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September 17, 2008

Index

INDEX
NCFE Levels 1 and 2 Certificate in Digital Photography
By Stuart Williams 2008-09 Tutor Mark Holloway

All headings, sub headings and Pictures are hyperlinked, click to navigate.

Appeals Procedure Index

1 2 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 8 10 11 12 12 14 17 19

Health and Safety
Tutors Discussion Working with computers Bad posture causes strain and eye injury Your Health & Safety Working with computers Protect your eyesight Use cables and wires Safely Protect your body General Precautions Handling the Camera Battery handling precautions Handling and storage precautions LCD monitor FCC Notice Evaluation Units 1 to 3 Candidate Information Pack Introduction

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Index

Completing your NCFE qualification Tracking your progress Navigation of camera Scene Mode Glossary of terms and functions and there uses Task take three and note why (scene mode) The difference between white balance ISO “Sensitivity” lowest value to the highest Aperture Priority Shutter Priority Shutter priority/Metering Auto Focus Project the Moon Manual Mode Flash Photography Chosen Subject Faces (Christine Keller) Depth of Field (D.o.F) Saving to memory stick When Viewing your Photographs To open up photograph information Day at the Black Country living museum Day out at Litchfield Cathedral NCFE 2 Photo Shop Project (Pop Art) The Use of External Flashgun in the field Evaluation

20 23 25 31 31 33 36 38 46 49 53 60 61 65 68 76 79 82 84 87 88 97

99 104

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Index

“Life looks better through a lens ;-)”

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Appeals procedure

NCFE Levels 1 and 2 Certificate in Digital Photography
Appeals Procedure – Birmingham Adult Education Service
We hope you will enjoy your study with BAES. However, if for any reason you find yourself in disagreement with your tutor/assessor about your assessment outcomes, you have the right to seek help by following the steps outlined below:

1. Contact the Internal Moderator for your course who will try to help you with your 2. 3. 4. 5.
problem. If you are not able to resolve the matter with the Internal Verifier, Janet Epps, please contact the Program Coordinator. If you are not able to resolve the matter with the Program Coordinator, you may then contact the External Moderator from the awarding body. If you are not able to resolve the matter with the External Moderator, you may contact the NCFE. If you are still not satisfied, you may refer the matter to the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority
Internal Moderator Janet Epps 477 Stratford Road, Sparkhill, Birmingham, B11 4LE 0121 464 1893 Janet.epps@birmingham.gov.uk Ladywood Arts & leisure centre,Monument Road,Ladywood,Birmingham B16 8TR 0121 6756338 Brenda_Woulfe@birmingham.gov.uk NCFE Citygate,St James Boulevard,Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 4JE

Program Co-ordinator

Brenda Woulfe

External Moderater

Dave Hudspeth

NCFE QCA

As Above 222 Euston Road, Londen NW1 2BZ

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[HEALTH AND SAFTY]

Health and Safety
Tutors Discussion
Health and Safety means that we all have to work together to make sure that you are safe when you come to classes, and to avoid accidents. It is up to us to make sure that the rooms, toilets, corridors and equipment you use are safe. If you see anything that you think in dangerous, like wet floors or loose plug sockets, please tell your tutor or the staff on reception. It is up to you to be careful, and not to behave in a way that could cause an accident. Walk, don't run, and use equipment with care. Your tutor will show you the right way to use things, and if you are not sure you must If you hurt yourself or feel ill, you must tell your tutor straight away. There is a first aid box in the centre office, and the office staff will help you if you need anything. If you hear the fire alarm, you must leave the centre right away by the nearest exit. Walk, don't run, and stay with your class. Don't go back for your coat or bag. Your safety is much more important. Please refer to the centre evacuation procedures.

WORKING WITH COMPUTERS
The operator should be as comfortable as possible when processing. The diagram below indicates an ideal position.

• • • • • •

Use blinds on windows to stop glare on screen Keep all trailing wires safe and out of the way M a k e s u r e y o u have enough space to work safely Visual Display Units should be adjustable Sit correctly, using an adjustable chair Use foot-rest if necessary

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[HEALTH AND SAFTY]

• Make sure desk is correct height

Bad posture cause strain and eye injury

Adjust your chair so that your legs fit comfortably underneath the desk, and your arms rest at a 90-degree angle to the desk top. Use a foot-rest if your feet will not rest flat on the floor. Keep your back straight and supported. Have enough space on the side of your keyboard so that you can put any documents you are working from within an easy range of vision. Use a copy holder. Keep the keyboard in front of you and don't rest your wrists on the desk. Keep your wrists level with the back of your hands.

Your Health & Safety
Computers are safe if you follow a few simple steps

Staring at a PC screen can lead to eye-strain. To avoid this. Look away frequently and focus your eyes on objects that are at the clear side of the room or out of the window at regular intervals. Make sure your work area is well lit and ventilated.

Protect your eyesight

Use cables and wires Safely

Make sure that you keep cables and wires tidy so that you do not trip over them. Be careful not to overload electricity sockets and consider a circuit breaker, it will protect you and your equipment. Remember, you are more valuable than the hardware, software & data.

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[HEALTH AND SAFTY]

YOU ARE IRREPLACEABLE!

Protect your body
If you do any physical activity without a break you may damage tendons, nerves or muscles. This is called Repetitive Strain injury. Using a mouse or keyboard for prolonged period can effect your fingers, wrist, elbows or even your back. The best way to avoid this is:• Choose suitable furniture so that you can sit properly. • Your chair should be comfortable, adjustable and provide proper support for your back. • The screen, keyboard and mouse should be at a comfortable angle. (See diagram above). • Take a break every 15-20 minutes to let your muscles rest and recuperate.

General Precautions
• Read All Instructions — Before you use the product, read all operating instructions. • Save These Instructions — Save all safety and operating instructions for future reference. • Heed Warnings — Read carefully and follow all warning labels on the product and those described in the instructions. • Follow Instructions — Follow all instructions provided with this product. Cleaning — Use only a damp cloth for cleaning. Never use any type of liquid or aerosol cleaner, or any type of organic solvent to clean this product. • Attachments — For your safety, and to avoid damaging the product, use only accessories recommended by manufacture. • Water and Moisture — Never use this product around water (near a bathtub, kitchen sink, laundry tub, wet basement, swimming pool or in the rain). • Location — To avoid damage to the product and prevent personal injury, never place this product on an unstable stand, tripod, bracket, table or cart. Mount only on a stable tripod, stand, or bracket. Follow the instructions that describe how to safely mount the product, and use only the mounting devices recommended by the manufacturer. • Power Sources — Connect this product only to the power source described on the product label. If you are not sure about the type of power supply in your home, consult your local power company. Refer to your operating instructions for

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[HEALTH AND SAFTY]

information on using the product with a battery. • Foreign Objects, Liquid Spillage — To avoid personal injury caused by fire or electrical shock from contact with internal high voltage points, never insert a metal object into the product. Avoid using the product where there is a danger of spillage. • Heat — Never use or store this product near any heat source such as a radiator, heat register, stove, or any type of equipment or appliance that generates heat, including stereo amplifiers. • Servicing — Refer all servicing to qualified personnel. DANGER If the product is used without observing the information given under this symbol, serious injury or death may result. WARNING If the product is used without observing the information given under this symbol, injury or death may result. CAUTION If the product is used without observing the information under this symbol, minor personal injury, damage to the equipment, or the loss of valuable data may result. • • Attempting to remove the covers or disassemble the product, could expose you to dangerous high voltage points. • Damage Requiring Service — If you notice any of the conditions described below, refer servicing to qualified service personnel: Liquid has been spilled onto the product or some other object has fallen into the product. The product has been exposed to water. The product does not operate normally despite following Operating instructions. Adjust only the controls described in the operating instructions as improper adjustment of other controls could damage the product and require extensive repair work by a qualified technician. The product has been dropped or damaged in any way.The product exhibits a distinct change in performance. Replacement Parts — When replacement parts are required, make sure that • the service center uses only parts with the same characteristics as the originals, as recommended by the manufacturer. Unauthorized substitution of parts could result in fire, electrical shock, or create other hazards. Safety Check — Upon completion of servicing or repairs, ask the service technician to perform safety checks to determine that the product is in good working order.

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[HEALTH AND SAFTY]

Handling the Camera WARNING
• • • • Do not use the camera in areas exposed to flammable or explosive gases. A fire or explosion may result. Do not use the flash on people (infants, small children, etc.) at close range. When you fire the flash, you must be at least 1 m (3 ft) away from the faces of your subjects. Firing the flash too close to the subject's eyes could cause a momentary loss of vision.

• • • • • • •

• Keep young children and infants away from the camera. • If not, the following dangerous situations may occur: • Becoming entangled in the camera strap or power cords, causing strangulation. If this happens, follow the doctor's instructions. • Accidentally swallowing the battery or other small parts. • Accidentally firing the flash into their own eyes or those of another child. • Accidentally being injured by the moving parts of the camera. • Do not use or store the camera in dusty or humid places. • Using or storing the camera in dusty or humid places may result in a fire electric shock. • Do not cover the flash with a hand while firing. • Do not cover the flash or touch it after it has just been fired sequentially. • It may be hot and cause minor burns. • Do not take apart or modify the camera. • Never attempt to disassemble the camera. The internal circuits contain high voltage points which could cause serious burns or electrical shock. Do not let water or foreign objects inside the camera. A fire or electric shock may result. If the camera is accidentally dropped in water, or if liquid is spilled into the camera, stop using it, allow it to dry, and then remove the battery. Contact the nearest authorized Olympus service center. Do not touch the battery or the battery charger while battery charging is in progress. Wait until charging is complete and the battery has cooled. The battery and battery charger become hot while charging. At these times, they may cause minor burns. Do not use a non-specified battery and/or charger. Use of a non-designated battery and/or re-charger may lead to camera or battery failure as well as other unexpected accidents. Any accidents resulting from use of non-designated equipment will not be compensated.

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[HEALTH AND SAFTY]

CAUTION
• Stop using the camera immediately if you notice any unusual odors, noise, or smoke around it. • If you notice any unusual odors, noise, or smoke around the camera during operation, switch it off immediately — and remove the battery. Allow the camera to sit idle for a few minutes to cool. Take the camera outdoors, away from flammable objects, and carefully remove the battery. Never remove the battery with bare hands. Contact the nearest Olympus service center immediately. • Do not use the camera with wet hands. • Damage or electric shock may result. Also, do not connect or disconnect the power plug with wet hands. • Be careful with the strap when you carry the camera. It could easily catch on stray objects — and cause serious damage. • Do not leave the camera in areas subject to extremely high temperature. • Doing so may cause parts to deteriorate and, in some circumstances, cause the camera to catch fire. • When the camera contains metal parts, overheating can result in a lowtemperature burn. Pay attention to the following: • When used for a long period, the camera will get hot. If you hold on to the camera in this state, a low-temperature burn may be caused. • In places subject to extremely cold temperatures, the temperature of the camera's body may be lower than the environmental temperature. If possible, wear gloves when handling the camera in cold temperatures. • Do not damage the power cable. • Do not pull on the charger's cable or add another cable to it. Be sure to connect or disconnect the charger's cable while holding the power plug. If the following cases occur, stop using and contact an Olympus dealer or authorized customer support center. • The power plug or cable produces heat, burning smell, or smoke. • The power plug or cable is cracked or broken. • The contact is bad on the power plug • Battery handling precautions • Follow these important guidelines to prevent the battery from leaking, overheating, burning, exploding, or causing electrical shocks or burns.

• DANGER
• Never heat or incinerate the battery. • Do not connect the (+) and (-) terminals to each other using metal objects. • Do not carry or store the battery where it may come into contact with metal objects such as jewelry, pins, fasteners, etc. • Never store the battery where it will be exposed to direct sunlight, or subjected to high temperatures in a hot vehicle, near a heat source, etc. • Never attempt to disassemble the battery or modify it in any way, such as by soldering. • Doing so may break the terminals or cause battery fluid to splash, resulting in potential

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[HEALTH AND SAFTY]

fire, explosion, battery leakage, overheating or other damage. • If battery fluid gets in your eyes, loss of eyesight may result. • If battery fluid gets in your eyes, do not rub them. Flush them immediately with clear, cold running water and seek medical attention straight away.

• WARNING
• Keep the battery dry at all times. Never allow it to come into contact with fresh or salt water. • Do not touch or hold the battery with wet hands. • If the rechargeable battery does not recharge within the specified time, stop charging it and do not use it. • If you do not, fire, explosion, ignition or overheating may result. • Do not use the battery if it is cracked or broken. • Doing so may cause explosion or overheating. • Never subject the battery to strong shocks or continuous vibration. Doing so may cause explosion or overheating. • Never attempt to modify the battery compartment on the camera, never insert anything (other than the specified battery) into the compartment. • If the battery leaks, becomes discolored or deformed, or appears abnormal in any way during operation, stop using the camera immediately. • Contact your dealer or an authorized Olympus service center. Continued use may result in fire or electric shock. • If the battery leaks fluid onto your clothing or skin, remove the clothing and flush the affected area with clean, running cold water immediately. If the fluid burns your skin, seek medical attention immediately.

• CAUTION
• Do not remove the battery from the camera immediately after operating the camera on battery power for a long time. • Doing so may cause burns. • Remove the battery from the camera if it is not going to be used for a long time. • Otherwise, battery leakage or overheating may cause a fire or injury.

• Handling and storage precautions
• Camera • To protect the high-precision technology contained in this product, never leave the camera in the places listed below, no matter if in use or storage: • Places where temperatures and/or humidity are high or go through extreme changes. Direct sunlight, beaches, locked cars, or near other heat sources (stove, radiator, etc.) or humidifiers. • In sandy or dusty environments. • Near flammable items or explosives.

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• • • •

In wet places, such as bathrooms or in the rain. In places subject to strong vibrations. Never drop the camera or subject it to severe shocks or vibrations. Do not leave the camera pointed directly at the sun. This may cause lens damage, color failure, ghosting on the CCD, or may possibly start a fire. • Condensation may form inside the camera when there is a sudden extreme change in temperature (such as when moving from indoors to outdoors). Acclimatize the camera to the temperature (e.g. by putting the camera into a plastic bag) before use. • If the camera has not been used for a long time, mold may form or the camera may malfunction. Before using the camera, check that the camera works properly. • Do not touch electric contacts on cameras and interchangeable lenses. Remember to attach the cap when removing the lens • Do not place the camera near anything that could be affected by magnetism (e.g. credit card, floppy disk, etc.). Doing so may destroy the data on these items.

• LCD monitor

• Do not push the monitor forcibly; otherwise the image may become fuzzy, resulting in a playback mode failure or damage to the monitor. If the monitor is damaged, be careful not to get any of the liquid crystals from the monitor in your mouth. If liquid crystals get on your limbs or clothes, wash them off. • A strip of light may appear on the top/bottom of the monitor. This is not a malfunction. • When a subject is viewed diagonally in the camera, the edges may appear to zigzag on the monitor. This is not a malfunction; It will be less noticeable in playback mode. • In places subject to low temperatures, the LCD monitor may take a long time to turn on or its color may change temporarily. When using the camera in extremely cold places, it is a good idea to occasionally place it in a warm place. A LCD monitor exhibiting poor performance due to low temperatures will recover in normal temperatures. • The LCD monitor is made with high-precision technology. However, black spots or bright spots of light may appear on the LCD monitor. These spots may not be uniform in color and brightness depending on their • characteristics or the angle at which you are viewing the monitor. This is not a malfunction.

• Change or modifications not expressly approved by the manufacturer may void the user's authority to operate this equipment. This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. • This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful

• FCC Notice • Radio and Television Interference

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• • • • • •

interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures: Adjust or relocate the receiving antenna Increase the distance between the camera and receiver. Connect the equipment to an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected. Consult your dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help. Only the OLYMPUS-supplied USB cables should be used to connect the camera to USB-enabled personal computers (PC). Any unauthorized changes or modifications to this equipment would void the user's authority to operate.

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[EVALIDATION]

Unit 1
Learning Outcomes: What you must do:

NCFE Level 1 Certificate in Photography Use of Camera Controls
What you have done to show this Where in your Journal this can be found Navigation of Camera, P25

1.1 Explore the use of camera controls to create an image 1.2 Explore a range of recording media For digital cameras: various storage media, file types and size and resolution

Group project with hand out.

USB Sticks, SD cards, DVD,CD, Hard Drive & Paper Resizing Jpegs copy & past into MS word

Saving to a memory stick, P82 when opening your photographs P86 ISO Project, P38 Scene Mode Project, P31

1.3 Select appropriate lens to record image 1.4 Explore the use of equipment and accessories 1.5 Follow health & safety procedures 1.6 take a shot 1.7 how to set aperture, shutter and focus controls 1.8 appropriate ISO choice and quality of image size and resolution 1.9 Appropriate focal length lens for a range of subjects 1.10 How to select the correct equipment and accessories 1.11 Appropriate health & safety procedures

Using 50mm lens 70 X 300mm lens 10 X 22 mm lens Flash, Tripods, Card readers, Off shoe flash cable &Lens hoods Flash project & Moon project Throughout Journal Aperture, Shutter and manual projects ISO Project

Manual Mode Project P65

Flash photography P68 Day @ Lichfield P97 Throughout Journal Flash photography P68 Moon Project P61 Throughout Journal Aperture P46 Shutter P49 Manual Mode Project P65 ISO Project, P38

Group discussion, Moon project

Moon Project P61

Flash tripod different lenses and lens accessories As element 1.5

Throughout Journal

Additional information The Journal should contain at least 3 examples of images taken at the start of the cause when their skills are being developed. Candidates can identify areas to improve in to help inform the work produced for unit 3.

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[EVALIDATION]

NCFE Level 1 Certificate in Photography

Unit 2
Learning Outcomes: What must you do: 2.1 Process/download an image 2.2 Select and produce a print 2.3 Appropriate health & safety procedures 2.4 Understand processing procedures needed to produce an image 2.5 How to alter images: Using a digital image- how to adjust contrast, brightness, saturation and resize 2.6 Appropriate health & safety procedures

Explore and develop image production skills
What you have done to show this On going throughout journal Class discussion Right posture at computer making sure liquids & cables are out of the way On going throughout journal Litchfield Project, and thought out journal Ref element 2.3 Where in your Journal this can be found journal Bad Posture, protect your eyes P6 journal Day @ Lichfield P67

Bad Posture, protect your eyes P6

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[EVALIDATION]

NCFE Level 1 Certificate in Photography

Unit 3
Learning Outcomes: What must you do: 3.1 Research and present possible ideas to develop into a photographic portfolio based on ONE of the selected topics listed 3.2 Explore work of other Photographers 3.3 Discuss a range of ideas with tutor and peers approval 3.4 Adapt ideas appropriately in response to factors and individual ways of working 3.5 Produce an evaluation of the completed Portfolio 3.6 Compositional elements and techniques used to produce a series of images to a chosen brief 3.7 An exploration of presentation techniques 3.8 How the study of the chosen aspect has influenced your picture taking 3.9 How to critically evaluate the completed portfolio

Produce & evaluate a range of photographic images
What you have done to show this Group discussion Chosen Faces Where in your Journal this can be found Group discussion

Christine Kessler project Group session Adapting and developing my own style of club photography Final evaluation Cropping down negative space Throughout journal Final evaluation Group discussion & tutorial

Christine Kessler project P76 Group discussion Throughout journal

Throughout journal Throughout journal Group discussion, Christine Kessler project P76 Group discussion

Additional information Portfolio must consist of 12 images presented as a considered approach to the chosen theme. The themes are; (1) Faces. (2) My Favourite Place. (3) A Day out. (4) Public or family event. Please Note: Candidates should only complete ONE of the above topics and images must be at least 8” X 6” in size

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10/01/2009CANDIDATE INFORMATION PACK

NCFE Level 1 Certificate in Photography Candidate Information Pack

Candidate Name: Stuart Williams Centre Number: Centre Name: Start Date: Stone Hall 17/09/08

Tutor's Name: Mr Mark Holloway

Signatures
Candidate: Assessor: …………………………………………………………………Date: .............. ………………………………………………………………….Date: ..............

Internal Moderator*: …………………………………………………………….Date: .............. External Moderator*: .............................................. Date: ...........................

for completion if part, or all, of the evidence has been sampled by the Internal and/or External Moderator

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CANDIDATE INFORMATION PACK

NCFE Level 1 Certificate in Photography

Contents
Section 1: Introduction Qualification Overview Aims Opportunities for Further Education and Training Links to Skills for Life 1 1 1 1

Section 2: Completing your NCFE Qualification Why use this Information Pack? The Internal and External Moderator Certification Additional Support Requirements Appeals, Enquiries about Results and Complaints Malpractice and Misconduct Equal Opportunities Data Protection

3 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5

Section 3: Tracking your progress How To Use This Information Pack Unit Summaries Unit 01 Unit 02 Unit 03 Use of Camera Controls Explore and develop image production skills Produce and evaluate a range of photographic images

6 6 7 8 10 12 13

About NCFE

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CANDIDATE INFORMATION PACK

Section 1: Introduction
Thank you for choosing an NCFE qualification. This information pack is yours to keep and is a place to record your progress. Your NCFE qualification can help you progress to further qualifications. The following qualification overview explains this in more detail.

Qualification Overview
The NCFE Level 1 Certificate in Photography is an ideal qualification for candidates wishing to gain knowledge of photographic principles and improve their image taking skills. The NCFE Level 1 Certificate in Photography has been accredited by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) as part of the National Qualifications Framework. Its QCA accreditation number is 100/5715/8. The qualification comprises the following three] mandatory units:
• • •

Unit 01 Use of Camera Controls Unit 02 Explore and develop image production skills Unit 03 Produce and evaluate a range of photographic images

Aim s
The NCFE Level 1 Certificate in Photography aims to: enable candidates to develop basic photography skills • provide candidates with an underpinning knowledge of the photographic process provide candidates with a basis for progression into other study

Opportunities for Further Education and Training
After successfully completing this qualification, you may like to go on to further study in qualifications such as

Links to skills for life
This qualification provides the opportunity for you to develop your Key Skills in Communication, Application of Num ber and Improving Own Learning and Performance. You and your Tutor may decide that you can take an assessment for these Key Skills. If you are assessed and are successful, you will be given a certificate to show which Key Skills you have achieved.

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CANDIDATE INFORMATION PACK

Section 2:

Completing your NCFE qualification

W hy Use This I nformation Pack?
This information pack provides you with the learning outcomes you have to meet to achieve each unit of this qualification. The Pack will help you keep track of the work you have done and the work you still need to do to finish your portfolio. It will also help your Tutors and Moderators find their way around your portfolio so they can assess it. To help you, page 6 of this booklet gives you an example of how to use the pack. Once you have completed your portfolio, your Tutor will sign the front of the pack, to s how it has been completed to his/her satisfaction.

The Internal and External M oderator
After your Tutor has assessed your work, another member of staff, the Internal Moderator, will review your Tutor's assessment. An External Moderator, employed by NCFE, will visit your centre and may wish to discuss the content of the cou rse and the work you are doing with you and the other candidates. The External Moderator's role is to ensure your work has been assessed in accordance with NCFE's requirements. The Internal and/or External Moderator will also sign the front of the information pack, if your portfolio is one of those selected.

Certification
Once you have built up your portfolio of evidence to the satisfaction of your Tutor and the Internal and External Moderator, you will be awarded the NC FE Level 1 Certificate in Photography. Once your portfolio has been completed and signed off by your centre and the External Moderator, your centre will return a signed Certificate Claim Form to NCFE. Your certificate will be despatched to your centre within 15 working days of receipt of this form. Your centre will either forward the certificate to your home address, or notify you that it is available for collection. If you do not achieve the full qualification you may claim a Letter of Unit Credit for the individual units you have completed. The centre where you are undertaking the qualification can request a Letter of Unit Credit from NCFE on your behalf once your evidence for that unit has been internally and externally moderated. Please speak to your course Tutor if you would like more details on how to claim a Letter of Unit Credit.

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CANDIDATE INFORMATION PACK

Additional Support Requirements NCFE recognises that you might require additional support in order to achieve your qualification; for example, if you have a permanent, or temporary, disability, medical condition or specific learning need. This may take the form of facilities to support reading or writing needs, a hearing, visual or physical impairment, facilities to support a medical condition or temporary injury, or facilities to support you if your first language is not English. Your Tutor will discuss the most appropriate method of support to meet your needs and may notify NCFE of the support they are going to give you. For more information your Tutor will be able to provide you with a full copy of NCFE's Reasonable Adjustments and Considerations Policy, or you can download it from www.ncfe.org.uk.

Appeals, Enquiries about R esults and Com plaints
If you have any queries or problems with your qualification, you should first talk to your Tutor, the Internal Moderator or another member of staff at your centre. If you have a complaint about the way your work has been assessed, or the support you have been given, you must raise the issues through your centre's own appeals or grievance policy (your Tutor should be able to give you a copy of this). For more information your Tutor will be able to provide you with a full copy of NCFE's Appeals and Enquiries about Results Policy, or you can download it from www.ncfe.org.uk.

M a l pr ac t i ce a n d M is c on d u ct
NCFE will act upon reports of suspected or actual cases of malpractice or misconduct received from candidates and other parties about a centre's activities or centre personnel which may affect the integrity of the qualification(s) and quality assurance systems. If your centre suspects you have been involved in malpractice or misconduct (eg cheating) your certificate will not be issued during the course of the investigation. If the case is proven you may have a part of your assessment disallowed or, in serious cases, your final results may be void. For more information your Tutor will be able to provide you with a full copy of NCFE's Malpractice and Misconduct Policy, or you can download it from www.ncfe.org.uk.

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CANDIDATE INFORMATION PACK

Equal Opportunities
NCFE fully supports the principle of equal opportunities and opposes a II unlawful or unfair discrimination on the grounds of ability, age, colour, culture, disability, domestic circumstances, employment status, gender, marital status, nationality, political orientation, racial origin, religious beliefs, sexual orientation and social background. NCFE aims to ensure that equality of opportunity is promoted and that unlawful or unfair discrimination, whether direct or indirect, is eliminated both in its own employment practices, and in access to its qualifications. NCFE's Equal Opportunities Statement is available to download from www.ncfe.org.uk.

Data P rotection
NCFE is registered under the Data Protection Act (1998) and is committed to maintaining the highest possible standards when handling personal information.

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CANDIDATE INFORMATION PACK

Tracking your progress

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CANDIDATE INFORMATION PACK

Section 3: Tracking your progress
Unit Sum m aries
Unit 01 Use of Camera Controls

This unit covers using a camera (either digital or film) and understanding the controls of a camera in order to produce well exposed and sharp images. During this unit you will develop photo s kills by producing a range of exploratory imagery. This work will be built on to produce a portfolio in Unit 03. Unit 01 This unit has one element and is mandatory: Element 1.1 Use of camera controls Unit 02 Explore and develop image production skills This unit covers the production of a print, either digital or film based. This unit has one element and is mandatory: Element 2.1 Explore and develop image production skills Unit 03 Produce and evaluate a range of photographic images This unit covers the production of a photographic portfolio. This unit has one element and is mandatory: Elements 3.1 Produce and evaluate a range of photographic images

Project:- Navigation of Camera
Unit Covered NCFE 1.1

Date 24/09/08
By Stuart Williams

Project: Navigation of camera - to negotiate yourself around your camera to find where different accessories fit to or what functions are available for you to use. Please remember that Digital Cameras are in themselves mini portable computers/storage devices.

Objectives: - To get to know your camera. Learn what it can do.

Learner's comments. Please fill in as much detail, thinking about the following issues: What did you learn from this project?

Not a lot as I had been playing with the camera for some time.

Was the project beneficial?

Not really.
Do you need more time spent on this project?

No thanks.
Tutor's comments:

Project:- Navigation of Camera
Unit Covered NCFE 1.1

Date 24/09/08
By Stuart Williams

Back View of Camera.

Please look at your camera to see if the following functions are on the camera Do you have all the above functions either on the back or somewhere else on your camera?

Yes

Please list what buttons/controls you have on the back of your camera.

Cross keys Picture Style selection button AF mode button White balance /share button Display button Aperture/Exposure button AF point selection/ magnification button

Metering mode Drive mode selection button Playback button set button Menu button Dioptric adjustment knob AE lock FE lock button Index reduce button Erase button

Project:- Navigation of Camera
Unit Covered NCFE 1.1

Date 24/09/08
By Stuart Williams

Mode dial: - gives you the choice of which Still Photography mode you want to use. The mode dial may be found within the menus on offer on the Monitor Text Display accessed via the LCD monitor. If this is the case then you do not have a dial then most of your options will be found as software accessed through your LCD monitor and menu button. Please list below all the options your camera has on offer on the Mode Dial.

Program Shutter priority Aperture priority Manual exposure Automatic depth of field Portrait Landscape Close up Sports Night Portrait Flash Off
Most Menu Buttons are multi-functional. Acting as quick access buttons to for

Project:- Navigation of Camera
Unit Covered NCFE 1.1

Date 24/09/08
By Stuart Williams

Below are examples of two quick/easy access buttons for flash modes and macro photography. MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY This is used to photograph objects, which are very close to the lens in order to see the detail of the object. You can use macro to adjust camera settings to take close-up shots, which you can also zoom in on. Try and take a photograph close up of fingernail for instance. How close can you get?

photography symbol

Macro

Above are examples of different Flash symbols available in the Flash Mode Please tick against any of the functions listed below that you can find on your Please tick against any of the functions listed below that you can find on your camera.

S

A

Project:- Navigation of Camera
Unit Covered NCFE 1.1

Date 24/09/08
By Stuart Williams

1

Self timer
Macro (photography) Zoom Bar Camera shake warning Lens Viewfinder Flash Red eye reduction mode Strap mount USB socket DC in socket Portrait mode Tripod mount Diopter adjustment dial Movie mode

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

x x

x

X

Delete button

Project:- Navigation of Camera
Unit Covered NCFE 1.1

Date 24/09/08
By Stuart Williams

When looking at the software menus available to the photographer they are often split up into three sections: Camera menus therefore all aspects of functions that are directly involved with photography.

Software which is to do with Photography. Therefore you will find anything which will aid you to take a photograph.

Playback menu. Which will include all the stored information about the photograph. IE what Mode was the photograph taken under?

Often represented by the image of a spanner. If there are two "spanners" as options then the first may refer to further options to fine tune your photographs but this is advanced photography, as a general rule leave these settings alone until you understand those options found under the camera options (1 above). The other options found under the "spanner" option are to do with the set up of time and date etc naming files (name for photograph each photograph being regarded as a file). Anything that is important for you to do your camera will probably ask you to set when you first set up your camera.

Project:- Scene Mode
Unit Covered NCFE 1.1

Date 24/09/08
By Stuart Williams

Glossary of terms and functions and there uses. Scene Mode
Dial Mode. Often found on the top of your camera. Features include.. Auto mode - under this mode the camera will work out an average for all settings and is best used In conjunction with a flash ( indeed some cameras will always fire up the flash in auto mode and will not allow you to switch the flash off). The draw back to this mode is that as the camera works out an average particularly concerning exposure levels you may find that bleaching out has occurred particularly in skies or in very light areas of the photograph. P-mode (Programmed mode) under this mode you can depending on your cameras specification change some of the cameras settings for instance the. ISO (film speed) or Shutter speed. Under this mode you can also find what are called scene modes e.g. landscape , portrait , night time , sport etc ( to find more you may have to go into you on screen menus. P-mode is a very useful mode to achieve well balanced photographs as the camera will work out what are the optimum settings after you have decided what settings you want to change. Under scene modes you are telling the camera to expect certain photographic conditions I.e. sports will expect a fast moving subject so will use a fast shutter speed and respective ISO ( film speed). Again allowing you to achieve a well balanced photograph. S-mode ( on canon cameras this is known as TV-mode) and stands for Shutter Priority mode. Under this mode you can set how long the shutter is open for -the shutter speed. The longer the shutter is open for the more light is allowed into the camera , therefore under low lighting conditions the shutter would be open longer. This is set up when you use the night time scene mode mentioned above. You can use S-mode for shots where you want to freeze a moving subject ( fast shutter speed I.e. 1/1000sec) or convey the impression of movement ( slow shutter speed 2sec).

Project:- Scene Mode
Unit Covered NCFE 1.1

Date 24/09/08
By Stuart Williams

A-mode (on canon cameras this is known as AV-mode) and stands for Aperture Priority mode. The aperture refers to the size of the hole allowing light in the camera and is situated within the lens of the camera. You can use this mode for shots . where you want to have the background out of focus (large aperture) or have both near and far objects in focus at the same time (small aperture). Please note a small aperture is f22 while a large aperture is t2.8. Small apertures are generally used in landscape photography while large apertures are used for portrait photography and as before will be set automatically when using different scene modes. M-mode stands for manual mode and under this mode you can set both shutter speed and aperture this is for more advanced photography. Playback mode. This mode is normally shown as a triangle within a box. Under this mode you can delete or erase unwanted photographs. Before you do this then you best enlarge the image by using your zoom. Useful if your memory card is filling up and is a practice that is good to get use to doing and saving disappointment when viewing photographs later , on a computer to find your photo could have been re-taken and hopefully improving the shot. How many pixels are needed ? Roughly 1MB will be good for an 4"x6" (A6) photograph 6MB or more will be useful for an A4 print or crop from an A4 print. Memory cards - ok the bigger the better until something goes wrong either its get damaged or stolen a series of small sized cards is often better to have. Under the back screen menu you should be able to find .. ISO ( film speed settings ) 100 being a fast speed but less sensitive than 800 which is a slower film speed but 8x as sensitive as 100. WB or white balance this refers to the colour temperature of the scene to be photographed and is measured in degrees of Kelvin ( see attached notes ).

Project:- Scene Mode
Unit Covered NCFE 1.1

Date 24/09/08
By Stuart Williams

Task to choose three of the pictures and note why.

I have chosen this as my primary picture as it seems that the whites are less washed out and the blue richness of the sky as well as the contrast of the greens in the tree.

I have chosen this landscape mode picture my second as I feel it was more of a true representation of the colures that were really going on.

Third and final picture is chosen for having a better composition than the above two however the exercise was not about composition, and could have been improved on.

Project:- Scene Mode
Unit Covered NCFE 1.1

Date 24/09/08
By Stuart Williams

Title Landscape Time Date 8/10/08 Mode landscape ISO Setting 100 White Balance Aperture f/7.1 Shutter Speed 1/125 No. Pixels 12.1 mp Metering Mode Pattern Notes: This is the only one that set its self
at 100 ISO and yet the colours look very strong not like the day it’s self. But probably the closest without the over exposure.

Title Normal Time Date 8/10/08 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: normal 400 Auto f/11 1/200 12.1 mp pattern Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title No flash Time Date 8/10/08 No flash 400 Auto f/11 1/200 12.1mp pattern

Title Macro Time Date 8/10/08 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Macro 400 auto f/11 1/200 12.1mp Pattern Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Giving a rich
the real colours

Title Portrait Time Date 8/10/08 portrait 400 Auto f/13 1/200 12.1mp pattern
sky but untrue to

Title
Night Portrait

Time Date 8/10/08
Night portrait Mode ISO Setting 400 White Balance Auto Aperture f/11 Shutter Speed 1/200 No. Pixels 12.1mp Metering Mode pattern Notes: a little washed out on the whites

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Note:

Title Sports Time Date 8/10/08 Sports 400 auto f/7.1 1/500 12.1 Pattern

Title
Without flash

Time Date 8/10/08 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Note:
Without flash

200 auto f/8 1/125 12.1mp Pattern

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Note:

Title IM 9467 Time Date 1/10/8 Portrait 400 Auto f/5.6 1/60 12.1mp pattern

Project:- Scene Mode
Unit Covered NCFE 1.1

Date 24/09/08
By Stuart Williams

Title
Stone hall landscape

Title Sports mode Time Date 1/10/8 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Sports 400 Auto f/9 1/800 12.1MP Pattern Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels

Title Shed back

out

Time Date 1/10/8 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Landscape 100 Auto f/8 1/200 12.1MP Pattern

Time Date 1/10/8 Landscape 160 Auto f/5.6 1/25 12.1MP

Metering Mode Pattern Notes: Unusual to see a ISO speed of 160

Title shed out back 2 Time Date 1/10/8 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Landscape 640 Auto f/5.6 1/25sec 12.1MP Pattern Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Colours are richer

Title Trees Time Date 1/10/8 Landscape 100 Auto f/7.1 1/125 sec 12.1 MP Pattern Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels

Title Trees 2 Time Date 1/10/8 Sports 400 Auto f/5 1/400 sec 12.1MP

Metering Mode Pattern Notes Colours are more in keeping with reality

Notes: Noticing again an unusual ISO speed

Notes & Research link

Project:-Difference between white balance lighting
Unit Covered NCFE 1.1

Date 01/11/08
By Stuart Williams

White Balance is measured in Degrees of Kelvin.

Notes:-

What is colour temperature (Degrees Kelvin)? Degrees Kelvin (or colour temperature) is a unit of temperature measurement starting from absolute zero at -273 Celsius. Degrees Kelvin (or colour temperature) is used in colour photography to indicate the colour balance or spectrum of light emitted from a light source. Sunlight measures about 5500K; film balanced for sunlight (daylight film), will assure 'true' colour rendition for objects reflecting the sun.

Project:-Difference between white balance lighting
Unit Covered NCFE 1.1

Date 01/11/08
By Stuart Williams

Title Florescent Time Date 22/10/8

Title Tungsten Time Date 22/10/8

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Program 100 Florescent f/5.6 1/30sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Program 100 Tungsten f/5.6 1/30 sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Notes and Research link

Project:Project: -

ISO different levels four times of day outside

Date 15/10/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

To record all the ISO levels at four times a day. For example you could take a photograph with an ISO 100 at 8am then 12 am then 4pm and lastly at 8pm. You must use one of two modes Program if D-SIR or Manual Mode if you have a compact without Program mode with individual ISO levels. You will then need to record your camera's other settings, which your camera has used to obtain a photograph. Please keep to the same mode setting. I.e. Program mode or Compact's Manual mode. See additional sheet. The flash must be off. In order to obtain a photograph without camera shake a tripod will be required. You can take interior photographs or exterior ones but you must record the same subject. Composition: - see tutors notes Objectives: - to record a photograph of all ISO levels. To cover units of syllabus stated above. N.B. learners who do not have access to any ISO settings on camera to use tutors camera in lesson time. Learner's comments. Please fill in as much detail, thinking about the following issues: 1. What did you learn from this project? I have learnt that the ISO setting sensitivity of the image sensor, and the lower the speed the better quality of picture. Higher ISO settings are generally used in darker situations to get faster shutter speeds for example indoor sports event when you want to freeze the action in lower light. I have also learnt that 100 ISO is generally accepted as ‘normal’ and will give you lovely crisp shots (little noise/grain). 2 Do you need more time spent on this project? No I think Im ok on this one thanks. Tutor's comments: -

Project:-

ISO different levels four times of day outside

Date 15/10/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

You Have Three Weeks to Do This Project. Project to be completed by Tuesday 30th October or Saturday 3rd November

Firstly what does the ISO setting mean?
Traditionally the ISO is a measure of the film speed in a traditional film camera. The higher the ISO number the faster the film speed. In digital terms film speed is often referred to as Sensitivity, e.g. 400 ISO is 4X as sensitive as 100 ISO. On a digital camera, raising the ISO allows faster shutter speed, smaller aperture or both, but also can result in a grainy image which in digital terms this is referred to as "noise" which unfortunately sometimes cannot be seen in the small LCD screen at the back of the camera until later enlargement. This may not be a negative issue if the end photograph is under 4"x6". On digital cameras the ISO number refers to the chips in the image-sensor rays. The number of chips or effectiveness of these chips can depend on the specification or make of camera.

Points to Remember.
Use a lower JPEG compression setting to avoid excessive noise. It is always best to try to use the lowest ISO setting possible. Noise can be a downside of higher ISO settings. Higher ISO settings allow faster shutter speed, a smaller aperture or both. The number of Pixels being used can be reduced to reduce "noise". On the other side of the coin too few pixels can mean a blocky-looking -or pixelated -- image. Health And Safety. Whenever moving around tripods are careful of the legs. It is very easy to trip or knock them over. Always position your tripod with two legs to the back one at the front. Cameras with top-heavy lens on must be properly supported.If photographing in low light have a torch at hand. When connecting your camera to the computer make sure it is on a secure surface and cannot be knocked off. Make sure you are sitting comfortably in front of the computer. Take time to read the Health and Safety notices on walls around computer room about working on a computer.
PLEASE NOTE YOU MUST SHOW YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS FROM YOUR CAMERA I WILL OT ACCEPT ANY PHOTOGRAPHS FROM DISC'S OR ANY OTHER FORM OF STORAGE MEDIUM.

Project:Composition

ISO different levels four times of day outside

Date 15/10/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Rule of thirds. This is a rule that is important objects on an axis is a third of the proportion of the photograph

Axis of photograph

Project:-

ISO different levels four times of day outside

Date 15/10/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Title 100 11 Time Date 11:19 12/10

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Program 100 Auto f/8 1/160 sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title 200 11 Time Date 11:19 12/10 Program 200 Auto f/10 1/250 sec 12.166 Pattern

Title 400 11 Time Date 11:19 12/10 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Program 400 Auto f/11 1/320 sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Title 800 11 Time Date 11:19 12/10

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Program 800 Auto f/14 1/400 sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title 1600 11 Time Date 11:19 12/10 Program 1600 Auto f/16 1/640 sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Title 100 16 Time Date 16:54 12/10 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes Program 100 Auto f/7.1 1/125 sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Title 200 16 Time Date 16:54 12/10

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Program 200 Auto f/9 1/200 sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title 400 16 Time Date 16:54 12/10 Program 400 Auto f/11 1/250 sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Title 800 16 Time Date 16:54 12/10 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Program 800 Auto f/13 1/400 sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Project:-

ISO different levels four times of day outside

Date 15/10/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Title 1600 16 Time Date 16:54 12/10 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Program 1600 Auto f/14 1/500 sec 12.166 Pattern Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title 100 18 Time Date 18:44 12/10 Program 400 Auto f/3.5 0.8 sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Title 200 18 Time Date 18:45 12/10 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Program 200 Auto f/3.5 1/2 sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Title 400 18 Time Date 18.45 12/10 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Program 400 Auto f/3.5 1/3 sec 12.166 MP Pattern Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title 800 18 Time Date 18:45 12/10 Program 800 Auto f/3.5 1/6 sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Title 1600 18 Time Date 18:45 12/10 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes Program 1600 Auto f/5.6 1/80 sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Title 100 20 Time Date 20:04 12/10 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Program 100 Auto f/3.5 4 sec 12.166 MP Pattern Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title 200 20 Time Date 20:04 12/10 Program 200 Auto f/3.5 2 sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Title 400 20 Time Date 20:04 12/10 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Program 400 Auto f/3.5 1 sec 12.166 Pattern

Project:-

ISO different levels four times of day outside
Title 800 20 Time Date 20:04 12/10 Title 1600 20 Time Date 20:04 12/10 Program 200 Auto f/3.5 1/4 sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Date 15/10/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Program 800 Auto f/3.5 0.6 sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Project:-

ISO different levels four times of day outside
Title Flash 100 nite Title Tung nite

Date 15/10/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

100

Title Florec nite

100

Time Date 30/10/8 23:55 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Program 100 Flash f/5.6 MV 12.166MP Pattern

Time Date 30/10/8 23:54 Mode Program ISO Setting 100 White Balance Tungsten Aperture f/5.6 Shutter Speed 2 sec No. Pixels 12.66MP Metering Mode Pattern Notes: No dramatic changes at different ISO settings with same WB but bit darker on shadow Title Tung 200 nite Time Date 31/10/08 00:02 Mode Program ISO Setting 200 White Balance Tungsten Aperture f/5.6 Shutter Speed 1 sec No. Pixels 12.166MP Metering Mode Pattern Notes: No dramatic changes at different ISO settings with same WB Title Tung 400 nite Time Date 31/10/08 00:01 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Program 400 Tungsten f/5.6 ½ sec 12.166MP Patten Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Time Date 30/10/08 23:54 Program 100 Florescent f/5.6 2 sec 12.166MP Pattern

Title Flash 200 nite

Title florec 200nite Time Date 31/10/08 00:11 Program 200 Florescent f/5.6 0.8 sec 12.166MP Pattern

Time Date 30/10/08 23:57 Mode Program ISO Setting 200 White Balance Flash Aperture f/5.6 Shutter Speed 1/60 sec No. Pixels 12.166MP Metering Mode Pattern Notes: ISO of 100 with flash on still seems quite dark

Title Flash 400 nite Time Date 30/10/08 23:58 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Program 400 Flash f/5.6 mp 12.166MP Pattern

Title Flores 400 nite Time Date 31/10/08 00:15 Program 400 Florescent f/5.6 ½ sec 12.166MP Pattern

Notes: No dramatic changes at different ISO settings with same WB

Project:-

ISO different levels four times of day outside
Title Flash 800 nite Time Date 30/10/8 23.59 Title Tung 800 nite Time Date 30/10/8 23:54 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Program 800 Tungsten f/5.6 Multi Value 12.66MP Pattern Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Date 15/10/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Title Flores 800 nite Time Date 30/10/08 23:54 Program 800 Florescent f/5.6 ¼ sec 12.166MP Pattern

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Program 800 Flash f/5.6 MV 12.166MP Pattern

Title Flash 1600 nite Time Date 30/10/08 23:59 Mode Program ISO Setting 1600 White Flash Balance Aperture f/5.6 Shutter 1/60 sec Speed No. Pixels 12.166MP Metering Pattern Mode Notes: Compared to the equal set at 100 ISO it’s a lot lighter. Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title Tung 1600 nite Time Date 31/10/08 00:00 Program 1600 Tungsten f/5.6 1/8 sec 12.166MP Pattern Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes

Title flores 1600 nite Time Date 31/10/08 00:14 Program 200 Florescent f/5.6 1/8 sec 12.166MP Pattern

Notes / Research link

Project:NCFE 1.2

Aperture Priority

Date 01/11/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered

Project- Aperture Priority. To record the information below and on the following page, of other learners' cameras settings while in Aperture Priority Mode. name
STUART

Camera model

Aperture (Fstop) range
f/1.8 –f/22 f/2.8-f/8 f/2.8-f/32 f/3.5-f/22 f/3.5-f/32 f/2.8-f/8 f/33-f/48 f/2.7-f/2.8 f/3.5-f/32

ISO level
100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

Metering setting
PATTERN SPOT PARTAIL PARTAIL PARTAIL SPOT SPOT PATTERN PARTAIL

Shutter speed
1/250 sec 1/125 sec 1/4000 1/400 sec 1/8sec 1/40 sec 1/570 1/40 sec f/.3

when A. is set to FStop
f/1.8 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/3.5 f/8 f/2.8 f/5 f/2.7 f/6.3

CANON 450D NICKY Fujifilm s800 SHARRON Canon 350d PAUL Canon 400d ROBERT Canon 400d DOREEN Cannon g10 MARTYN Capljo r4 HENRY Canon power shot PAULEEN Canon 400d

What is Aperture Mode? This is mode the camera set the optimum shutter speed automatically for the aperture you have selected. When you open the aperture (decrease the aperture value), the camera will focus within a shorter range (shallow depth of field) and produce a picture with a blurred background. On the other hand when you close the aperture (increase the aperture), the camera will focus over a wider range in the forward and backward directions (more depth of field), producing a picture with clear focus throughout the image area. Does your camera have a preview function to check how the background will look? Tips If the shutter speed indicator light is flashing when set to a high speed, set the ISO sensitivity to a lower value or you could use a commercially available filter for adjusting the amount of light. Objectives: - Having looked and recorded the above information now look at the different lenses on the cameras in the classroom. How important is it to use the correct lens? It would certainly help to use the right lens when available. What do you think different lenses influence? The different lenses influence the depth of field as well as the amount of light getting through to the sensor. Do you think there are any particular lenses within the classroom that are designed for a particular use? Yes mine being a 50mm f/1.8 and a lot of the compacts are designed for portrait and general purpose.

Project:NCFE 1.2

Aperture Priority

Date 01/11/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered

Project- Aperture Priority to take three pictures of the same subject using the extreme settings from the largest aperture to the smallest and one about half way.

Title IMG 5558 Time Date 21/01/09 16:00 Aperture Priority 100 Flash f/22 1/6 sec 12.166MP Pattern

Title IMG 5559 Time Date 21/01/09 16:00 Aperture Priority 100 flash f/9 1/4 sec 12.166MP Pattern

Title IMG 5560 Time Date 21/01/09 16.00 Aperture Priority 100 flash f/1.8 1/100 sec 12.166MP Pattern

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Notes: long DoP big numbers (f/ stop) and clarity

Notes: some were in between

Notes little numbers narrow DoP and blurred outside of DoP

Learner's comments. The correct lens is important as it can govern how much light is allowed in to the sensor which in turn will have an influence on the shutter speed when in Aperture Mode, as well as helping to gain the required depth of field. Tutor's comments:-

Notes/Research link

Project:NCFE 1.2

Aperture Priority

Date 01/11/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered

Classroom Project:- to take pictures against brightly lighten wall using spot & pattern metering in Aperture Priority.
Title 5554 Time Date 21/01/09 11:13 Aperture Priority 100 Bright Day f/5 1/2000 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Title 5555 Time Date 21/01/09 11:13 Aperture Priority 100 Bright Day f/5 1/6 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Due to the fact of it being a particularly bright scene with a lot of glare, I have set the ISO at 100 which is my lowest setting, and the aperture at f/5 to allow the back ground to appear with a nice soft focus to help emphasize the subject (Pauline), as can be clearly seen while adjusting the metering between pattern and spot the picture appears a lot lighter in one than the other. as I spot metered on the wall as that was the brightest area, so this would cause the sensor to speed up the shutter in order to cut out some of the glare. IMG 5554 is in my opinion the better of the two as the contrast is more interesting. Action Plan to improve on picture 1.I think I should have opened up the aperture as far as I could without over exposure, to blur back ground out completely. 2. Give Pauline sun glasses so she doesn’t have to squint. 3. find a little better camera angle so’s not to catch so much shadow at the back of her head. Health & Safety To be careful not to point the camera at the sun or catch a reflection of it of the window. Not to strain your eyes while facing the sun. Wear sunglass and sun screen as U.V rays can be harmful to the eyes and skin.

Project:-

Shutter Priority

Date 01/11/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Homework:Using a long exposure time and short exposure. Creating different photographic results using different exposure times using the Shutter Priority mode. Ghosts. By leaving the shutter open for the maximum time allowed walk around in front of your camera. You will need to make sure that the lighting in the room is a low and make sure your camera is facing away from an directional light. See example below.

Definition of shutter Priority

Title 0364 Time Date 1/11/08 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode TV 100 Florescent f/18 10 sec 12.166 MP Pattern Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Title 0388 Time Date 1/11/08 17:52 TV 100 Florescent f/16 3.2 sec 12.166MP Pattern

Title 0401 Time Date 1/11/08 18:00 TV 100 Florescent f/29 30 sec 12.166 Pattern

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Notes: inadequate effect when background is plane.

Notes: with an interesting background one gets a feel of depth to the scene.

Notes: here I’ve tried to focus on the red mug to give a dimension to the ghost. (me)

Project:-

Shutter Priority

Date 01/11/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Car lights blurring into distance. The same as above but this time outside at night. Find a busy road where the traffic is moving, take a photograph leaving the shutter open for the maximum time allowed.

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title 0402 Time Date 3/11/08 18:30 TV 100 Florescent f/10 8 seconds 12.166 MP Pattern

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title 0403 Time Date 3/11/08 18:30 TV 1600 Florescent f/36 30 seconds 12.166 MP Pattern

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title 0405 Time Date 3/11/08 18:32 TV 400 Florescent f/25 20 sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Fast shutter speed. (250th sec and above) Take a photograph in daylight capturing a moving car or something in the garden being blown in the wind. Example of fountain below.

Equipment needed. 1. Tripod 2. Stutter release cable or remote control device. Alternatively you can use the self timer to avoid camera shake when taking the photograph. 3. Torch

Project:-

Shutter Priority

Date 01/11/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Health and safety. 1. Photographing in low light environment:- please make sure that you are always aware of where tripod legs are situated and that you allow plenty of space around the tripod to avoid tripping up or simply knocking the camera. 2. When outside at night please make sure you are safe and secure before taking photographs. Also that you do not block the way of members of the public. Please record below the camera settings you used for each photograph.

Title 0301 Time Date1/11/8 13:08 TV 100 cloudy f/29 30 sec 12.166MP Pattern

Title 0303 Time Date 1/11/08 13:10 TV 100 Cloudy f/4.5 1/4000 12.166MP Pattern

Title 0315 Time Date 1/11/08 13:17 TV 400 Cloudy f/7.1 1/400 12.166MP Pattern

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Notes: Over Exposure shutter speed open to long.

Notes: Under Exposed shutter speed to quick.

Note: shutter speed quick enough to catch drop of water.

Title 0348 Time Date 1/11/08 13:27 TV 400 Cloudy f/5.6 1/250 sec 12.166MP Pattern

Title 0342 Time Date 1/11/08 13:25 TV 1600 Cloudy f/40 ¼ sec 12.166 MP Pattern

Title 0333 Time Date 1/11/08 13:23 TV 400 Cloudy f/13 1/40 12.166MP Pattern

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Notes: water still a little blurred.

Notes: Slow shutter speed giving water blurred image

Notes: Had the external flash on to make water sparkle.

Project:-

Shutter Priority

Date 01/11/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

To display the way shutter priority works on a moving subject, and how it works in relation to the available light
Which Units did this project cover? List below all the camera controls you have used. • On/Off button • Automatic focus on/off • White balance button • Self timer (drive mode) • Play back button • Mode dial • Main dial • Live viewing button • Shutter button • Delete button

Describe below in your own words what you thought the project was about.

Evaluation: Did everything go to plan? Not exactly as shown in the above examples. Problems

with exposure. I had to change the aperture from the experience
How successful was it? I felt that it went very well and as I able was able to learn What did I have to change?

Comments by Tutor.

I confirm that this is all my own work. Signed.

Tutor Signature.

Project:-

Shutter Priority / Metering

Date 01/11/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Understanding how to control the amount of light entering the camera
Shutter Priority Auto Exposure: - A semi- automatic exposure mode in which the photographer sets the shutter speed and the camera selects the appropriate aperture. Shutter- opening that opens to allow light to reach the camera's sensors (equivalent of film in traditional cameras). Shutter speeds are measure in fractions of a second 1/4000-second for instance is a fast shutter speed while 60" seconds or a minute therefore a slow shutter speed for very low lighting conditions. Project- Shutter Priority. Following on from the aperture and the metering projects in this the final Semi-Auto Mode you will need to take 36 photographs (24 if your camera has only 2 metering modes) using 12 different subjects taken 3x under each different metering mode. Try to take the photographs under varying lighting conditions from strong light to low light. You may need to change your ISO setting from 100 up to its maximum setting. (Consult your results from your ISO project.) Objectives: - understanding how to control the amount of light entering the camera to obtain a good exposure. This can be affected by the ISO , Aperture Shutter speed in relation to each other and to some extent by which metering mode has been chosen.

Notes:Evaluative Metering (Pattern) this is an all-around metering suited for portraits and even backlit subjects, the camera sets the exposure automatically to suite the scene it is this mode that is used in the basic zone modes. Partial metering Effective when the background is much brighter than the subject due to back lighting etc. Spot metering this is for specific part of the subject or scene. Centre weighted average metering. (C.W.A) this metering is weighted at the centre and then averaged for the entre scene.

Project:-

Shutter Priority / Metering

Date 01/11/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Title IMG 4201 Time Date 19:24 20/12/08

Title IMG 4202 Time Date 19:24 20/12/08

Title IMG 4203 Time Date 19:25 20/12/08

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

TV 400 shade f/11 3.2 sec 12.1 Pattern

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

TV 400 Shade f/5.6 3.2 sec 12.1 Partial

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

TV 400 Shade f/4.5 3.2 sec 12.1 Spot

Title IMG 4207 Time Date 20:06 20/12/08

Title IMG 4208 Time Date 20:06 20/12/08

Title IMG 4209 Time Date 20:07 20/12/08

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

TV 400 Tungsten f/22 3.2 sec 12.1 Pattern

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

TV 400 Tungsten f/22 3.2 sec 12.1 Partial

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes

TV 400 Tungsten f/22 3.2 12.1 Spot

Title 4219 Time Date 15:41 22/12/08

Title 4220 Time Date 15:42 22/12/08

Title 4222 Time Date 15:43 22/12/08

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

TV 400 Shade f/5.6 3.2 sec 12.1 spot

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

TV 400 Shade f/5.6 3.2 sec 12.1 partial

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes

TV 400 shade f/5.6 3.2 sec 12.1 Pattern

Project:By Stuart Williams

Shutter Priority / Metering

Date 01/11/08

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Title IMG 4286 Time Date 00:36 23/12/08 TV 100 Tungsten f/2.5 1/60 sec 12.1 Pattern

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Title IMG 4284 Time Date 00.35 23/12/08 TV 100 Tungsten f/2.8 1/60 sec 12.1 Centre Weighted Average

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Title IMG 4285 Time Date 00.36 23/12/08 TV 100 Tungsten f/8 1/60 sec 12.1 Partial

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Title IMG 4283 Time Date 00.35 23/12/08 TV 100 Tungsten f/9 1/60 12.1 Spot

Notes: Title IMG 4249 Time Date 23:21 22/12/08

Notes: Title IMG 4251 Time Date 23:22 22/12/08

Notes: Title IMG 4252 Time Date 23:22 22/12/08

Notes: Title IMG 4254 Time Date 23:23 22/12/08

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

TV 100 Tungsten f/4.5 0.8 sec 12.1 Pattern

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

TV 100 Tungsten f/3.2 0.8sec 12.1 Partial

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

TV 100 Tungsten f/3.5 0.8 sec 12.1 Centre Weighted Average

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

TV 100 Tungsten f/2 0.8 sec 12.1 Spot

Notes:

Notes:

Notes

Notes

Project:By Stuart Williams

Shutter Priority / Metering

Date 01/11/08

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Title IMG 0015 Time Date 17:43 23/12/08

Title IMG 0018 Time Date 17.45 23/12/08

Title IMG 0019 Time Date 17:46 23/12/08

Title IMG 0020 Time Date 17:46 23/12/08

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

TV 100 Tungsten f/14 0.6 sec 12.1 Centre Weighted Average

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

TV 100 Tungsten f/9 0.6 sec 12.1 Spot

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

TV 100 Tungsten f/8 0.6 sec 12.1 Partial

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

TV 100 Tungsten f/6.3 0.6 sec 12.1 Pattern

Notes: Title IMG 4326 Time Date 13:18 24/12/08 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: TV 100 Cloudy f/16 1.5 sec 12.1 Pattern

Notes: Title IMG 4333 Time Date 13:20 24/12/08 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: TV 100 Cloudy f/14 1/15 sec 12.1 Partial

Notes: Title IMG 4335 Time Date 13:21 24/12/08 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes TV 100 Cloudy f/11 1/15 sec 12.1 Spot.

Notes: Title IMG 4336 Time Date 13:21 2412/08 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes TV 100 Cloudy f/2 0.8 sec 12.1 C.W.A

Project:By Stuart Williams

Shutter Priority / Metering

Date 01/11/08

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title IMG 4547 Time Date 13:15 02/01/09 TV 100 Sunny f/5 1/250 sec 12.1 C.W.A

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title IMG 4548 Time Date 13:15 02/01/09 TV 100 Sunny f/9 1/250 sec 12.1 Spot

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title IMG 4549 Time Date 13.15 02/01/09 TV 100 Sunny f/6.3 1/250 sec 12.1 Partial

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title IMG 4550 Time Date 13:16 02/01/09 TV 100 Sunny f/4 1/250 sec 12.1 Pattern

Title IMG 4551 Time Date 13:20 02/01/2009 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: TV 100 Sunny f/10 1/250 sec 12.1 Pattern Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title IMG 4553 Time Date 13:24 02/01/09 TV 100 Sunny f/14 1/250 sec 12.1 Partial Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes

Title IMG 4554 Time Date 13:24 02/01/09 TV 100 Sunny f/18 1/250 sec 12.1 Spot. Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes

Title IMG 4555 Time Date 13:24 02/01/09 TV 100 Sunny f/11 1/250 sec 12.1 C.W.A

Project:By Stuart Williams

Shutter Priority / Metering

Date 01/11/08

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title IMG 4341 Time Date 13:26 24/12/08 TV 100 Cloudy f/7.1 1/30 sec 12.1 Sport

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title IMG 4342 Time Date 13:27 24/12/08 TV 100 Cloudy f/11 1/30 sec 12.1 C.W.A

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title IMG 4343 Time Date 13.27 24/12/08 TV 100 Cloudy f/10 1/30 sec 12.1 Partial

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title IMG 4345 Time Date 13:27 23/12/08 TV 100 Tungsten f/10 1/30 sec 12.1 Pattern

Title IMG 4543 Time Date 13:13 02/01/2009 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: TV 100 Sunny f/7.1 1/250 sec 12.1 Pattern Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Title IMG 4544 Time Date 13:14 02/01/09 TV 100 Sunny f/9 1/250 sec 12.1 Partial Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes

Title IMG 4545 Time Date 13:14 02/01/09 TV 100 Sunny f/11 1/250 sec 12.1 Spot. Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes

Title IMG 4546 Time Date 13:14 02/01/09 TV 100 Sunny f/7.1 1/250 sec 12.1 C.W.A

Project:-

Shutter Priority / Metering

Date 01/11/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Learner's comments. Please fill in as much detail, thinking about the following issues: -What did you learn from this project?

I have understood how by changing the metering will adjust the amount of light let into the camera. Although in some instances this has not made a vast amount of difference. shutter speed (without tripod or IS) 1/60 min to 1/250 for anything moving. For sports 1/250 to 1/1000 but slow shutter speed if you are taking pictures of flowing water ie waterfall or fountain so the picture portrays movement. Panning when taking a shot of a motorbike racer to blur the background, with a fast enough shutter to ensure a sharp picture of the rider.
Was the project beneficial?

Yes I found it to be very useful indeed.
Do you need more time spent on this project?

Not a great deal no.
Tutor's comments: -

Notes & Research

Project:-

Auto Focus

Date 01/12/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Project- auto focus (AF) and metering using manual mode. Auto Focus - see additional notes also refer to your own camera manual. Manual mode - under this mode you have total control over the shutter and aperture independently of each other by using the EV or AV scale you can determine how over or under exposed your photographs will be. Objectives: To try and take a photograph of the moon under manual mode. Remember the moon is reflecting the sun's rays and is very bright so you may not have to set your shutter speed to it's slowest. Use spot metering. Remember how important the right metering mode is therefore change this mode rather than your ISO. Learner's comments. Please fill in as much detail, thinking about the following issues: 1. What did you learn from this project?

I have learned spot metering is important with a scene like this as there is only one main light source on the subject, therefore there need only be one metering point to illuminate the whole of the subject, as there were a few clouds around they could have influenced the metering had it not been point specific As the subject is such a long way from the camera a small aperture setting (Big f/ numbers) would be most suitable for a greater D.o.P. A white balance setting of sunny day was in place as there was such a strong natural light source available, this of cause would correlate to being able to use a robust ISO setting of 100. With the subject being so well lit a faster shutter speed would be appropriate. I also found the remote on the camera to be invaluable as taking a picture of a subject such a long way away the slightest vibration on the camera or tripod would soften the image.
2. Was the project beneficial?

Yes I found it most beneficial as I was able to take advantage of, and appreciate some equipment, tripod, remote and zoom lens as well as appreciating the technical knowhow to achieve a picture in what I would have found to be usually difficult circumstances .
3. Do you need more time spent on this project?

No thank you I think I understand.
Tutor's comments: -

Project:-

Auto Focus

Date 01/12/08
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Health and Safety Note - AT NO TIME SHOULD YOU EVER POINT YOUR CAMERA AT THE SUN AS THIS CAN DO PERMANENT DAMAGE TO THE CAMERAS' SENSORS AND IF YOU LOOK THROUGH THE VIEWFINDER WHILE POINTING THE CAMERA AT THE SUN YOU WILL ALSO DAMAGE YOUR EYE SIGHT!

Title Moon 11 Time Date 08/02/09 03:23 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Manual 100 Sun light f/36 1/6 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Title Moon 12 Time Date 08/02/09 03:11 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Manual 100 Sun Light f/5.6 1/250 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Project:By Stuart Williams

Auto Focus

Date 01/11/08

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Project- take 4 photographs under different AF modes. At different times of the day. Objectives:- what is Auto Focus? Auto Focus is a mechanism using sensors used to record the photograph inside camera or as a little opening on the front of the camera often between the flash and the lens or viewfinder. The camera uses special sensors to help it to focus automatically. Some types "sense" changes in contrast (the difference between light and dark areas of the scene) while others use a beam of infra-red light, particularly in low light, sometimes this sensor is housed in with the flash hence in low light your flash may pop-up but not actually flash. Most SLR cameras use a combination of both systems. Please read further handouts. Learner's comments. Please fill in as much detail, thinking about the following issues:1. What did you learn from this project?

I have learnt that using the correct auto focus mode can be extremely beneficial under the right circumstances. 2. Was the project beneficial? It was a good way of illustrating the advantages of using the correct auto focus
3. Do you need more time spent on this project? Not at this time

Tutor's comments:-

Notes from canon manual One shot AF Suitable for still subjects when you press the shutter button halfway the camera will focus only once you can recompose the shot. AI Focus AF Suitable when you cannot decide between one shot or AI Servo AF depending on the subjects movement, the camera will switch automatically to one shot or AI servo AI Servo AF suitable for moving subjects while you hold down the shutter button half way the focus and exposure setting will be adjusted continuously.

Project:By Stuart Williams

Auto Focus

Date 01/11/08

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Title IMG 4652 Time Date 15:19 05/01/09 Mode TV ISO Setting 200 White Balance Sunny Aperture f/5.6 Shutter Speed 1/125 sec No. Pixels 12.1 Metering Mode Pattern Notes: Shot using AI Focus AF

Title IMG 4653 Time Date 15:19 05/01/09 Mode TV ISO Setting 200 White Balance Sunny Aperture f/10 Shutter Speed 1/125 sec No. Pixels 12.1 Metering Mode Pattern Notes: Shot using One Shot AF

Title IMG 4664 Time Date 15:22 05/01/09 Mode TV ISO Setting 200 White Balance Sunny Aperture f/8 Shutter Speed 1/250 sec No. Pixels 12.1 Metering Mode Pattern Notes: Shot while using AI Servo AF

Title IMG 4698 Time Date 15:33 05/01/09 Mode TV ISO Setting 200 White Balance Sunny Aperture f/4 Shutter Speed 1/250 sec No. Pixels 12.1 Metering Mode Pattern Notes: Shot while using One shot AF

Title IMG car Time Date 12:30 04/01/2009 Mode TV ISO Setting 400 White Balance cloudy Aperture f/4 Shutter Speed 1/200 sec No. Pixels 12.1 Metering Mode Pattern Notes: Shot using AF Focus AF

Title IMG 4595 Time Date 12:49 04/01/09 Mode TV ISO Setting 400 White Balance Cloudy Aperture f/4 Shutter Speed 1/250 sec No. Pixels 12.1 Metering Mode Pattern Notes: shot while using AI Servo AF

Title IMG 4598 Time Date 12:50 04/01/09 Mode TV ISO Setting 400 White Balance Cloudy Aperture f/4 Shutter Speed 1/200 sec No. Pixels 12.1 Metering Mode Pattern. Notes Shot using AI Focus AF

Title IMG 4601 Time Date 12:50 02/01/09 Mode TV ISO Setting 400 White Balance Cloudy Aperture f/4 Shutter Speed 1/200 sec No. Pixels 12.1 Metering Mode pattern Notes shot using Single shot AF

Project:By Stuart Williams

Auto Focus

Date 01/11/08

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Title IMG 0002_2 Time Date 21:40 05/01/09

Title IMG 0004_1 Time Date 21:23 05/01/09

Title IMG 0006 Time Date 21:14 05/01/09

Title IMG 0004_2 Time Date 21:44 05/01/09

Mode TV ISO Setting 400 White Balance Tungsten Aperture f/4.5 Shutter Speed 0.6 sec No. Pixels 12.1 Metering Mode Spot Notes: Shot with one shot AF

Mode TV ISO Setting 1600 White Balance Tungsten Aperture f/5 Shutter Speed 1sec No. Pixels 12.1 Metering Mode Pattern Notes: Shot with one shot AF

Mode TV ISO Setting 800 White Balance Tungsten Aperture f/4.5 Shutter Speed 1 sec No. Pixels 12.1 Metering Mode Patten Notes: Shot with one shot AF

Mode TV ISO Setting 400 White Balance Tungsten Aperture f/4 Shutter Speed 1/15 sec No. Pixels 12.1 Metering Mode Spot Notes: Shot with one shot AF

Title IMG 4736 Time Date 21:53 06/01/2009 Mode TV ISO Setting 100 White Balance Sunny Aperture f/7.1 Shutter Speed 1sec No. Pixels 12.1 Metering Mode spot Notes: Shot while using AI focus

Title IMG 4739 Time Date 21:55 06/01/09 Mode TV ISO Setting 100 White Balance Sunny Aperture f/1.8 Shutter Speed 1/400 sec No. Pixels 12.1 Metering Mode Spot Notes: shot while using AI Servo AF

Title IMG 4740 Time Date 21:56 06/01/09 Mode TV ISO Setting 100 White Balance Sunny Aperture f/1.8 Shutter Speed 1/400 sec No. Pixels 12.1 Metering Mode Spot. Notes Shot using AI Focus AF

Title IMG 4741 Time Date 21.56 06/01/09 Mode TV ISO Setting 100 White Balance Sunny Aperture f/1.8 Shutter Speed 1/400 sec No. Pixels 12.1 Metering Mode spot Notes Shot with one shot AF

Project:-

Using Manual Mode

Date 28/01/09
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Manual mode option is often the last option available on your cameras mode dial. In this mode the camera will not assist you in any way to take a photograph. The camera needs to be set up by the photographer.

N.B. This mode does not affect the auto focus of your camera. To override your auto focus function you will need to switch the switch from auto focus to manual focus which is found on your lens or in the menu options accessed through the LCD screen on the back of your camera. Just because you are in manual mode does not mean that you are in manual focus.

Manual mode allows the photographer to be as creative as he or she wishes but if you are looking for a correctly exposed photograph then the Exposure Compensation slide (E.V. or A.V. on canon cameras) which will appear on your LCD screen will aid you in this. Make sure that the maker is in the middle or -1/3rd (therefore slightly under exposed). How do I achieve this? By use of the shutter or aperture. If you wish to use an aperture of f/16 then you would set the aperture to this and then set an appropriate shutter speed that would cause the arrow on the camera's E.V. slide to move towards the centre = a reading of 0 E.V. Your photograph should be correctly exposed. This is purely a matter of choice though hence why this mode is described as the most creative mode available to the photographer.

Notes & Research Link

Project:-

Using Manual Mode

Date 28/01/09
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Some further points to remember. 1. While you are learning to use Manual Mode set all other options you are used to using to their auto setting. I.E. White Balance (WB), Flash etc. 2. Metering onto the right area of the subject or using the right metering option can help achieve a correct exposure. Therefore if a particular light is of interest then you will need to use Spot/Centre weighted metering but if an overall light is of interest then you will need to use an overall metering system. 3. Remember that your choice of ISO will affect your shutter speed but the higher the ISO the more risk of grain or noise and therefore a poorer picture quality. 4. You will need a tripod available to use if the shutter speed drops below 1/60th of a second. If you have disabled your flash. 5. The choice of lens (if you have more than one) will change the aperture and shutter values. 6. Aperture and shutter readings achieved in other modes (P.S.A.) will be different in manual mode but are useful guides if you are struggling to set up your camera.

Project:-

Using Manual Mode

Date 28/01/09
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Class work task:- to make an action plan setting up your camera in Manual Mode. Setting up the cameras to take a portrait scene that is back lighten. • Choose between Manual focus and automatic focus if auto focus choose focal point or points. Composition of the scene landscape or portrait • Then choose picture style landscape portrait faithful standard neutral monochrome etc. • Then setup the Aperture or shutter speed dependent on requirements. • Choose a suitable Whit balance. • Set up the ISO according to requirements • Setup the Shutter speed or the Aperture by taking an evaluation via the E.V guide. Title Time Date Mode ISO White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering mode Focal length IMG 5981 28/01/09 - 11:10 Manual 400 Cloudy f/1.8 1/100 sec 12.1 M.P Spot 50mm

Notes:In this picture I have had to set the camera to spot metering due to a strong back light on the subject (Pauline), as there was an uninteresting back ground I have chosen to have a narrow D.o.P to enhance the subject. There was a heavy shadow from the left of the picture so I have chosen an ISO setting of 400 to lighten that a little in order to keep my E.V scale at zero I have chosen a shutter speed of 1/100 sec. I have achieved what I set out to.

Project:-

Flash Photography

Date 04/03/09
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Health & Safety issues. 1. Due to changes in design and voltage, an old or incompatible flash unit can damage your digital camera. When you choose a flash unit for a digital camera, make certain it is compatible with your camera. 2. Do not use your flash on people (infants, small children etc) at a close range. When the flash fires you should be at least in (3ft) away from the faces of your subject(s). Firing the flash too close to the subject's eyes could cause a momentary loss of vision. In infants we have no idea of any long-term damage firing the flash at close range can cause. Please remember that a new born infant has little control of their pupil therefore an infant looking most appealing will have their pupil wide open. 3. Do not cover the flash with a hand while firing. Do not cover the flash or touch it after it has just been fired on continuous shoot. It may be hot and cause minor burns. What is Flash Photography? Flash photography includes all photographs taken with the use of an additional light source that may be "built in" to the camera unit -or as a separate flash unit. Or may be external to the camera unit in the form of lights which will be controlled by the camera via cables from the "hot shoe" or "infra-red" signal from a remote control device or camera itself. The built-in flash on a digital camera rarely provides enough light or enough versatility for the dedicated digital photographer. For this reason, many digital photographers choose to use a flash unit for their digital camera. Flash units come in many shapes and sizes, and must precisely match the digital camera. Flash should be used when the shutter speed is too low to avoid a blurred photograph or there is a strong backlight, which is causing the subject to be in silhouette. Using Flash more Creatively. Most cameras automatically apply the flash when it gets dark or whenever more light is needed. Whilst useful in many ways this ignores the potential of bringing a sparkle to an otherwise flat looking photograph with dark shadows by filling those shadows with subtle coloured shaded areas. Digital cameras are extremely susceptible to red-eye. Choosing a flash unit with tilting head can eliminate some of this. Simply aim the flash toward the ceiling and bounce the light back toward your subject. Bouncing also eliminates strong shadows or lights in your pictures.

Project:-

Flash Photography

Date 04/03/09
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Flash Modes. Auto Flash. This often the cameras default flash mode and will fire automatically when the meter senses that the ambient lighting is too low for hand held photography. Like all things automatic on any camera this can be a bit insensitive about how strong the flash is. Resulting in dark backgrounds and flat looking, overexposed photographs. This is caused by the flash illumination dropping off quickly beyond a certain distance and is called Flash Fall Off.

Title

Andy Farley Presents 20 08/02/09 Aperture Priority 100 Flash f/4 4 sec 12.1 M.P Pattern

Time Date Mode ISO Whit Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No Pixels Metering

Project:-

Flash Photography

Date 04/03/09
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Fill in Flash. (Sometimes referred to as forced flash) This flash mode is used to add to the ambient light and is often a very delicate small flash. Good to use when subject is set against a strong backlight. Other times to use this flash are in a snow or brightly lit environment.

Title

Andy Farley presents 8117

Time Date Mode ISO Whit Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No Pixels Metering

15/02/09 Manual 400 Flash f/5.6 1/50 12.1 Spot

Project:-

Flash Photography

Date 04/03/09
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Slow Sync Hash. In this flash mode there is synchronization of the flash and shutter at a slow speed to help capture ambient lighting in a flash photograph. Party environments or social documentary photography examples of when slow sync flash may be used.

Title Andy Farley 7547

Time Date 15/02/9 00:09

Mode Manual

ISO 400

White Balance Flash

Aperture f/4

Shutter Speed ½ sec

No. of Pixels 12.1

Metering pattern

Focal Length 10mm

Notes:- The Shutter set at a low speed has allowed me to capture the flame trail effectively without blurring the dancer to much, however with the flash set to second certain I have managed to capture the dancer twice. With such a large aperture my intention was to blur out some of the back ground.

Project:-

Flash Photography

Date 04/03/09
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

No flash. When photographing reflective, shinny surfaces or when very close to the subject are times when flash is the last thing you want to include in your set up.

Title IMG2988

Time Date 23/11/8

Mode Shutter Priority

ISO 1600

White Balance auto

Aperture F5.6

Shutter Speed ½ sec

No. of Pixels 12.1

Metering pattern

Focal Length 10mm

Notes:- I have not used a flash in this image, it would have blown the laser beams out as well as spoiling the light coming in from the right hand side, so I feel this is a good example as to a suitable time not to be using a flash.

Project:Studio set up

Flash Photography

Date 04/03/09
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Kit used:Black curtain background Strobe lamp & tripod Modeling lamp & tripod Stool without wheels Extension cable 1 x White umbrella 1 x Reflective umbrella How the Studio would work:1. The Molding lamp would be giving a constant light through the umbrella on to the subject until the flash was triggered were by it would give a much more intense light through the umbrella for the flash. 2. The reason for the constant light is really just to do two things (a) make a little light in a dark studio so the AF focus can work amongst other obvious benefits (B) to give the photographer an idea were the shadows would fall on the subject. 3. The Strobe this lamp would only come on when the Flash was demanded, both lamps are triggered by the camera or external flash on the camera. The strobe light would be directed and fired into the reflective umbrella to defuse the light. The light would then be redirected back towards the strobe and ultimately on to the subject. 4. The Models stool had no wheels for both health and safety for the possibility that it may have been possible to wheel it into the equipment as well was the fact that the model would not move around so much. 5. The reflective umbrella would be diffusing the light and bouncing it back down on the subject while the white umbrella (modeling lamp) would diffuse the light when the light would be passing through the umbrella. How the studio was set up:1. After mountain the head lights on to their tripods along with their umbrellas it was time to position them The reflective umbrella on to the strobe, would be facing the inside of the umbrella, so that the back of the strobe would be facing the subject. 2. The Modeling lamp on the other hand would be set up in much the same way but with the top of the white umbrella facing the subject. 3. The lamps were plugged in and cables were put out of harm’s way as much as possible. 4. The lamps and tripods were placed either side of the stool at different levels 5. The black background curtain was hung behind the model. 6. The camera had to be set to fire in sync with the studio strobes. I did this by

Project:-

Flash Photography

Date 04/03/09
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

menu maintenance 3 custom function (C.Fn) Exposure 2. 7. Setting the camera up in the main I chose the fastest shutter speed 200th of a second and the aperture ranging from mid to the small numbers. Summery I found that there were a few ways of controlling the intensity if the light on the subject apart from using the camera controls, one was to use the variable setting on the back of the lamps another was to move the lamps away from the subject and the third was to vary the light coming from my external flash or to set it at master so it would only admit a very small flash that would not affect the subject at all. I moved the lamps in to various positions around the model giving me varying effects, such as different ways that the nose shadows were cast if at all, and lighting up the hair line. Some set ups looked better than others but there didn’t seem to be a wrong way Just as long as the flash was not to harsh. Fill Flash This was a very simple but effective way of greatly improving on a picture particularly when light is coming from any direction other than directly behind you. As it will eliminate any unwanted heavy shadowing This was done by simply keeping my shutter speed and aperture at the same setting and dropping down the intensity of the flash it took several attempts. Moving the power of the flash down by one or two stops at a time just until the light from the flash matches that of the lighting in the scene. Title
Time Date Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Fill Flash IMG35 04/03/09 11:16 Manual 100 Sunny day f/5.6 1/125 sec 12.1 spot

Project:-

Flash Photography

Date 04/03/09
By Stuart Williams

Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

the desired effect. Shooting in doors one can always use the wells and ceiling to bounce the flash.

Slave Flash This is quite simply an extra flash or flashes triggered by the on shoe flash strategically placed to give Title
Time Date Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Flash 084 04/03/09 12:53 Manual 100 Flash f/5.6 1/200 sec 12.1 Pattern

Off Shoes Flash This is exactly as it sounds the flash unit is connected via a cable to the camera. Giving greater versatility to the direction of the light source. Smoke taken with the flash to the right of the camera so’s not to light up the background as I needed the background as dark as possible so I could invert it and add a tint. Title
Time Date Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

smoke 7/4/9 18:07 manual 100 auto f/22 1/200 sec C.W.A

Project:-

Chosen Subject (Faces:- Christine Kessler)

Date 17/05/09
By Stuart Williams

Your Name Stuart Williams Your chosen subject is? Faces Please give a few reasons why you have chosen this subject.

I find portraiture a fascinating subject involving one of my hobbies, that of talking pictures of clubbers on a night out. I love strong colors and using extremes of color and light, coupled with flamboyant people makes for a very exiting time.
And what sort of settings do you think you will be using or what sort equipment do you think you might need.

I think I will be able to most of the project in a club environment were possible, but for all other sense I will make do with a make shift studio. The equipment I shall be using is a canon 450D body and wide angle, zoom , and a 50mm lens as well as defuses, cables, canon software, and filters.. The inspirational photographer I have chosen is Christine Keller world renowned for her portfolio of strong colours denoting a unique use of all the available colours and light, she is also notarized for her work with black and white photographs but is probably most noted for her work with fetish and besquel sense. http://www.christinekessler.com/

Project:-

Chosen Subject (Faces:- Christine Kessler)

Date 17/05/09
By Stuart Williams

Photographs by Christine Keller

Project:-

Chosen Subject (Faces:- Christine Kessler)

Date 17/05/09
By Stuart Williams

Photographs by Stuart Williams

Project:- Depth of Field (DoF)
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Date 05/11/08
By Stuart Williams

Depth of Field (DoF) The Depth of Field (DoP) is quite simply how large the focused area in photo actually is.

Project:- Depth of Field (DoF)
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Date 05/11/08
By Stuart Williams

Depth of Field (DoF) The Depth of Field (DoP) is quite simply how large the focused area in photo actually is.

Depth of Field (DoF) The Depth of Field (DoP) is quite simply how large the focused area in photo actually is.

Project:- Depth of Field (DoF)
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Date 05/11/08
By Stuart Williams

Aperture: Notes:Big number = max depth of field and focus. Small number = minimum depth of field and focus Large aperture probably good for portraits Small aperture probably good for landscapes

Project:- Saving to a memory stick
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Date 00/10/08
By Stuart Williams

Saving to memory stick.
First of all connect your camera via a USB cable to the USB port and make sure it is switched on camera and selected the PC option if applicable. Then select one or more by holding the left click on the mouse down and dragging across to select the required photograph.

Then go to "organize” at the top left of your window and select copy, copy selected photographs"

Project:- Saving to a memory stick
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Date 00/10/08
By Stuart Williams

Create a file in your memory stick by left clicking on your removable memory icon to be found in my computer window then left clicking on your mouse were a drop down menu will appear and select “new” were by a were yet another drop down menu will appear and select “folder”.

Select the new folder by a right click on your mouse. And a drop down menu will appear were by you will select paste.

Name the folder the same way by right hand click of mouse were a text box will appear below the file.

Project:- Saving to a memory stick
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Date 00/10/08
By Stuart Williams

Now safely remove your memory stick by left click mouse on the safely remove hardware icon to be found at the bottom right of your screen.

Project:- When Opening your Photographs
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Date 00/10/08
By Stuart Williams

When viewing your Photographs on Birmingham Adult Education’s Computers please use the following instructions. If you own a Canon Camera there are card readers available for you to down load your photographs. 1. open up the start menu by clicking on the start button

2.Left click on my computer folder in the start menu.

3. Double left click Removal Disk (E),(G) or (H). E,G or H refers to the respective USB Port if Importing from a memory stick or mass media storage card (the one inside your camera) USB is the abbreviation for Universal Serial Bus.

Project:- When Opening your Photographs
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Date 00/10/08
By Stuart Williams

4. You have now opened up the folder containing all the information about your pictures and camera.

5. Double left click on DCIM to open it. 6. Duble left click on the file with your camera’s make on it. And open all your photographs viewed in the form of thumbnails but also as a contact sheet.

6. To view photographs as a slid show double click on the “view as slide show” option in the picture task menu on the left hand side of your screen. 7. You can at any time left click on the photograph in the slide show or on the selected photograph from the contact sheet.

Project:- When Opening your Photographs
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Date 00/10/08
By Stuart Williams

To Open up photograph information. 1.You must first right click on the photograph and a drop down menu will appear.

2.Left click on the properties option.

3.You will have brought up a new window and if you look to the top of that window you will see an option reading details left hand click on that option and you will be able to scroll down and see all the details of your photograph.

Project:- How to access photo information
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Date 00/10/08
By Stuart Williams

First right click on the desired photograph.

Then Left click on the properties.

The click on details on the properties box.

Project:-Day visit to Black Country Living Museum Date 03/12/08
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2 By Stuart Williams

Health and Safety. Health and Safety Issues while in the Black Country living museum:- Remember that you must always respect the needs of other museum visitors and not 1) Block there access to and from any building, 2) Block any fire escapes, 3) Hinder or block their view for any length of time such that it would cause them to seek an unsafe advantage point, 4) tripods can be used in the Museum but cannot block any access for other museum visitors. FAILURE TO ADHERE TO THIS LAST PIONT CAN MEAN BEING ASKED TO LEAVE THE MUSEUM. NO PHOTOGRAPHY OF ANY CHILDREN/TEENAGERS. If a child should wander into shot then do not proceed with taking the photograph. School groups will be visiting the museum should they enter a building that you are already in stop what you are doing and leave the area returning when the party has moved on. Please sign to acknowledge the rules about photography and children have been covered.

Signture________________________ Print Name Stuart Williams
Project Brief:- To take 12 photographs in different parts of the Museum which will demonstrate different use of camera controls and settings. Points to remember. 1. You will need to change your ISO continuously. Why? For low light conditions 2. A large aperture setting will let in more light. When and why would it be useful to keep to a large aperture? For low light conditions & shallow DoF. 3. Shutter will also allow you to record subtle interior lighting. 4. Manual may be used but remember this could take a while to set up and there is always the issue of children being photographed and other museum visitors. 5. You will need to change your metering settings continuously. 6. Please use Auto Focus. 7. Remember rule of thirds and good composition can be corrected on computer at a later date.

Project:-Day visit to Black Country Living Museum Date 03/12/08
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2 By Stuart Williams

Projects are to take shots in the following areas:1. Newcomen Engine House inside and out. (No.8 on map) 2. Racecourse Colliery. (No.10 on map) 3. Toll house (No.11 on map) 4. A moving tram or bus. 5. St James's School House. (No17 on map) 6. Inside back room of general store (No.21 on map) 7. Inside public house (No30 on map) 8. Pigs behind Cobbler's shop. (No. on map) 9. Nail making shop. (N0.33 on map) 10. Iron workings (No.35, 45, 46 On map) You can also take photographs of areas of the museum of your own choice but you will be assessed on the photographs taken in the areas listed above.

Mark Holloway Digital Photography Tutor.

Project:-Day visit to Black Country Living Museum Date 03/12/08
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2 By Stuart Williams

Title 3057 Time Date 26/11/8 11:11 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Shutter Priority 100 Cloudy day f/3.5 1/60 sec 12.1 MP Spot Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Title 3064 Time Date 26/11/08 11:19 Shutter Priority 800 Cloudy day f/3.5 1/6 sec 12.1 MP Spot Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Title 3085 Time Date 26/11/08 12:06 Shutter Priority 100 Cloudy day f/22 ½ sec 12.1MP Spot

Notes: Newcomen Engine House Title 3097 Time Date 26/11/08 12:08 Shutter Priority 200 Cloudy day f/5 1/40 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Notes: Newcomen Engine House Title 3104 Time Date 26/11/08 12:22 Shutter Priority 100 Cloudy day f/5.6 1/6 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Notes: Racecourse Colliery Title 3106 Time Date 26/11/08 12:28 Shutter Priority 100 Cloudy day f/11 1/13 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes Toll house

Notes: Racecourse Colliery Title 3107 Time Date 26/11/08 12.:30 Shutter Priority 400 Cloudy day f/3.5 1/25 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Notes: Racecourse Colliery Proving the depth of field Title 3112 Time Date 26/11/08 12:34 Shutter Priority 800 Cloudy day f/7.1 1/6 sec 12.1 Spot

Title 3079 Time Date 26/11/08 11:41 Shutter Priority 100 Cloudy day f/25 0.6 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Toll house

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Toll house

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Notes: A moving tram

Project:-Day visit to Black Country Living Museum Date 03/12/08
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2 By Stuart Williams

Title 3179 Time Date 26/11/8 14:31 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Shutter Priority 100 Cloudy day f/22 0.8 sec 12.1 MP Spot Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Title 3182 Time Date 26/11/08 14:38 Shutter Priority 100 Cloudy day f/4 0.8 sec 12.1 MP Spot Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode
store

Title 3131 Time Date 26/11/08 13.42 Shutter Priority 1600 Cloudy day f/36 1 sec 12.1MP Spot

Notes: St James's School House Title 3146 Time Date 26/11/08 13:54 Shutter Priority 400 Cloudy day f/8 1/16 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Notes: St James's School House Title 3142 Time Date 26/11/08 13:49 Shutter Priority 1600 Cloudy day f/3.5 1/6 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Notes: Inside back room of general Title 3136 Time Date 26/11/08 13:46 Shutter Priority 1600 Cloudy day f/7.1 1 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Notes: Inside public house Title 3157 Time Date 26/11/08 14.03 Shutter Priority 1600 Cloudy day f/5.6 1/4 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Notes: Inside public house Title 3172 Time Date 26/11/08 14:15 Shutter Priority 100 Cloudy day f/3.5 1/5 sec 12.1 Spot

Notes Inside public house Title 3169 Time Date 26/11/08 14:13 Shutter Priority 100 Cloudy day f/10 1/2 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Iron workings

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode

Notes: Nail making shop

Notes: Iron workings

Project:-Day visit to Black Country Living Museum Date 03/12/08
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2 By Stuart Williams

Title 3160

Title 3186

Title IMG_3183-EditEdit-Edittle 3085 Time Date 26/11/08 12:06 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Time Date 26/11/8 14:07 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Shutter Priority 100 Cloudy day f/3.5 1/15 sec 12.1 MP Spot Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Pigs

Time Date 26/11/08 14:50 Shutter Priority 1600 Cloudy day f/6.3 1/100 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Notes: Iron workings Metering set between inside of the roof and the gable end.

Project:-Day visit to Black Country Living Museum Date 03/12/08
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2 By Stuart Williams

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes

Title 3146 Time Date 26/11/08 13:54 Shutter Priority 400 Cloudy day f/8 1/16 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Appraisal of image 3146 On reflection the image is over exposed while spot metering is set on the near corner of the table, and with an aperture of f/8 and a shutter speed of 1/6 of a second, should not have been responsible of the over exposure, which would lead me to think that I could of afforded to set the ISO at a lower level. And the fact that Mark pointed this out to me.
Title 3104 Time Date 26/11/08 12:22 Shutter Priority 100 Cloudy day f/5.6 1/6 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes

Appraisal of image 3104 I rather like this picture as it demonstrates spot metering on the oil well and AF point selection on said well, while displaying a prime example of Depth of field. While maintaining a natural colouring. Even thought ISO is set at 100.

Project:-Day visit to Black Country Living Museum Date 03/12/08
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2 By Stuart Williams

Title 3064 Time Date 26/11/08 11:19 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes Shutter Priority 800 Cloudy day f/3.5 1/6 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Appraisal of image I am fond of this image as it shows some depth to the picture it seems to be a very busy image while I could have stopped the flair through the windows by changing the metering I think it gives a bit of ambience.

Project:-Day visit to Black Country Living Museum Date 03/12/08
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2 By Stuart Williams

THE GOOD THE BAD AND THE PLAIN UGLY
Title 3064 Time Date 26/11/8 11:19 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Title 3131 Time Date 26/11/08 13:42 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Title 3126 Time Date 26/11/08 14.08 Shutter Priority 100 Cloudy day f/4.0 1/25 sec 12.1 MP Spot Shutter Priority 1600 Cloudy day f/36 1 sec 12.1 MP Spot Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Title 3160 Time Date 26/11/08 14:07 Shutter Priority 100 Cloudy day f/3.5 1/15 sec 12.1 Spot Shutter Priority 800 Cloudy day f/3.5 1/6 sec 12.1 MP Spot Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Title 3130 Time Date 26/11/08 13:41 Shutter Priority 800 Cloudy day f/36 1 sec 12.1 MP Spot Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes Title 3159 Time Date 26/11/08 14:07 Shutter Priority 100 Cloudy day f/4.5 1/4 sec 12.1 MP Spot Title 3062 Time Date 26/11/08 11:17 Shutter Priority 800 Cloudy day f/3.5 1/10 sec 12.1 MP Spot Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes: Title 3126 Time Date 26/11/08 13:40 Shutter Priority 800 Cloudy day f/36 13 sec 12.1 MP Spot Title 3060 Time Date 26/11/08 11:16 Shutter Priority 800 Cloudy day f/3.5 1/20 12.1MP Spot

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes:

Project:-Day visit to Black Country Living Museum Date 03/12/08
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2 By Stuart Williams

Title 3179 Time Date 26/11/08 11:19 Mode ISO Setting White Balance Aperture Shutter Speed No. Pixels Metering Mode Notes Shutter Priority 800 Cloudy day f/3.5 1/6 sec 12.1 MP Spot

Appraisal of image 3179 This I consider to be a bad picture as the sky is overexposed, I have lost a good opportunity to bring out the sharpness, colour and richness of the bricks although the ISO was set appropriately for me to sharpen up the brick work had it been necessary, could have afforded to speed up the shutter speed maybe up to 1/25th of a second or slightly higher. Although the sky was less than interesting it would have been a simple job to repair with a new one with the assistance of Photo Shop. However the desired effect of drama and depth of field was not achieved due to bad positioning. And I can’t help but feels a bad choice of subject matter.

Project:- Day visit to Lichfield Cathedral
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2

Date 11/02/09
By Stuart Williams

Task to take Pictures of the Cathedral

IMG 2 11/2/9 10:47 Manual 100 Flash f/5.6 1.6 sec 12.1 spot

IMG 8 11/2/9 13:01 Manual 100 Flash f/4 1/200 sec 12.1 pattern

IMG 5 11/2/9 12:15 Manual 100 Flash f/5.6 ½ sec 12.1 spot

IMG 6 11/2/9 12:27 Manual 100 Flash f/5.6 1/10 sec 12.1 Spot

IMG 10 11/2/9 13:07 Manual 100 Flash f/5.6 1/60 sec 12.1 Pattern

IMG 12 11/2/9 14:22 Manual 100 Flash f/5.6 1/100 sec 12.1 Spot

Project:- Day visit to Lichfield Cathedral
Unit Covered NCFE 1.2
IMG 1 11/02/09 14:34 Manual 100 Flash f/4 1/100 sec 12.1 spot IMG 7 11/02/09 12:35 Manual 100 Flash f/5.6 1sec 12.1 spot

Date 11/02/09
By Stuart Williams

Edit 4 11/02/09 12:02 Manual 100 Flash f/5.6 8 sec 12.1 spot

Edit 3 11/02/09 12:01 Manual 100 Flash f/5.6 1sec 12.1 spot

IMG 4 edited

IMG 15 11/02/09 14:54 Manual 100 Flash f/5.6 1/100 sec 12.1 spot

IMG 14 11/02/09 14:34 Manual 100 Flash f/4 1/100 sec 12.1 spot

Project:- Photo Shop (Pop Art)
Unit Covered NCFE 2

Date 17/05/09
By Stuart Williams

POP ART

Project:- Photo Shop (Pop Art)
Unit Covered NCFE 2

Date 17/05/09
By Stuart Williams

1. Start Image.

2 I tried adjusting the image by just switching to black and white but I found it to be a little flat so I used Conte Crayon, as it seemed to be the most effective filter to give me more texture to imitate a screen print. Then playing with the relief, foreground & back ground sliders to darken the shadows and brighten the highlights. To obtain as much contrast as I could. 3. I had a problem with her fringe as it was partly blown out when I adjusted the levels so I decided to air brush it out all together, I did this by sampling forehead colour and using the brush tool, this will make it easier to mask & will be closer to the Warhol image of Monroe.

4. I was still unhappy with the contrast. I needed to add more, so in order to gain that little bit extra I have lightened the highlights, in doing so I have lost some portrait features like the left eye brow and lips. So I have used the burn tool set on shadow to highlight said features. This I felt was still not quite enough. 5. Still to make the contrast even more prominent I have create a levels layer, and adjusting both the shadow input slide to darken it a bit more, and the mid tone slider to brighten up the dull grey. This however still needed to be improved. As I have lost some detail with lighting it up.

Project:- Photo Shop (Pop Art)
Unit Covered NCFE 2

Date 17/05/09
By Stuart Williams

6. In order to reclaiming some lost detail; I have used the brush tool on the adjustment layer, set on black the paint tool was adjusted to its full opacity, then I painted over the hair, lips & eyes browse. This did work, and added that little bit more contrast and brought out some of the lost detail on the image.

7. Created a new layer calling it hair then using the polygonal lasso tool to a rough & ready stencil as Warhol would have probably used scissors or a Stanley knife with the feather set on zero for a sharp edge. Then sampling the colour form Warhol’s Monroe, then edit>fill>foreground, layer mode multiply. I did try and use the layer just set to normal, and drop the opacity to about 70% but using the multiply mode made was far more effective. 8. Using the same process as above with the exception of having to use the subtract section tool to cut out both the eyes and lips.

9. Again using the same presses as above but changing the opacity both for the colour of the eyes and eye lashes. I felt the blue of her eye lashes was to strong so I turned the opacity down to 70%, the eyes were missing something so I decided to try a little green in them, but still leaving the sparkle in black and white, this I felt was a great improvement.

10. I tried to creating the background layer by using the magnetic lasso tool, but this didn’t work very well as I kept on losing great big chunks of her hair and face, so in the end I just opted for the lasso tool and carefully went around all the edges by hand. Yet again, I sampled the colour from the original, then refined edges the edges using the refine edge tool.

Project:- Photo Shop (Pop Art)
Unit Covered NCFE 2

Date 17/05/09
By Stuart Williams

11. I had a problem, there were still bits that I hadn’t cut out correctly so to over come this I selected the background layer, and using the eraser tool I carefully cleaned those edges that I was unhappy with.

12. Crop image tightly to mimic Warhol’s Monroe. Then Flatten image layer>flatten image.

13. Using the eraser tool on the skin layer to highlight the pearls then giving the image a nice thick border Edit>Stroke>centre>40% black. But some thing still didn’t look quite right as it was all to fresh and precise. And even having used Conte Crayon the image just felt a little flat.

14. To overcome this problem tried several filters but I felt the best one for the job was to use the noise filter set to around 7% this did give the image the desired effect both of a screen print and it also seemed to age the image as well.

Finished image save>save as>Jpeg

Project:- Photo Shop (Pop Art)
Unit Covered NCFE 2

Date 17/05/09
By Stuart Williams

Project:- The use of External Flash in the Field
Unit Covered NCFE 2

Date 30/05/09
By Stuart Williams

Some advantages of an external flashgun are:1. You get a more powerful flash which will give you greater control over the quality and strength of the light by using a diffuser directing the light or simply by turning the strength down. 2. It’s possible to take the flash off the camera to create a directional light source, by using a cable, master/ slave or remote control. 3. When it’s mounted on the camera hot shoe you get less red eye as it stands a little higher than the on board flash thus changing the direction slightly so that flash is not quite as hard. 4. You can aim the flash in different directions whereas a pop up flash will just give you one flash straight ahead. 5. I can set the flash to give you multi blasts on the same exposure giving you a strobe effect on moving objects. 6. You can use colour gels to match the environment. 7. You can take continuous pictures with the flash firing on each of them. 8. The flash can be set to wide when using wide angle lenses by pulling out the wide angle filter from the top of the flash. Due to the time element I generally use my flash in E-TTL mode (EvaluativeThrough The Lens). This is a Canon EOS flash exposure system that uses a brief pre-flash before the main flash in order to obtain a more correct exposure, whilst simultaneously infa red beams will calculate the distance from the subject and adjust the strength accordingly. However for moody shots I will venture into manual mode. Using this “M” mode I can achieve full control over the power of the flash. Second Curtain or Rear Sync This is a great way of improving your pictures. It basically changes the time in which the flash fires, flashing at the end of the exposure rather than the beginning. This can help to illustrate movement as well as lighten up the background of the subject. This is because the camera exposes the natural background light (the ambient light) in the room first and then at the very last second, it fires the flash to freeze the subject. It is however important to keep the camera steady as the shutter stays open for longer, but this can create some great effects if so desired. Drag the Shutter Another way is to expose more of the background without using second curtain is to “drag the shutter”. This is where you slow down the camera shutter speed so it allows in the existing light and then your flash fires to light up your subject. This is done by taking a meter reading with you camera set in program mode and then switching it into manual mode and slowing down the speed. For example reading 1/60 then slow it down by a few stops to 1/15 maybe. The nice thing is that your

Project:- The use of External Flash in the Field
Unit Covered NCFE 2

Date 30/05/09
By Stuart Williams

subject won’t blur as when the flash fires it will freeze the subject. This is because the flash is fired at the last moment just before the shutter closes. Using the Flash off the Camera Shoe Sometimes you can get some great effects by getting the flash off the camera and creating directional light. Simply by lighting up the subject from one or both sides (with a remote flash) I can create great contrasts with shadows. For example, by holding it above one’s head and pointing the flash down at the subject to imitate the direction of sun light. This is done by simply connecting the flash to the camera via a cable or a master slave flash. Playing with the Strobe Mode This is done by setting the flash to multi and it will capture multiple images of a moving subject on the same exposure. However, sometimes it can take a little playing around with dependent on the subject and the speed its moving. I have found the most effective way of getting a great result is to have a dark plain background and a surface that doesn’t absorb too much of the light preferably a reflective surface, as well as a really slow shutter speed. For example if you want the flash to fire 10 times over 5 second you would set the shutter speed at 2 seconds (number of flashes ÷ firing frequency = shutter speed). If the subject is static then some great results can be achieved by moving the camera while taking the shot. Bouncing the Light Although I usually always use a diffuser I have found this to be a wonderful way of soften the light in a room with a low ceiling. When I have directed the flash at a 45 degree angle pointing at a white ceiling, this will spread the light right out making it a lot softer and wider. As the light is coming from above its no longer harsh and having a one dimensional feeling creates lots of interesting gentle shadows on their face. To add a little more detail to the subject, by pulling out the bounce card from the top of my flash I can usually get a little sparkle in their eyes as well as remove some of the shadow underneath them. By bouncing the light I never seem to get shadows on the walls behind the subject either. However, this method has back fired on me when the ceiling has been to high or an off white colour, as the light takes too long to hit the subject or my subject has appeared yellowish when the ceiling has been yellowish. Fill in Flash This I have found to be most useful when taking portraits outside. It’s taken me much time to set up but it has been worth while. For the best results I have taken the flash off of the camera to give a little directional light. Then rather than adjusting my aperture I have adjusted the strength of the flash, lowering it one stop at a time until the flash blends in the daylight.