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UNIT 4
Facilitate the Counselling Process
DPC4C Unit Topic: The Counselling Process
Published by: J & S Garrett Pty Ltd
ACN 068 751 440

All Case Histories in this text are presented as examples only and any comparison which might be made with persons either living or dead is purely coincidental.

Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Second Edition, 2006 (2.0) Copyright ownership: J & S Garrett Pty. Ltd. ACN 068 751 440 This book is copyright protected under the Berne Convention. All rights reserved. No reproduction without permission. Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors Head Office 47 Baxter St., Fortitude Valley, QLD 4006.

This book is protected by copyright and may not be reproduced or copied either in part or in whole nor used for financial gain without the express approval in writing of the owner (J & S Garrett Holdings Pty. Ltd. ACN 068 751 440) of the copyright.

Contents
PREAMBLE Unit Title...........................................................................................................................................................................5 Unit Purpose................................................................................................................................................................5 Suggested Hours....................................................................................................................................................5 Prerequisites...............................................................................................................................................................5 Content..............................................................................................................................................................................5 Resources/Readings...........................................................................................................................................5 Assessment..................................................................................................................................................................6 Time Frame...................................................................................................................................................................7 Unit Outcomes..........................................................................................................................................................8 About the Icons........................................................................................................................................................12 SECTIONS Introduction..................................................................................................................................................................13

Section 1: The Counselling Process

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15

Section 2: The Beginning Phase..................................................................................................21 Section 3: The Middle Phase.............................................................................................................31 Section 4: The Ending Phase............................................................................................................41

Practical Component.........................................................................................................................................53 Glossary............................................................................................................................................................................54

tutorials.Volume 1 (Version 3) Readings A – J commencing on page 83 of this workbook. If you are interested in the following titles. Book of Readings . Suggested Hours Although everyone will work at their own pace. we suggest you allow approximately 75 hours to complete this unit competently. Recommended Texts: The following texts are for supplementary reading only. 5 . The process is applied to counselling practice to ensure clients are assisted through the counselling interview process to achieve optimum benefits for clients. Pre-requisites The pre-requisite for this unit is DPC3C – Apply counselling interview skills Content      The counselling process Identifying client concerns Exploring client concerns Reviewing the counselling process Negotiating the termination of the counselling relationship Resources/Readings Required Learning Resources:   Unit 4. including seminars. They do not have to be purchased as a part of this course. assignments and any practical activities. the Institute usually has most of them available in the library or for purchase at a student discount through the Institute Bookshop.Preamble Unit Title Unit DPC4C: Facilitate the counselling process Unit Purpose This unit focuses on the application of the knowledge and skills required to facilitate the counselling process to enhance client growth.

USA: Brooks/Cole. G. (1996). C. Theory and practice of counselling and psychotherapy (5th ed.Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process  Corey. 6 .).

case studies. research projects and exercises. Failure to submit clean. The completed Workbook and any additional assignments etc. before being able to complete the practical component. legible workbooks will unfortunately result in these being returned to you. by either: a) attending a seminar b) videotaping your skills. expected to stick rigidly to this word count. should be submitted to The Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors at the end of each workbook. please attach another page to the relevant activity and ensure any additions are clearly marked at the top of the page with      your name student number the workbook code and title section number and title the activity number your assignment refers to Where we have provided a guide as to how many words we would expect you to write. It is in your best interest to complete the practical component as soon as possible after completing the prerequisite units. Should you need more space to complete activities. Please ensure you either write or print clearly in blue or black pen (no pencil please). This way you will be very familiar with the content and better able to complete the required activities.Preamble Assessment This unit will be assessed by completing this workbook and an additional practical component. or c) having a Private Assessor assess your skills. please note. this word count is based on the amount of words required to adequately show your understanding and knowledge of the topic. You are required to be assessed as competent on all workbook activities.. 7 . You are not however. including written assignments. You can complete the practical component of this unit. unmarked.

Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process Time Frame Please note. Sections 1 . The recommended time frame for Unit 4 – Facilitate the Counselling Process. Austudy/Abstudy students must keep to the Austudy/Abstudy Assessment Due Dates on your Course Outline.4 is five weeks. Good Luck! 8 . Please return the workbook to the following address: Address: The Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors Locked Bag 15 FORTITUDE VALLEY QLD 4006 Thank you for choosing to study with The Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors. Remember you must notify the Institute of your Austudy/Abstudy acceptance. Unfortunately failure to do so may result in your benefit being revoked.

4. Performance Criteria 1.3 The client is encouraged to determine the pace of the counselling process.Preamble Unit Outcomes Upon completion of this unit. 3. DPC4C/02. 3. DPC4C/03. DPC4C/04. Explore client concerns. DPC4C/05.4Apply strategies to generate initial client-counsellor rapport.3 Respond to expressions of strong emotion in an appropriate manner suited to the counselling environment. 5.3A plan for counselling is constructed and contracted with the client. 5. 1. 3. 2. Negotiate the termination of the clientcounsellor relationship.2Communicate client rights during the counselling process.2 The counselling process is evaluated and documented with clients to ensure it remains helpful.2 Recognise and respond to situations of risk or potential risk immediately and appropriately. Begin the counselling process. 4.1 Clients are encouraged to express their perception of the counselling process.1 Plan and contract the conclusion of the counselling process with the client. 2. 9 .1 Communicate presenting issues and prioritise them with the client. 2.1Clients are encouraged to understand the counselling process. 1.1Recognise and acknowledge client strengths and resources.3Assist clients to recognise underlying issues and their relevance to change. you should be able to: Element DPC4C/01. Facilitate the identification of client concerns. 5. 4. 1.2 Client concerns are reviewed.3 Plan and apply appropriate procedures for any unresolved client concerns. Review the counselling process.2Communicate changes in a client’s situation or circumstances throughout the counselling process.

the following underpinning skills are required.Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process Evidence guide Critical aspects of evidence: It is essential that competence be demonstrated in facilitating the counselling process. These include the ability to:  Identify and explore client concerns  Facilitate change within counselling practice  Apply the counselling process  Apply communication sub-skills 10 . The candidate must be able to:  Begin the counselling process  Facilitate the identification of client concerns  Facilitate the exploration of client concerns  Review the counselling process  Negotiate the termination of the client-counsellor relationship Underpinning knowledge may include: The knowledge requirements for this unit of competency are listed below:  Procedures for ensuring clients rights are known before relationship begins  Personal limitations  Client concerns  Communication sub-skills  Identification of risk situations  Client contracting  Review of counselling  Ending the counselling process Underpinning skills may include: To achieve the performance criteria.

assessment self-check audio tape self-evaluation exercise discuss with friend. family member.Preamble About the Icons The following icons are small graphics used throughout this workbook to describe certain activities that you will need to undertake. study partner or supervisor simulation field excursion video reading written assignment reflect on this topic written task research project tip review/revise exercise 11 .

INTRODUCTION 12 .

The model that you will be studying in this unit divides the counselling process into three phases. the establishment of client goals occurs in the beginning phase. This means ensuring that the client is aware of their rights and your ethical and legal responsibilities as a counsellor. Overview of Sections: Section 1: The counselling process The first section of this unit introduces you to the general counselling process and invites you to reflect on the purpose of each phase. Section 3: The middle phase The middle phase of the counselling process is marked by a shift from focusing on setting goals and identifying concerns to exploring client feelings and issues that may surround their concerns. as well as a likely ending or review date. middle and end phases respectively. In this section we invite you to consider how you might handle such expressions of strong emotion. The middle phase is the exploration and change phase and as such may evoke strong feelings and responses in your client. This unit has been similarly divided into sections that focus on the counselling process in general as well as the beginning. middle and end. any fees. This section provides an opportunity for you to reflect on the procedures required to ensure that your client feels prepared for the middle phase of counselling and focused on the achievement of their goals. In addition we ask you to reflect on when it might be necessary for you to discuss the past with clients and at what stage in the counselling process should you review your client’s progress. It also means that clients are aware of the practicalities involved in the counselling process. All of these factors need to be clearly communicated to your client and an agreement made on those terms. the beginning. including the session length and frequency. 13 .Introduction Introduction About this Unit: This unit is designed to provide you with an introduction to the counselling process. This counselling process you are learning in this unit offers a framework from which you can structure your own counselling sessions and may assist you in later units when you study more specific counselling strategies and approaches. Section 2: The beginning phase It is the counsellor’s role in the beginning phase to prepare the client for the middle phase of counselling. from the initial interview to the final session. In addition.

counsellors need to reinforce the progress and achievements that their client has made. In addition. During the end phase.Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process Section 4: The end phase Ending the counselling process can evoke numerous feelings in both the client and the counsellor. In this section we invite you to reflect on ways in which counsellors can ensure that their clients successfully work through any negative feelings about the termination of counselling and leave their final session feeling as though they no longer require the counsellor’s support 14 . the counsellor needs to be aware of the possibility for clients to respond strongly to the loss of the client-counsellor relationship.

15 .

Section 1 THE COUNSELLING PROCESS 16 .

e. Identify and prioritise client’s presenting issues 4. Identify relevant underlying issues 3. Confidentiality and its limits The frequency and duration of sessions Fees and other practicalities (such as cancellation procedures and opening hours) Number of sessions before review 2. Ensure that any new skills/behaviours/thought patterns are transferred beyond the counselling room into everyday life Counselling reveals that a more specific intervention is required Progress has been made but still some counselling work to go Refer client to appropriate service or professional Client goals have been achieved Re-contract with the client by reviewing goals and timeframes Phase 3: The Ending Discuss and manage the loss of the counselling relationship. Explore client feelings and issues in more depth 2.i. as required Reinforce what has been achieved Figure 1: The Counselling Process 17 . Apply appropriate intervention strategies 4. Review the counselling process Consolidate skills . Build rapport 3. Set counselling goals Phase 2: The Middle 1.Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process The Counselling Process About this Section: In this Section you will learn about: The three phases of counselling  The beginning phase  The middle phase  The end Phase 1: The Beginning Establish the counselling contract with your client and ensure the following are discussed and clearly communicated to your client.

Tip: Unit 4. beside each item below. M =Middle phase or E = End. a. c. b.1 ACTIVITY 2 2. Exploring options for more specific forms of help Identifying recurring patterns Establishing how long the sessions will be Establishing rapport Reaffirming what has been achieved B f. Hodgkinson (1992 – Reading 4.Section 1: The Counselling Process To complete this section you will need the following resources: 1.1 18 . middle and end. g. The beginning phase a) Reading 4.Volume 1 Read through Reading 4. d. In your own words. Be sure to identify what occurs for the client in each phase.1 before starting this section. Identify the phase at which each of the following should occur by writing either B = Beginning phase. summarise the phases of counselling in the space provided below. h. ACTIVITY 1 1. e. This will assist you in completing the following activities.1) identifies three main phases of counselling: beginning. Book of Readings . Establishing fees Exploring strong feelings Exploring relevant underlying issues B B B B B B B Reading 4.

Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process       19 .

The counselling process described in your readings offers a broad framework for structuring your counselling sessions and is designed to offer guidance rather than prescription. 20 . As counselling is such an individual and personal process for each client. Sometimes you may find the need to return to rapport building and goal setting (phase 1) after spending some time discussing and exploring client concerns (phase 2).Section 1: The Counselling Process b)       The middle phase c)       The end Summary: This section was designed to provide you with a brief overview of the counselling process. There are no set rules as the process is lead by the needs of your client. it is unlikely that all counselling will follow this process strictly.

Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process ASSESSOR’S COMMENTS FOR UNIT 4 .SECTION 1 To be completed by The Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors to provide constructive feedback on the assessment of this workbook. C / NYC Date: Signature of Assessor: 21 .

Section 2 THE BEGINNING PHASE 22 .

CONTRACTING WITH THE CLIENT (Geldard & Geldard. Sometimes a contract will involve an agreement to attend counselling sessions at regular intervals. A counselling contract may be a verbal or written agreement between the counsellor and the client.2 (Part 1 & 3).1. Identify and prioritise client’s presenting issues 4. 4. and issues to be discussed.Section 2: The Beginning Phase The Beginning Phase About this Section: In this Section you will learn about: Establishing a counselling contract The importance of building rapport Identifying and prioritising presenting issues Goal setting Recognising situations of risk Phase 1: The Beginning 1. pg.5 (Part 1) before starting this section.4.Volume 1 Tip: Read through Readings 4. Build rapport 3. ACTIVITY 1 1. This is very important for some clients who may fear that they will be pressured in subtle ways to discuss issues which they do not wish to explore. Establish the counselling contract with your client and ensure the following are discussed and clearly communicated to your client. 4.3. 12) “A counselling contract may include an agreement regarding issues such as those related to confidentiality.  Confidentiality and its limits  The frequency and duration of sessions  Fees and other practicalities  Number of sessions before review 2. general and specific goals. for example weekly or 23 . 4. Unit 4. 2005*. Book of Readings . Set counselling goals Resources: To complete this section you will need the following resources: 1. the counselling process. This will assist you in completing the following activities. At the contracting stage we like to make it clear that the client’s wishes will be respected with regard to what issues will and will not be discussed. Contracting with clients One of the first steps in the counselling process is establishing a counselling contract. the counselling methods to be used by the counsellor. 4.

(2005). K. with a review of the counselling process occurring at set times. Australia: Prentice Hall.Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process fortnightly for a particular number of sessions. D.” (p. 12) *Geldard. 24 . & Geldard.). Basic personal counselling: A training manual for counsellors (5th ed.

1 & extract 1.1 List six (6) items that may be included as part of the counselling contract. 4. 6.. 2.                                     What are the benefits of establishing a counselling contract for. 1. 5.. 3.2 a)       b)       The counsellor? 25 .Section 2: The Beginning Phase 1.. The clients? Reading 4.

In your own words.                         ACTIVITY 3 Identify client’s presenting issues 3. 2002 – Reading 4. 4. explain what       “encouraging clarity” means. 2. 3.Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process ACTIVITY 2 “The therapeutic relationship is a central factor in successful therapy:” (Bertolino & O’Hanlon.2 (Part 2) & 4. Thus it is crucial in the initial stages of counselling that the counsellor joins with the client to establish a relationship based on mutual trust and rapport. List four (4) ways a counsellor can convey acceptance to their client. 26 .3 (Parts 1 & 2) The therapeutic relationship (or client-counsellor relationship) plays a large role in determining the success of the counselling process.1 Reading 4. Reading 4.2).5) discusses the concept of “encouraging clarity”. 2.5 (Part 1) Egan (1994 – Reading 4. 1.

we work with clients to determine which one or two concerns should be addressed first. Needham Heights. They will then move on to concerns that are more significant for them. In such cases.Section 2: The Beginning Phase 3. 3. competency-based counseling and therapy. 2. B. (2002). we summarise and acknowledge them all. For example. When clients have a number of complaints. Collaborative. MA: Allyn & Bacon. In this case. B. many clients will just want their experience and views to be acknowledged and heard. but that we are just learning which ones are most troublesome and should be focussed on initially. & O’Hanlon. we sometimes find that what clients are initially complaining about is not their primary concern. We assure clients that all of their concerns are important and will be addressed. 91)* *Extract from: Bertolino. and then learn which ones are most pressing. For this reason.2 List three (3) skills that a counsellor may use to “encourage clarity” from a client?                   1. we always check with clients to be sure that we clearly understand what it is they want to see change. Sometimes a client indicates that all complaints or concerns are of equal weight. Reading extract Read through the extract above and answer the following: 27 . a client will mention numerous concerns and the therapist will be unclear as to which one takes precedence. ACTIVITY 4 Prioritising client concerns “In learning what it is that clients want.” (p.

1       What should a counsellor do if a client presents with more than one concern or complaint? 4.2 What should a counsellor do if their client suggests that all concerns or complaints are of the same degree of importance?       28 .Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process 4.

Section 2: The Beginning Phase ACTIVITY 5 Goal setting 5.1       Why do you think it is important to set goals in the beginning phase of counselling? Reading 4.4 5.4       5.3 Nelson-Jones.2 Nelson-Jones. Write one question that you think would be useful to ask a client when clarifying their outcome goals (make sure your question is different from those listed in your reading).4) describes two types of goals: 1) Process goals and 2) Outcome goals In your own words describe the difference between these two types of goals.Box 16. (2003 – Reading 4.1) provides some example questions for assisting clients in clarifying their goals. (2003 – Reading 4. Reading 4. 29 .4 .

Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process       30 .

B. Discuss options with the client about what they can do.  Note: You may choose the same letter more than once. sometimes even in the first session of counselling a client. B or C) and answer the questions that follow. Continue the session as normal. 6. Do you consider this a risk situation? YES b. age 17) tells you that he is using illegal drugs and selling it to his peers. then assist them to follow through on those. Thus situations of risk may include:    Suicidal clients Threats made by the client to harm the counsellor or another Violence in the counselling session Read through the possible counsellor responses listed below (A. a. C. Possible counsellor responses: A. Which response do you think is most appropriate for a counsellor? A 31 .Section 2: The Beginning Phase ACTIVITY 6 Situations of risk In the beginning phase of counselling you may need to respond to situations of risk. Your teenage client (boy. A. Explain to the client that this is one of those times that you have to tell someone about what has just been said (break confidentiality). Ask your client if they would like to tell someone about the situation or if they wish you (as the counsellor) to do the telling. harm themselves or harm others. B or C). We define situations of risk as those situations in which a counsellor becomes aware of the potential for a client to be harmed.1 Read through the following scenarios and consider:  Whether you would classify the scenario as an “at risk” situation?  How would you respond when faced with the situation? (choose from A.

      Why do you think this is the most appropriate counsellor response? 32 .Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process c.

a. Your client (man. 34) tells you that she has been shoplifting regularly at the local shopping centre. c. b.       Do you consider this a risk situation? YES Which response do you think is most appropriate for a counsellor? A Why do you think this is the most appropriate counsellor response? C. Why do you think this is the most appropriate counsellor response?       33 . a. Do you consider this a risk situation? YES Which response do you think is most appropriate for a counsellor? A c. Your client (woman. age 42) says that he gets so frustrated with his young children that sometimes he feels like “killing them”. b.Section 2: The Beginning Phase B.

goal setting and establishing the counselling contract. ASSESSOR’S COMMENTS FOR UNIT 4 – SECTION 2 To be completed by The Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors to provide constructive feedback on the assessment of this workbook.Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process Summary: This section outlined the beginning phase of the counselling process. All of these factors contribute to providing a firm basis on which client issues and concerns can be explored in detail and depth throughout the middle phase of counselling. trust-based relationship with your client. The beginning phase is also characterised by identifying client concerns. C / NYC Date: Signature of Assessor: 34 . The foundations for this relationship are established in the beginning phase of counselling. From first contact to final session it is important to maintain a strong.

Section 3 THE MIDDLE PHASE 35 .

2.Volume 1. Book of Readings . This is frequently due to the nature of human relationships and the building of trust. 3.5 (Part 2) & 4. In this section we look at a variety of situations that may occur in the middle phase of counselling and explore options for appropriate counsellor action. 4. ACTIVITY 1 Responding to expressions of strong emotion It can be a frightening and confronting experience for a client to express strong emotion within a counselling session.e. This will assist you in completing the following activities. 4.3 (Part 3). Sometimes clients need to trust their counsellor and feel safe in the counselling environment before they can consider becoming as vulnerable as they believe the expression of strong emotion may make them. Explore client feelings and issues in more depth Identify relevant underlying issues Apply appropriate intervention strategies Review the counselling process Consolidate skills . Progression from the beginning phase to the middle phase of counselling is marked by the transition from discussing client concerns and goals to exploring client issues further. 4. Tip: Read through Reading 4.2 (Parts 1 & 3).i. Often the expression of difficult or tightly held emotion does not surface until the middle phase of counselling. Reading 4.6 before starting this section. Unit 4. 5. Ensure that any new skills/behaviours/thought patterns are transferred beyond the counselling room into everyday life Resources: To complete this section you will need the following resources: 1.Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process The Middle Phase About this Section: In this Section you will learn about: − Responding to expressions of strong emotion − Exploring underlying issues − Recognising and acknowledging your client’s strengths − Reviewing the counselling process Phase 2: The Middle 1.2 (Parts 1 & 3) 36 .

37 . What does this mean? Note: You will need to include an explanation of both permission and protection in your answer.1 Moursund (1993 – Reading 4.2: Part 3) discusses the need for the counsellor to “provide both permission and protection” to a client exploring their emotions.Section 3: The Middle Phase 1.

Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process       1.                   1 . List one (1) occasion when it may be helpful to discuss the past with your client?       Reading 4. 3 .5 (Part 2) ACTIVITY 3 38 .5: Part 2) contends that there are pluses and minuses for discussing the past.2 List three (3) ways a counsellor can help a client to “feel safe”. 2 . Egan (1994 – Reading 4. ACTIVITY 2 Exploring underlying issues 2.

2 . What do you think some of the benefits for doing this may be for your clients? List three (3). To assist in identifying client strengths (or competencies). Bertolino & O’Hanlon (2002 – Reading 4. These strategies are designed to assist the client to change in some way. This is often accompanied by a feeling of helplessness and an assumption on the client’s behalf that they have nothing more to offer in generating solutions or new options. 1 . 39 . You are not required to have a thorough understanding of intervention strategies at this stage. Details of various intervention strategies will be covered in Units 8-12.Section 3: The Middle Phase Recognising and acknowledging your client’s strengths Clients often arrive at an initial counselling session feeling troubled emotionally and unable to move forward on a particular issue or concern.                   Reading 4. It is vital therefore that when you observe a strength or skill in a client. you acknowledge and highlight it to your client.3 (Part 3) Important Note: In addition to exploring client feelings and underlying issues. the middle phase of counselling also involves the implementation of appropriate intervention strategies. 3.3: Part 3) suggest shifting focus from “what’s wrong” to “what’s right”. 3 .

Some counsellors choose to conduct a brief review after every session. 40 . Checking with the client in this way is called reviewing the counselling.Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process ACTIVITY 4 Review the counselling process Part of the counselling process involves checking that the client is satisfied with the counselling that you are providing. A review can be an informal chat with your client about how they feel things are going in the sessions or it can be a series of questions on paper that they may fill out in session or between sessions. The way in which you choose to conduct your reviews is dependent on you and your personal counselling style. Nonetheless you may wish to conduct additional reviews to assist you in assisting your client. Some organisations will have procedures already in place that outline how counselling reviews are to be conducted. others choose a predictable time-frame. Reviews can be conducted in a variety of ways. The initial counselling contract should outline the review process for the client. such as every three sessions or every six weeks. A review should include:  Review of the progress that has been made towards the client’s goals  Evaluation of the counselling relationship (from the client’s perspective)   Evaluation of the pace of the counselling progress Re-evaluation of the termination (final session) date  Feedback from the client on what is working well for them and what is not The frequency of reviews is up to you and your client.

What questions could you ask your clients to encourage them to discuss their perceptions of the counselling they are receiving?) E.Section 3: The Middle Phase 4.       4.       2.g.1 Why do you think it is important to review the counselling with your clients? Consider both the client and your role as counsellor in your answer.       41 . (i.3 Write two (2) questions that may be useful to include in a counselling review. “What do you think has been most helpful so far?” 1.e.

e. List four (4) ways counsellors can assist clients during counselling to continue using their new skills after counselling has ended (i. skills or ideas that are new and perhaps initially awkward or uncomfortable for them.       42 .Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process The results of your reviews with clients may determine whether you develop a new counselling contract with the client. ACTIVITY 5 Consolidate new client skills During the counselling process clients may learn strategies.       4. It is crucial therefore that the counsellor prepares the client for continuing to use the new skills after counselling has ended. consolidate their skills).       Reading 4.       3. Clients may be aware of the benefits of these new skills. begin the ending phase of counselling or offer suggestions about service providers that may be more appropriate for your client’s concerns.6 1. yet find it difficult to maintain the changes and fall back into old patterns of thinking or behaviour. 2. 5.

If new patterns prove successful for the client. C / NYC Date: Signature of Assessor: 43 . This is the phase of counselling when change happens. The counsellor may also end this phase by deciding that they are unable to help any further and thus providing the client with other suitable alternatives. it is vital that the counsellor implements strategies that encourage the new patterns to become habits. The middle phase ends when a client decides that their needs have been meet or they no longer require support. when clients explore new options and may try out new ways of thinking or behaving.Section 3: The Middle Phase Summary: The middle phase of the counselling process is marked by a shift from focusing on setting goals and identifying concerns to exploring client feelings and issues that may surround their concerns. ASSESSOR’S COMMENTS FOR UNIT4 – SECTION 3 To be completed by The Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors to provide constructive feedback on the assessment of this workbook.

Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process 44 .

Section 3: The Middle Phase 45 .

.Facilitate the counselling process Section 4 THE END PHASE 46 .

Book of Readings . emotional reactions.2 (Part 4) 47 . Tip: Unit 4. This will assist you in completing the following activities. Resources: To complete this section you will need the following resources: 1.1 List one (1) thing a counsellor could do to assist a client in working through their feelings of sadness in the end phase of counselling? Reading 4.8 before starting this section. A multitude of emotions including a sense of loss.7 & 4.Section 4: The End Phase The End Phase About this Section: In this Section you will learn about: Acknowledging and managing the loss of the counselling relationship Exploring post-counselling options with clients Phase 3: The Ending Discuss and manage the loss of the counselling relationship. One of the final tasks of the counsellor is to assist the client in working through these sometimes intense. as required Reinforce what has been achieved 1. ACTIVITY 1 Discuss and manage the loss of the counselling relationship The end phase of the counselling process can be at once a liberating and disconcerting experience for both client and counsellor alike.Volume 1. Revise Reading 4.2 (Part 4) and read Readings 4. fear. anger or guilt may emerge as a response to the ending of the client-counsellor relationship. 1.

Facilitate the counselling process       48 .Unit 4 .

      Reading 4.7).7 1. Scissons (1993 – Reading 4.       4.       49 .       3. 2. lists eight (8) things that you can do to help the ending phase of the counselling process run more smoothly.Section 4: The End Phase 1. Briefly describe those eight things below.       5.2       What can a counsellor do to assist a client in working through their feelings of fear in the end phase of counselling? ACTIVITY 2 2.

Unit 4 .       50 .Facilitate the counselling process 6.

you provide them with information about the additional services that are relevant and available to them.       8.Section 4: The End Phase 7.8 important to provide your client with information about the relevant services that are available to them. should you call them following the final session to make sure they have followed up? Justify your answer. At these times it is Reading 4.       ACTIVITY 3 Appropriate referral At times counselling may reveal that more intensive work is required or a specific specialist is needed for the client to continue to work through their concerns. Imagine that in your final session with a client. 51 . 3.

Facilitate the counselling process       52 .Unit 4 .

is in the Defence Force and has been away on service for the last four months.       4. 4. answer the questions below. Her partner. List four (4) points you would discuss with Jenny as part of the counselling contract?       2. her children and her moods (she feels sad and exhausted). She has come to counselling to try and get some help with managing her time. Doug. Beginning Phase a) 1.1From the information in the case study above.       3.       53 .Section 4: The End Phase ACTIVITY 4 Putting it all together Case study: Jenny is a 32 year old woman with three young children. Jenny is finding it increasingly difficult to cope with the children on her own.

Unit 4 .       c)       List one (1) way in which you could identify which concern or complaint was most pressing for Jenny? d)       Write three (3) examples of goals you may set with Jenny? 54 .       2.Facilitate the counselling process Beginning Phase b) List two (2) ways in which you would start to build rapport with Jenny? 1.

List two (2) things you could do to ensure that Jenny can repeat what she is learning in the counselling room in situations of her everyday life?       2.Section 4: The End Phase 4. Middle Phase a) 1.       b) 1.2 Imagine that you have finished the beginning phase of counselling with Jenny.       3.       55 . List three (3) communication skills you could use to help Jenny explore her feelings in more depth?       2. Answer the questions below in regard to the middle phase of counselling.

Facilitate the counselling process 4. List two (2) things you could do to address this?       2.       56 . Answer the questions below in regard to the end phase of counselling. End Phase a)       List one (1) way in which you may decide when Jenny no longer needs the support of a counsellor? b) 1.3 You have moved through the middle phase of counselling with Jenny and are thinking about ending the counselling process with her. Jenny says she feels sad about not being able to see you anymore.Unit 4 .

Some clients may require further work with specialist practitioners or more time with you to work on other issues of concern. Thank you. Any feelings associated with the loss of the counselling relationship need to be addressed with compassion and support. we strongly recommend taking a photocopy of your work for your own records. The end phase is a time for reviewing the work that has been done and ensuring that your client’s concerns have been addressed. Signed:       Date:       57 . Declaration of Authenticity I.Section 4: The End Phase Summary: This section highlighted some of the issues that may surface in the end phase of counselling. Postage difficulties or unforeseen circumstances (although unlikely) may require you to resubmit an item of assessment. Important Note: Whilst we take care to ensure that all received workbooks and assessment items are kept secure. Whatever the decision.      hereby declare that all of the work completed within this workbook is my own. counsellors need to be aware that the end phase of counselling can be an emotional experience for many clients.

C / NYC Date: Signature of Assessor: FINAL ASSESSOR'S COMMENTS FOR OVERALL WORKBOOK To be completed by The Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors to provide constructive feedback on the assessment of this whole workbook. . . C .Unit 4 .. / NYC Date: Signature of Assessor: 58 .Facilitate the counselling process ASSESSOR’S COMMENTS FOR UNIT 4 – SECTION 4 To be completed by The Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors to provide constructive feedback on the assessment of this workbook.

Facilitate the counselling process 59 .Unit 4 .

there are specific guidelines that you will need to follow. you will be provided with complete and easy to follow details and instructions regarding how to complete your practical component by this option. you will need to refer to the seminar timetable for when Communication Skills I is next scheduled in your area.  the use of observation skills to understand client conflict. You would have received a copy of this form in your initial pack. and you wish to complete the practical component by videotaping your skills. You need to firstly apply to complete this practical component by “Alternative Assessment” by completing the Application Form. Option (b): Videotaping your Skills If you are unable to attend the one day seminar due to personal. disability or work or family commitments. Upon returning this form to your local Student Support Centre. please contact your local Student Support Centre. Topics covered in this Practical Component:  the use of open and closed questioning skills to gain additional information the use of active listening skills and client feedback to encourage or bring closure to discussion  reflecting the feelings and emotions of the client as a means of clarifying their feelings and behaviour. or (c) having a Private Assessor assess your skills. family or work commitments. there are specific guidelines that you will need to follow. Option (a): One day Seminar If you wish to complete the practical component by personally attending the one day seminar.Practical Component Practical Component Prerequisites: You will need to have completed the workbooks for Units 1 and 2 and have them assessed as competent before being able to complete this practical component. You can book by phoning your local Student Support Centre. Option (c): Having a Private Assessor Assess your Skills If you are unable to attend the one day seminar due to distance. and you wish to complete the practical component by having a Private Assessor assess your skills. incongruities and discrepancies  Process: You can complete the practical component by either: (a) attending a one day seminar (b) videotaping your skills. 60 . If you need further assistance.

you will be provided with detailed information regarding how to complete your practical component by this option. You would have received a copy of this form in your initial pack. Upon returning this form to your local Student Support Centre. 61 . please contact your local Student Support Centre. If you need further assistance.Notes You need to firstly apply to complete this practical component by “Alternative Assessment” by completing the Application Form. You will also be provided with details of the closest Private Assessor to you.

The process of providing sufficient information to clients about other relevant support services so that they may follow up on that information. The agreement between client and counsellor. Please note that these definitions are not to be considered as all encompassing. Referral Therapeutic Alliance 62 . The following definitions have been provided to assist you in your understanding of some of the new terminology you may encounter in your readings and workbook for this unit.Facilitate the counselling process Glossary The following definitions have been provided to assist you in your understanding of some of the new terminology you will encounter in your readings and workbook for this unit. Note: Various intervention strategies will be covered in Units 8 – 12 of the Diploma. The collaborative partnership between client and counsellor. if they wish to. Please note that these definitions are not to be considered as all encompassing.Unit 4 . It may include information such as: Counselling Contract     Client rights and confidentiality Length and frequency of sessions Date of first counselling review Client goals Intervention Strategies Strategies and techniques designed to initiate change in the client.

Notes Type any additional Notes/Comments here 63 .

C NYC C NYC Section 5: . . First Submission . Re-Submission Activities and questions that need to be resubmitted C NYC C NYC Section 2: . C NYC C NYC Section 4: .. C NYC C NYC Section 3: .Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process ASSESSMENT SUMMARY TABLE This Page Will be Completed by the Assessor When Your Submission is Returned to You Section Number Section 1: . C NYC C NYC Section 6: . C NYC C NYC Section 7: C NYC C NYC 64 .

If your assessor does not mark your work as Competent by the second resubmission. To make a resubmission. Question Number and Page Number before each answer.What You Need to do if you are NYC WHAT YOU NEED TO DO IF YOU ARE NOT YET COMPETENT . The most important thing is that you clearly identify the Section Number. Your marker will need to look at your original answer and your resubmitted answer. . it is simply to provide you with clear guidelines as to what you need to resubmit. If you have been marked Not Yet Competent (NYC) this means that you have not yet met all the requirements for this Unit. Don’t forget that if you have any difficulties: Ring the Study Assistance Line on 1300 139 239 65 . You simply need to resubmit the questions that the marker has asked you to as outlined in the Assessment Summary on the previous page. the marker will have given you feedback regarding the question(s) you need to resubmit. Space is provided for two resubmissions only. then they will contact you to arrange any future work required for this unit. enter your answers into the Entry Boxes on the following three pages. Activity Number. . This may be because you have not given enough detail when answering all the questions. you may have left out a question or you may have answered some questions incorrectly. A new Entry Box begins on each page so you can choose how to layout your answers. Being NYC does not mean that you have to redo the whole unit. . On this page the marker will have identified exactly which questions you need to resubmit. This page is not designed to give you feedback. . In your workbook. Please do not change your original answers in your workbook. . . Feedback may be given in the Comments beside the question you need to resubmit and/or in the Assessor’s Comments Box at the end of each section.

Enter Your Resubmitted Answers Here:       66 .Resubmission RESUBMISSION PAGE 1 The following Entry Box is for students to complete any activities that require resubmission. .

Enter Your Resubmitted Answers Here:       67 .Resubmission RESUBMISSION PAGE 2 The following Entry Box is for students to complete any activities that require resubmission.

Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process RESUBMISSION PAGE 3 The following Entry Box is for students to complete any activities that require resubmission. Enter Your Resubmitted Answers Here:       68 .

Enter Your Resubmitted Answers Here:       69 .Resubmission RESUBMISSION PAGE 4 The following Entry Box is for students to complete any activities that require resubmission.

Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process RESUBMISSION PAGE 5 The following Entry box is for students to complete any activities that require resubmission. Enter Your Resubmitted Answers Here:       70 .

C / NYC Date: Signature of Assessor: NOTE: If the student is not assessed as competent in the second resubmission. the assessor needs to contact the student to arrange future resubmissions. . .. .. ... . C / NYC Date: Signature of Assessor: ASSESSOR'S COMMENTS – SECOND RESUBMISSION To be completed by The Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors to provide constructive feedback on the assessment of this workbook. 71 . .Resubmission ASSESSOR'S COMMENTS – FIRST RESUBMISSION To be completed by The Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors to provide constructive feedback on the assessment of this workbook.

Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process

Australian Counselling Association Code of Conduct
Introduction 1. The Australian Counselling Association (“the ACA”) has been established to; (a) To provide an industry based Association for persons engaged in counsellor education and practice. (b) To monitor, maintain, set and improve professional standards in counsellor education and practice.

(c) To be a self-regulatory body to provide for registration of members and to provide a mechanism for dealing with complaints about members. (d) To liaise with Government for the benefit of members and the public. 2. Membership of the ACA commits members to adhere to the ACA Code of Conduct. The Code of Conduct applies to counsellors work related activities. It includes the clinical or counselling practice as well as research, teaching, supervision of trainees and other activities that relate to the overall general training and employment of the counselling profession. 3. The Code of Conduct is intended to provide standards of professional conduct that can be applied by the ACA and by other bodies that choose to adopt them in Australia. Depending upon the circumstances compliance or non-compliance with the Code of Conduct may be admissible in some legal proceedings. Code of Ethics 1. Code of Ethics The helping relationship constitutes the effective and appropriate use of helper’s skills that are for the benefit and safety of the client in his or her circumstances. Therefore as members (regardless of level) of the Australian Counselling Association we will:  Offer a non-judgemental professional service, free from discrimination, honouring the individuality of the client.  Establish the helping relationship in order to maintain the integrity and empowerment of the client without offering advice.  Be committed to ongoing personal and professional development.  Ensure client understanding of the purpose, process and boundaries of the counselling relationship.

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ACA’s Code of Conduct
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Offer a promise of confidentiality and explain the limits of duty of care. For the purpose of advocacy, receive written permission from the client before divulging any information or contacting other parties. Endeavour to make suitable referral where competent service can not be provided. Undertake regular supervision and debriefing to develop skills, monitor performance and sustain professional accountability. Be responsive to the needs of peers and provide a supportive environment for their professional development. Not act as or practice legal council on behalf of or to a client when practicing as a counsellor or act as an agent for a client. Not initiate, develop* or pursue a relationship be it sexual or nonsexual with past or current clients, within 2 years of the last counselling session. Be responsible for your own updating and continued knowledge of theories, ethics and practices through journals, the association and other relevant bodies. Be committed to the above code of ethics and recognise that procedures for withdrawal of membership will be implemented for breaches.

2. Code of Practice Introduction This code applies these values and ethical principles outlined above to more specific situations which may arise in the practice of counselling. No clause or section should be read in isolation from the rest of the Code. 2.1 Issues of Responsibility

2.1.1 The counsellor-client relationship is the foremost ethical concern. However, counselling does not exist in social isolation. Counsellors may need to consider other sources of ethical responsibility. The headings in this section are intended to draw attention to some of these. 2.1.2 Counsellors take responsibility for clinical/therapeutic decisions in their work with clients. 2.1.3 Responsibility to the client Client Safety 2.1.3.1 Counsellors must take all reasonable steps to ensure that the client does not suffer physical, emotional or psychological harm during counselling sessions. 2.1.3.2 Counsellors must not exploit their clients financially, sexually, emotionally, or in any other way. 73

Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process Suggesting or engaging in sexual activity with a client is unethical. 2.1.3.3 Counsellors must provide privacy for counselling sessions. The sessions should not be overheard, recorded or observed by anyone other than the counsellor without informed consent from the client. Normally any recording would be discussed as part of the contract. Care must be taken that sessions are not interrupted. Client Self-determination 2.1.3.4 In counselling the balance of power is unequal and counsellors must take care not to abuse their power. 2.1.3.5 Counsellors do not normally act on behalf of their clients. If they do, it will be only at the express request of the client, or else in exceptional circumstances. 2.1.3.6 Counsellors do not normally give advice. 2.1.3.7 Counsellors have a responsibility to establish with clients at the outset of counselling the existence of any other therapeutic or helping relationships in which the client is involved and to consider whether counselling is appropriate. Counsellors should gain the client’s permission before conferring in any way with other professional workers. Breaks and Endings 2.1.3.8 Counsellors work with clients to reach a recognised ending when clients have received the help they sought or when it is apparent that counselling is no longer helping or when clients wish to end. 2.1.3.9 External circumstances may lead to endings for other reasons which are not therapeutic. Counsellors must make arrangements for care to be taken of the immediate needs of clients in the event of any sudden and unforeseen endings by the counsellor or breaks to the counselling relationship. 2.1.3.10 Counsellors should take care to prepare their clients appropriately for any planned breaks from counselling. They should take any necessary steps to ensure the well being of their clients during such breaks. 2.1.4 Responsibility to other Counsellors 2.1.4.1 Counsellors must not conduct themselves in their counselling-related activities in ways which undermine public confidence either in their role as a counsellor or in the work of other counsellors. 2.1.4.2 A counsellor who suspects misconduct by another counsellor which cannot be resolved or remedied after discussion with the counsellor concerned, should implement 74

ACA’s Code of Conduct the Complaints Procedure, doing so without breaches of confidentiality other than those necessary for investigating the complaint. 2.1.5 Responsibility to Colleagues and Others 2.1.5.1 Counsellors are accountable for their services to colleagues, employers and funding bodies as appropriate. At the same time they must respect the privacy, needs and autonomy of the client as well as the contract of confidentiality agreed with the client. 2.1.5.2 No-one should be led to believe that a service is being offered by the counsellor which is not in fact being offered, as this may deprive the client of the offer of such a service elsewhere. 2.1.5.3 Counsellors must play a demonstrable part in exploring and resolving conflicts of interest between themselves and their employers or agencies, especially where this affects the ethical delivery of counselling to clients. 2.1.6 Responsibility to the Wider Community Law 2.1.6.1 Counsellors must take all reasonable steps to be aware of current law as it applies to their counselling practice. 2.1.7 Resolving Conflicts Between Ethical Priorities 2.1.7.1 Counsellors may find themselves caught between conflicting ethical principles, which could involve issues of public interest. In these circumstances, they are urged to consider the particular situation in which they find themselves and to discuss the situation with their counselling supervisor and/or other experienced counsellors. Even after conscientious consideration of the salient issues, some ethical dilemmas cannot be resolved easily or wholly satisfactorily. 2.2 Anti-Discriminatory Practice

Client Respect 2.2.1 Counsellors work with clients in ways that affirm both the common humanity and the uniqueness of each individual. They must be sensitive to the cultural context and worldview of the client, for instance whether the individual, family or the community is taken as central. Client Autonomy 2.2.2 Counsellors are responsible for working in ways that respect and promote the client’s ability to make decisions in the light of his/her own beliefs, values and context. 75

1 Exceptional circumstances may arise which give the counsellor good grounds for believing that serious harm may occur to the client or to other people. In such circumstances the client’s consent to change in the agreement about confidentiality should be sought whenever possible unless there are also good grounds for believing the client is no longer willing or able to take responsibility for his/her actions.3.1 Confidentiality is a means of providing the client with safety and privacy and thus protects client autonomy.Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process Counsellor Awareness 2.2 Many settings place additional specific limitations on confidentiality. The use of an interpreter needs to be carefully considered at the outset of counselling.4 Exceptional Circumstances 2. Agreements about confidentiality continue after the client’s death unless there are overriding legal or ethical considerations.g. Normally.3. This agreement can be reviewed and changed by negotiation between counsellor and client. updating doctors in primary care.4.3.4 Counsellors have a responsibility to consider and address their own prejudices and stereotyping attitudes and behaviour and particularly to consider ways in which these may be affecting the counselling relationship and influencing their responses.3. These are made explicit through clear contracting.3. Counsellors considering working in these settings must think about the impact of such limitations on their practice and decide whether or not to work in such settings.1 Counsellors must ensure that they have taken all reasonable steps to inform the client of any limitations to confidentiality that arise within the setting of the counselling work.3. the decision to break confidentiality should be discussed with the client and should be made only 76 .3 Counsellors are responsible for ensuring that any problems with mutual comprehension due to language. For this reason any limitation of the degree of confidentiality is likely to diminish the effectiveness of counselling. 2. 2. team case discussion in agencies.3 Confidentiality 2. 2.3. 2.2. cultural differences or for any other reason are addressed at an early stage.3 Settings 2.2.3. 2.3. 2. e.2 The counselling contract will include any agreement about the level and limits of confidentiality offered.

2.5. 2.4 Contracts 2. 77 .4. 2. 2.3.1 Advertising and Public Statements 2. The ethical considerations include achieving a balance between acting in the best interests of the client and the counsellor’s responsibilities to the wider community.5.6 Counsellors must pay particular attention to protecting the identity of clients. as they will affect their practice and communicate them to clients and significant others e. agency. reports or publications the client’s informed consent must be obtained wherever possible and their identity must be effectively disguised.3.4. such as potential self-harm. 2.3.1. 2. especially in the event of the counsellor’s incapacity or death.5.g.3.1 Counsellors who hold accredited qualifications and who are members of recognised bodies are encouraged to mention this.3 Counsellors hold different views about the grounds for breaking confidentiality. 2.4.2 Arrangements must be made for the safe disposal of client records. 2.4 When case material is used for case studies.3. supervisor.3.3.ACA’s Code of Conduct after consultation with the counselling supervisor of if he/she is not available. an experienced counsellor. 2.3.2 All advertising and public statements should be accurate in every particular.1.5. suicide.1 Counsellors should ensure that records of the client’s identity are kept separately from any case notes.5 Any discussion about their counselling work between the counsellor and others should be purposeful and not trivialising.3. and harm to others.5. Counsellors must consider their own views.4. conveyed only to appropriate people and for appropriate reasons likely to alleviate the exceptional circumstances.5.4.2 Any disclosure of confidential information should be restricted to relevant information. 2.5 Management and Confidentiality 2.3 Care must be taken to ensure that personally identifiable information is not transmitted through overlapping networks of confidential relationships.

2 The counsellor has a responsibility to ensure that the client is given a free choice whether or not to participate in counselling.4.1. their availability to other people.5 Boundaries 78 . and the degree of security with which they are kept.2.5 Counsellors must be aware that computer-based records are subject to statutory regulations.6 Counsellors are responsible for addressing any client dissatisfaction with the counselling.3. The communication of essential terms and any negotiations should be concluded by having reached a clear agreement before the client incurs any commitment or liability of any kind.Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process 2.3 Contracting with Clients 2.4. and the relevant counselling training. cancelled appointments and other significant matters.1 Counsellors are responsible for reaching agreement with their clients about the terms on which counselling is being offered.4.4. If records of counselling sessions are kept.3.2 Counsellors should take all reasonable steps to honour undertakings made in their pre-counselling information. arrangements for the payment of any fees. 2.4 Records of appointments should be kept and clients should be made aware of this.4.1 Any publicity material and all written and oral information should reflect accurately the nature of the service on offer.4. the degree of confidentiality offered. 2. qualifications and experience of the counsellor.4. At the client’s request information should be given about access to these records.4.3 Counsellors must avoid conflicts of interest wherever possible.3. 2. 2. It is the counsellor’s responsibility to be aware of any changes the government may introduce in the regulation concerning the client’s right of access to his/her records. 2. Reasonable steps should be taken in the course of the counselling relationship to ensure that the client is given an opportunity to review the counselling. including availability.4.3. 2.4.2. 2.2 Pre-Counselling Information 2. Any conflicts of interest that do occur must be discussed in counselling supervision and where appropriate with the client. 2.4.3. 2.3 Counsellors should not display an affiliation with an organisation in a manner which falsely implies sponsorship or validation by that organisation. clients should also be made aware of this.3.

1.5.6.6.4 Competence includes being able to recognise when it is appropriate to refer a client elsewhere.1.1. In situations of personal or emotional difficulty. business relationships.6 Competence 2. 2.5 Counsellors should take reasonable steps to seek out peer supervision to evaluate their efficiency as counsellors from time to time. The decision about any change(s) in relationships with former clients should take into account whether the issues and power dynamics presented during the counselling relationship have been resolved.6. or illness.2 The counselling relationship must not be concurrent with a supervisory or training relationship.1 Counsellors must have achieved a level of competence before commencing counselling and must maintain continuing professional development as well as regular and ongoing supervision. 2.6 Counsellors must recognise the need for continuing education in their chosen profession to maintain a professional level of awareness of current scientific and 79 .6. Any changes in relationships must be discussed in counselling supervision. 2. 2. 2.1 Counsellors are responsible for setting and monitoring boundaries throughout the counselling sessions and will make explicit to clients that counselling is a formal and contracted relationship and nothing else. training.1.5.3 Counsellors remain accountable for relationships with former clients and must exercise caution over entering into friendships.6.5. 2. 2.1 Counsellor Competence and Education 2. counsellors will monitor the point at which they are no longer competent to practice and take action accordingly.2 Counsellors must actively monitor their own competence through counselling supervision and be willing to consider any views expressed by their clients and by other counsellors.4 Counsellors are prohibited from sexual activity with all current and former clients for a minimus of two years from cessation of counselling.ACA’s Code of Conduct With Clients 2.6.6. With Former Clients 2.5.3 Counsellors will monitor their functioning and will not counsel when their functioning is impaired by alcohol or drugs.1. supervising and other counselling relationships. 2.1.

9 Counsellors must consider the need for professional indemnity insurance and when appropriate take out and maintain adequate cover. colour. 2. education.6.1.1.6. mobility. 2. Definition: A client: a person or persons who agrees to be counselled or is being counselled by a person who has represented themselves to be a qualified counsellor.6.10 When uncertain as to whether a particular situation or course of action may be in violation of the Code of Ethics and Practice. ACA has due regard for those groups of people with identifiable characteristics which can lead to visible and invisible barriers thus inhibiting their joining and full participation in ACA. sexual orientation. setting. This is particularly important as ACA is the “Voice of Counselling” in Australia. ACA will promote and encourage commitment to Equality of Opportunity by its members.1.1.net. gender. be open to new procedures and keep up to date with all dangers that are relevant to their area of expertise.au 80 . 2. information.7 Counsellors should take steps to maintain their level of competence in the skills they use. 2. Equal Opportunities Policy Statement The ‘Australian Counselling Association’ (ACA) is committed to promoting Equality of Opportunity of access and participation for all its members in all of its structures and their workings. religion. Barriers can include age. social class and status.8 Counsellors are responsible for ensuring that their relationships with clients are not unduly influenced by their own emotional needs.6. employer responsibilities.theaca. race.au Web: www. money. time or payment of fees. culture.Unit 4 – Facilitate the counselling process professional information and education in their particular fields of activity.net. nationality. knowledge. monitoring and evaluating standards and the implementation of the complaints procedures. the recruitment of and working with volunteers. assessing. creed. The work of ACA aims to reflect this commitment in all areas including services to members. counsellors must consult with their counselling supervisor and /or other experienced practitioners. The Australian Counselling Association’s Code of Conduct was reprinted with the kind permission of: The Australian Counselling Association Ph: 1300 784 333 Email: aca@theaca. regardless of place. ‘ethnicity’. disability.

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