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VFred Fiedler2 developed a contingency or situational theory
of leadership. Fiedler postulates that three important
situational dimensions are assumed to influence the
leader¶s effectiveness. They are:
‡ ½     
the degree of confidence
the subordinates have in the leader. It also includes
the loyalty shown the leader and the leader¶s attractiveness.
‡     the degree to which the followers¶
jobs are routine as contrasted with nonroutine.
‡ 

  the power inherent in the leadership
position. It includes the rewards and punishments typically
associated with the position, the leader¶s formal
authority (based on ranking in the managerial hierarchy),
and the support that the leader receives from supervisors

and the overall organization.V

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