International Journal of

Innovation Science
Volume 1 · Number 2 · June 2009

Multi-Science Publishing 1757-2223

International Journal of Innovation Science
Volume 1 · Number 2 · June 2009 Editorial ..........................................................................................................................................................i Editorial Board Biographies ........................................................................................................................................................iii Integrated Innovation: a Model for A New New Product Development Curriculum Prasad Boradkar and Thomas N. Duening......................................................................................61 Clearing the “Fog of Innovation”: Evaluating Ideas Accurately by Recognizing and Controlling Perceptions Joseph F. Dellaria ...........................................................................................................................73 Rebalancing The Innovation Policy Debate Mark Dames, David Robson, Madeline Smith and Tom Tumilty .....................................................87 The Innovative Paradox in Science and Science Parks E. Roland Andersson and Bjarne Jansson ......................................................................................97 Leading Innovation Andrea Meyer ...............................................................................................................................103 Innovation in Tough Times An interview with Dipak Jain .........................................................................................................111

Volume 1 · Number 2 · 2009

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From the Editor
Exploring the Science of Innovation – It’s just a beginning… Launching the first issue of International Journal of Innovation Science was a milestone as it started our journey of exploring innovation science. The journey that will take us to experts world over, into the brain, and, and take them all to a destination from where we can see the future, and create innovative solutions. I am thrilled to be on this innovation exploration wondering what will be next! I am excited to meet so many innovation experts who also had similar desire to learn about the magic of innovation. Reception to the inaugural issue of International Journal of Innovation Science (IJIS) had been nothing but total delight. The first reaction of our esteemed members of the editorial board is ‘excellent,’ ‘very happy,’ and ‘love it.’ It is the fruit of labor of authors who contributed to the first issue, and members of the editorial board that made the idea of the journal a reality. Not to mention our publishing team of Anita Raman (USA) and Bill Hughes (UK) without their total support and leadership the journal would have remained just an idea even with the all the editorial work. It is a great feeling to have an International Journal of Innovation Science in reality. Staying the course does take a lot more effort than expected. Continually looking for experts who like to write, and who have differentiated through their research, development, and distinct experiences. One thing for sure that there is no shortage of experts who would like to play a role in development of the science of innovation, but discovering them in their caves would take a long march. I am excited to have truly global participation in the development of the second issue of the IJIS. Even more exciting thing happened for the current issue that I represented the journal at World Innovation Forum where Prof. Clayton Christensen, Harvard University, Prof. Vijay Govindrajan, Tuft University, Prof. C.K. Prahalad, University of Michigan, and Dan Ariely, Duke University shared their leading thoughts about innovation. Many industry leaders including Donna Sturgess Head of Innovation at Glaxo Smith Kline, and Padma Shree Warrior, Chief Technology Officer of Cisco shared their findings. I thought sharing their work of innovation thought leaders at World Innovation Forum would be a great opportunity to bring academia and industry together in our unique value proposition of IJIS. I was elated to hear words such as ‘centrality of individuals’ by Prof. C. K. Prahalad, and science of innovation by Prof. Christensen. In this issue, we have again tried to bring contribution from academia and industry. One must recognize that academic work may sometime appear just ‘academic’ because it may be something new, and industry contributions may not pass the test of rigor in research. Being on both sides of the aisle, I do understand the challenges to make the two sides jell, and maintain the quality of the journal that is in its infancy. Following is a brief summary of the articles in this issue: INTEGRATED INNOVATION This paper provides an overview of a new “new product development (NPD)” curriculum developed on the foundation of what is called Integrated Innovation. The Integrated Innovation model creates a context of cognitive tension that is resolved by answering several pertinent questions. Cognitive tension is the result of trying to resolve multiple intellectual challenges simultaneously, where each challenge has equal prima facie priority. The curriculum that has been developed on the Integrated Innovation model is designed to help create a new generation of NPD professionals who have an enlarged role within the globally competitive enterprise. This paper provides insight into the Integrated Innovation model and its corresponding curriculum. It includes suggestions for future research and curriculum development. CLEARING THE “FOG OF INNOVATION” Sorting through 3000-6000 ideas to find one innovation requires time and significant resources. Unproductive efforts to deliver innovation easily can consume the short-term growth demanded by Wall Street and stockholders. This paper presents a new, paradigm breaking method, the Perception Versus Reality Analysis (PVRA), to identify and develop innovative ideas. In addition, the concept of an Innovation Continuum is introduced. The combination of these can assist all involved in product development to capitalize on potential revenues by accurately focusing on the strategies to optimize their opportunities. Volume 1 · Number 2 · 2009

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From the Editor

REBALANCING THE INNOVATION POLICY DEBATE Innovation, the successful exploitation of new ideas, is an important driver of economic growth. The traditional view of innovation as a pipeline process based around commercializing scientific or technological invention has today been replaced by a broader understanding that innovation is not necessarily linear and reaches far beyond the production of products to be focused on successful market outcomes. Based on the authors’ experience of innovation policy development in Scotland, this paper concludes that there needs to be a dramatic change in approach to innovation policy if Scotland is to sustain long-term economic growth and competitive advantage. THE INNOVATION PARADOX IN SCIENCE AND SCIENCE PARKS Universities have a synthetic style for radical innovation but an inappropriate administrative culture. Science parks, which are supposed to have such entrepreneurial culture, instead lack an appropriate synthetic style. This paper argues to combine appropriate styles and cultures into a new arena. A modified-systems approach, based on the suggested principles, should, however, be structurally tested and compared with the current science-park model. LEADING INNOVATION This paper summarizes the key takeaways from the wide-ranging World Innovation Forum 2009 that can be grouped into three themes. First, opportunities for innovation exist not only in new products and services but in customer experiences, as the case studies of Build-a-Bear, JFK’s new T5 terminal, and GlaxoSmithKline’s Alli illustrate. Second, understanding future trends in innovation requires knowing that radical innovation often takes years to be adopted and begins in populations other than the traditional users. Anticipating trends in innovation means looking for signs that people’s expectations are changing and that new ideas are about to reach critical mass. Finally, biology provides a both source of innovation and a useful metaphor for innovation-related thinking, as Paul Saffo, C.K. Prahalad, Clayton Christensen and Fred Krupp described. INNOVATION IN TOUGH TIMES This paper is the Q & A about the role of innovation in the current economic environment. According to Dean Dipak Jain, innovation should be recession proof. He expressed his confidence that the International Journal of Innovation Science would lead to further formalization and repeatability of the innovation process for more organic business growth. I was fortunate to have a meeting with Dipak Jain, Dean, Kellogg School of Management, and a world renowned expert in marketing, innovation and entrepreneurship. I am thrilled to have his interview presented to our readers in just the second issue of our baby International Journal of Innovation Science. Pampering from stalwarts likes of Prof. Jain, and Prof. Christensen, I am sure our baby journal would be growing rapidly along with the growth of innovation science. Enjoy reading IJIS! Praveen Gupta Editor –in-Chief Faculty, Business Innovation, IIT Chicago President, Accelper Consulting Author, Business Innovation in the 21st Century Chair, Business Innovation Conference

International Journal of Innovation Science

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