Requirements : In order to comply with new
state regulations Council Member Terry Caviness made a motion
to allow Bridget Langley, Town Clerk to serve as Finance Officer
for the Liberty ABC Board. Council Member James Lee Humble
seconded the motion, which passed unanimously.
Budget Amendment – VFDF Grant : Council Member Terry Cav-
iness made a motion to approve the amendment to the 2010-2011
General Fund appropriations by Four thousand one hundred
eighty two dollars and fifty cents received from the NC Dept of
Insurance for Fire Department turn out gear. Council Member
Shane Isley seconded the motion, which passed unanimously.
Board Appointments – Planning Board : Council Member Shane
Isley made a motion to reappoint Mike Fogleman to another
three year term on the Planning Board and Board of Adjust-
ments. Council Member Pike Johnson seconded the motion,
which passed unanimously
Railroad Crossing Signal Proposal :Council Member Terry Cav-
iness made a motion not to spend Twenty thousand four hun-
dred dollars and pay an annual maintenance fee of One thou-
sand five hundred thirty two dollars to the NC Department of
Transportation for a railroad crossing signal and gates at West
Raleigh Avenue based on our other commitments and low reve-
nues and recommend installing stop signs. Council Member
James Lee Humble seconded the motion, which passed unani-
mously.
Water/Sewer Capacity Study Contract : Council Member Shane
Isley made a motion to approve the contract with Alley, Wil-
liams, Carmen & King, Inc. for the Engineering Services on the
Water Leak Detection Study and Water and Sewer Capacity
Study which is being partially funded by the N.C. Rural Eco-
nomic Development Center. Council Member James Lee Humble
seconded the motion, which passed unanimously.
Town Manager’s Report : The Town is moving quickly on the
sewer line grants at the Liberty Industrial Park. A map of the
line is complete which has to be submitted with the grant. We
are submitting a two part grant. One is the Rural Center and the
other is to the North Carolina Industrial Fund, each grant is
ninety thousand dollars. Americhem has indicated they would
like this taken care of quickly.
Mayor Comments : Mayor Parker has been approached by a
couple of residents regarding graffiti around town and would
like suggestions on what can be done to stop it. Council Member
James Lee and Shane Isley feel it needs to be looked at after the
weather improves.
Adjourn : There being no further business to discuss, Council
Member Terry Caviness made a motion to adjourn. Council
Member James Lee Humble seconded the motion, which passed
unanimously.
Normally “There’s Something
About Liberty “ is about an
event , a major happening
that is in Liberty, but this
month I realized, it is about
people also. So this months
column is about James Lee
Humble. You was part of Lib-
erty .
T H E L I B E R T Y L E A D E R
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Couple Puts Their 'Ministry 
Where Their Mouth Is' ‐ 
Plans Rehab Clinic
Take a minute and try to figure out how many ways 
a plumber and a nurse can save your life. Go ahead, 
think for a second. Obviously, a nurse can do a lot if 
you’re in the hospital or in need of medical a?en‐
Aon. And flooding basements and tumultuous odors 
pre?y much define the burdens of a working 
plumber; but for Ander and Debra Walker ‐ they’ve 
found a new way to save the world. And it starts 
one drug addict at a Ame. 
        The couple  has  started  the  process  of building a 
drug rehab center with transiAonal housing on their 
30 acres of  land in Franklinville.  I sat  down recently 
and talked to the founders of “Faith Rock Ministries” 
to see where this vision came  from. “The idea for it 
came  to  me  one  day 
as I was tackling the 
15‐hour  trip  home 
from  my  daughter’s 
house.”  Rev.   Walker 
recalled.  “I  was  just 
driving  along,   sing‐
i ng,   worshi ppi ng, 
and  talking  to  God. 
Then  he  just  gave 
me  this  vision  for  a 
facility on our  land. I 
didn’t know how  we 
were supposed   
to  make  it  happen, 
but  I  knew  that’s 
what God wanted us 
to do.” 
  Debra,  a  pas‐
tor  and  former  RN, 
has  been  working 
wi t h  addi ct s  of 
drugs  and  alcohol 
for  28  years.  “Al‐
though  my husband 
and  I   have  never 
been  through  ad‐
dicAon  like  that 
personally,  we’ve 
seen the destrucAon 
in  the lives of  family 
and  friends.  It’s  our 
c a l l i ng  t o  he l p 
them.”  
        Their  goal  is  to 
establish  faciliAes 
for rehab,  transiAonal housing, and a training center 
for  the  paAents  to  learn  a  trade  so  they’ll  have  a 
chance at  employment  once  they leave.  “We have 
been  a part  of  a lot  of  programs that  just spit them 
back out into the street and into the same mess that 
got  them addicted”  Ander  said,  “we  have to  equip 
them  for  a  successful  future.”  According  to  the 
Walkers, their  program is a  li?le  bit  unconvenAonal 
compared  to  the normal  12‐step  programs.  “We’re 
not knocking them” Debra added,  “but  we’ve found 
that  a  different  approach  has  be?er  results  in  the 
long run.”  Their  programs, which have been craWed 
over  the years and in play constantly for  the  past  3, 
are grounded  solidly  in  Biblical  scripture. They also 
don’t  just  deal  with stopping the addicAon; they go 
a  li?le  deeper.  “If  you  get  to  know  the  history  of 
these  addicts,  there  is  one  or  a  series  of  key  life 
events  or  tragedies  that  send  them  over  the  edge 
into  drugs and alcohol.  The  Lord  wants  to  heal  that 
wound.”  EffecAvely, they not only stop the problem, 
but  eliminate or  heal  the source of it.   “We are try‐
ing  to  change  the  core  of  the  person  through  the 
Spirit  of  God, and  give them some hope for  the fu‐
ture.  We  set  up  boundaries  so  they  can  see  what 
that  looks  like  in  life.”  The  plan  is    to  also  offer 
classes to help heal  those core issues like domesAc 
violence,  sexual  abuse,   and  anger  management. 
“We have to start  looking at what has  caused them 
to  make  these decisions in  their  lives. Yes, they are 
the ones who made  the choice, but  we want to en‐
courage  them  as  much  as  we  can  to  start  making 
be?er ones.”
       The Walker’s program  also  embodies  more than 
just  drug treatment,  but  life  treatment  as  a  whole. 
“As a nurse, I’ve  seen  that  drugs and alcohol  wreak 
havoc  on  your  body.”  Debra  added,  “A  lot  of Ames 
addicts  are  free from the  drugs,  but  never  recover 
physically.”  Therefore,  they implement a health and 
wellness  aspect,  rebuilding  their  nutriAon  and 
changing  their  eaAng and  exercise habits. They are 
already working with  a physician  who  has been  re‐
searching ways to restore an addict’s health. 
     The third component in their “Trinity” approach is 
vocaAonal training. Ander  has been trained  in many 
fields like  plumbing,  carpentry,  and other  construc‐
Aon  areas  that  would  be  of  great  use  to  someone 
looking for  something to do for a living. But  manual 
labor  isn’t  the only opAon  they hope to  offer. They 
will  be  providing  a  GED  program  for  those  who 
haven’t  finished their  educaAon,  and hope to work 
with  other  business owners and  professionals to  let 
the paAents pursue a career that they truly enjoy. 
Of  the  three‐faceted  approach,  Walker  said:  “We 
want them to be healed in mind, body, and soul.  We 
need to teach them life skills so that they will  have a 
path  to  succeed.  There  is  a  4  ‐  5%  success  rate 
among  the  normal  drug  rehab  programs.  We  think 
we can do be?er. In fact, we NEED to do be?er.”
    So  where do  they stand  now? They  have already 
begun  clearing  their  land  on  Faith  Rock  Road  in 
Franklinville. They are not  planning on seeking gov‐
ernment  aid  through grants or  any other  programs. 
“We feel like if  we did that,  we would be subjecAng 
our  ministry  to  a lot  of  meddling” Ander  said,  “We 
have faith  that God will provide help somehow.”
     As of  now,  they will  be relying solely on donaAons 
from churches, businesses,  and individuals ‐  as well 
as loans leveraged by the land the facility will be on. 
They plan to open a men’s home first, and later ad a 
women’s facility, since  there are  only four  women’s 
rehab  homes in the state.  “It’s not  just  money that 
this  place  needs,   it’s  manpower  and  prayer  too.” 
The Walkers  hope to  have services  and  equipment 
donated  to  complete  the  construcAon,   as  well  as 
volunteers willing to  do  more than what’s required. 
“We  have no  illusions about  it,  this won’t  be easy” 
Ander  admi?ed,  “but  in  order  to  serve God,  some‐
Ames you  have  to get your  hands  dirty. You  have  to 
put  yourself  in  uncomfortable  situaAons  with  dan‐
gerous  people.  SomeAmes  it’s  ugly,   but  the  Lord 
never said it would be easy.” 
     The Walkers know that they could lose everything 
if  this  fails.  They  know  that  there’s  a  very  good 
chance, logically,  that  it  will  fail.  But  they also  know 
that  serving God  and  living  for  Jesus  Christ  means 
risk  and  sacrifice.  They know  that  the people  they 
help are the ones we lock our  doors for.  They know 
that  they’ll  be  rejected  by  individuals,   businesses, 
and  even  churches.  But  they  know  that  more  than 
any of  that ‐ it’s God’s plan. God’s call  on  their  lives 
and  everyone’s  life  is  to  “heal  those  who  are  bro‐
ken” (Isaiah  62). They know that  if  they lose  every‐
thing in this life, but help a few join them in the next 
‐  it’s  all  been  worth  it in  the end.  So  we encourage 
you  to  get  involved  in whatever  way you  can.  Con‐
tact  them  at  622‐2126  or  send  support  or  encour‐
agement  to    1323 Browns  Crossroads  Rd  in  Staley. 
27355.
T H E L I B E R T Y L E A D E R
6
Apples 99 Cents A Pound
Mother Nature Visits Liberty
December was a beautiful month at the Nature Library.
We had snow inside and out. The children had pictures
taken with Mother Nature and made snowflakes and or-
naments to take home. Then on two Saturdays it snowed!
Nature was at its loveliest. It was nice to have a White
Christmas. One of our many donations is a lovely book
on snowflakes come on by and look at it. A sample of one
of the photos in it shows a microscopic view of a snow-
flake. Silas and Eli Christenbury visited with Mother Na-
ture in the picture below. If you have not visited you do
not know what you are missing. Liberty Nature Research
Center , 128 S. Fayetteville St., Liberty (Inside Roy Reitzel
Center) Hours: Mon 9-1, Wed 1-5, Sat 9-1
During the months of February
and March the Library will con-
tinue to display nature crafts
made by Henry King. If you
haven’t had a chance to see, it’s
really fun to look at. One of the
items is a miniature of an Inuk-
shuk (means ” in the likeness of
a human”, monuments made of
unworked stones that are used
by the Inuit for communication
and survival. One other display
is items from Rising Meadow
Farm, Liberty. We will have
some wool, dyed and un-dyed
and items made from the wool.
If you would like to schedule a group visit please call
622-4276 or 455-2242 to set up a day. We have some inter-
esting and fun programs for scouts and daycares.
Look for some educational programs coming in the near
future.
RCC Cosmetology Center
Reopening Jan. 15
Randolph Community College's
Cosmetology Center will reopen
for clients for the spring semester
on Saturday, Jan. 15. The Center's
normal hours are 8:15 a.m.-12:15
p.m., every Wednesday, Thursday,
Friday, and Saturday. Senior Appreciation Day, which
offers all hair services one-half price for those 55 and
up, is on Wednesdays. The Cosmetology Center is
located in Hillside Shopping Center at 1003 S. Fayet-
teville Street. For a price list, please visit RCC's Web
site at http://www.randolph.edu/cosmetology/.
Be Prepared! Program
The SALT Council and Randolph County Emergency
Services will present “Be Prepared! Answering Your
Emergency Services/Preparedness Questions” at Ran-
dolph County Senior Adults, 133 W. Wainman Avenue,
Asheboro. Randolph County Emergency Services per-
sonnel will discuss Emergency Services, 911, DNRs,
living wills and 72-hour disaster kits and answer any
questions you may have. This program is FREE and
open to the public. Refreshments will be provided.
For more information contact Margie DiDona at 625-
3389 (or 1-800-252-2899) or Myra Gaddy at 336-318-
6835.
PACK IT UP
Downtown Liberty
118 W Swannanoa Ave
Ph 622-7225
Handling All Your
Shipping Needs
UPS - FED EX
Copies & Faxes
Embroidery
Screen Printing
Signs - Vinyl Graphics
Ball Season Just
Around The Corner
Let Us Help Get All
Your Teams Needs
Done!!!!!!
T H E L I B E R T Y L E A D E R
www.libertynewspaper.org 7
Hours:
Mon to Fri
7:30 am to 6pm
Sat
7:30am to Noon
Closed Sunday
Winter Maintenance Service Package
Performed pressure test on cooling system,
check level and freeze protection for coolant,
tested charging system, clean battery cables
and load test battery, check belts and hoses,
check wiper blades and washer fluid, check
tire pressure in all tires (including spare if
available), check all lights and brakes. All
fluid, parts and other needed service area ex-
tra cost.
$39.95
Special
Visit Debbie’s For All Your Needs
Gi ve A Gift Certificate As A Valentine Gift!!!
G
iv
e
T
h
e

G
ift T
h
a
t
T
h
e
y
W
a
n
t
Be Prepared For All The Winter Storms
According to the National Weather Service, a Winter Storm Watch is in
effect for our area until 4pm Tuesday and you still have time to take some
simple steps to prepare for snow and ice: Create an Emergency Prepared-
ness Kit: Pack warm clothing and water-resistant boots, along with extra
blankets, a first aid kit and essential medications, canned food and can
opener, bottled water, flashlights and a battery-powered radio with extra
batteries. Consider including sand or non-clumping kitty litter to make
walkways and steps less slippery. Prepare Your Car: Winterize your vehi-
cle and keep the gas tank full, which will help to keep the fuel line from
freezing. Prepare Your Home: Make sure your home is properly insulated
by installing storm windows or covering windows with plastic from the
inside to help keep cold air out. Maintain heating equipment and chim-
neys by having them cleaned and inspected every year. Running water,
even at a trickle, helps to prevent pipes from freezing. 
T H E L I B E R T Y L E A D E R
www.libertynewspaper.org 8
New A.A. meeting will be on Thurs at 7:00 pm. St Paul Baptist
Church.
251 Asheboro St.
Liberty, NC
Contact Haywwod B.
@ 1-336-795-0008
for info.
• 549 W. Starmount Ave., 3 bed, 2 bath brick
ranch with double attached carport, den, living
room, two fireplaces, on one acre plus town lot.
$119,900
•  618 N. Greensboro St., one of Liberty’s oldest
(1890) homes updated and ready for your fam-
ily. 4 bedroom, 4 bath two story dripping with
charm and early American appeal, and only
$114,900.
• 8583 Hinshaw Shop Rd., Liberty. 4+- acres on
paved road in Pleasant Hill area; two bed, one
bath upgraded cottage….69,900.
• 183 South Fayetteville St.; huge 3 Bed, 1 Bath,
high ceilings, huge windows, in 1920’s condi-
tion. $72,000.
• 872 Bish Rd., Staley. Total remodel on five acres
with pond. Two bed, one bath cottage with new
central heat and central air, new carpet and vi-
nyl, may rent to own….call for details.
• 25+ acres on southern city limits $205,000 or
may sell ½ for 112,500. call for details.
• 8+ acres on Julian Airport Rd., Julian area,
$50,000….may sell part…
• 13+- acres on old Liberty Rd., Julian area…lies
low in spots…only $12,000!!!
• 16 +- corner acres on Bulb Rd./old Liberty Rd.,
Julian area, $65,000.
• 2.60 acre lot directly on old Liberty Rd. in Jul-
ian, $25,000…may finance….
• Building lots from 1 to 5 acres in all areas
around Liberty. Some are site built only
lots, some modular, some doublewide lots.
$21,000 to 39,900
Earth Visions Kicks Starts A New Year
Each New Year is greeted by the Earth Visions fitness group of Liberty
with their families and friends.  This year included a grueling hike up
the steep, briar clad cliffs of Moore’s Knob at Hanging Rock State Park. 
Even the seasoned fitness buffs agree that it is one of the hardest en-
deavors that they have ever undertaken.  The clouds settled on the
mountain, creating misty, dripping weather.  The damp stones and
climbing surfaces were slippery and very steep.  Often they climbed on
all fours.  Once blindfolded, the group found it easier and quicker to
scale up the mountain leaf litter, even though it was very steep.  At the
top, many were found doing their pushups at the top of the tower.  Pic-
tured in the mist at the top is Sam Kennedy of Earth Visions counting
the fifty pushups for Shane Combs, left and Dillon Mazepa, right.  After
a brisk walk, jog back down the trail, the group gathered for a January
1st picnic.  They had earned the meal of chili beans, soup, sandwiches,
desserts and coffee heated right on the spot, to warm them.  These fit-
ness folks really know how to cook and eat.  A good meal with good
company eases the trials and tribulations of the hard climb.  It is safe to
say that only the drivers were awake on the ride home.  This 7th Annual
New
Year’s Day
Event
sported
the largest
group to
date. 
There
were 26
people
who ac-
cepted
The Chal-
lenge, and
Finished
in fine
style. 
T H E L I B E R T Y L E A D E R
9
THE
edge
HAIR STUDIO
116 W Swannanoa Ave
Downtown Liberty, NC
Ph 622‐3779
The Latest Cuts For Men, Women, Kids
All Hair Cuts $10
Why Not Gi ve A Gift Certificate This Year!
Spotlight On Liberty
Police Of The Year
That would be none other than , Phillip Cook, which
is the Detective, Town of Liberty-Liberty Police
Department. He was born on Nov 12 in NC. He
has an eduation background from Chatham
County Schools, Associate of Arts Degree-Criminal
Justice, from Randolph Community College. His
work history shows his dedication . He has been on
Liberty Police Department, Patrol Officer and
Criminal Investigations, Twelve + years experience.
So lets get to know Detective Cook a little better.
What is his hobbies and interest. Well that would be
none other that all types of outdoor activities, spend-
ing time with my family Speaking of his family, he
is married and has two (2) children. I asked Phillip,
what lead you in this career. He stated, “ The desire
to help others and protect the community from
criminal activity.” I also inquired who was your fa-
vorite role model and why? With a big smile he re-
plied, “My grandmother instilled a dedicated work
ethic, tied to Christian values, during my youth that
has carried me forward.” I asked him if he anything
special that makes your day. Mr Cook said, “Know-
ing that I could help someone that has been a victim
of criminal activity. “ In their a good piece of advise
you would like to share with our readers. “Never
compromise your integrity or degrade the law en-
forcement code of ethics. Always remain focused to
understand a law enforcement officer’s action’s has
an effect on others., “ he said with strong confi-
dence. Concluding our interview I asked him what
has been your best memory in this career. He
thought and said, “ I have had many wonderful expe-
riences during my career and look forward to the
next citizen interaction.” Well we can see now why
he deserves the officer of the year.
Now Open
5546 HWY 49 N
Liberty, NC
Ph 6225-3720
A Showcase of Fine Crafts & Arts By Local & NC Artists
Snow Cream....MMMMM
What A Treat
So with this snow I got to enjoy
a treat that goes with the second
snow fall as the old wives tale
goes. I remember my grandma
Wright telling me, do not eat the
first snow, we have to wait for sec-
ond. Now, to a young child, that is
just torture. But this snow Christmas
Night led to perfect snow for eating.
 We took a big pot of snow, mixed in the right
amount of milk, sugar and flavoring and waylay , a win-
tery dessert. We made sure not got get none of the yellow
snow. Ugggghhh!!!! That is just nasty to think about. A friend
of mine on Facebook shared a great prank she pulled on her
kids. She went out to get the snow, filled the pot half full and
then pulled out some yellow food coloring and put a little in
the snow and then proceeded to fill the rest with snow. She
brought the pot in and told her children to make the snow
cream. They were so excited and then it happened, they un-
covered the yellow.  They screamed, Mom, you got snow
with dog pee..... , she could not do nothing but laugh. Great
one...my friend pulled a great prank. As we enjoyed our
snow cream, a question arouse, when did snow cream come
about.  Well, I did a little snooping. The origins of the snow
based dessert by this name are hard to verify, but the tech-
nique of using snow as a main ingredient in a dessert is very
old.[  Common ingredients for this variety are a dairy based
ingredient, sugar and a flavoring agent. In adding a small
amount of dairy-based liquid and a flavoring agent (similar
to ice cream ingredients) into clean snow, the snow melts and
congeals into a simple ice cream substitute. The cream based
variety of Snow Cream is of old lineage. It is known in conti-
nental Europe at least as early as the late 15th or early 16th
century where it can be found in the Dutch recipe collection
now known as KANTL Gent 15.It has been suggested
that "Snow" may be even older than that. Well with the
next snow, enjoy you some snow cream. For those that
do not know how to make snow cream, here is one of
numerous variations of snow cream recipe. Snow Ice
Cream Recipe: Ingredients, 8 cups Fresh Snow (liquid
measure), 1 cup Sugar, 1 cup Milk, 2 tbsp Vanilla ....
Method: Put approximately 8 cups of fresh snow into a
large mixing bowl, Add the ingredients - first 1-cup
sugar, then 2 tablespoons vanilla and finally, 1-cup milk.,
With the help of a wooden spoon, mix all the ingredients
well., Continue mixing till the ingredients are well com-
bined and snow attains the texture of ice cream., Serve
immediately, since snow cream does not hold well in
freezer. 
Gi ve That
Unique
Gift This Year
The Liberty Artisan & Craft
Gallery
Valentines Day Will Be Here Before You Know It.......
Remember your special someone on this day,
Come in and see all the unique creations by our
special artists just for Valentine’s Day.
Speciali ty Soaps, Scented Candles and Oils,
Jewelry, Scarves, Table Top Gardens,
Framed Art work, Wood Carvings, Garden Art,
Bird Houses, and Books just to mention a few.
Hours:
Tues to Sat 10 to 5
Sun 1 to 4
Closed Mondays
Get Your Ad In
The Liberty Leader
For The Valentine’s
Holiday
T H E L I B E R T Y L E A D E R
10
Snow Brings Time To Be A Kid Again
With the snow we have had this month, it has allowed me to step back in time. That
would be to be a kid again. I believe we get so wrapped up in daily life we forget to
have fun. God wants his children to enjoy their life. However the devil does not want
that, he keeps us BUSY. That breaks down to Being Under Santas Yoke. How you may
say? Well we get tied up with , I want that car, that boat, that motorcycle, that TV, that
computer, that that that and then we realize we have to work more to keep it ... Little
by little we ad to our list and then we look back and see it, We have yoke on us. Well
make a point to shed some of that... Kick back and be like a kid some, even better kick
back and be like a kid with a kid.....
It will do your heart good. This past
snow I went sledding and even a
snow ball fight. I forgot how much
fun you can have without spending
a single dollar. I challenge you to try
to get ride of your yokes and em-
brace some good healthy fun. Pray
to God to help you with these mat-
ters, you will be surprised what HE
will do.....
Chili cook-off is hot to Go!
Asheboro, NC: Think you have a great chili recipe? Put it to the
test at the Old Time Chili Cook-Off 2011; you might win some
cash! Registration is open to individuals, businesses and non-
profit organizations. The entry fee is $25.00 and cooks will fire up
the grills on April 16th at Bicentennial Park in downtown Ashe-
boro. Rules and registration forms are available by calling Cindy
Wilkins at 336-430-8372 or by emailing to
oldtimechili10@hotmail.com. We’re also on Facebook: search
“OldTime ChiliCook-Off”. Grand Prize winner will receive
$600.00 in cash and 2nd Place winner takes $400. $200 will be
awarded to the People’s Choice winner and a $100 Showmanship
Prize will be awarded for the best-decorated cooking space. Cooks
must enter before April 10, 2011. The Old Time Chili Cook-Off
and Cruisin’ for Miracles Car Show combines great chili, hot cars,
cold brew, and live music. Tickets for chili tasting are $5.00 for
adults and children over 10. Anyone interested in entering the
chili competition or volunteering is invited (not mandatory) to a
planning meeting on January 12th, 7:00PM at Magnolia 23 Restau-
rant in downtown Asheboro.
Phone: (336) 282-7768
Mark Laughlin, Park Manager • Julian, NC
Dr. Clyde M. Gilmore
Memorial
Park
5
0
t
h

A
N
N
IV
ER
SA
R
Y

SP
EC
IA
L
New Section
“ Freeman Hillside”
(Overlooking Lake)
$1500.00 per plot
(2) plot min.
Includes a credit of $975.00
for opening/closing per plot.
Only the first row of 124
spaces will receive this special.
Also Opening a Cremation
Section (Around Jesus Statue) $500.00
per space. Internment and granite marker
w/inscription are included. Cash or Check Only.
“Serving
Families
Since 1961”
Bike Accident Death
STALEY a ' A motorcyclist has died
from injuries suffered in a one-vehicle
accident on Soapstone Mountain Road
on Monday afternoon shortly after 5 p.m.
A highway patrol spokesman said Mon-
day night the motorcyle was involved in
a chase with law enforcement when the
wreck occurred about one mile from
White’s TMs Chapel Road.
Send Us Your Stories and Events
This is your paper......
Call 336-404-9791 or
libertynewspaper@aol.com
T H E L I B E R T Y L E A D E R
11
At The Well
At the center of the Village is a
deep well of life-giving water
where the townspeople meet.
As they draw water their voices
blend in the culture, society and
wisdom that they share. Each
month meet here at the well to
hear those voices.
My neighbor calls with a strange request. Strange in
more than one way. She says that we are all going to
meet at the well in the morning at one o’clock. “It’s
December 20th, you’re kidding,” I say, thinking that I
will have been asleep for a while by the wee hours of
December 21. “And it is a busy time of year preparing
for Christmas gatherings” I say, trying to make sense of
this. “Come on over and we will fill you in” and the
phone goes dead. Feeling the building excitement of
unusual and mysterious happenings, I leave my
Christmas wrappings and plans and go to see what this
is all about. Several are gathered and it feels truly alive
and of one mind.
There are a couple of teenagers talking about what is
coming up tonight. “There is the full moon tonight,
which will disappear in a total lunar eclipse,” one of
them says. “It is also the Winter Solstice today” adds
the other. “But it will be cold and dark!” whines a little
sister, only seven years old. She cannot understand all
of the excitement. “It is really neat”, I comment, “but
why is everyone wanting to meet and hold vigilance
for this? Can’t we just know about it and talk about it
tomorrow?” “NO” the teens chime. “It is the first time
this has happened in FIVE CENTURIES”. “Oh, my” I
say feeling a little stupid for asking. That really does
make it a big event. They continue, “and it won’t hap-
pen again for years”. “OK, I’m in” I say not really
knowing what I am signing up for. “Bring stuff to stay
warm, and stuff to build a fire. We will be at the area
near the well. That is the best place to view the
eclipse.”
Once back home, the Christmas wrappings seem to
have lost some glamour. FIVE CENTURIES just keeps
booming in my head. We are going to witness some-
thing that was witnessed five centuries ago! Right now,
I wanted to know exactly what is going on this 21st day
of December when it is the Solstice. I learned that it is
the longest night of the year and the shortest day of the
year in our part of the world. I learned that the Solstice
happens when the wobble of the earth in its path
around the sun, starts to turn North America back to-
ward the sun. Today is the exact day this is happening
at 6:38 pm the evening of the day, along with the lunar
eclipse beginning at nearly the very
beginning of our day 1:15 am. All
on the same day, this is a big event,
and I am glad to be invited to par-
ticipate in it. Even if it means I
have to get up in my middle of the
night to take part in it.
Five Centuries…I hear it again in
my head. Oh my gosh, the last
time this happened was in the early
1500’s. It would have been just af-
ter Columbus arrived in America.
There would have been settlers and
native people. I wonder what they
thought was happening when the
full moon just disappeared for a
couple of hours. This was when
people rode horseback and used wagons. They lived in
log cabins without central heat. No electricity or in-
door plumbing was there. Five hundred years is a very
long time. We are the next witnesses of this event and
one and a half billion people will be able to see it from
our world today. Who will bother to look?
I set my alarm, but found that the excitement wakes me
before it rings. The wool blanket and fleece clothing
wait for me next to my warmest shoes and socks. I
dress quickly, pick up some twigs and wood for the fire
and see folks in the full moon light as I approach the
well. A fire is set and ready, but not lit. I add my wood
to the fire. “There will be a ceremony in honor of the
eclipse” I hear a voice say from the darkness. We
snuggle and watch, as the earth moves between the sun
and the moon, casting her shadow to block the light.
There is celebration, and it is not so cold next to the fire,
that has now been lit. “It makes us feel such wonder
about our earth” someone mused. “How so?” came the
question from the other side of the fire. “Well, the earth
takes care of everything for us, all the time, without us
having to think about it”. “Uh huh” I answer, trying to
decide how I would set up an eclipse years down the
road if I had to plan it. “And everything we have, and
everything we eat, and keeping warm comes straight
from the earth” a twelve year old was speaking, after
having listened intently. “And look at how we treat
her” the young voice continued in a shaky tone. “We
even burn the bones of her trees to keep warm”.
“LOOK !! The moon is completely covered and there is
only a halo of light”. It really was darker, with the full
moon hidden. How many times do you get to watch as
the chunks of the moon are bitten deeper and deeper
by the shadow of the earth? We all stood in a circle. We
held hands and raised them high between each one of
us in the circle. We sang together in honor of a timeless
event, given freely to all who would partake. We felt
somehow included in this ancient and mysterious dark
night of the full moon. We put our hands down and
swayed together, just glad to be alive. Knowing that
our very lives were gifts. For 72 minutes the shadow
covered the moon. Then slowly the moon was spit out
again, bite by bite, and the full light of the full moon
returned. Our fire had burned low, as well as our
droopy eyelids. What a great community we live in.
Thank you teenagers for learning of this and knowing
the value of it. Thank you neighbors for inviting us all
and preparing the much-needed fire. Thank you,
moon, for sharing your wondrous event for 1.5 billion
earthlings to see. Thank you earth for giving and giv-
ing to us all, forever and ever. I am clothed, sheltered,
fed and given the very air I breathe from you. The
ceremony was for Mother Earth, Father God and
Grandmother Moon- I love you all and count my bless-
ings and I bid you all good night.
A Great Gift
suggestions: 
To your enemy,
forgiveness. 
To an opponent,
tolerance. 
To a friend, your heart. 
 To a customer, service. 
To all, charity. 
To every child, a good
example. 
To yourself, respect.
  ~Oren Arnold
T H E L I B E R T Y L E A D E R
Nullam arcu leo, facilisis ut 12
Snow On Christmas
Day...Yipee!!!
When I was a kid I liked snow. In fact, you could say maybe
I even loved snow. It snowed all Christmas night and into
the next day..., a soft gentle, steady, but relentless snow that
has melted my heart and remembered me about what I
used to love. As a kid, I remember numerous 12" snows we
had. I always came up over your boot tops. We do not have
that many anymore.  It has been years since we had a great
snow for snow cream to sledding, but it had arrived and
even better yet on Christmas Day. This snow is the stuff
dreams are made of- fluffy and so light it practically offers
no resistance when shuffled through. I made it out for 3
little short walks to get my thick sugary holiday blood
moving and fill the ole lungs with some fresh winter air.
Walking down the side street the effortless movement of
delicate snowflakes through the clean air and the reflection
of Christmas lights off the crystalline terrain was an expe-
rience to be revered and remembered. This must be what
the white Christmas hype is about. Well, I guess you can
say the persimmon seed was correct, for we have had snow
each weekend in the month leading up to Christmas Day.  I
knew no way better to show the story of this great snow
we had in our community than the pictures from the area.
They tell the story better than I could ever. I got
to be a kid agian, walking down the path an
going sledding with loved ones. You are never
too old to kick back and act as a kid. I love see-
ing kids and adults get out and enjoy great fam-
ily time. This is something that gets lost in the
hustle and bustle of today's daily grind of the
day. Normally the day after Christmas the
stores and malls are filled with eager shopper
wanted that special sale or returning that gift
(that may have been the wrong size or just was
not what was on your list), but with this snow,
the street were silent and people had a chance
to enjoy each other. Until the next great snow
fall....
P O S T Y O U R C H U R C H E V E N T S H E R E
www.libertynewspaper.org 13
Ph: 336-376-8972
http://hickorygrove.nccumc.net
Liberty Church Of God Of 
Prophecy
902 W Swannanoa Ave, Liberty
Ph 622‐0496
SS 9:45to10:45
SWS 11:00
Pastor Rev Luther Jackson
Rocky River Friends Meeting
Each Sunday:  10 am - Sunday School      11 am -
Worship
 David Hobson, Pastor
Rocky River Friends Meeting
Location:  1795 Staley-Snow Camp Road
Mailing Address:  8217 Silk Hope-Liberty Road,
SILER CITY, NC 27344-4467
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Forgetting what is behind and straining
toward what is ahead, I press on toward
the goal to win the prize for which God
has called me heavenward in Christ Je-
sus.
Philippians 3:13-14 (NIV)
Time For Change?
If you're anything like me, you probably feel overwhelmed by all the
changes you'd like to see in your life—especially around the New
Year, when change is the "thing" to do. I already know what I need
to improve—my fitness level, availability to friends, amount of qual-
ity time with God. But sometimes, the more I resolve to change, the
more I feel as though I've failed when my "to do" list of goals ends
up a crumpled piece of paper in a dark corner of my desk—and in
my mind. Why not try to take a few things from your life to allow
you more time to be in
prayer, studying the
word, doing things for
HIM....
Less can
be more
ST. PAUL HELP ME HOLY GHOST
MISSION BAPTIST CHURCH
251 N ASHEBORO STREET -  LIBERTY, NC 27298
Sunday School...............................10:00 am
Morning Worship...........................11:00 am
Bible Study - Wednesday.....7 pm - 8:30 pm
Communion First Sunday
Pastor Isaac Fortune, Sr. - 336-501-3306
T H E L I B E R T Y L E A D E R
www.libertynewspaper.org The Liberty Leader Newspa-
per 14
Local Obits For Past 30 Days
LIBERTY — Sarah Wilhite Andrews died December 31, 2010
Oak Grove Baptist Church, Liberty. Burial will be in the church
 LIBERTY — James Albert Greene, 78, died Sunday, December 26,
LIBERTY — James Lee Humble passed away on Saturday, Janu-
ary 1, 2011 at UNC-Chapel Hill.James Lee was a member of the
Liberty Lions Club with perfect attendance for 38 years where he
held the office of treasurer, and currently serving his fourth term
as Liberty Town Council member. He was the treasurer of the
Liberty Historical Fire Truck Foundation and was retired from
the Liberty Fire Department. He was a past member of the His-
torical Train Society of Greensboro. James was an elder in his
church, First United Church of Christ of Liberty. He deeply loved
his Church and his Town..James was preceded in death by his
parents, Wilbert J. and Swanna Humble, his brother, Gerald
Humble.Surviving is his loving companion for over 20 years,
Becky Bray of Siler City; sister, Cynthia H. Brown (Willie) of Siler
City; brother, David Humble (Helen) of Ramseur; niece, Ashley
H. Wilson; nephews C. J. Humble, Scott and Jamieson Brown.
LIBERTY — Israel "Pat" Lambert died December 11, 2010.
LIBERTY — Clyde Darrell Moody, 62, passed away on Friday,
December 10, 2010 at his home.He was preceded in death by his
parents, Floyd and Katherine Manring Moody.Surviving are his
two brothers, Arnold Moody and Arthur Moody.
LIBERTY — Henry Odell "Pete" Rush was received into the arms
of Jesus on December 22, 2010 at Wesley Long following a coura-
geous battle with cancer.
LIBERTY — Mrs. June Virginia Shaver Staley, 91, died Saturday,
December 18,
STALEY — Jack Lineberry died December 22, 2010.He is sur-
vived by: wife, Marcia Lineberry of the home; sons, Jeffery (Vir-
ginia) Langley of Southport, Joshua Langley, stepson, Leonard
Nelson of Staley; daughter, Jennifer Lineberry of Franklinville;
stepdaughter, Marcia Griffin (Kylen) of Grovetown, GA; moth-
ers, Anges Lineberry of Staley;brothers, Lynn Lineberry (Donna)
of Staley, Jerry Lineberry (Millie) of Forrest City; sister, Dianne
Whitehead (Wallace) of Snow Camp; nine grandchildren
SNOW CAMP — James Albert Brown, affectionately known as
"Pop" to his family and caregivers, 82, passed away peacefully
with his family by his bedside on Wednesday January 5, 2011 at
Alamance Regional Medical Center after several months of de-
clining health.He was born on November 12, 1928, in Faith, NC,
the son of the late Floyd Grover Brown and the late Helen Ger-
trude Jones Brown. He was preceded in death by his adored wife
of 38 years, Yvonne Naomi Handschuh Brown. Surviving rela-
tives include a sister, Emily Brown Burman, of Bethesda, MD; his
devoted daughter and caregiver, Amy Jo Nicholson of Snow
Camp, and two cherished sons; Christopher Michael Brown of
Burlington and David James Brown of Memphis, TN. Mr. Brown
also leaves behind four beloved grandchildren; Brandon Santini
of Memphis, TN, Michael Brown of Graham, Katie Yvonne
Nicholson of Pembroke, and Jessica Brown of Graham; and one
great-grandchild, Ella Santini of Thorndale, PA. Mr. Brown also leaves behind special
family members known as his daughters and sons "in love", Kimberly Brown, of Gra-
ham; Tina Enz, of Elon; Steven Hoover, of Memphis, TN; Jeffrey Nicholson, of Snow
Camp; and Michael Holt, of Snow Camp.
NOW CAMP — Mrs. Edith Jones Griffin, 93, of 8040 Pleasant Hill Church Road died
Friday, January 7, 2011 at her residence.She was a loving mother, grandmother, sister,
and friend. She was known to be the matriarch of the family, always taking care of
others. She was an avid Carolina Tar Heels fan, and enjoyed needle work and garden-
ing flowers.Survivors are daughter, Juanita Kirkman and husband Bobby, of Snow
Camp; son, Keith B. Griffin, of Florida; three Grandsons; three great-granddaughters;
two great-great-grandchildren; two step-grandchildren; four step-great-
grandchildren; and many loving nieces and nephews.Preceded in death by husband,
Thomas B. Griffin; parents, Samuel Weldon Jones and Georgie Massey Jones; and two
sisters and two brothers.
SNOW CAMP — Donald "Donnie" Gene Wolfe, 60,died Sunday, December 26,
JULIAN — Michael H. Chalflinch, 58, passed away on Thursday, December 9, 2010, at
Moses Cone Hospital. Mike was born in Mecklenburg County, on October 21, 1952,
the son of Ben T. and Evelyn Richie Chalflinch. He spent his early childhood in Moore
Chimney and
Woodstove Fire Safety
Fireplaces
Have your chimney inspected by a profes-
sional prior to the start of every heating sea-
son and cleaned if necessary. Creosote, a
chemical substance that forms when wood
burns, builds up in chimneys and can cause a
chimney fire if not removed through cleaning.
Always protect your home and your family
by using a sturdy fireplace screen when burn-
ing fires. Remember to burn only wood -
never burn paper or pine boughs, which can
float out the chimney and ignite your roof or a
neighboring home. Do not use flammable liq-
uids in a fireplace. If you are purchasing a
factory-built fireplace, select one listed by a
testing laboratory, and have it installed ac-
cording to local codes. If you decorate your
fireplace with Christmas stockings or other
seasonal decorations, don't burn fires in it.
Wood Stoves
Be sure your wood stove bears the mark of an
independent testing laboratory and meets lo-
cal fire codes. Follow the manufacturer's rec-
ommendations for proper installation, use and
maintenance. Chimney connections and
chimney flues should be inspected at the be-
ginning of each heating season and cleaned
when necessary. Follow the same safety
rules for wood stoves as you would for space
heaters. Burn only wood, and be sure the
wood stove is placed on an approved stove
board to protect the floor from heat and hot
coals. -----------------------------------------
Fireplaces and wood burning stoves are auxil-
iary home heating devices that demand care
and attention in their purchase, installation,
and maintenance. For someone considering
the installation of a wood or coal stove, a fire-
place, or a solid-fuel furnace, careful consid-
eration must be given to the safety aspects of
the equipment and the installation. Expert ad-
vise is often required. Instructions must be
followed to the letter.

Following these precautions can reduce the
possibility of a fire or injury related to wood-
stove use.
• All wood burning stoves and fireplaces
should be cleaned and inspected before the
heating season begins.
• Make sure that the door latch closes properly.
• Furnaces and water heaters which have flue
pipes attached to the chimney of a fireplace or
wood burning stove should have tight fitting
joints and seams.
• Never use liquid fuel to start the fire in a
fireplace or wood burning stove.
• Ashes need to be thoroughly dampened,
cooled, and stored in metal cans that are used
solely for ash storage, not in compost piles,
cartons, boxes or anything else that is combustible.
• It is important to use only thoroughly dried
hardwood. This will prevent or slow the
buildup of creosote. That is the cause of
many chimney fires.
• Have the chimney and flue inspected by a
qualified mason or chimney sweep prior to
use. Cracks in the flue or mortar joints
can allow flames and heated gases to extend
into the structure.
• Use a fireplace screen to prevent flying
sparks and embers from falling out onto the floor.
• Install and maintain smoke alarms and car-
bon monoxide detectors to provide protection
for your family.
Although these following these precautions
should reduce your risk of a chimney fire, be
aware of the signs of one and know what to
do if you encounter them -- a loud roar, suck-
ing sounds, shaking pipes, hot spots on wall
or chimney, or smoke in the house or apart-
ment. If you hear or see any of these sounds
shut off the fire's air supply, get everyone out
of the house quickly, and call 911 from
a neighbor's phone.


T H E L I B E R T Y L E A D E R
15
January 2011
Freedom Teens
Magazine
Ph 622-2154 or 260-4516
FREE!!!
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T H E L I B E R T Y L E A D E R
Nullam arcu leo, facilisis ut 16
Saving A Piece Of The
World For Its Wildlife
Right after the holiday snow storm Hayley
McWilliams got a call that there was extensive
snow damage to Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Park
and Breeding Center in Scotland Neck, North
Carolina. Rare and endangered birds had been
killed by the devastation and dozens were miss-
ing. She knew she must go help. She is just
that kind of a person. Although a trained volun-
teer in animal wildlife rescue, McWilliams is the
Director of Retail for the NC Zoo Society. Pro-
ceeds from the two gift shops she oversees go
directly to funding a wide variety of programs
and projects that support animal well-being, con-
servation, education, field work, and research.
Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Park and Breeding
Center is one of the projects the Zoo Society supports. McWilliams and
another Society employee, Justin Richardson, were the first to respond to
Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Park. They helped staff and local volunteers
inspect the 26 acre facility looking for injured and trapped birds. “We were
there to do whatever needed to be done,” said McWilliams. “It was also
important to repair netting and fencing as quickly as possible to keep the
predators away.” “We were afraid of loosing more birds.”
This wasn’t the first time McWilliams was quick to volunteer during a time
of crisis. In 2003, the Pisgah Covered Bridge, one of Randolph County’s
historical and cultural treasures, was destroyed by a flash flood. McWil-
liams was one of the first people to recover pieces of the bridged that had
washed away. McWilliams has worked for the NC Zoo Society, raising
money and awareness for the Zoo and its
initiatives, for 16 years. The NC Zoo Society,
an independent association of members, is
committed to fostering enduring personal
connections between people and nature.
They strongly support the North Carolina
Zoo and its projects that educate and inspire
people about their natural environment. The
Society, through the Zoo, conserves wildlife
and wild places throughout the world, pro-
motes scientific research and advcacy, en-
courages relationships with nature through
outdoor recreation, and generates respect for
animals and their welfare. Asked why she
does it, McWilliams quickly responds, “Be-
cause I really believe it’s our responsibility
to save a piece of the world for its wildlife.”
POW/MIA Remembrance -Wow
What A
Story!
The following is a
suggested POW/MIA
Remembrance Service
to be used at banquets,
luncheons or memorial
gathering of The
American Legion. This
service can be used as
scripted, or modified
to meet the specific
needs of your
function/Post. The
Master of Ceremonies
script for this service
can also be found in
Section 3 of The
American Legion Offi-
cers Guide and Manual of Ceremonies. POW/MIA Re-
membrance Service All Those who have served, and those
currently serving in the uniformed services of the United
States, are ever mindful that the sweetness of enduring
peace has always been tainted by the bitterness of personal
sacrifice. We are compelled to never forget that while we
enjoy our daily pleasures, there are others who have en-
dured and may still be enduring the agonies of pain, dep-
rivation and imprisonment. Before we begin our activities,
we pause to recognize our Prisoners of War and those
Missing in Action. We call your attention to this small table
which occupies a place of dignity and honor. It is set for
one symbolizing the fact that members of our armed forces
are missing from our ranks. They are referred to as POWs
and MIAs. We call them comrades. They are unable to be
with their loved ones and families, so we join together to
pay humble tribute to them, and to bear witness to their
continued suppressors. The table is small, symbolizing the
frailty of one prisoner, alone against his or her suppressors.
The table cloth is white, symbolic of the purity of their in-
tentions to respond to their Countries call to arms. The sin-
gle rose in the vase, signifies the blood they may have shed
in sacrifice to ensure the freedom of our beloved United
States of America. This rose also reminds us of the family
and friends of our missing comrades who keep faith, while
awaiting their return. The red ribbon on the vase repre-
sents the red ribbons worn on the lapels of the thousands
who demand, with unyielding determination, a proper
account of our comrades who are not among us. A slice of
lemon on the plate reminds us of their bitter fate. The salt
sprinkled on the plate reminds us of the countless fallen
tears of families as they wait. The glass in inverted; they
can not toast with us at this time. The chair is empty. They
are NOT here. The candle is reminiscent of the light of
hope which lives in our hearts to illuminate their way
home, away from their captors, to the open arms of a grate-
ful nation. The American Flag reminds us that many of
them may never return - and have paid the supreme sacri-
fice to insure our freedom Let us pray to the Supreme
Commander that all of our comrades will soon be back
within our ranks. Let us remember - and never forget their
sacrifice. May God forever watch over them and protect
them and their families.  
Ho Ho Ho      St. Nicholas stop by  the Liberty Sen-
ior Center with goodies during their Christmas Social
Senior Center Calendar
T H E L I B E R T Y L E A D E R
Nullam arcu leo, facilisis ut 17
Open Mon to Sat 11m to 5pm
www.awesomefindsgiftshop.com
Now check us out online
www.libertyshowcase.net
Liberty
Showcase
Live Music Weekly----Smoke Free / Al-
cohol Free--Fun For The Whole Family
P.O. Box 1103
101 S. Fayetteville St, Liberty
Phone (336)622-3844
Come To Visit Us Soon!!
THERESA'S MOBILE
TAX SERVICE
Fast - Friendly - Professional Tax Service
“Convenient Service At Your Door Step”
Call for
Appointment at
336-653-4866 or
336-839-0477
Tmobiletaxservice@yahoo.com
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Sat. 22
nd
 7:00 PM Blender is back featuring Chad & Kristi
Gaines.  The best of a variety of country, soul, pop, and
oldies.  Tickets are $12.00 Adults, $11.00 Seniors, Children
12 & under are free.
 --------------------------------------
Sat. 29
th
 we have Eric Chilton and The Chill Tones.  If you
don’t know already, Eric Chilton is the WFMY News 2
Chief Meteorologist.  This band leans to Carolina beach,
70’s & 80’s music you grow up with. They performed at the
Lexington Barbeque Festival. Tickets are $16.00 in ad-
vanced and $18.00 at the Door.  Reservations are recom-
mended for this show because of limited seating.
 -------------------------------------------------
Also, don’t forget Stephen Freeman, Echos of A legend, A
Tribute to Elvis, will be at the Showcase Sat., Feb. 12
th,  
7:00
PM for our Valentine Show.  Bring your special someone
and have a great night of entertainment. Tickets are just
$22.00 in advanced and $25.00 at the door.  Reservations are
recommended for this show because of limited seating.
Randolph County American Red Cross Volunteer Orientations
Can you teach CPR and first aid, help in disasters, and assist blood donors?What about being a blood donor? Can
you help with fundraisers and office support? I’ve heard a lot about the Red Cross, but what exactly does it mean
to volunteer for the American Red Cross?Join us for a Volunteer Orientation to learn about the History of the
American Red Cross, our Services and how you fit in. Randolph County Volunteer Orientations will be held at
Acme-McCrary in the Fitness Center on the second Monday of each month from Noon – 1 pm. Upcoming Dates
are Jan 10, 2011; Feb 14, 2011; March 14, 2011Acme-McCrary is located at 159 North Street, Asheboro, NC
27204Enter the Fitness Center from the back or front entrance. Parking is available behind the Fitness Center next
to Fayetteville Street. The orientation will be held in the 3rd floor conference room. Go directly to the conference
room by using the stairwells on the right or left of the building. Registration is required E-mail or call Anne Ves-
tal, Director of Volunteers at vestala@usa.redcross.org (336) 333-2111 or (336) 332-6916 Volunteers should be 16
years of age to attend an Orientation Class. Parents of youth under the age of 18 will need to sign the Volunteer
Application. Visit our web sites at http://www.gso.redcross.org/ and http://www.redcross.org
Greatest man in history, named
Jesus, had no servants, yet they
called him Master. Had no de-
gree, yet they called him
Teacher. Had no medicines, yet
they called him Healer. He had
no army, yet kings feared Him.
He won no military battles, yet
he conquered the world. He
committed no crime, yet they
crucified Him. He was buried
in a tomb, yet He lives today.
Share
this if
you
believe
with
all
your
heart.
Fall and winter is the time to plant shrubbery and trees
T H E L I B E R T Y L E A D E R
Nullam arcu leo, facilisis ut 18
Back by Popular Demand!
St. Stephen AME Church pre-
sents...
The Cotton
Club
Black History Celebration
"Come saved, leave Saved" ,
reminiscing on the legacy of
black music from gospel, jazz,
blues, soul and R&B. Lena
Horne, BB King, Aretha, Temp-
tions, Cab Calloway and many,
many more!
Sat. Feb. 26, 2011, Liberty Show-
case Theatre
Contact the church if you would
like to participate, tickets are on
sale now. $20.00 (First come)
622-3722
KJ-52
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HOSTED BY
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GUEST SPEAKER
PRESENTED IN PART BY NEWSONG MINISTRIES
Sponsored by
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Presented by the American Bible Society
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NO TICKETS REQUIRED!
HOLT INTERNATIONAL PRESENTS
SATURDAY - February 5th
Greensboro Coliseum
Leaving Freedom Family Church @ 12:30
invite you to...
th
e
Communi ty Bulletin Board
Julian Fire Dept
Brunswick Stew Sale
Feb 12th
Call 392-3675 For Info
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$oturdov, Februorv 2ó
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Ph 622-5769
T H E L I B E R T Y L E A D E R
20
The American Legion Post 81 CHRISTMAS MEETING
This was our Christmas Party, Law Officer, Policeman and Fireman of the Year Awards
Banquet.  We recognized individuals for outstanding service in their field. A meal of turkey,
ham, green beans, yams, apples, assorted desserts, rolls, coffee, and lemonade was prepared
by Legionnaires and Unit 81 Auxiliary members. There were about eighty members and
guests present for the event.    The meeting was opened by 15th District Commander Tommy
N. Parham, after prayer by Henry Galary and the POW/MIA Ceremony by PDC Cary
McMasters.    Several American Legion and Auxiliary guests were in attendance for the occa-
sion. They were as follows;Department President Wanda Moore from Benson Unit 109, De-
partment Commander Bill Oxford from Lenoir Post 29, Department First Lady Frances Ox-
ford, PDC Dick Neville from Clayton Post 71, Division III Commander Patricia Harris from
Apex 124, PDP Sharon Neville Unit 71, Past 15th District President Barbara Wilson Unit 8
and 15th District Vice Commander Harold Wilson Post 8
  The Awards that were presented are as follows:
Law Officer of the year – Liberty Police Department - Phillip Cook
Randolph County Sheriff’s Department Officer of the Year -Bernie Maness
The Fireman of the Year were as follows:
Julian Fire Department Fireman of the Year -Stephen York
Staley Fire Department Fireman of the Year -Matt L. Lineberry
Liberty Fire Department Fireman of the Year -David Fogleman
 Randolph County Honor Guard was to be recognized for their Service to the Veterans and
community but was not in attendance.
The Media and Community Service Award went to THE LIBERTY LEADER editor- Kevin
Bowman. Liberty Auxiliary Unit 81 President Jeane Stutts gave a Certificate of Appreciation
to Department President Wanda Moore for her service to the American Legion and Auxiliary
Unit programs in North Carolina. President Stutts also gave a Certificate Of Appreciation to
Doris Ann McMasters for her work with the youth programs and her Assistance to Liberty
American Legion Post 81 and Post activities and programs. The Speaker for the evening was
Department Commander Bill Oxford on the service that the Fireman and Police Departments
provide to the communities each year. The Commander had the utmost re-
spect for the volunteer Fireman and Law Officers across our great State.
Commander Oxford was presented a Certificate of Appreciation for his work
with the American Legion and his third visit to Liberty American Legion Post
81. Several drawings were held that night with the following results:   50/50
drawing was won by Richard Clapp.L.T. Smith did the 40/8 Nursing Scholar-
ship and it was won by PDC Dick Neville from Clayton Post 71 who donated
the money back to the Scholarship fund. The Liberty Post 81 Raffle was won
by Jason Faulk of Fairmont, N.C. The ticket sold by Steve Truax.  With no fur-
ther business and after the closing prayer the meeting was closed in due form.
                        Submitted By Cary A. McMasters. PDC   Post 81 Adjutant
 
SAHM has 2 FT openings available:
*$65 weekly fee includes: meals, art, aca-
demic works, and most field trips!!
*sibling discounts I am a married, mother
of 4 who lives about 2 miles from Liberty
Elementary. I have kept children for over 7
years in my home and before I worked as a
Pre-K teacher for a daycare program. I am
currently enrolled in schooling to earn my
BA degree in Psychology with a minor in
Child Development. My hours are de-
pendent on the care you need!!
*also offering drop-off care and school bus
drop off afterschool care!
Call Nichole at 336-839-0476 (dial 336) or
email @ nlhg0721@aol.com
For Sale Wanted / Services
Will buy silver coins for cash!
 Will buy USA Silver Coins dated
1964 and before. (Ex. Mercury and
Roosevelt dimes, and quarters)
 Contact John @ 336-622-4133
HELP WANTED
Kids R Us.. If you are an energetic
person and has childcare credentials
to work in childcare, a position has
opened in the infant and toddler
room at Kids R Us Childcare Center
in Liberty.  If interested apply in per-
son at Kids R Us in Liberty or call
622-3033
Just in a While
Yes, he’s gone, but we won’t worry or fret,
We haven’t reached our heavenly home just yet.
Happy are they who rest in our Lord, Jesus said,
He is on his way to raise us from the dead.
Let’s not mourn, sorrow or overly grieve,
Sooner or later everyone has a time to leave.
Just in a while we will all reach that heavenly place.
And then see each other face to face.
A memory, a thought, our remaining time well
spent,
Remember, our loved ones from God was sent.
Sitting outside in the cool shade,
Content and delighted while the children played.
Greetings were given by a wave, hello or smile,
Knowing love was always in a heavenly style.
Heaven is sweeter since our loved ones are there,
Let’s look up, and greet the days with joy and cheer.
Just in a while, we will be together again,
Either way, whether we stay or go, we will win.
So in this world, on our lord we must rely,
We will join him in the sweet by and by.
Written by: Mexana Oxendine
A Life Of Over 200 Years End
It was a sad day a to see a tree with
that many years coming down. The
stories it could tell if it talked. The
tree was located on the property of
Lawyer Jim Wilson office on N
Asheboro St. Charles Hicks with
the help of others helped drop this
massive tree down to the earth.
Well, everything has its season.

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