12 Chapter 6 Infinite Variety: Variables of Characterization The ideal reader of narratives—ancient or modern—must be prepared to respond to the  emphasis of the narrative with respect to character, placing individuality or “typical” 

connection foremost to the extent which the narrative itself calls for such priority; but  above all he must bring to his consideration of character a versatility of response  commensurate with the infinite variety of narrative characterization. ­­Robert Scholes and Robert Kellogg1  Round and Flat This chapter might be seen as yet another gloss on the famous distinction made in E. M.  Forster’s Aspects of the Novel between round and flat characters.  According to Forster,  round characters are life­like and “capable of surprising in a convincing way,”2 while flat  ones are more likely understood as types, easily described, perhaps in a single sentence.  Many Dickens characters are flat; Dostoyevsky’s are round.  To extend this to movies, we  might say that while standard genre types are flat, art cinema protagonists like Guido in 8   1/2 are round.  The general pattern in such a gloss on Forster would be briefly to affirm  the appeal of distinguishing between two such categories of characters and then to discuss  various complicating issues.  Because “flat” sounds like “bad,” the critic must be at pains  to show as Forster himself did that some writers use flat characters artfully.  And because  two categories would seem insufficient to account for the “infinite variety of narrative  characterization,” the critic will want to further elaborate the distinction by adding 

13

criteria,  subdivide Forster’s two categories, or supplement them with additional ones.  Seymour Chatman argues that round and flat refer to the variety (or lack thereof) of the  character’s traits.3  Scholes and Kellogg assert that the key distinction between characters  is really a matter of whether and how their “inner life” is explored;4 likewise Tzvetan  Todorov discusses psychological and a­psychological characters.5  Mieke Bal adds that  flat characters are unchanging, whereas round ones develop,6 and she goes on to plot  various relational distinctions between characters: they may be more or less predictable,  may have more or less detailed accumulations of traits, and be more or less similar to  other characters in the narrative.7  Shlomit Rimmon­Kenan, citing the Israeli theorist  Joseph Ewen, organizes the distinction into three scales: complexity (which refers to  whether the character has a small or large number of traits), development (whether the  character changes or is static), and “penetration into the ‘inner life’” (whether or not the  character’s “consciousness is presented from within”).8 Within cognitive film theory there have been several attempts to clarify and  expand upon Forster by referring to the spectator’s comprehension of character rather  than to character as a textual figure.  Murray Smith creates a typology of seven character  dimensions: complexity, fixity, stereotypicality, plausibility, artificiality, centrality, and  transparency, but goes on to criticize typologies of character for “hypostasizing” character 

14

instead of analyzing the phenomenology of character construction.  In place of Forster’s  definition, Smith suggests that a flat character would be “one that never challenges the  stereotype schema it invokes on first appearance,” while a round character would be “one  where the initial schema is subject to considerable revision.”9  Thus for Smith, the crucial  dimension of round/flat is the typicality of the character’s attributes as understood by the  spectator, however, round/flat is not the only way of accounting for different kinds of  characters.  Per Persson, complementing Smith, proposes that the distinction between  round and flat should be based upon the way spectators attribute mental states to  characters: a flat character “defies or makes difficult mental attribution processes,” while  a round character “is one that not only allows mental attributions, but also presents a wide  range of cues and appraisal parameters with which to reason and ‘play around with.’”  He  continues that “roundness is thus a result of the interaction among the way in which the  narration places the character in rich situations, the powerful inferential structure of folk  psychology, and the viewer’s cognitive creativity.”10  Persson also cites Ed S. Tan, who  writes, “The characters in quality films are round, in the sense that they display more  emotion, and that emotion is more developed than that of the heroes in the popular  genres.”11 These cognitivist formulations repeat many of the elaborations on Forster from 

15

literary theory, albeit with a different vocabulary and a more reception­oriented  perspective.  Round characters, according to Smith, are less easily typed than flat ones.  According to Persson, round characters are more richly psychologized.  And according to  Tan, their emotional development is greater.  I agree with all of them that typicality,  psychological richness, and emotion are very significant components of the key variables  of characterization, and with Smith that roundness cannot be reduced to a single  dimension.  But I believe that these elaborations on round/flat can be clarified more still  by considering the distinction between character and characterization, by granting that  there are qualities of flatness and roundness that describe characters but not  characterizations and vice versa.  It is also important to consider the effect of  characterization on our sense of character, and on the degree of fit between the two.  I  believe as well that distinctions among characters are more likely to be described  effectively using a scalar continuum than using pairs of opposites, and that films may  have certain aspects of roundness in some respects and certain aspects of flatness in  others.  What will distinguish this gloss on round and flat from others is its focus on  understanding characters rather than character in the abstract, and on distinguishing  between character as a person­like agent constructed by the spectator out of the encounter 

16

with narrative, and characterization as the process by which character is brought to life.  If American independent films have interesting characters, does that mean that the  characters of indie cinema are more likely to be what the literary and film theorists above  would call round, which is to say psychological, changing, un­typical, emotional, and  possessing many traits?   And whether these characters are seen to be flat or round, can  something similar be said of their characterization?  It is these questions that I want to  explore here.  In doing so I will discuss three sub­distinctions of the round/flat  opposition, borrowing some of Ewen’s terms and ideas: depth of characterization (which  includes the “inner life” and “mental attributions” ideas but is more basically the degree  to which the character’s construction is informative); complexity  of characterization (i.e.,  the degree to which the presentation of the character is multifaceted, straightforward,  roundabout, contradictory, enigmatic, sophisticated, etc., as well as the degree to which  the character herself is); and character change (i.e., the extent to which the character and  characterization develop).  I am assuming that for all three variables, one side of the scale  is clearly understood as the flat side (shallow, straightforward, unchanging) and the other  side of the scale is clearly the round side (deep, complex, and dynamic).  By using a  tripartite distinction, it will be possible to plot characters on a scale that accounts for both  round and flat aspects of a given individual’s representation, rather than being forced into 

17

a choice between one or the other.  The point, however, will not merely be to generate  another taxonomy, another analytical model, another set of terms.  I recognize that this  taxonomy is to an extent arbitrary, to an extent redundant with others, and that other  taxonomies might better suit other analyses.  The point, rather, is to establish a baseline of  understanding about what makes independent cinema’s characterization distinctive.  (Since I shall weave many independent film examples through the discussion of these  three variables, this chapter will not end with a case study as its predecessors did.  I hope  that my points will be well enough illustrated without one.) In previous chapters I have already suggested many ways in which independent  cinema characterizes, and this chapter is meant to complement those suggestions and  bring them together.  It is also intended to echo many of the points made in Part I about  the cognitive processes used in constructing character.  This discussion is especially  closely related to Chapter 2’s discussion of types, since typing is one of the dimensions of  the round/flat dichotomy.  This discussion is also, however, aimed at investigating some  pre­theoretical notions about independent film and about character more generally, such  as the idea that characterization is best conceived as an arc, and the oft­heard suggestion  that some films spend more time on character “development” than plot or vice versa.   We often assume that narratives judged by a wide consensus of critical opinion to 

18

be of high aesthetic value must have round characters, characters who have depth and  complexity and who undergo significant development.  Pre­theoretically and intuitively  this appeals to our common­sense assumptions.  Probing the characters of independent  cinema, however, we find some significant instances of shallowness, straightforwardness,  and an absence of character change.  Contrary to our intuition, independent films  sometimes have static, straightforward characters whose inner life is not made evident to  us in the fashion of Murnau and Lang, Bergman and Fellini, Hitchcock and Welles.  The  characterization may complexify a character whose is not all that multi­dimensional, as in  Memento and The Limey, or it may keep us at such a distance from a character’s inner life  that we cannot arrive at a satisfying sense of who she is, either temporarily, as in Hard   Eight, or even in the end of the film, as in Safe.  In many films, such as Down By Law and  Reservoir Dogs, the characters do not undergo meaningful change or the sort prescribed  in screenplay manuals. My thesis in this chapter is that independent cinema’s approach to characterization  is in some ways better conceived as flat than as round: for aesthetic effect, many  filmmakers construct characters who are shallow rather than deep, straightforward rather  than complex, or static rather than changing.  Such effects may satisfy any of several 

19

functions: they may further an aesthetic of minimalism, allow for genre­based play, serve  thematic goals, produce ambiguity, appeal to a conception of realism, or be necessitated  by aesthetic experimentation or innovation in other areas.  These effects and functions  support the three viewing strategies introduced in Chapter 1.  Flatness effects can enhance  the sense of characters as emblems, can stimulate formal play, and can be seen as an  antidote to the conventional character depth of mainstream popular cinema.  However, by  saying that flatness is a salient strategy of independent film, I do not mean to suggests  either that independent film is less than it has been cracked up to be, or that the  theoretical project of categorizing characters along scales corresponding to roundness and  flatness is inadequate to the task of understanding cinematic character.  I hope this  analysis will demonstrate the independence of roundness and flatness values from the  evaluation and judgment of characters and narratives.  In other words, good stories can  have flat or round characters, just as can bad ones.

Narration and Characterization As a sub­process of narration, characterization varies according to patterns of information  distribution.  One important aspect of narration for purposes of understanding 

20

characterization is exposition, the introduction of character­relevant information.  Following Meir Sternberg, I understand exposition to be the process whereby the  spectator is introduced to the narrative world, including “the history, appearance, traits,  and habitual behavior of the dramatis personae; and of the relations between them.”12  I  have already discussed in reference to Passion Fish and Hard Eight how delayed  exposition creates an interest in character by frustrating processes of typing, trait  attribution, folk­psychology inference, and emotion recognition.  As Sternberg argues,  narratives typically are full of gaps which the reader or spectator must fill in by posing  such questions as “What is happening or has happened and why?  What is the connection  between this event and the previous ones?  What is the motivation of this or that  character?  To what extent does the logic of cause and effect correspond to that of  everyday life?  And so on.”13  Exposition is a process of strategically managing these gaps  by presenting information in an order that maximizes particular aesthetic effects.  Gaps  may be flaunted or suppressed by the narration, meaning that we may or may not be made  aware of their existence.  These two options may produce, respectively, suspense and  surprise.  The effect of gaps on the spectator is dependent on the order in which narrative  information is presented.  Sternberg describes the strong effect that first impressions have 

21

on readers.  This “primacy effect” can be exploited by narration in the choice of which  events to dramatize in the beginning of a narrative and which ones to withhold as gaps.14  The primacy effect is a psychological principle of impression formation and it holds that  the first of a person’s traits we encounter has the effect of shaping the meaning of later  ones, so that a person being described as “intelligent, industrious, impulsive, critical,  sullen, envious” would produce a different impression from one described “envious,  sullen, critical, impulsive, industrious, intelligent.”15  It is not merely that the mind  emphasizes the things we encounter first, but that we view the latter traits through the  impression we have already formed on the basis of the first ones encountered.16  We form  a schema based on the first­encountered item which we impose on the subsequent data.  The primacy effect shapes meaning by influencing our expectations.  It is no coincidence,  then, that screenwriting advice stresses the importance of character introductions. 17   The impression that we form of a main character is typically accomplished  quickly in the early sequences of a film, often with redundant, repetitive narrative data,  and is very seldom radically challenged.  This is partly the product of a widespread  narrative convention and partly the effect of cognitive structures of person perception.  The order in which perceivers encounter information about others is crucial to their  evaluation of them, and this is easily exploited in characterization.  As a principle of 

22

narrative construction, the primacy effect is especially significant in films that either  present temporally disordered events, such as Pulp Fiction, or that withhold significant  details about a character, such as The Crying Game.  By exploiting it, filmmakers bias the  impression that spectators will form of characters, allowing for subsequent refinements  and revisions of our understanding.  The effect of characters surprising us, an important  element of roundness, is a product of manipulating the order of exposition so that  primacy is given to particular character attributes and not others.  In Passion Fish, Sayles  withholds information about Chantelle that imbues her with depth and complexity and  shows her to have changed, and the impression of these roundness effects is created by the  narration’s surprising us.  And the effect of characters having complex, contradictory  attributes may be amplified by an order of exposition rigged to create a specific first  impression, only to complicate that impression later on.  The convoluted order of  Tarantino’s Kill Bill Vol. 1 and Kill Bill Vol. 2 begins with the Bride as a victim of  unspeakable violence and quickly shifts ahead in time so that she may exact comparably  gruesome revenge.  Tarantino saves the backstory about the Bride’s relationship with Bill  and the assassin squad until the second film, and also saves the ultimate meeting of Bill  and the Bride.   These “earlier” and “later” scenes reveal aspects of the Bride that 

23

humanize her and show a different dimension of emotional experience.  Like the  characterization of Chantelle, this process of withholding imbues the Bride with depth  and complexity that is merely hinted at in the early stages of the plot. Sternberg discusses such effects in relation to The Odyssey and Pride and   Prejudice, but they are also standard features of independent cinema.18  The exploitation  of the order of exposition fits well into all of the viewing strategies introduced in Chapter  1: by increasing the interest in character, effects of surprise and complexity flesh out the  social rhetoric of independent film and make emblematized characters more interesting  (admittedly, this is not the case in the Kill Bill films); by manipulating formal design  features, films with scrambled time structures may make play a matter of exposition; and  by introducing complexity in both of these areas, independent films implicitly challenge  the straightforwardness of much of mainstream cinema’s expository approach.  This is  another way of saying that regardless of whether its characters are really round and  Hollywood’s really flat, independent film’s characterizations tend to be more  sophisticated and challenging. 

24

Variable 1: Depth If we think of a film character as a quantity of narrative data processed by the spectator— something like a computer file—then the most apparent variable among characters is that  some comprise larger files than others.  Most basically this is observed in the distinction  between major and minor characters: some characters appear only briefly while others are  in every scene of a film.  The dramatized events of the narrative, and other events merely  described or alluded to, are informative about the characters who take part in them so that  even a character about whom we know very little may still be given a degree of depth by  having appeared in so many scenes or been so repeatedly referenced.  In Hard Eight,  Sydney is a deeper character than Jimmy because we simply see more of Syd, hear more  of his speech, and see more of the other characters in relation to Syd.   The narration of  Hard Eight is more informative in relation to Sydney, and depth of characterization is in a  sense simply a matter of informativeness: the more information we are given, the more  depth the characterization takes on.  The choice of “depth” over another term such as  “breadth,” “richness,” or even “informativeness” is somewhat arbitrary, though it follows  the most common casual usage.  Depth is not simply a matter of the “inner life” being  represented or not, since, as I have argued, the construction of a character’s mental states 

25

is often more a matter of social­cognition inferences than it is of direct subjective  representation.   Informativeness refers to all of the aspects of characterization, external  and internal.   A large file of data would seem to make for a rich character, however,  informativeness may mean two separate things in relation to character and  characterization.  First there is the quantity of information, which itself is a necessary but  not a sufficient condition for characterization in depth.  For characterization in depth, the  information must also be of a certain kind.  Knowing what a character eats for breakfast  every day of his life would be informative in terms of the quantity of data but not in terms  of its meaningfulness.  So second, characterization may or may not be informative in the  sense of the information about the character being relevant, interesting, and useful in  making sense of the narrative world.  One of the most significant factors in determining  the parameters of our engagement with characters is our ability to understand them or to  believe that we understand them, because even an avalanche of information about a  character will not be meaningful without a clear way of organizing it.   In this section I argue that depth should be understood as including two distinct  variables, one relating to character and the other to characterization.  The first sense of  informativeness, referring to the quantity of narrative information, corresponds to depth 

26

of character, while the second sense, referring to the explanatory coherence of the  information, corresponds to depth of characterization.  As we shall see, depth of character  is no guarantee of depth of characterization, but depth of characterization does  correspond to depth of character. There are many ways in which characterization may or may not be informative.  A  character who is in virtually every scene of a film, such Michel in Bresson’s Pickpocket,  may still be presented opaquely, while a character who is only in one or a few scenes  might seem to be richly informative by comparison.  We may feel that we understand  Norman Bates’s mother fairly well, though she is a secondary character who we never  really see, and who doesn’t really exist!  The effect of satisfactory depth in the  characterization of Mrs. Bates is a product of the kind of information presented, which  can be just as important as its quantity in determining our response to characters.  So by  the second sense of informative I mean that we can formulate a coherent explanation for  their behavior as we can for Mrs. Bates, whom we deem to be pathologically jealous of  her son’s feelings of affection for Marion; as we have seen, this requires that we establish  a nexus of attributions linking causes of narrative events to the situations and dispositions  of fictional persons and to infer stable personality traits on the basis of our observations  and inferences.  With this nexus of character and causality in place, we can generate 

27

further explanations the more information we are given: the new information is  understood in the context of a pre­existing pattern of knowledge, a character­specific  schema.  And while understanding others requires more than knowledge about their  behavior or their external life circumstances, it also requires more than penetration into  explicitly represented mental states.  The effect of depth is achieved by the integration of  different kinds of information about a character into a coherent schema.  Characterization  in depth is multifaceted and holistic, synthesizing material from the multiple channels of  narrative data, integrating the elements of characterization I have described and analyzed:  observed actions, descriptions, typing, attribution, folk­psychology inferences, emotion  expressions, and stylistic effects such as music and camera movement.  Because all of  these elements are informative, all are potentially depth­producing.  But the essential  requirement of depth is the combination of relevant data with an explanatory mechanism  to make sense of it. We might think of depth not as a pair of opposites, deep and shallow, but as two  separate but related scales of informativeness.  (See figure on pages 290­291.)  There is  the scale of quantity of information and the scale of explanatory coherence.  We may plot  any given character along both scales.  If the depth of information and the depth of  explanatory coherence are equal, we have depth of characterization that is commensurate 

28

with depth of character, because our means of making sense of the character allows our  completion of the task.  We might call this satisfactory depth.  If the depth of information  is greater than the depth of explanatory coherence, then we must say that the  characterization is shallow in comparison to the character.  Thus it is possible for  relatively shallow characters to have commensurately shallow characterization, in which  case they have satisfactory depth despite their shallowness.  This would be the case in  primitive narrative films such as Porter’s The Gay Shoe Clerk, in which the means of the  representation of the characters is adequate to the degree of informativeness about them.  Or it is possible for characters with moderate or greater depth to have shallow  characterization, as in films by Bresson.19  I do not believe it is possible, however, for a  character to have depth of characterization but not of character, since it does not make  sense for an explanatory mechanism to be more advanced than the data it purports to  explain. In a classical narrative, the most typical effect of depth in characterization is a  product of repetitive narrative data and straightforward narration that minimizes  contradictory or ambiguous character traits (for more on straightforwardness see the next  section, on complexity).  This produces a moderate depth in character as well as  characterization, and satisfactory depth. Classical cinema depends on redundancy 

29

generally, but especially in its mode of characterization, with mutually reinforcing traits,  expressions, cinematic techniques, and narrative events creating easily recognized  characters with clear belief­desire psychologies that link directly to narrative causes and  effects.  Clarity and coherence are twin engines of depth: understanding behavior and  expressions, inferring psychology, and integrating diverse data into a meaningful whole  produces an effect of a character about whom we know a substantial amount of  meaningful information.  The redundancy of cues in the classical mode maximizes clarity  and coherence (though perhaps at the cost of complexity, uniqueness, elegance, or other  aesthetic values).  This is achieved most often by the radical restriction of personality  traits and the convergence of all other narrative data around the most central one, such  that typing, emotion expressions, folk­psychology inferences, and secondary traits tend to  reinforce that trait and, more importantly, not to contradict it.   Harry Morgan’s most prominent traits in Howard Hawks’s To Have and Have   Not are his independence and individualism: he doesn’t want anyone’s help, and he  doesn’t want to stick his neck out to help anyone.  This is revealed in his dialogue, his  actions, his expressions, the other characters’ reactions to him, and the most basic  conflicts of the plot: whether or not he will risk his own safety to aid Frenchie’s Free­ French comrades attempting to enter Martinique illicitly, and whether or not he will enter 

30

into a committed, romantic relationship with Slim (Lauren Bacall).  It is also supported  by the film’s political rhetoric opposing American isolationism prior to entering World  War II, and by the film’s intertextual referencing of similar films (e.g., Casablanca) that  are also about reluctant Americans abroad, other Hawks adventure movies such as  Scarface and Only Angels Have Wings about stoical, self­assured male protagonists, and  other Bogart films such as The Maltese Falcon in which he plays similarly independent  heroes.  Harry clearly has greater depth than his affable sidekick, Eddie (Walter Brennan),  about whom we learn very few details beyond his perpetual drunkenness and his loyalty  to Harry, or the snarlng local French official Renard (Dan Seymour), about whom we  learn even less.  This is because Harry has more scenes and more lines than Eddie or  Renard, because he interacts with more characters than they do, because Harry’s mental  processes are given much greater significance in the unfolding of the plot, because Harry  is the cause of many more of the narrative’s events, and because the narrative events are  represented in terms of their impact on Harry more than any other character.  So it is true  that Harry’s inner life is explored—indirectly, of course, in a Hawks film—more than the  inner lives of the other characters.  In particular, his internal process of decision­making  is critical for our understanding of the plot.  But it is also true that we have more 

31

information about Harry than the others.  These two facts are made relevant by the other  details of the characterization, especially by Harry’s place within the organization of  narrative events as the central node around which the other characters are arranged in  their network of relationships.  The result is typically classical: a moderate depth of  characterization befitting a mode of storytelling that favors efficiency, order, and balance:  not too shallow, not too deep. Thus the moderate degree of classical cinema’s depth of character and  characterization is a product of informativeness that is moderate as a function of its  redundancy and relative simplicity.  This kind of informativeness is itself a product of the  imperative for clarity and coherence that insures legibility, accessibility, and maximal  audience appeal in a commercial entertainment industry.  It is for this reason that  Bordwell et al. call Classical Hollywood an “excessively obvious cinema.”20  Classical  Hollywood, heir to 19th century traditions of both realism and melodrama, borrows some  of each narrative mode’s characters and characterizations.21  John Ford’s westerns offer  excellent examples of how these inheritances are combined, with some of the richness of  detail and milieu of 19th Century fiction, as in the cross­section of western society  offered in Stagecoach, and its emphasis on probing character psychology, as in the 

32

complexity of Ethan Edwards’s motivation in The Searchers.  Nineteenth Century realism  emphasizes both the texture of the social domain, as in Balzac’s extensive array of  characters, and the vividness of the individual, as in Flaubert and Tolstoy, and Ford’s  evocation of both western society and the western hero achieves some modicum of these  effects.  But as westerns, Ford’s films also borrow the Manichean morality of the  melodramatic mode, as in My Darling Clementine’s contrast of the Earps and the  Clantons and Clementine and Chihuahua; melodrama’s clarity of overwrought  emotionality, as in Wyatt’s hatred for the Clantons and his passion for vengance; and the  staging of spectacular scenes, as in the O.K. Corral shootout.22  In merging these  traditions, Classicism balances richness and vividness of characterization with a pattern  of genre­ and star­based expectations and a powerful emotional rhetoric that is more  easily achieved with relatively shallow characters.  (I should insist here that I do not use  the term shallow in an evaluative aesthetic sense, and I mean no judgment or disapproval  on the basis of taste in my usage.)   There are three ways in which films from outside of the classical tradition  frustrate our conventional expectation of modest depth achieved by the merging of the  realist and melodramatic modes, and I have alluded to them all in the discussion above. 

33

We must first of clarify the distinctions between character and characterization and  between information and explanation.  A shallow character is a character about whom we  know little, while a shallow characterization (so defined by being shallow in comparison  with the depth of the character) is one that frustrates our understanding of a character  about whom we do have enough information to achieve at least modest depth.  This  distinction may seem overly subtle but it is necessary, as some characterizations produce  an effect not really of shallowness but of opacity: the narration suggests a character in  depth but closes off access to her.  This distinction explains two of the three non­classical  depth techniques: truly shallow characters lacking even the depth of classicism necessary  for character­centered causality, and characters presented using a technique of opacity.   The former is as much a theoretical as a practical category because depth is  always a matter of degree, but examples may be found in modes of discourse that are only  minimally narrative, such as the cinema of attractions, some examples of experimental  cinema, advertisements, music videos, and even non­narrative forms that contain some  narrative traces.  The characters in the films of Méliès, for example, certainly lack depth,  as do those in the films of Michael Snow that have characters, such as Wavelength, some  of Andy Warhol’s duration exercises and superstar studies, such as Sleep and Mario  

34

Banana, and Richard Linklater’s more experimental films, such as Slacker and Waking   Life.  As for limit cases, in which narrative is itself minimal, examples may be found in  children’s television programs such as Teletubbies in which the characters have a very  small number of distinguishing traits and in which the principal narrative events are  simple in the extreme, such as riding a scooter around the lawn or saying “Bye­bye!” and  leaving.  While minor characters such as Renard in To Have and Have Not may also be  considered shallow, it depends on our scale of comparison: they are shallow when viewed  next to the main characters, but deep compared with the Teletubbies.  Since most films  have minor as well as major characters, it would be incorrect to identify shallow minor  characters as somehow “un­Classical,” though we would do just that with the other  examples I have mentioned. Truly shallow main characters are the exception in narrative feature films, but  shallow characterizations of characters whose depths have parameters we are not able to  apprehend are much more common.  Carol in Safe is an example: we have a great deal of  information about her, but we do not know enough to explain and understand all of her  represented experiences; she may have psychological depth or she may not—we cannot  tell, and so we are puzzled by her.  By contrast, the narration may suggest no such thing, 

35

and merely represent a shallow character as such, in which case the narration does not  solicit our interpretation of the character, does not challenge us to figure him out.  Silent  film comedies abound in such characters, such as the various antagonists in Chaplin’s  The Kid who have minimal attributes and function merely as obstacles preventing the  tramp and the kid from getting along in life as a makeshift family.  While truly shallow  characters may either be minor characters or characters in simple, one­dimensional  narratives, a truly shallow, opaque characterization is a fundamentally ambiguous device  and much more likely to be found outside of the Hollywood tradition.  Shallow  characterization is characterization that keeps the audience at a distance, that forces us  into speculation and even puzzlement, and that can produce characters as objects for  intensive interpretation, such as Patricia in Breathless, Noriko in Late Spring, Mr. Badii  in Taste of Cherry, and William Blake in Dead Man. The key distinction between shallowness of character and shallowness of  characterization is thus the fit between them: if the characterization seems appropriate to  the character, it is not shallow in relation to it, but if the narration suggests that a better  understanding of the character is possible but beyond our means, and both awakens and  frustrates a desire in the spectator to know more about the character, then it seems that the 

36

character has greater depth than the characterization, and the characterization is thus  shallow in relation to its object.  This strategy is not necessarily typical of independent  cinema, which is generally more likely to favor characters and characterizations in depth.  But among a subset of formally experimental indie films that use disordered temporality,  shallow characterization is an element of formal play.  In Soderbergh’s The Limey, the  characters of Wilson (Terrence Stamp) and Valentine (Peter Fonda) would seem to have  much greater depth than we can ascertain from the jumbled presentation of them in the  film’s first half, during which the narration is frustratingly uninformative and difficult to  follow, with no one trait announcing itself as the most central facet of Wilson’s or  Valentine’s characters comparable to the redundant emphasis on Harry Morgan’s self­ reliance in To Have and Have Not.  Such films use experimental patterns of exposition in  relation to their characters such that in the first parts of the narrative the characters’ very  identities are obscure.  I will return to this point on experimental exposition and to The   Limey in the next section, but for now the key idea is that shallow characterization is a  narrative value that is distinct from shallow character.  Shallow characters are those about  which the narrative is uninformative; shallow characterizations are those wherein the  narration is insufficiently explanatory, or rather, is insufficient in soliciting inferences 

37

which the spectator may use to create an explanatory framework vis­à­vis the characters. In addition to shallowness, then, there may be depth of character and  characterization, which do not need to be separated out into discrete functions because it  is inconceivable that a characterization could have depth without the character also  having it.  Ethan in The Searchers is a character who has depth because we have  considerable, clear information about him that coheres and makes sense in the narrative  context.  Many independent films traffic in characters in fairly conventional depth, such  as Passion Fish, Smoke, You Can Count On Me, Traffic, Boys Don’t Cry, Monster’s Ball,  Before Sunset, Fargo, Welcome to the Dollhouse, Sideways, Clerks, and Do the Right   Thing, all of which have main characters who are the central nodes in richly informative  narrative patterns, all of which achieve a high degree of clarity about character  psychology, and all of which combine all of the basic appeals of characterization in this  process, including a complex approach to typing, a power of strong emotion effects, a  pattern of clear disposition attributions, and a density of inferential knowledge about  intentional states.  In comparison to typical classical characters in contemporary popular  genres such as action, horror, or comedy, the protagonists of these films may have greater  depth, but the difference is one of degree and may be more subtle than champions of 

38

indie films might like to think.  Are the differences really so great in the depth of  characters in films by Frank Capra, George Cukor, Billy Wilder, John Ford, Alfred  Hitchcock, Sidney Lumet, Mike Nichols, Steven Spielberg, and Robert Zemeckis, on the  one hand, and films by John Sayles, Jim Jarmusch, Steven Soderbergh, Spike Lee,  Quentin Tarantino, Todd Haynes, and Kevin Smith, on the other?  While the concept of  informative characterization may be somewhat hard to quantify, it would seem highly  unlikely that the crucial distinction between The Apartment and Clerks, The Philadelphia   Story and Down by Law, E.T. and Welcome to the Dollhouse, is that the independent films  have characters with greater depth than the classical ones.  Even so, there is a widespread  notion that independent films offer characters with more depth than Hollywood films, and  perhaps the idea of depth in popular discourse may really be a placeholder for some other  value, such as perceived realism, vividness, uniqueness or complexity, or it may arise out  of a misperception of the depth of Hollywood characterization among spectators who  prefer independent cinema as a matter of cultural taste. There is, however, the possibility of deep characters and characterizations, which  would entail having significantly more knowledge and understanding of characters than is  typical of the average film.  Since this is a matter of degree, we must admit that some 

39

especially character­centered Hollywood films, such as Citizen Kane, The Godfather, and  Raging Bull, would seem to be models of this.  Classics of international art cinema  furnish many more examples, such as Wild Strawberries, Charulata, Juliet of the Spirits,  The 400 Blows, and Belle de Jour, as does its more contemporary festival film  equivalents, such as Breaking the Waves, Talk to Her, and A Brighter Summer Day.  This  is a straightforward notion of depth: informative and relatively clear and coherent  characterizations that engage our attention in their own right.  Some independent films  achieve this unusual degree of depth (e.g., Passion Fish) and many do not (e.g., Stranger   Than Paradise).  To summarize, then, the three modes of depth that deviate from classical  character and characterization are: (1) shallow character; (2) shallow characterization; and  (3) deep character/characterization.  (See figure 6.1.)  But because all of these are relative  and relational terms, it is hard to say whether independent cinema as a whole uses any of  them to any significant degree.  Depth of character and characterization is a usefully  vague variable, like the relative terms we use to describe the weather.  Whether we say  that the weather is mild or harsh depends on many factors aside from temperature, wind,  and precipitation, such as climate, time of day, and time of year.  As I write I am  expecting tomorrow to be a mild day, but as it is now winter in the Midwestern United 

40

States, that means the temperature will be in the high 40s Farenheit.  So with depth of  character and characterization, we may say that a particular film, director, genre, cycle,  etc., favors a particular shallowness or depth, just as a particular region has a warm or  cool climate, but whether a given characterization is deep or shallow will always be a  matter for critical judgment and interpretation in relation to other characters, films, and  narratives. Character and Characterization: Scales of Depth  Scale 1: Character Depth GSK                  W, HM CW?    CFK Shallow <­­­­­­­­­|­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­|­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­|­­­­­­­­­­­>Deep

Scale 2: Characterization Depth GSK             W, CW           HM    CFK Shallow <­­­­­­­­­|­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­|­­­­­­­­­­­­|­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­|­­­­­­­­­­­>Deep

Legend: GSK: The Gay Shoe Clerk (The Gay Shoe Clerk) W: Wilson (The Limey) HM: Harry Morgan (To Have and Have Not) CFK: Charles Foster Kane (Citizen Kane)

41 CW: Carol White (Safe) marked with a question mark and no solid position on Scale 1  because of our inability to understand her fully Shallow character/shallow characterization=small quantity of information,  commensurate quantity of explanatory coherence Deep character/deep characterization=large quantity of information, commensurate  quantity of explanatory coherence Deep character/shallow characterization=large quantity of information, inadequate  quantity of explanatory coherence Shallow character/deep characterization=not possible

One significant complicating factor in the area of depth returns us to the topic with which  we began this section: the comparison between major and minor characters.  In ensemble  films, there typically is no main character or pair or characters.  Instead there are  constellations of interrelated characters, who have no greater depth than many of the  minor characters in other films.  In Richard Linklater’s Dazed and Confused, there are at  least eight characters represented with modest depth, but none of them is given the degree  of attention that a main character would get in a single or dual protagonist film, such as  Before Sunrise.  Yet ensemble films do not seem to have shallow characters.  This is a  paradox of characterization, but it reveals something about how depth works.  No  individual character in Dazed and Confused is represented with the kind of 

42

informativeness that we expect of main characters, but many of them seem no less vivid  and memorable, no less compelling as characters.   This should really come as no  surprise, however, when we recall that the sheer quantity of narrative information about a  character is no guarantor of the effect of depth absent a clear explanatory framework.  The characters of short stories may seem to have significant depth, but they are  represented with considerably less information than the characters of novels.  The minor  characters of novels and feature films often seem shallow by comparison to the main  characters, but this often really is a product of comparison.   In ensemble films, the effect of depth is achieved in two ways: by setting a lower  baseline for comparisons of depth and shallowness than in single or dual protagonist  films, as I have discussed, and by the effect of accumulative and comparative  characterization.  By accumulative I mean that Dazed and Confused spends as much or  more time on characterization as a single or dual protagonist film of the same length and  scope, and that keeping all of the characters straight in one’s mind involves as much or  more character­related activity as following only one or two major characters.  Although  no one character has significant depth, in aggregate there is considerable depth to the  film’s characterization.  And by comparative I mean that because there are so many  characters, they take on additional significance and depth not through any particular 

43

device of characterization, such as the solicitation of inferences or the attribution of  personality traits, but through the effect of being juggled with the other characters in our  minds and compared in the process.  The characters set each other into relief to a greater  degree than in a single or dual protagonist film, and the structure of Dazed in Confused  prompts these comparisons, such as comparisons between the male and female bullies  and male and female victims, between the boys and girls more generally, between the  athletic kids and the more artsy ones, and between the younger kids and the older ones.  The male bully, O’Bannion (Ben Affleck), is characterized in part by the implicit  comparison of him with the high school graduate who hangs around the kids, Wooderson  (Matthew McConaghey), which makes O’Bannion seem pathetic.  The kids drinking and  taking drugs, especially Randall “Pink” Floyd, whose football eligibility depends on him  staying clean, are characterized in comparison to Slater, the stereotypical stoner, and this  makes the other kids’ consumption seem less serious.  The younger characters, the  victims of the last­day­of­school hazing, are represented as parallel to one another, so  Mitch’s (Wiley Wiggins) relationship with an older girl is echoed in Sabrina’s (Christin  Hinojosa) relationship with an older boy.  Mitch is also characterized in comparison with  his sister, Jodi, who is popular and well liked.  In general, these character traits have two  possible functions: transferability and contrast.  The former is a kind of guilt by 

44

association, as in the linkage of O’Bannion and Wooderson and of the male and female  bullies.  The other sets off characters from one another more starkly than would otherwise  be the case.  In terms of the two hazings in the film, the older girls are more interested in  humiliating and degrading the younger ones, while the boys are more interested in  inflicting physical pain through violence.  This establishes the sexes as parallel but  distinct spheres in the world of the film, but this is turned around in the scene in which  O’Bannion gets his comeuppance outside the bowling alley.   In general, then, the function of the ensemble cast can be to accentuate an effect  of depth of characterization without offering substantial additional information about any  given character.  The whole of the narrative context is thus a factor in the effect of depth,  and depth must be seen in terms of relationships established among elements of the  narrative, not merely in terms of whether a film uses character point­of­view structures,  subjective narration, or an intensive focus on an individual.

Variable 2: Complexity  If the first variable refers to the way that characters and characterizations are informative,  the second concerns qualities of the information.  The complexity of a character is 

45

determined by the extent to which comprehending the character challenges our cognitive  habits and skills.  Some characters are presented so straightforwardly that we seem to  understand them almost automatically, they are so readily comprehensible and so familiar,  while others require more work.  This is distinct from depth; a character can be richly  informative without having complexity.  The opposite is not true, however; complexity  requires at least a minimum of informativeness.   As with depth, it is important to distinguish between complexity of character and  complexity of characterization.  Characterizations often exceed characters in complexity.  As a narrative progresses, the Characters often become clarified to the point that the gaps  that made us curious about them are eventually mostly filled in.  They may seem quite  complex after two or three reels but by the end of the film they seem much more  conventionally straightforward.  This is especially true, we shall see, in narratives with  delayed exposition, in which a convoluted narrative structure complexifies  characterization without complexifying character.  In other cases, as with depth, character  and characterization are commensurately complex, and as the narrative unfolds so does  the complexity of both character and characterization.  This is the case, for example, in  You Can Count On Me, which progressively reveals new dimensions of the two main  characters without the manipulation of temporal order.  The younger brother (Mark 

46

Ruffalo) who we are meant to suspect as being selfish and unreliable comes to seem more  like a good guy, while his dependable big sister (Laura Linney) starts to seem impulsive  and a bit irresponsible.  By contrasting their trajectories and multiplying their  contradictory traits, the film enhances both character and characterization in complexity. There are at least three relevant (non­grammatical, non­mathematical), related  meanings of the adjective “complex” in the dictionary: (1) consisting of several connected  parts, i.e., composite; (2) consisting of parts that are related in an intricate fashion; and  (3) complicated, as opposed to simple, and thus difficult to analyze.  These are all apt  descriptions of complex characters, especially if we substitute “traits” for “parts,” and  while there may be other aspects to complexity in characterization, at least these make for  a good start.23  How do these meanings distinguish complexity from depth?  A character  having depth presupposes (1), but not (2) or (3).  Since (2) and (3) really presuppose (1),  complexity in characterization can be assumed to involve intricately interrelated  characteristics and to cause difficulty in analyzing (or more basically, comprehending)  them, while depth can be assumed to be a more general descriptive term for a character  with a relatively large number of traits (or belonging to a relatively large number of  types).  Thus complexity refers both to facts of the characterization as represented in  cinematic discourse and to facets of the process wherein the character is taken up and 

47

constructed by the spectator. For example, in Orson Welles’s Touch of Evil, Hank Quinlan (Welles) has both  depth and complexity.  We know and understand a considerable amount about him,  including substantial backstory that is not represented directly but is described in  dialogue.  Quinlan’s characteristics combine contradictory values, such as coarseness,  corruption, racism, hubris, and murderous violence with a desire that justice and right be  done, a sense of duty to his role as enforcer of the law, and loyalty to his friends.  Another  element of his complexity is the sympathy Welles brings to his portrayal, the sense he  achieves that Quinlan deserves no less admiration than his rival, Mike Vargas (Charlton  Heston), who is morally much more upstanding, and the vindication Quinlan  posthumously receives when he, not Vargas, is proven to have been right all along about  who killed Rudy Linneker.  Welles portrays Quinlan with pathos and poignancy, as the  mere shadow of a once­great man, while Heston plays Vargas with a kind of bland,  handsome earnestness.  Vargas, for his part, also has considerable depth—though not as  complete a backstory—but lacks complexity in comparison to Quinlan because Vargas is  less contradictory, less enigmatic, less of a challenge to figure out.  For Ewen, complexity  refers to whether a character has a small or large number of traits,24 which makes his  complexity closer to my depth, but the difference here has to do with the way in which 

48

those traits are arrayed and the way that they interrelate.  Quinlan might have more traits  than Vargas or he might not, but the crucial distinction between them is to be found in the  process whereby spectators make sense of the narrative data.  Because of the intricacy of  his traits, Quinlan is more complicated and demands more cognitive work. Like depth, complexity depends on all of the resources of characterization.  The  poker­faced portrayal of Dawn in Welcome to the Dollhouse gives her complexity because  it forces us to consider whether she is suppressing her feelings, and if so which feelings  she is suppressing.  The situation in the opening cafeteria scene cues folk­psychology  inferences and her response within that situation cues attributions of personality traits and  prompts questions about the character.  The staging, cutting, framing, and sound all  support the generation of this effect.  The interrelation of these devices adds up to an  intricacy of characterization, while specific challenging devices such as inexpressive  vocal and facial expressions make this complexity more prominent.  Similarly, the  absence of backstory about Sydney in Hard Eight, the opacity of Carol’s inner life in  Safe, and the play with type­related expectations in Passion Fish are all complexifying  devices.  They all make comprehension more challenging and demand an active  engagement with the process of characterization through interpretation.  

49

Sydney is a clear­cut complex character who demands this kind of engagement.  In the early parts of Hard Eight, his motives are unclear because his backstory is not well  established, his loyalty to John seems unearned, and as the plot develops, he has to  balance contradictory desires to help himself and to help John and Clementine.  His  personality traits seem to be partial: we know only so much, but want to know more, and  we have difficulty making clear attributions based on dispositions and situations in  reference to his behavior toward Jimmy, Clementine, and especially John.  His face and  voice, while very distinctive and engaging, do not seem to display basic emotions to help  clarify his goals.  All of these elements of Sidney depend, of course, on the narration’s  withholding of the key narrative information about Sid having killed John’s father.  Expository delay thus generates complexity because it forces active interpretation of  character.  Yet even in the end, having been satisfied with our knowledge of Sydney, he  still seems somewhat complex, if only because he has been willing to kill again—to kill  Jimmy—to protect his relationship with John and to protect his own secret.  We are left  wondering still about Sydney’s character and the motivation for his behavior, including  his motivation for killing John’s father, though we are hardly as curious and puzzled in  the end as we had been after the first twenty or thirty minutes. The complexity of  Sydney’s characterization exceeds that of his character, as is most typically the case. 

50

Enigmatic characterization demanding that we puzzle over character rarely intensifies at  the end of a narrative; the conventional pattern is to exploit complexity until the  dénouement, when the questions posed by the characterization are mostly answered. As this example attests, the temporal dimension of narrative is crucial to effects of  complexity.  Complexity often requires contradiction and omission to be effective, and  these things are more often found in the beginning and middle rather than the end of  stories because of their utility in generating narrative interest.  We must distinguish  clearly, then, between character and characterization, just as we did with the variable of  depth.  A complex character, such as Charles Foster Kane, is himself a finely crafted  intermeshing of traits, a filigree of contradictions.  He is both powerful and frustrated,  admired and loathed, high­minded and petty, fortunate and hapless, sentimental and  heartless, loyal and cruel.  This is Kane as a character abstracted from the narration of  Kane.  (Sometimes such characters are thought to be true­to­life because we perceive real  people to have this kind of complexity, to be full of contradictions and inconsistencies,  especially when compared with the more straightforward heroes of myth and Hollywood.)  Characterization in Citizen Kane is also complex, a jangle of voices distinct every one in  its representation of the hero, and moderately exploitive of the potential for this process to 

51

challenge, to pose questions, to open up enigmas, to temporarily frustrate our  understanding.  By the end of the film, however, with the revelation of the sled thrown  into the fire, a good measure of the uncertainty about Kane has been resolved—the  difficulty in analyzing Kane has to a large extent been overcome by the time we learn the  significance of “Rosebud.”  It is standard that complex characters are represented through  complex characterization and so these terms are interchangeable in some cases.  But it is  also possible for a moderately complex character to be represented straightforwardly, as is  standard in classical cinema, and for complex characterization to represent a  comparatively straightforward character.  The latter is sometimes the case in formally  playful films which require that we expend considerable resources puzzling over a  character who in the end is hardly intricate or contradictory in a fashion commensurate  with his characterization.  More on this shortly. The demand to analyze a character’s personality traits, intentional states, and  emotions, rather than merely to comprehend details about them, is hardly specific to  narratives that seem especially character­focused.  As Barthes observed in S/Z, character­ related questions are a primary engine of plot development in mainstream (readerly) texts,  generating interest and a desire to know more.25  Moderate character complexity, like 

52

moderate depth, is a standard feature of classical cinema.  In To Have and Have Not,  Harry’s contradictory desires give him complexity: he wants to stick to his modus   operandi of keeping to himself, but we sense that he feels honor­bound to help a friend  and support in practice a cause that he already supports in principle.  Likewise he insists  that Slim leave Martinique while at the same time also, it seems, he desires that she stay  with him, and his claim to independence is also tempered by the closeness of his paternal  relationship with Eddie.  These may not seem to be complex descriptions of the same  degree as Sydney, because no enigma is generated around Harry and the others beyond  the comparatively simple will­he­or­won’t­he, but these elements of his characterization  do give Harry more complexity than, again, Renard, who is one­dimensional by  comparison.  Our efforts to understand Renard are much simpler: his personality traits are  limited and consistent, his facial and vocal expressions are transparent, his beliefs,  desires, and goals are obvious, and no contradictions or questions attend our perception of  his character. Many independent films, such as Safe and Passion Fish, maximize complexity of  characterization and character without pushing the limits of comprehension, plausibility,  and narrative convention.  These are all important constraints on complex 

53

characterization, as the audience may be unwilling to entertain too much omission and  contradiction.  Typing is especially significant in the effect of complexity, because the  interrelation of traits is a key element of this variable, and traits and types are closely  linked.  Safe and Passion Fish are both films in which novel and contradictory types, both  genre types (from the woman’s picture/disease­of­the­week drama) and social types  (rooted in milieu, age, gender, race, class, physical ability) are introduced and contrasted  within a given characterization.  These two films are good examples of a fit between  character and characterization: both Carol in Safe and May­Alice and Chantelle in  Passion Fish are complex in close correspondence to their respective characterizations.  This pattern fits well with the socially emblematizing tendency of independent cinema:  complexity lends itself to the exploration of identity and justifies the film’s interest in it.  Indeed, the socially emblematic rhetoric of independent film would not function well  with predominantly simple, straightforward characterizations or even with only the  modest complexity of classicism, because complex characters are distinctive and vivid,  they call attention to character as a narrative value and as an appeal of cinema, and they  make character especially salient to audiences. A more interesting and distinctive approach, however, corresponds to the form­as­

54

game tendency.  One central appeal of formally playful narration is a concomitant  formally playful characterization.  Surface structures of play, such as radical temporal  reordering and genre­norm subversion, are devices for complexifying characterization,  but they may do so without necessarily complexifying character.  Thus it is possible for a  narrative to have complex characterization but not have complex characters.  The  characters in Memento are hard to understand, especially at first, because of the film’s  contorted expository pattern.  But by the end, the events and their causes are unraveled  clearly and coherently, and the ultimate effect is that Leonard is not a particularly  complex character.  The appeal of this approach to character within the form­as­game  strain of independent cinema may go along with the notion of play as the central appeal  of narrative experimentation.  Thinking seriously about characters leads naturally, it  would seem, into thematic interpretation and social rhetoric.  If form is pure play, it is  precisely these modes of engagement that the narrative is trying to close off.  Thus while  complexity in characterization can be fun, complexity of character might be too serious to  fit this reading strategy.  So while the form­as­game film is underway the characters seem  fascinating, but in retrospect, with the puzzles mostly solved, the gaps mostly filled in, the  characters may not appear to be so different from those of much more conventional 

55

narratives.  In The Limey, Wilson and Valentine are not very different from characters in  genre films with similar narratives in terms of character complexity, but their  characterizations certainly do pose difficulties of comprehension. The idea of characterization being difficult for the spectator to analyze prompts  the question of what devices of characterization promote active interpretation, puzzling,  reconciling, unraveling, etc.  There are two main devices that give complexity to  characterization in character­driven narratives such as independent films, each of which  have several sub­devices.  First, narratives may present character data which are at first  incompatible or contradictory. Such data create complex characterizations and complex  characters by requiring that the spectator resolve contradictions inherent in the characters’  internal composition. .  For example, characterization may have intricate typing, with  multiple types in tension with one another.  In Passion Fish, aspects of Chantelle’s  character that are withheld add to her complexity, as we compare our expectations of her  with the character she turns out to be, and her complexity in turn adds to May­Alice’s.  Characterization may also present character attributes or behavior that contradict  established typing.  The latter is a feature of many of the characters in The Big Lebowski,  who combine categories of identity and identifying behavior as a kind of character mix­

56

and­match game.  Walter is a Vietnam­obsessed veteran and an observant Jew who  refuses to bowl on the sabbath.  The thugs who are Bunny’s “kidnappers” are also  members of a German techno­pop band, a parody of the group Kraftwerk.  The  flamboyant Latino bowler Jesus (John Turturro) is also a child molester, for no apparent  reason.  Of course, The Dude himself is an unemployed slacker thrust into the role of  detective.  Comedies do allow for certain kinds of formal anarchy as a genre convention,  but we would not withhold the badge of complexity from these characters simply because  it is a convention of comedy to subvert norms of consistent typing.  However, some of  these characters (the kidnappers, Jesus) are minor and have little depth.  Thus they are  moderately complex—more so than the characters in, say, American Pie, but less so than  the characters in Passion Fish. Characterization may also be complex when there is an incompatibility or  contradiction between narrative situation and character reaction, including emotion  expressions and behavior.  This is the Welcome to the Dollhouse kind of complexity, in  which typing offers a baseline of knowledge about the character, but narrative situations  are the most salient input into character psychology.  Dawn’s behavior, including actions  and expressions, challenges our understanding of her because it forces us to consider 

57

various motivations, none of which the narrative specifies as correct.  We don’t know why  she doesn’t ease her suffering by capitulating to her parents, and we don’t know why she  sees herself as a suitable girlfriend for Steve.  We juggle several explanations but may not  ever settle on one.  In some narratives, this kind of characterization is a function of a  suppressed gap, as when Fight Club reveals the explanation for Tyler Durden’s behavior  by planting the entire character’s existence in the mind of the narrator, or when Julie in  Swimming Pool turns out to be an imposter.  Identity itself need not be the substance of  the gap, however, as character motivations may be obscured in many ways.  In The Big   Lebowski, Maude’s romantic interest in The Dude seems incongruous until we learn that  she only wants him for his sperm, which she tells him only after they have sex.  There may also be an incompatibility between previously attributed dispositions  and behavior.  In Do The Right Thing, Sal and Mookie have both depth and complexity.  The latter is a product of specific attributes or actions which may seem incompatible with  typing, especially racial and occupational typing, and its associated trait inferences. Their  friendly relationship is an aspect of their complexity as it defies the racial lines of  opposition drawn among members of the neighborhood (and among characters of the  narrative) and goes beyond what one ordinarily expects of employer and employee.  Sal’s 

58

action of smashing Radio Raheem’s boom box and Mookie’s action of throwing the trash  through Sal’s window both may seem inconsistent with the characters’ attitudes of  tolerance and with Mookie’s friendly attitude toward Sal, but by assimilating this  contradictory input into their characters we see them in a new way and recast our sense of  each of them. Finally, there are characters who have such inconsistent or contradictory traits,  intentional states, and emotions, that they are in a sense at odds with themselves as a  matter of defining their very identity.  These are the classic conflicted characters torn  between opposite goals and between alternative self­conceptions.  Macbeth wants to  become the king, but he also wants to be a good host to his guest, King Duncan.  Does he  wait his turn, like a dutiful subject, or does he fulfill the witches’ prophecy and follow his  ambition?   Shakespeare’s tragic heroes may be the most fully achieved examples of these  internally conflicted characters, who struggle to know themselves as much as they  struggle to make their way in the world of the narrative.  But on a more modest scale,  similar dynamics inform the construction of character­centered Hollywood and  independent films as well.  This is a matter of character as much as it is of  characterization, since this kind of conscious internal conflict is rarely obscured—or  amplified—by the characterization.

59

At least one of the main characters in a romantic comedy, such as It Happened   One Night, must choose between two romantic partners, one we hope they will reject and  one we hope they will accept.  The choice between King Westley and Peter Warne  represents a choice between two ways of living, two world­views, but also between two  self­conceptions for Ellie Andrews.  She has to realize that she is the sort of person who  marries Peter, not the sort of person who marries Westley, and this opposition of internal  details of character gives her a degree of complexity.   Initially, we aren’t sure if she’s a  Westley sort of person or a Peter sort of person.  The same dynamic informs many  contemporary films, including independent romantic comedies such as Kissing Jessica   Stein, which inverts both the sexual orientation of one of the characters and the place of  self­transformation within the narrative structure.  Jessica follows the same pattern as  Ellie to the point that she moves in with her Peter Warne, Helen.  But the film isn’t over,  and eventually she leaves to go back to her old life.  In adding this additional downbeat  coda to the romantic comedy formula, Kissing Jessica Stein substitutes the bitter­sweet  feeling of returning to an old, “square,” straight life for the excitement of the new one  Jessica had only tasted briefly before it became untenable.  She grows and learns  something about herself, but the transformation is much more subtle than films in which 

60

a character really accepts a new conception of herself.  Thus the terms of the Hollywood  transformation as it plays out in It Happened One Night are turned around as the  optimism of Capra is replaced with pragmatism and a bit of melancholy.   In independent cinema, the kind of internal character oppositions and  transformations that mark Hollywood films from It Happened One Night to Casablanca  to The Graduate to Jerry Maguire are less likely to occur in such a straightforwardly  positive fashion.  More often, the character realizes his inadequacies in a state of dejected  acceptance, as Primo and Secondo do in the final scene of Big Night, or learns a life  lesson, as in High Art and Thirteen. In many films, the characters wind up no closer to  self­revelation than in the beginning, as in Down by Law, Buffalo ’66, Barton Fink, Kids,  Your Friends and Neighbors, and Welcome to the Dollhouse, though they hardly seem to  be pursuing any such thing.  The moderate complexity of Hollywood characters is often a  product of their more malleable changeability, which typically is presented to the  character as fixed alternatives.  Harry Morgan can either keep to his regular routine, or he  can help the Free French.  The progression of the narrative is from one position to  another, and suggests a concomitant change in the character.  This straightforwardly  internally contradictory character is a less prominent feature of independent cinema’s 

61

characterization than it is of other narrative modes.  It may seem that this type of  character is too conventional for independent cinema because his arc follows a  predictable pattern and his psychology is stereotypically flattened by the fixed  alternatives.26   However, some independent films that do represent a process of growth through  the resolution of internal contradictions.  For example, Secretary brings together two  characters whose complexity is a product of their shame over having illicit desires.  Mr.  Gray (James Spader) has a fetish for domination, while his new secretary, Lee Holloway  (Maggie Gyllenhall), mutilates herself.  He begins to act out his fantasies on her, and to  the surprise of them both, she begins to crave these sexualized play­beatings.  The  characters’ parallel  complexity comes from the contradiction between what they want  and what they think they are supposed to want, and the trajectory of both characters is  toward self­recognition, embracing their own “deviance” by embracing each other.  Aside  from treating alternative sexual expression sympathetically, the film also dramatizes two  complex characters’ growth from repressive to expressive.  Typically for an independent  film, the positive message is a product of the validation of a minority identity—sexual  fetishists, in this case—not typically represented sympathetically in the movies. In addition, then, to characterizations informed by incompatible or contradictory 

62

information, there may also be those with insufficient narrative data to fit the spectator’s  expectations, causing speculation and puzzlement about undefined character attributes.  Insufficient narrative data need not necessarily create complex characters, as the withheld  information demands not resolving and reconciling but speculating, hypothesizing, and  studying.  The ultimate outcome of this activity may be a complex character or it may not. One way of offering insufficient data is exposition through fragmented  temporality.  Films with flashback and flashforward structures suppress important  explanatory information. In films of radical temporal reordering, the main characters are  often presented as the narrative’s central enigma.  The complexity attendant to Wilson in  The Limey and Leonard in Memento is extensive, and the narrative form prompts us to  study them carefully, to scan their blank faces for signs of clear emotion, for evidence of  their true intentions, for glimmers that might unravel their motivation for us.  Both are  revenge narratives, pursuits of both knowledge and of a person.  We are aligned with  Wilson and with Leonard, seeking with them but also desiring more knowledge about  them, and sympathizing with their drive to avenge a loved one without quite approving of  this desire.  The tension between these interests and desires, between our knowledge and  their knowledge (greater in Wilson’s case, lesser in Leonard’s), between our confusion 

63

and theirs, between our cautious sympathy and our determination to know more, between  hoping with them and fearing for them without the confidence of being able to base our  feelings on solid evidence, conspires to effect in us a sense of intricacy and fascination. In both films, however, the narrative data becomes clarified to the point that our  interest in character shifts away from these animating tensions and back onto more  conventional appeals better described as depth than as complexity.  We wind up knowing  a considerable amount about Leonard and Wilson, but ultimately, their quests are quite  linear and straightforward.  The non­linear, complex aspects of The Limey and Memento   are products of an intricate narrative structure, not of intricate character traits.  In The   Limey, Wilson is singularly focused on avenging his daughter Jenny’s death, and the only  twist on this comes at the end, when he reconsiders and spares Valentine’s life.  This  change of heart is a product of his realization of his similarity to Valentine, of their  parallel roles in Jenny’s life.  As we shall see, this is more a matter of character change  than character complexity.  If the narrative of The Limey were to be arranged  chronologically, it is hard to imagine that the interest we take in Wilson would be nearly  so great, since so much of the film’s effect is a product of the ambiguous flashback and  flashforward pattern, its intercutting of spatially discontinuous shots that would seem to 

64

be temporally continuous, and its stingy exposition of significant narrative details.  Likewise, watching Memento in chronological sequence, as one can do on the special  edition DVD, is an exercise in tedium.  The explanation of Leonard’s pursuit of Terry is  put in exceedingly clear terms as the product of a specific mental illness causing Leonard  to confuse and invent memories, thus pathologizing his motivation.  By the film’s end,  Leonard’s motivation and behavior seem to have even less complexity than Wilson’s;  Leonard is quite straightforwardly a pathetic, confused amnesiac, and this trait is the  master key that explains everything about him.  Character complexity is complicated by  mental illness, which is itself unusual and in some instances strangely fascinating.  But  Leonard’s illness does not give him complexity.  Leonard’s illness simplifies rather than  complicates his inner life by reducing his motivation to an imaginary rather than a real  source.  There is no challenge in understanding Leonard once the film is over because the  narrative forestalls any possible ambiguity or contradiction about his traits.  Like Wilson,  Leonard is a richly informative character presented in a formally challenging fashion, but  ultimately his complexity is no greater than the average character’s. The other way a characterization provides insufficient narrative data is by delayed  exposition.  When the narration withholds important backstory, characterization may  seem more complex because it can be difficult or impossible to explain characters’ 

65

behavior and reactions.  Hard Eight is an example of this, and as we have seen its  complexity of characterization is not commensurate with its complexity of character.  But  there are more radical versions of withholding in recent Hollywood cinema, such as The   Sixth Sense, Vanilla Sky, Fight Club, and A Beautiful Mind, all of which use that old  standby of motivating experimental devices as character psychology (see Chapter 5).  These are certainly complex characterizations, with very pronounced suppressed gapping  which, when revealed, force a complete recasting of narrative events.  And even after their  secrets have been revealed, the characters do have a modest complexity.  But unlike these  examples, the more formally complex independent film announces its challenge upfront  rather than saving  it for a big surprise.  Since the formal play is a selling point, it makes  no sense to hide it as a narrative twist, as in The Sixth Sense.  Thus elaborate gapping is  more likely to be flaunted rather than suppressed in independent films, as it is in The   Limey.

Variable 3: Change Of all of the narrative­related terms that casual filmgoers and reviewers invoke, none may  be as vexing to the narrative theorist as “character development.”  Contrasted with plot, 

66

character development is unambiguously positive and interesting; it’s what good movies  are supposed to have and in plentiful supply.  The ultimate snobbish put­down of the  genres lowest on the cultural totem pole, from kung­fu films and gross­out comedies to  cartoons and video games, is to say that they have no character development.  Independent cinema, on the other hand, is supposed to be the very opposite, higher up the  totem pole, and more focused on character.  When you look closer at characterization in  terms of development, however, things are not so straightforward.  Character development  may mean various things, and we have no rationale for assuming a priori that good  narratives have it and bad ones do not.  Indeed, as I argue at the end of this discussion,  some films prefer to have static rather than changing characters.  This may sound  counterintuitive, as we have been led to believe that character change is an unequivocally  positive narrative value.  But independent cinema has many cases of static rather than  dynamic characters, and in comparison with Hollywood cinema, independent film  characters generally change less.  This preference for the static is motivated by various  factors, some of which are aesthetic and some of which are part of independent film’s  social rhetoric.  I will spell this argument out in due course, but before I do we must  consider character development as a variable of characterization.

67

There are several meanings of “develop,” all of which may be pertinent to  understanding characterization.  “Develop” may mean simply the unfolding of events over  time, as in “we’ll see how things develop.”  In this simple sense, any experience of  narrative events by characters constitutes development.  The earliest instance given by the  OED refers to the 17th Century usage referring in heraldry to the unfolding of an ensign,  which itself is a modification of the earlier term “disvelop,” (and we must suppose the  opposite of “envelop”) and though this meaning is now obsolete it is telling in the sense  that narrative developments are a kind of unfolding.  In the 18th Century, this usage was  adapted to mean any kind of revelation or discovery.  This is also telling, as the narrative  instance of development is also a kind of gradual discovery about character.  In various  other, more modern senses, develop can refer to making things seen, in photography, to  the growth and maturation of an organism, in biology and psychology, and to evolution or  change, as in a object developing from one state into another.  Its connotations are of  advancement and betterment.  Development often refers to something latent being  brought into a state of fullness, as when the seedling of an idea takes flower and is fully  realized.  In literary and dramatic terms, however, “development” can refer simply to the  progression of action (as distinguished from exposition and conclusion), and on the news  a “development” is nothing more than a new bit of information.  There is thus a spectrum 

68

of senses of the term development, from new things coming to light to improvement,  change, and transformation. Out of these various meanings we might identify several discrete senses of  development as it applies to character and characterization: (1) The character experiences the unfolding of events in time, externally or internally.  E.g., the development of Carol in Safe is from typical Southern California homemaker to  Wrenwood patient. (2) The character grows, matures, is bettered, externally or internally.  E.g., in Passion   Fish, May­Alice overcomes her anger and cynicism, accepts her identity, and finds peace  in her new life. (3) The character’s traits change, externally or internally.  E.g., at the end of The Limey,  Wilson turns from being vengeful and angry to being understanding and accepting. These meanings are, clearly, interconnected, as (2) and (3) require the passage of  time and so presuppose (1); (2) presupposes (3); and (1) presupposes (2), at least  superficially to the extent that everyone matures as life goes on.  In all of these instances,  the character undergoes some kind of change that impacts upon him or her in some  minimally meaningful way, and all may be external, internal (psychological), or more 

69

likely both since we will attribute mental states to characters without their explicit  representation or description.  In none of the examples I give above is the character’s  inner change directly indicated by the characterization, but we are generally primed to  read inner change into external change—it is both a narrative and a social convention.  Moreover, these three kinds of change are just as available to classical characterization as  they are to any other mode.  If independent characters differ from classical ones along the  variable of change, it is not because only they exploit some of these possibilities.  These  interconnected meanings are themselves full of intricacies and subtleties, but there is yet  another meaning of “character development” that we might glean from the discussion  above, and this last meaning complicates matters further: (4) We learn more about the character (the character is revealed to us—unfolded before  our eyes). This one does not presuppose any other terms, and is not presupposed by them.  It is, as  with depth and complexity, another instance demanding that we distinguish between  character and characterization.  Characters develop, but narratives also develop  characters.  The greatest source of confusion in this area is the perpetual ambiguity  between the character’s development and the narrative’s development of character.   Like depth and complexity, change is a temporally dynamic variable of character. 

70

It requires narrative unfolding and must be analyzed in narrative context.  Also like depth  and complexity, it is possible to have change in characterization—indeed, it is  inconceivable not to have it—without having significant character change.  But before  considering characters who do not change, we must probe meanings (1) through (3) to  consider how they work. Characters who change significantly may be considered dynamic.  The classic  instance of character change in mainstream cinema occurs with the Hollywood plot point,  an event propelling the narrative forward, which often occurs when a character realizes  that he has been pursuing the wrong goals and changes course, or when some goals have  been achieved and new ones arise.27  According the screenwriting guru Syd Field, “a plot   point is a function of the main character.”28  Professional screenwriting advice tends to be  character­centered, and the idea behind the plot point is that the structure of plot action  must be tightly linked to the growth of the characters in the story.29  Not all plot points  signal significant change of personality traits, but they often do signal a change in a  character’s attitudes, feelings, desires, and most importantly, goals.  In The Apartment, a  plot point that is also a point of character change occurs when C.C. Baxter decides to  pursue a relationship with Fran at the risk of not advancing in his profession.  In Meet Me  

71

in St. Louis, it is when Alonzo Smith realizes that he should keep his family in St. Louis  and declares that they will not be moving to New York after all.  In North by Northwest it  is when Roger Thornhill discovers the true identity of George Kaplan and turns from  pursuing Kaplan to working with the spy agency against Vandam.  In all of these cases,  an internal change and an external one link up directly, such that a character’s  intentionality affects the events of the plot and vice versa.  They key to this device is that  the plot and the character develop as one.30 Less common are changes in personality traits, and especially rare are profound  changes.  I suspect this kind of transformation is what many people have in mind when  they think of characters who change, rather than develop, because when we think of  people changing we tend to think of the most deep and lasting interior development, such  as transforming from stingy to generous or from pessimistic to optimistic.  Actors like to  play characters who undergo such changes because it gives them an opportunity to show  their range, and characters whose personality traits are so labile do make for interesting  stories, but they are not really that common.  The problem with creating such characters is  making such drastic transformations credible.  Perhaps the most typical cases are to be  found in coming­of­age stories, wherein maturity demands new traits.  Michael 

72

Corleone’s youthful idealism at the beginning of The Godfather has turned into  Machiavellian ruthlessness by the end, but this has been motivated very well by  considerable growth of other kinds over the course of a long narrative and by significant  changes in his character’s external situation.  Go­for­it sports movies like Rocky and other  narratives of apprenticeship and education often require a character who begins as a  novice lacking confidence, but who by the end has triumphed to the point that she has  gained a new, stronger sense of self.  Politically and socially engaged films like Traffic  sometimes offer a hero or heroine who begins unaware of the consequences of some  situation but who comes into consciousness of its full impact, and so is transformed from  ignorance to conviction.  And stories that fit into the Joseph Campbell pattern of mythic  quest, such as Star Wars, Braveheart, and Gladiator, portray a character transformed into  a hero by overcoming a series of obstacles, a symbolic journey mirrored by an interior  process of self­discovery.31 Often, as with the Campbell archetypes, this idea of profound internal change can  be viewed more as revelation than as alteration, as digging deep into character to discover  the truth at the core of her being.  This notion of character revelation may accord, again,  with social expectations about other people.  As we have seen in regard to stereotypes and 

73

to impression formation, people’s cognitive structures are not easily changed.  Despite the  appeal of redemption stories, we are suspicious of leopards who can change their spots  too easily.  But the discovery of a fuller or truer sense of self may seem less implausible  than an overnight transformation.  Some screenwriting guides distinguish between  characterization and character not as I have, but as the distinction between outer and inner  self—characterization according to the screenwriting guides refers to external details such  as the character’s car, office, and favorite football team, while character refers to their  inner nature.  For many screenwriters, the development of character is a journey from the  outside to the inside, from characterization to character.  For example, Robert McKee  writes:  The revelation of true character in contrast to characterization is  fundamental to all fine storytelling.  Life teaches this grand principle:  what seems is not what is.  People are not what they appear to be.  A  hidden nature waits concealed behind a façade of traits.  No matter what  they say, no matter how they comport themselves, the only way we ever  come to know characters in depth is through their choices under pressure. 32   McKee is actually making two related points here: first, characterization should develop  from a level of shallow appearances to a deeper level of reality; second, the events of the  plot should allow us to “come to know”—that is, they should reveal—character through  conflict (“choices under pressure”).  Like Field, McKee asserts the crucial 

74

interdependence of plot progression and character development.  But McKee goes a step  farther in the direction of asserting the necessity of character revelation linking with a  change in the character’s traits, especially the most important personality traits: “The  finest writing not only reveals true character, but arcs or changes that inner nature for  better or worse, over the course of the telling.”33  McKee thus advocates a two­step  process: (1) characterization should develop from representing external details to  revealing previously hidden true character; (2) this true character should change over the  course of the characterization. Step (1) makes sense insofar as all characterization suggests beneath­the­surface  features of character, in which case it is a truism, but it is a stretch if by “true character”  we mean that people have a secret core of identity—inaccessible even to themselves—that  we can come to know by witnessing them under ideal pressure­filled conditions.  Granting that characters are not people, we must still remember that our means of  engaging with characters is the same cognitive apparatus that we use to make sense of  real people, and that characters are assumed to be minimally different from real people in  most cases.  The New Age and self­help culture notwithstanding, we don’t go around  searching for people’s true core of identity very often in our everyday lives, especially not  while our thinking is occupied by a task as attention­consuming as reading a story or 

75

watching a film.  Furthermore, what is to say that the inner character revealed in the end  is truer than the one introduced at the beginning?  Why is Michael Corleone’s violent,  mafia­don self more true than his youthful, idealistic self?  Thinking about character in  terms of true nature may be useful as a tool for screenwriters, but it does not seem to  describe the process of watching most films very aptly. What we make of step (2), of course, depends on what we made of step (1).  But  what I find interesting about McKee’s formulation is that he links two kinds of revelation  together, one a revelation that unfolds over time, and one a revelation that probes into  depth.  As a film unfolds, we learn more about character moment by moment—more of  the character is revealed to us, as a flag being unfolded is revealed piece by piece.  But as  this temporal revelation of narrative events occurs, a cumulative effect occurs as we learn  more and more traits and arrange them in our character schema, which allows us to probe  the character’s inner life and to work out the interrelation of the many traits we have  learned about.  Then to that we can add character change, which itself is another kind of  revelation.  So whether or not we think of “true character” as something fairly ordinary or  as something profound, these various levels can be seen to operate together in many  instances.   Passion Fish is a fine example of the McKee paradigm of character revelation: we 

76

go from the external (May­Alice’s injury) to the internal (her anger, frustration,  acceptance, etc.); we go into depth about her traits (her feelings about not only her injury,  but also her career, family, and background; her generosity as well as stubbornness; and  her sexuality in relation to Renny); and some of her attributes change (her distemper is  replaced with a sense of peace).  In response to various pressure situations, May­Alice is  revealed through an arc of character­events.  Many independent films, and many  Hollywood films and foreign ones, popular and art­cinema alike, follow similar  progressions.  Most characters change in certain respects, and all characterizations  develop by a progression of revelations, by unfolding along a trajectory.  This is what  McKee and others mean by “character arc,” a shorthand way of making plot a function of  character.  Some guides demand that the arc combine revelation with change, and this  kind of characterization may be very old (Scholes and Kellogg identify it with the rise of  Christianity34), but development does not demand that character follow characterization  into the realm of change. As with shallowness and depth, it is hard to imagine a main character in a feature  film who is really unchanging, because change can be thought of in so many ways.  But in  relative, comparative terms, many characters are better thought of as static than as  dynamic.  As always, minor characters are flat by comparison to major ones, and so a 

77

character who appears only once in a film obviously has no arc to speak of.  But main  characters can change in many ways, and even if they grow physically, even if they  encounter many others, experience many events, have conversations and confrontations,  engage in dramatic conflict, they need not necessarily change very much as characters.  Because Hollywood characters are expected to change and to change in a somewhat  predictable fashion, one way of countering Hollywood’s norms of representation is to  offer static characters.   But there are other benefits to taking a counter­Hollywood  approach to character.  Indeed there can be something comforting—or frightening—about  the constancy of some characters, such as those in some of the films of Jim Jarmusch,  Quentin Tarantino, Todd Solondz, or the Coen Brothers.  There are a variety of effects  that static characters can achieve in a narrative.  In films with episodic or vignette  structures, such as Stranger Than Paradise and Down By Law, the kind of Hollywood plot  points that at once reveal character and propel the narrative forward are attenuated.  These  are character studies which treat characters as unchanging objects of contemplation.  In  some crime films the main narrative events, such as the heist and its aftermath in  Reservoir Dogs, the kidnapping­gone­wrong in Fargo, and the confrontation between  Jimmy and Sidney in Hard Eight do not produce character­changing conflict; rather, they 

78

show the characters for who they are and are satisfied with that.  The events of Fargo do  not change Jerry or Marge so much as reveal them to us.  Characterization develops but  the characters do not. Then there are films such as Safe and Welcome to the Dollhouse in which  characters resist change in the face of events that might offer it to them.  These characters  counter the McKee paradigm head­on: instead of their true nature being revealed and  altered by the pressure of events, it is undefined or unyielding in spite of them.  Carol’s  external circumstances change considerably, and her emotional life is completely  transformed.  But part of Haynes’ agenda, part of his commentary on identity, is to keep  Carol’s “true character” from ever being revealed in a coherent fashion.  We simply do not  have enough access to Carol to determine her salient inner traits and their potential to be  changed by her experience.  As for Welcome to the Dollhouse, here is a case in which a  different dynamic applies: Dawn is resistant to change in the face of overwhelming social  pressure.  As I have discussed, the power of the film’s ending is a product of her  constancy, of the expectation that her suffering will continue.  The whole point of her arc  is to defy the forces of this social pressure, and Solondz’s social commentary, like  Haynes’s, demands a static character.  Otherwise the problems these filmmakers address 

79

may seem more manageable than they actually are.   The socially emblematizing viewing strategy sometimes prefers static characters  to dynamic ones because social problems cannot appear to be easily solved by the  transformation of individuals.  If there is something unsatisfying in the ending of Passion   Fish it is the way that Sayles leaves questions open about the future while at the same  time emphasizing the positive aspects of May­Alice’s and Chantelle’s development.  Their  transformation from antagonists into a kind of family, integrated into an authentic  community and looking after each other, is subtly undercut by persistent questions about  their romantic relationships with men and Chantelle’s responsibility to her daughter.  Thus the character development that makes the ending possible also makes the film’s  social rhetoric more problematic because of our lingering skepticism about the characters’  fortunes. There are also the temporal disorder films, some of which are also character­ change­resistant.  The main character of Memento is psychologically incapable of change  because of his amnesia, but the film’s narrative structure does him no favors in this  department.  This is the cost of focusing the narration on determining the cause rather  than the effect of the narrative’s basic conflict.  Leonard does not decide to kill Terry 

80

because he has changed, certainly not because his inner “true character” has changed.  Rather, he kills Terry because he is incapable of change.  Memento is an excellent  example of the distinction between character revelation and character change, between  characterization as development and the development of a character: all of the  development we see in the film, which is substantial, is geared toward showing us more  and more of the characters, but comparatively little of it probes beneath their surface to  explore their depths.  Memento also gives the lie to the notion that films are either plot­ or  character­centered, since it is so obviously both of these at once. Pulp Fiction is less radical in its construction of character than Memento, but in its  way it also downplays character change as the expense of formal experimentation.  In  Pulp Fiction, Jules (Samuel L. Jackson) is the one whose change is made prominent, as  he takes his lucky break of being missed by a bullet early in the film as a religious sign  that he should quit his life of crime, and in the end (he says) he leaves that life behind.  But the effect of the disorderly temporality on the other characters is to militate against  the notion of character change, and the focus of the audience on playful narration might  outweigh their concern with thematizing Jules’s character development.35   Vincent (John Travolta), for example, is seen at the end of the film leaving the 

81

diner, but we know that later in the story he is to be killed coming out of the bathroom of  Butch’s apartment.  The effect of his murder and “resurrection” is a blow against  conventional character development.  For a main character, Vincent’s murder seems  somewhat arbitrary and is not well explained, with a gap in motivation that is never filled  in: why is his gun on the kitchen counter rather than with him in the bathroom?   This  killing is causally underdetermined according to the terms of the narrative; there is  insufficient significance to Vincent’s being gunned down.  There is no redemption or  other positive thematic value to the event, so it could be a gesture toward nihilism, or  more likely, a gruesome Tarantino bit of shock and fun.  (In terms of Butch’s story,  however, it is a conventional plot point, as killing Vincent allows Butch to get away with  his watch.)   But knowing at the end of the film that Vincent’s life will end so arbitrarily  leaves us appreciating him as a basically static character, as a character who defies the  convention of the Hollywood arc, as a counterpoint to the emphasis the ending gives to  Jules’s religious transformation.  Tarantino seems to be telling us that we can have it both  ways if we want: we can have meaningful character change, motivated according to the  terms of the crime genre as redemption, or we can have meaningless character stasis,  motivated by the desire to have fun with storytelling conventions.   The static character  becomes a function of formal play.

82

In terms of characterization, then, a static state is not really an option for main  characters because more information about a character is constantly being revealed.  Characterization is a constant flow of information, and in that sense it develops whether a  film emphasizes character, plot, or whatever.  But in terms of character, significant  change is neither necessary nor is it necessarily aesthetically preferable.  Some films  prefer to have static characters, or to have characters whose growth is not measured in the  profound alteration of the personality traits that define their identity.

Conclusion This discussion of variables of characterization has been an attempt to suggest some ways  in which characters who are relatively flat can be just as interesting as characters who are  round through and through.  It has been an attempt more specifically to distinguish  between different kinds of flatness and roundness: between characters and  characterizations, between main and minor characters, between different variables of  characterization, and between different modes of cinematic practice.  As an aesthetic  principle, it is simply incorrect to place depth, complexity, and change on a higher plane  of value than shallowness, straightforwardness, and stasis.  Whether motivated as an anti­

83

mainstream gesture or by a specific aesthetic program such as realism, social criticism, or  formal experimentation, devices of flatness in characterization are no less compelling to  the spectator or the film critic.  As a character says in Pulp Fiction, “Just because you are  a character doesn’t mean you have character.”

1

 Scholes and Kellogg, 206.  E.M. Forster, Aspects of the Novel (San Diego: Harcourt, 1927), 78.  Chatman, Story and Discourse, 132.  Scholes and Kellogg, 170­204.  Tzvetan Todorov, The Poetics of Prose trans. Richard Howard (Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1977), 66­79.  Mieke Bal, Narratology: Introduction to the Theory of Narrative (Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985.), 81.  Ibid, 79­93.  Shlomit Rimmon­Kenan, Narrative Fiction: Contemporary Poetics (London: Routledge, 1983), 40­42. Smith, Engaging Characters, 117. 

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Persson, 216­217. While I agree that round characters typically demand that we “play around” with  their mental attributes, I believe Persson errs in defining flatness as “defying mental attribution.”  Surely the relatively flat secondary characters who help the hero of a movie, such as secretaries, taxi  drivers, and assistants, do not defy mental attribution—they simply have a small number mental  attributes, such as the desire to help the hero, which are made very clear within the narrative scenario.  I  describe characters who defy mental attribution later in the chapter in terms of complex  characterization.
11

 Tan, 173.    Sternberg,1.

12

13

 Ibid, 50.

14

 Ibid, 93.  See also Bordwell, Narration in the Fiction Film, 38.  Perry R. Hinton, The Psychology of Interpersonal Perception (London: Routledge, 1993), 84.

15

 The primacy effect is credited to Solomon E. Asch, “Forming Impressions of Personality,” Journal of   Abnormal and Social Psychology 41 (1946), 258­90.  See also Ross and Nisbett, The Person and the   Situation, 70­71 and Menakhem Perry, “Literary Dynamics” Poetics Today 1.1­2 (1979), 35­64, 311­ 361.
16

17

 For example, Syd Field writes, “The first ten pages of your screenplay are absoultely the most  crucial.” Syd Field, Screenplay: The Foundations of Screenwriting expanded edition (New York: Dell,  1994), 70.
18

 Sternberg, 56­158. 

 See for example Murray Smith’s discussion of characterization in Bresson’s L’Argent in Engaging   Characters, 173­181.
19 20

 Bordwell, Staiger and Thompson, 3.

 On the theatrical tradition, see Nicholas A. Vardac, Stage to Screen: Theatrical Method from Garrick   to Griffith (Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1949).  On realism, melodrama, and classical Hollywood, see Rick  Altman, “Dickens, Griffith, and Film Theory Today,” South Atlantic Quarterly 88.2 (1989): 321-60, and Jane M. Gaines (Ed.), Classical Hollywood Narrative: The Paradigm Wars (Durham, NC: Duke UP, 1992). On 19th Century realism and classical Hollywood, see also Colin MacCabe, “Realism and the Cinema: Notes on Some Brechtian Theses,” Screen 15.2 (Summer 1974), 7-27, and Colin MacCabe, “Theory and Film: Principles of Realism and Pleasure,” in Phil Rosen (Ed.), Narrative, Apparatus, Ideology: A Film Theory Reader (New York: Colubmia UP, 1986), 179-197. On the history of the term melodrama in Hollywood see Steve Neale, “Melo Talk: On the Meaning and Use of the Term ‘Melodrama’ in the American Trade Press,” The Velvet Light Trapp 22 (Fall 1993), 66-89.
21

 This conception of melodramatic appeals is indebted to Ben Singer, Melodrama and Modernity:   Early Sensational Cinema and Its Contexts (New York: Columbia UP, 2001), 37­58.
22 23

 The definition of complexity by the way in which character traits are combined has many antecedents  in narrative theory, e.g., in S/Z, Roland Barthes writes: “character is a product of combinations: the  combination is relatively stable (denoted by the recurrence of the seme) and more or less complex  (involving more or less congruent, more or less contradictory figures).”  Barthes, S/Z trans. Richard  Howard (New York: Hill and Wang, 1974), 67.  Seymour Chatman argues that the translation of the  French figures into “figures” is misleading, and should be rendered as “traits.”  Chatman, Story and   Discourse, 116n22.
24

 Rimmon­Kenan, 41.  Barthes, S/Z.

25

26

 One screenwriting manual that opposes the three­act structure of mainstream cinema condemns its  “binary character psychology,” as in the choice facing Bud in Wall Street between Gekko and his  family.  Ken Dancyger and Jeff Rush, Alternative Screenwriting 2nd Ed. (Boston: Focal Press, 1995), 

34.
27

 Thompson, Storytelling in the New Hollywood.  Field, Screenplay, 123, emphasis in original.

28

29

 For example, two critics of conventional Hollywood storytelling write that “One of the most difficult  challenges of writing a three­act, character­driven story is to devise plot points that not only feed into  the action, but also articulate character development.” Dancyger and Rush,, 21.
30

 Many screenwriting manuals such as Field’s emphasize this point, insisting on the connection  between the main line of plot action and the character’s.  See also Thompson.
31

 William Indyck writes of the Joseph Campbell myth­narrative, “No matter where the hero goes or  what his adventure entails, his journey is always an inner journey of self­discovery, and his goal is  always that of character development.  The hero is seeking to become psychologically complete.”  William Indyck, Psychology for Screenwriters: Building Conflict in Your Script (Studio City, CA:  Michael Wiese Productions, 2004).
32

 Robert McKee, Story: Structure, Substance, Style and the Principles of Screenwriting (New York:  ReganBooks, 1997), 103.
33

 Ibid, 104.

34

 Scholes and Kellogg, 165.

 The audience’s focus on narrative experimentation and play is emphasized in Dana Polan, Pulp   Fiction (London: BFI, 2000).
35

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.