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correlated to the

Connecticut
Mathematics
Curriculum
Framework
McDougal Littell
Algebra 2 ©2008

correlated to the

Connecticut
Mathematics Curriculum Framework

ALGEBRAIC REASONING: PATTERNS AND FUNCTIONS - Patterns and


functional relationships can be represented and analyzed using a variety of
strategies, tools and technologies.
1.1 Understand and describe patterns and functional relationships.
1.1.a Model real-world situations and make generalizations about mathematical
relationships using a variety of patterns and functions.
1.1.a(1) Describe and compare properties 236-243, 337-345, 370-377, 379-386,
and classes of functions, including 387-392, 428-434, 446-451, 478-485,
exponential, polynomial, rational, 486-491, 492-498, 499-505, 558-563,
logarithmic and trigonometric. 565-571, 852-858, 866-872, 908-914,
915-922
1.1.a(2) Analyze essential relations in a 19-20, 23-24, 29, 31-32, 34-39, 54, 57,
problem to determine possible functions 100, 103-104, 108, 110-111, 115, 119-
that could model the situation. 120, 125, 128-129, 134, 137-138, 155,
157-158, 162, 165-166, 170, 172-173,
181, 189, 192, 198, 200-201, 204, 208-
209, 213, 215-216, 239, 242-243, 246-
247, 250-251, 254, 257-258, 261, 262,
264-265, 268-271, 287, 290-291, 295,
298-299, 311, 314, 331, 340, 343-344,
348, 351-352, 356, 358-361, 365, 367-
368, 373, 376-377, 389, 391-392, 394-
399, 421, 426-427, 447, 450-451, 480,
488, 494, 500, 528, 529-536, 552-553,
556-557, 560, 562-563, 567, 569-571,
589, 592, 594-595, 774-781, 910, 913-
914, 918, 921-922, 927, 929-930, 941-
947
1.1.a(3) Explore conic sections and their 620-625, 626-632, 634-639, 640, 641,
applications graphically and symbolically. 642-648, 650-657, 658-664, 665-666,
667, 668, 669-672, 673, 674-675, 676-
677

PE = Pupil’s Edition 1
McDougal Littell Algebra 2 ©2008 correlated to the
Connecticut Mathematics Curriculum Framework, 9-12 Extended

1.1.a(4) Solve problems involving 19, 23, 155, 170, 362-369, 431, 481, 483,
financial applications including compound 484, 485, 488, 494-495, 497, 525, 526-
interest, amortization of loans, and 527, 543, 679
investments.
1.1.a(5) Solve problems involving direct 107-111, 120 (Quiz #7-14), 140, 143,
and inverse variation. 145 (#14-17, 25-26), 550-557, 571 (Quiz
#1-4), 603, 607 (#1-6, 28), 876
1.1.a(6) Understand and use optimization 174-175, 239 (Example 5), 242-243, 389,
strategies, including linear programming. 391-392

1.1.a(7) Apply the concepts of limits to Opportunities to address this standard


sequences and asymptotic behavior of can be found on the following pages:
functions. 478-479, 486-487, 502, 558, 565, 642,
794, 918
1.2 Represent and analyze quantitative relationships in a variety of ways.
1.2.a Relate the behavior of functions and relations to specific parameters and
determine functions to model real-world situations.
1.2.a(1) Relate the graphical representation 73-79, 80-81, 82-88, 89-96, 98-104, 107-
of a function to its function family and find 111, 121, 123-129, 236-243, 245-251,
equations, intercepts, maximum or 308-315, 337-344, 370-377, 379-385,
minimum values, asymptotes and line of 387-392, 393-399, 446-451, 478-485,
symmetry for that function. 486-491, 492-498, 499-505, 558-563,
565-571, 620-625, 775-781, 908-914,
915-922, 941-947
1.2.a(2) Recognize the effect of changes in 123-129, 236-243, 245-251, 337-345,
parameters on the graphs of functions or 478-485, 486-491, 499-505, 558-563,
relations. 565-571, 915-922
1.2.a(3) Recognize that the slope of the A6-A7
tangent line to a curve represents the rate
of change.
1.2.a(4) Represent functions and relations Opportunities to address this standard
with polar coordinates and in the complex can be found on the following pages:
plane. 278-282, 860-865, 866-872, 873, 875-
880, 898-900, 901, 905, A2-A3, A4-A5

PE = Pupil’s Edition 2
McDougal Littell Algebra 2 ©2008 correlated to the
Connecticut Mathematics Curriculum Framework, 9-12 Extended

1.3 Use operations, properties and algebraic symbols to determine equivalence


and solve problems.
1.3.a Use and extend algebraic concepts to include real and complex numbers, vectors
and matrices.
1.3.a(1) Determine equivalent 18-24, 26-32, 41-47, 50-58, 245-250,
representations of an algebraic equation or 252-258, 259-265, 266-271, 284-291,
inequality to simplify and solve problems. 300-307, 353-359, 393-399, 452-459,
515-521, 589-595, 598-600, 924-930,
931-937
1.3.a(2) Combine, compose and invert 428-435, 437-445, 464 (#1b, 4a, 7a), 467
functions. (Example 6.3, #20-23, Example 6.4, #24-
26), 469 (#17-30, 37a, 38), 470-471, 472
(#1b), 473 (#7, 9, 13, 16, 18-19), 499-
505, 830, 874, 875-880
1.3.a(3) Use logarithms, vectors and 187-193, 195-202, 203-209, 210-217,
matrices to solve problems. 218-219, 221, 224-226, 227, 228-229,
230-231, 232 (#34-41), 499-505, 507-
513, 515-521, 529-537, 538, 541, 1012,
1034

PE = Pupil’s Edition 3
McDougal Littell Algebra 2 ©2008 correlated to the
Connecticut Mathematics Curriculum Framework, 9-12 Extended

NUMERICAL AND PROPORTIONAL REASONING: Quantitative


relationships can be expressed numerically in multiple ways in order to make
connections and simplify calculations using a variety of strategies, tools and
technologies.
2.1 Understand that a variety of numerical representations can be used to
describe quantitative relationships.
2.1.a Extend the understanding of number to include the set of complex numbers.
2.1.a(1) Compare and contrast the 1-9, 40 (#36-38), 16 (#68-69, Quiz: #1-3,
properties of numbers and number 4-6), 24 (#83-86), 61, 88 (#50-55), 275-
systems, including rational, real and 282, 281 (#69), 414-419, 420-421, 975,
complex numbers. 976, 978, 1010
2.1.a(2) Select and use an appropriate form 3-6, 10-17, 330-335, 334 (#49-50), 352
of number (integer, fraction, decimal, (#1-4), 402, 415-419, 420-427, 465-467,
ratio, percent, exponential, scientific 480-481, 483-485, 584, 594, 822, 852-
notation, irrational, complex) to solve 858, 976-977, 979, 980, 982-983, 989,
practical problems involving order, 1025
magnitude, measures, labels, locations and
scales.
2.1.a(3) Justify mathematical procedures 4 (#7-8), 6 (#17-22), 7 (#55), 68, 188,
and determine how they apply to invented 196-200, 271 (#42), 281 (#70-73), 391
operations using field properties (closure, (#32), 398 (#23), 418 (#59), 490 (#29),
associative, commutative, distributive, 512 (#71, 73), 550 (#1), 556 (#36), 748
identity and inverse). (#24), 819 (#2), A18-A19
2.1.a(4) Judge the effects of computations 10-17, 266, 275, 414-419, 421-427, 465,
with powers and roots on the magnitude of 466-468, 469 (#9-16), 507, 693-695,
results. 1034
2.2 Use numbers and their properties to compute flexibly and fluently, and to
reasonably estimate measures and quantities.
2.2.a Investigate mathematical properties and operations related to objects that are
not numbers.
2.2.a(1) Recognize vectors and matrices as 187-193, 195-202, A10-A11, A12-A13
systems that have some, but not all, of the
properties of real numbers.
2.2.a(2) Perform operations with complex 187-193, 194, 195-202, 203-209, 217
numbers, matrices, determinants and (Quiz #1-4), 224 (Example 3.5), 225, 227
logarithms. (#15-22), 275-282, 291 (Quiz #1-12),
320 (Example 4.6), 321 (#29-34), 323
(#16-18), 499-505, 507-513, 541
(Example 7.5, #25-31), 543 (#10-12, 16-
18)

PE = Pupil’s Edition 4
McDougal Littell Algebra 2 ©2008 correlated to the
Connecticut Mathematics Curriculum Framework, 9-12 Extended

GEOMETRY AND MEASUREMENT: Shapes and structures can be analyzed,


visualized, measured and transformed using a variety of strategies, tools and
technologies.
3.1 Use properties and characteristics of two- and three-dimensional shapes and
geometric theorems to describe relationships, communicate ideas and solve
problems.
3.1.a Use methods of deductive and inductive reasoning to make, test and validate
geometric conjectures.
3.1.a(1) Recognize the relationships 1002-1003
between a conditional statement and its
converse, inverse and contrapositive.
3.1.a(2) Test the validity of logical 836-837, 1000-1001, 1002-1003
arguments.
3.1.a(3) Use deductive arguments, 836-837, 1000-1001
including direct and indirect proofs, to
develop an understanding of an axiomatic
approach to geometry.
3.1.b Explore non-Euclidean geometries.
3.1.b(1) Recognize that the familiar A22-A23
geometry of Euclid is based on a particular
set of axioms and that a different set of
axioms would lead to a different geometry.
3.2 Use spatial reasoning, location and geometric relationships to solve problems.
3.2.a Use a variety of coordinate systems and transformations to solve geometric
problems in two- and three-dimensions using appropriate tools and technologies.
3.2.a.(1) Visualize three-dimensional 63 (#31), 68 (#10), 334 (#40-42), 350
objects from different perspectives and (#48-51), 567, 572 (#2), 580 (#51-53),
analyze cross-sections, surface area and 649, 993
volume.
3.2.a(2) Use Cartesian, navigational, polar 204 (Example 2, Guided Practice 4), 208
and spherical systems to represent, analyze (#40-41), 209 (#45-46), 614-619, 620-
and solve geometric and measurement 625, 626-632, 634-639, 640, 641 (#1, 4-
problems. 6), 642-648, 650-657, 658-664, 667 (#1-
2, 4-6), 669-672, 673, 674-675
3.2.a(3) Represent translations, reflections, 202 (#45), 216 (#49), 988-989
rotations and dilations of plane figures
using sketches, coordinates, vectors,
function notation and matrices to examine
the effects of transformations and their
composites and to solve related geometric
problems.

PE = Pupil’s Edition 5
McDougal Littell Algebra 2 ©2008 correlated to the
Connecticut Mathematics Curriculum Framework, 9-12 Extended

3.3 Develop and apply units, systems, formulas and appropriate tools to estimate
and measure.
3.3.a Approximate measurements that cannot be directly determined with some degree
of precision using appropriate tools, techniques and strategies.
3.3.a(1) Use successive approximation, A8-A9
upper and lower bounds, and limits to
solve measurement problems.
3.3.a(2) Use properties of similarity and 852-853, 866-872, 941-947, 875-880,
techniques of trigonometry to make 881, 882-888, 889-894
indirect measurements of lengths and
angles to solve a variety of problems.

PE = Pupil’s Edition 6
McDougal Littell Algebra 2 ©2008 correlated to the
Connecticut Mathematics Curriculum Framework, 9-12 Extended

WORKING WITH DATA: PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS - Data can be


analyzed to make informed decisions using a variety of strategies, tools and
technologies.
4.1 Collect, organize and display data using appropriate statistical and graphical
methods.
4.1.a Model real data graphically using appropriate tools, technology and strategies.
4.1.a(1) Investigate and solve relevant 112, 113-120, 139 (#3, 6), 143 (Example
problems by designing statistical 2.6, #23), 145 (#18-19, 27), 146-147, 148
experiments and collecting, organizing, (#1, 4), 149 (#16), 308, 311-315, 323
displaying and analyzing data in tabular, (#32), 327 (#21), 528, 530-536, 537 (#1,
graphical and symbolic forms. 4), 744, 744-749, 774, 775-760, 781, 782
(#1, 5), 819, 1006-1009, A20-A21
4.1.a(2) Apply and defend regression 115-116, 117 (Guided Practice 4), 118
models for bivariate data and use them to (#10-15, 19-20), 119, 120 (Quiz #15),
formulate predictions. 139 (#6), 143 (Example 2.6, #23), 145
(#18-19, 27), 308, 311, 314 (#48-50),
323 (#32), 528, 530, 531 (Guided
Practice 4), 532, 533 (Example 6, Guided
Practice 9, #11-14), 534 (#23-26, 31),
535, 536 (#36), 537 (#1, 4), 542 (#38),
543 (#29), 547 (#21), 775-780, 781, 782
(#1, 5), 786 (Example 11.5, #23), 787
(#14), 791 (#17)
4.1.a(3) Recognize the limitations of 314 (#50c), 779 (#13d), 782 (#5a)
mathematical models based on sample data
as representations of real-world situations.
4.2 Analyze data sets to form hypotheses and make predictions.
4.2.a Describe and analyze sets of data using statistical models.
4.2.a(1) Determine statistical measures to 744-749, 750, 751-755, 756 (#1-2, 4-6),
describe univariate data. 784 (Example 11.1, #4-8), 785 (Example
11.2, #9-11), 787 (#1-3, 11), 790 (#1-2,
5-6, 9), 791 (#11-12, 16)

4.2.a(2) Describe characteristics of 766-771, 772-773, 782 (#9), 783, 791


sampling methods and analyze the effects (#15)
of random versus biased sampling.

PE = Pupil’s Edition 7
McDougal Littell Algebra 2 ©2008 correlated to the
Connecticut Mathematics Curriculum Framework, 9-12 Extended

4.3 Understand and apply basic concepts of probability.


4.3.a Solve problems using the methods of discrete mathematics.
4.3.a(1) Understand and use permutations, 682-689, 690-697, 704 (#58-61), 705 (#1,
combinations, recursion and mathematical 6, 8), 734 (Example 10.1), 735 (#5-9,
induction to solve problems. 14), 737 (#1-8, 27), 740 (#1a), 741 (#8,
14), 826, 827-833, 836-837, 842
(Example 12.5, #32-38), 843 (#25-28),
846 (#2), 847 (#13, 20)
4.3.a(2) Solve problems using finite Not addressed in this text.
graphs.
4.3.b Make statistical inferences through the use of probability.
4.3.b(1) Explore the characteristics and 757-762, 780 (Quiz #1-3), 782 (#6-7),
applications of the normal distribution and 783, 785 (Example 11.3, #12-17), 787
standardized scores. (#4-6), 790 (#3-4), 791 (#10, 13)
4.3.b(2) Construct and interpret confidence A14-A15
intervals.
4.3.b(3) Explore a variety of statistical Opportunities to address this standard
tests such as chi-squares and t-tests and can be found on the following pages:
understand the meaning of hypothesis 763-765
testing.
4.3.b(4) Use relative frequency and A16-A17
expected values to represent and solve
problems involving uncertainty

PE = Pupil’s Edition 8
CT 62
5/2007
2008
CC2