Managing Celerra File Systems

P/N 300-002-120 Rev A01

Version 5.4
April 2005

Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Access to Celerra File Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Cautions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Celerra File System Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 File System Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 File System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 File System Planning Considerations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 About Mounting a Celerra File System on a Data Mover . . . . . . . . .10 Monitoring the Amount of Space in Use in a File System . . . . . . . .11 File Systems and Automatic Volume Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Celerra WORM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Checking File System Consistency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Nested Mount File Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 EMC NAS Interoperability Matrix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 User Interface Choices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Managing Celerra File Systems Roadmap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Create a Celerra File System on a Celerra Network Server . . . . . . . . . . .20 Create a Mount Point for a Celerra File System on a Data Mover . . . . . .22 Mount a Celerra File System on a Mount Point on a Data Mover . . . . . .23 Enabling Access to Celerra File Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Enable NFS Access to a Celerra File System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Enable CIFS Access to a Celerra File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Enable FTP Access to a Celerra File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Enable TFTP Access to a Celerra File System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Enable MPFS Access to a Celerra File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Managing Celerra File Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Listing All Celerra File Systems on a Celerra Network Server . . . . .26 Listing Configuration Information for a Celerra File System . . . . . .27 Checking Celerra File System Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Finding Out If a File System Has an Associated Storage Pool . . . .30 Extending a Celerra File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Exporting a Celerra File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35

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Renaming a Celerra File System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Deleting a Celerra File System and Freeing Its Disk Space . . . . . . . 36 Listing Mount Points on a Data Mover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Listing All Celerra File Systems Mounted on a Data Mover. . . . . . . 39 Mounting a File System for Read/Write Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Mounting a File System for Read-Only Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Unmounting a Celerra File System from a Data Mover . . . . . . . . . . 41 Unmounting All Celerra File Systems from a Data Mover . . . . . . . . 43 Changing the Size Threshold for All File Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Changing the Size Threshold for a Data Mover. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Enhancing File Read and Write Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Finding and Fixing File System Storage Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Starting and Monitoring a File System Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Starting ACL Check on a File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Listing Current File System Checks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Displaying Information on a Single File System Check . . . . . . . . . . 50 Displaying Information on all Current File System Checks . . . . . . . 51 Managing Celerra Nested Mount File Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Creating a Nested Mount File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Mounting a Nested Mount File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Deleting the Nested Mount File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Adding an Existing File System to the NMFS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Exporting a Component File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Removing a Component File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Moving a Nested Mount File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Troubleshooting File Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Known Problems and Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Related Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Want to Know More? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Appendix: GID Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Restrictions for GID Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

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Version 5.4

Managing Celerra File Systems

Introduction
The purpose of a file server is to make file systems available to users. The Celerra® Network Server is a file server that offers the administrator flexibility in creating file systems to respond to customer needs. This technical module is part of the Celerra Network Server information set. This module is intended for the system administrator responsible for configuring and managing Celerra volumes and file systems.

Access to Celerra File Systems
The Celerra Network Server supports file system access by NFS and CIFS users, as well as by other file system access protocols. In order to configure the file systems and access protocols for different users, you must understand the types of users you have and how they need to access files. The Celerra Network Server lets you configure a file system for the following access protocols:

NFS user access: For how to set up and manage NFS client and user access to a Celerra file system, refer to the Managing NFS Access to the Celerra Network Server technical module on the user information CD. CIFS user access: For how to set up and manage CIFS client and user access to a Celerra file system, refer to the guides Configuring CIFS on Celerra and Managing Celerra for the Windows Environment on the user information CD. Simultaneous CIFS and NFS user access: For how to set up and manage simultaneous CIFS and NFS client and user access to a Celerra file system, refer to the Configuring CIFS on Celerra for a Multiprotocol Environment technical module on the user information CD. Note that the Celerra Network Server lets you map Windows users and groups to UNIX UIDs (user IDs) and GIDs (group IDs) to provide users with seamless access to shared file system data; for details, refer to the Configuring External Usermapper for Celerra technical module on the user information CD. File Transfer Protocol (FTP) access: FTP is a client/server protocol that operates over TCP/IP and allows file uploading and downloading across heterogeneous systems. FTP includes functions to log on to the remote system, list directories, and copy files. For how to set up and manage FTP access to a Celerra file system, refer to the Using FTP on Celerra Network Server technical module on the user information CD. Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) access: A simple, UDP-based protocol to read and write files. TFTP can be used to boot remote clients from a network server. TFTP does not authenticate users or provide access control.

Managing Celerra File Systems

Version 5.4

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The synchronized BCV is then separated from the source volume and is addressed directly from the host to serve in backup and restore operations.◆ Multiplex File System (MPFS) access: MPFS adds a thin. and application testing. Component file system: Refers to the file system/s mounted on the nested mount root file system and is part of the nested mount file system. without manual volume management by an administrator. Slice volume. File system: A method of cataloging and managing the files and directories on a storage system. Every file system must be created on top of a unique metavolume. Business continuance volume (BCV): A Symmetrix® volume used as a mirror that attaches to and fully synchronizes with a production (source) volume on the Celerra Network Server. See also Metavolume. 4 of 66 Version 5. Stripe volume. refer to the Using HighRoad on Celerra technical module on the user information CD. FMP is responsible for exchanging file layout information and management of sharing conflicts between clients and Celerra Network Servers. The export has its own specified access controls. AVM organizes volumes into pools of storage that can be allocated to file systems. Volume. Volume. which can consist of disk. The LUN is an ID for the logical unit. but the term is sometimes used to refer to the logical unit itself. or stripe volumes. Note: All referenced documents are available on the Celerra Network Server User Information CD. See also Disk volume. The LUN is the last part of the SCSI address for a SCSI object.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . All other volume types are created from disk volumes. For how to set up and manage MPFS access to a Celerra file system. Nested mount file system (NMFS): File system that contains the nested mount root file system and component file systems. Automatic Volume Management (AVM): A feature of the Celerra Network Server that creates and manages volumes automatically. Celerra WORM: Celerra Write-Once Read-Many feature. Terminology This section defines terms that you need to understand in order to manage volumes and file systems on the Celerra Network Server. slice. lightweight protocol known as the File Mapping Protocol (FMP) that works with NAS protocols such as NFS and CIFS to control metadata operations. Nested export: An export of a component file system. Also called a hypervolume or hyper. a physical storage unit as exported from the storage array. a concatenation of volumes. Slice volume. decision support. Metavolume: On a Celerra system. Disk volume: On Celerra systems. Stripe volume. Refer to the Celerra Network Server User Information Glossary on the user information CD for a complete list of Celerra terminology. LUN (Logical unit number): The identifying number of a SCSI object that processes SCSI commands. The clients use the file layout information to read and write file data directly from and to the storage system.

and cables. which cut across the volume and are addressed in an interlaced manner. Storage pools are used to allocate available storage to Celerra file systems.4 5 of 66 . a virtual disk into which a file system. or other application places data. See also Disk volume. Storage pools can be created automatically by AVM or manually by the user. Storage pool: Automated Volume Management (AVM). Volume. Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. A volume can be a single disk partition or multiple partitions on one or more physical drives. Storage system: An array of physical disk drives and their supporting processors. Metavolume. Volume: On a Celerra system. extended. See also Disk volume. the NMFS root is mounted as read/only. or renamed. a Celerra feature.Nested mount file system root: File system on which the component file systems are mounted. When a file is in worm state. Stripe volume. Stripe volume. Allows for stripe units. Stripe volume: An arrangement of volumes that appear as a single volume. Slice volume. power supplies. See also Disk volume. modified. removed. Slice volume: On a Celerra system. Metavolume. more manageable units of storage. a logical piece or a specified area of a volume used to create smaller. Stripe volumes make load balancing possible. organizes available disk volumes into groupings called storage pools. it cannot be moved. Metavolume. database management system. Worm: A file's status in a Celerra WORM file system. Volume. Stripe volume.

NearCopy. Do not manually edit the nas_db database without consulting EMC Customer Support. not Symmetrix metavolumes. or FarCopy) snapshots of a production file system (PFS). For additional information on file system user/group quotas management and tree quota enhancements. when the file system is in use. refer to the Using Quotas on Celerra technical module on the user information CD. refer to the technical module Using Quotas on Celerra on the user information CD. do not use slice volumes (nas_slice) when creating the PFS. can cause temporary file system disruption. including slow file system access. If you plan to create TimeFinder®/FS (local. If your user environment requires international character support (i.References ◆ If you are CWORM enabled. Turning on quotas later. refer to the technical module Using International Character Sets with Celerra on the user information CD. ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ 6 of 66 Version 5. Instead. use the full disk presented to the Celerra Network Server. For information about quotas and how to turn on quotas. you should turn on quotas immediately after creating the file system. the Celerra Network Server). If you plan to set quotas on a file system to control the amount of space that users and groups can consume.. since TimeFinder copies and restores volumes in their entirety and does not recognize sliced partitions created by the host (in this example. use standard Symmetrix volumes (also called hypervolumes). ◆ Restriction ◆ When building volumes on a Celerra Network Server attached to a Symmetrix storage system. refer to the Using Celerra WORM technical module on the user information CD. EMC strongly recommends configuring your Celerra Network Server to support this feature before creating file systems. support of non-English character sets or Unicode characters). Cautions ◆ All parts of a Celerra file system must use the same type of disk storage and must be stored on a single storage system.e. For detailed information about international character support and how to configure it on a Celerra Network Server. Any changes to this file could cause problems with your Celerra installation.4 Managing Celerra File Systems .

File systems on a Celerra Network Server are stored in volumes configured to meet your business requirements. we discuss file system: ◆ ◆ ◆ Types Requirements Planning considerations File System Types The Celerra Network Server creates different file systems depending on how they are used. Table 1 File System Types File System Type uxfs sfs rawfs mirrorfs ckpt mgfs group vpfs ID 1 -5 6 7 8 100 -- Description Default file system Share file system Raw file system Mirrored file system Checkpoint file system Migration file system Stores members of a file system group Volume pool file system (multiple services sharing a single metavolume) Local configuration volume used to store replicationspecific internal information Nested mount file system rvfs -- nmfs 102 Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. You might see the types listed in Table 1. A metavolume is required to create a file system. In this section. you are ready to create your file systems. Metavolumes provide the storage capacity that can be used to expand file systems. For information on volumes and how to configure metavolumes. After you configure metavolumes.Celerra File System Concepts A file system lets you arrange and manage files and directories on a storage system. refer to the Managing Celerra Volumes technical module on the user information CD.4 7 of 66 . A metavolume is also a way to form a logical volume that is larger than a single disk.

not one. If you plan to create multiple copies of your production file system. you need to plan for 10 BCVs. underscores ( _ ).File System Requirements The following lists the requirements for creating a file system: ◆ ◆ ◆ You can create a file system on only nonroot metavolumes that are not in use. you need to plan for that number of BCVs. but cannot begin with a hyphen or period. not the logical volume.). It can include up to 254 characters. For example. 8 of 66 Version 5. ). TimeFinder/FS uses the physical disk. A metavolume must be at least 2 megabytes to accommodate a file system. Volumes used for BCVs need to be the same size as the standard volume. including hyphens ( . so unused capacity is carried over to the BCVs. The copy is done track by track. from one production file system you may create 10 copies. Larger file systems might take more time to back up and restore. larger file systems can take more time for a consistency check to run. File System Planning Considerations Consider the following when you are planning file systems for your Celerra Network Server: Table 2 File System Planning Considerations Issues Size of the production file systems Considerations Plan your backup and restore strategy. ! CAUTION ! All parts of a Celerra file system should use the same type of disk storage and should be stored on a single storage system.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . refer to the Using TimeFinder/FS with Celerra and Using TimeFinder/FS Near Copy and Far Copy with Celerra technical modules on the user information CD. Data growth rates Use of TimeFinder/FS or remote TimeFinder/FS Be sure to consider your space needs as your data increases. A file system name must be unique on a particular Celerra Network Server. Therefore. and periods ( . For information about TimeFinder/FS. If a file system becomes inconsistent (rare occurrence). when it creates BCV copies.

For information about SRDF.emc. Use of HighRoad® You cannot enable HighRoad access to file systems with a stripe depth of less than 32 KB. refer to the Using SRDF/S with Celerra for Disaster Recovery technical module or the Using SRDF/A with Celerra technical module on the user information CD. For example. refer to the Using HighRoad on Celerra technical module on the user information CD. you have the option of applying the CWORM feature (Celerra Write-Once ReadMany) to the file system. On a per-Data-Mover basis. the file system is persistently marked as such until it is deleted. Use of CWORM File System Size Guidelines The size of your file systems depends on a variety of factors within your own business organization. and the size of all SavVols used by the Celerra Replicator feature. CWORM is a licensed feature of Celerra. the total size of all file systems. Selecting the CWORM option designates the file system as CWORM.com. which are available at Powerlink at http:// powerlink. You must have a CWORM software license to create a CWORM file system The CWORM feature is disabled by default. Extending Capacity of a File System The Celerra Network Server provides two ways to extend capacity of a file system: ◆ ◆ by volume by size if the file system has an associated storage pool When you extend a file system by volume.Table 2 File System Planning Considerations (continued) Issues Use of SRDF® disaster recovery Considerations All file systems on the Data Mover must be built on SRDF volumes. must be less than the total supported capacity of the Data Mover. This storage pool directs AVM to allocate space from volumes configured at installation time for remote mirroring using SRDF. Contact your EMC representative or refer to the Celerra Network Server Release Notes. which are available at Powerlink at http:// powerlink.4 9 of 66 . and the size of all SavVols used by SnapSure. In this case.com. For more information.emc. You can extend by size a file system that has an associated storage pool. When you create a new file system. the AVM feature extends the file system with storage from the same storage pool. refer to the Celerra Network Server Release Notes. If you use the AVM feature to create the file systems. you must specify the symm_std_rdf_src storage pool. extend it using a stripe volume of the same size and depth. For a list of Data Mover capacities. if the original file system was created using a stripe volume. you should extend it with the same type as the original file system. Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5.

you should mount a file system only on the end of a multicomponent mount point name. This is the default for all file systems but checkpoint and TimeFinder/FS file systems. A file system can be mounted read-only on several Data Movers concurrently. stripe volumes. you can set up client access to the file system. After mounting the file server on a Data Mover. you must create a mount point on a Data Mover. Read/Write Option for Data Mover Mounts When a file system is mounted read/write on a Data Mover. and metavolumes. No file systems should be mounted on intermediate components of a mount point name. About Mounting a Celerra File System on a Data Mover Before you can make a Celerra file system available for client access. and no Data Mover can mount the file system as read/write.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . and then mount the file system on that mount point. the disk volumes that provided storage space to the file system become part of the available free space on the file server. clients cannot write to the file system regardless of the permissions defined when the client access is set up. if you have a file system mounted on the /new1 mount point. /new1/new2 or /new1/new2/new3/new4). Read-Only Option for Data Mover Mounts When a file system is mounted read-only on a Data Mover. you should not mount a file system on a mount point named /new1/new2. No other Data Mover is allowed read/write or read-only access to that file system. For example. only that Data Mover is allowed access to the file system. International characters are not supported as mount point names. or read-only on many Data Movers. A mount point name can have a maximum of seven components (for example. /new1/new2/new3/new4/new5/new6/new7). 10 of 66 Version 5. With the exception of nested mount file systems. After you delete or disconnect all of the file system entities. business continuance volumes. you can use different options to define how the file system mount is controlled. A mount point name must begin with a / (slash). Options for Mounts on Data Movers When defining a mount point for a file system on a Data Mover. /new). slice volumes. followed by alphanumeric characters (for example. The name can include multiple components that make the mounted file system appear to be a logical subdirectory (for example. This is the default for checkpoint and TimeFinder/FS file systems. A file system can be mounted read/write on only one Data Mover.Deleting File Systems and Freeing Disk Space If you want to delete a Celerra file system and free its disk space. you must delete or disconnect all entities associated with the file system: all checkpoints. The same file system cannot be mounted both read/write and read-only on multiple Data Movers.

group. to prevent a file system containing 100 gigabytes of storage from filling up. You change the threshold by changing the percentage number in the global parameter file (if you want to change the threshold for all file systems on a Celerra Network Server) or in the parameter file for a single Data Mover (if you want to change the threshold only for file systems on that Data Mover). you must set up event logging (an SNMP trap or e-mail notification) for it as described in the Configuring Celerra Events and Notifications technical module When the file system size threshold is exceeded. to a smaller percentage if the amount of space in use in your file systems grows at a rapid rate. you can set a lower soft quota limit so that the administrator is notified when the hard limit is being approached. or directory tree quotas. It is useful to monitor this file system size threshold because the performance of a file system can degrade as its used space approaches 100 percent full. Once the hard limit is reached. By default. and the administrator is notified that the hard limit was hit. In addition to setting the hard quota limit. For detailed information about quotas and how to set up user. existing files can be read. You may want to change the file system size threshold. refer to the Using Quotas on Celerra technical module on the user information CD. you can impose quota limits on users and groups that create files or on directory trees. group. you may choose to set the hard quota limit to between 80 percent and 85 percent of the total file system space. When used space in the file system totals 80 gigabytes. You can set a hard quota limit on user.Monitoring the Amount of Space in Use in a File System The Celerra Network Server monitors the amount of space in use in its file systems. the administrator is notified that the soft limit was hit. the Celerra Network Server is set up to trigger an event when the used space in a file system exceeds 90 percent full. To be notified of this event. When used space totals 85 gigabytes. you can set a soft quota limit of 80 gigabytes and a hard quota limit of 85 gigabytes using user. For example. Using Quotas to Prevent File Systems from Filling Up To prevent a file system from getting full. the system denies user requests to save additional files and notifies the administrator that the hard limit was reached. At this point. or directory tree quotas. but action must be taken either by the user or administrator to delete files from the file system. Both actions have the side effect of reducing the amount of used space to a percentage below the threshold. Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. you can take one of two corrective actions: Remove files from the file system or extend the file system size. for example. group. or increase the hard limit to allow the saving of additional files. or directory tree quotas to prevent allocation of all of the space in the file system. the system denies user requests to save additional files. To avoid degradation of file system performance.4 11 of 66 .

This ensures that the file system and its extensions consist of the same type of storage. the Celerra Manager will determine the best storage pool to use for the extension and will present that pool as the default for the extension. If the file system you want to extend has no associated storage pool. AVM and the Celerra Manager The Celerra Manager uses AVM to create a file system when you create the file system from a storage pool. refer to the Using Celerra WORM technical module on the user information CD for additional information on this feature. it is recommended that you extend the file system using space from the storage pool already associated with the file system. AVM and the Celerra Command Line Interface The Celerra command line interface (CLI) uses AVM to create a file system when you specify a size and storage pool from which to allocate the space. with the same cost. you specify the extension size instead of a volume to add to the file system. AVM handles the extension by creating and allocating new storage from the storage pool associated with the file system. If your system is CWORM enabled.File Systems and Automatic Volume Management The Celerra management interfaces implement support of AVM to automate volume creation and management. When you use the AVM to create a file system in a Celerra interface. Files can be stored with specified retention periods. which until expiration will prohibit the files from being deleted. performance. CWORM can be applied to any standard Celerra file system. Only an administrator has the ability to delete the CWORM file system. 12 of 66 Version 5. Celerra WORM Celerra WORM (Write-Once Read-Many) allows you to archive data to WORM storage on standard rewritable magnetic disks. corrupted. or deleted.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . A Celerra WORM-enabled file system: ◆ ◆ ◆ Safeguards data while ensuring its integrity and accessibility. In a CWORM environment. When you extend a file system created with AVM. administrators can use WORM protection on a per-file basis. You can write data to a CIFS or NFS file system a single time to create a permanent. using the nas_fs -create size=<size> pool=<pool> options. Simplifies the task of archiving data for administrators and applications. When you use the Celerra Manager to extend a file system created from a storage pool. noneditable set of records that cannot be altered. and availability characteristics. Improves storage management flexibility and application performance. the file server automatically creates and manages volumes as part of file system creation and expansion operations.

The first step in the fsck process is to ensure the corruption can be safely corrected without bringing down the server.Checking File System Consistency The file system check (fsck) feature checks file system consistency on a specified file system by detecting and correcting file system storage errors. ! ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ Using auto fsck (default) The Celerra Network Server begins auto fsck when file system corruption is detected. Two is the maximum number of fsck processes that can be run on a single Data Mover at the same time. The corrupted file system is not available to users during the fsck process. Also. You must start fsck manually on the unmounted file system. A fsck of permanently unmounted file system can be executed on a standby Data Mover. The fsck process also corrects any inconsistencies in the ACL (Access Control List) database. The fsck process continues to run during and after a Data Mover failover. you can start manual fsck on a particular file system using the nas_fsck command. File system consistency is maintained through a logging mechanism and reboot/shutdown operation causes no corruption. NFS clients receive a “NFS server not responding” message and CIFS clients lose the server connection and must remap shares. If a Data Mover reboots or experiences failover or failback while running fsck on an unmounted file system. Depending on the size of the file system. users again have access to the file system. the server either begins fsck automatically (auto fsck) or panics itself to initiate fsck on reboot.4 13 of 66 . the file system is not available to the users. the fsck utility may use a significant chunk of the system’s resources (memory and CPU) and may affect overall system performance. ! ◆ CAUTION During fsck. After fsck finds and corrects the corruption. While fsck is running. other file systems mounted on the same server are not affected and are available to users. When file system corruption is detected. The fsck process cannot run on a read/only file system and you do not need to run fsck for normal reboot/shutdown operations. Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. fsck will not start automatically after the Data Mover reboots. Refer to the section on displaying information on a single file system check. You can check the status of fsck through the Control Station using the nas_fsck command.

The nas_fsck command also lists and displays the status of fsck and aclchk. users can choose one of the following options: ◆ ◆ ◆ Start the fsck during off-peak hours. the reboot process does not run fsck and the corrupted file systems are not mounted.Using fsck on Reboot If auto fsck cannot safely correct the corruption or if there are not enough system resources available to run fsck. refer to the section on finding and fixing file system storage errors and the Celerra Network Server Command Reference Manual on the user information CD. The aclchk utility finds and corrects any errors in the ACL database.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . For more information on manually starting and using the nas_fsck command. 14 of 66 Version 5. the reboot process runs fsck on any corrupted file system. If you set the ufs. In most cases. the server detects the corrupted file system and begins fsck. In these cases. By default. the user is notified when sufficient memory is not available to run a fsck. During reboot. Using Manual fsck The nas_fsck command allows you to manually start fsck on a particular file system. the server panics itself to initiate fsck on reboot. Reboot the server and start fsck immediately. Run fsck on a different server if the file system is unmounted. The fsck utility should not be run on a server under heavy load to prevent the server from running out of resources.skipFsck parameter. Refer to the Celerra Network Server Parameters Guide on the user information CD for additional information on parameters.

4 15 of 66 . The client sees the component file systems as a single share or single export. You can increase the total capacity of the NMFS either by extending an existing component file system or by adding new component file systems. Capacity is managed independently for each component file system. keep in mind the following considerations and procedures: ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. When using NMFS. The NMFS contains the component file systems that are mounted on the NMFS root. and simple moves are not possible from one component file system to another. The following features are supported on component file systems only: ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ Snap Replicator Quotas Security policies Backup SRDF TimeFinder FS MPFS access to MPFS enabled FS CDMS FileMover NMFS contain component file systems only. There are no additional limitations on the number of nested file systems or component file systems beyond the existing limitations for the number of file systems on a Data Mover. Hard links (NFS).Nested Mount File Systems The Nested Mount File System (NMFS) allows you to manage a collection of file systems as a single file system. renames. NMFS can contain different classes of storage. NMFS root is a read/only file system.

2. Search for NAS Interoperability Matrix.2 or higher No specific hardware requirements No specific network requirements No specific storage requirements Software Hardware Network Storage Note: Any Celerra-qualified storage system. To view the EMC NAS Interoperability Matrix: 1. The EMC NAS Interoperability Matrix appears in the list with a high score.emc. EMC NAS Interoperability Matrix Refer to the EMC NAS Interoperability Matrix for definitive information on supported software and hardware. Table 3 System Requirements for Managing File Systems Celerra Network Server Version 5. Go to http://powerlink. The default order for search results is from highest to lowest score.com.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . such as backup software. Fibre Channel switches. and application support for Celerra network-attached storage (NAS) products.System Requirements Table 3 lists the requirements for creating and managing file systems on the Celerra Network Server using this document. 16 of 66 Version 5.

You can also perform most of these tasks using the Celerra Manager management interface.4 17 of 66 . This technical module describes how to configure Celerra volumes and file systems using the command line interface (CLI). refer to Getting Started with Celerra Management and the Celerra Manager online help in the application or on the user information CD. Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. For more information about Celerra Manager.User Interface Choices The Celerra Network Server offers flexibility in managing networked storage based on your support environment and interface preferences.

Table 4 File Systems Roadmap Tasks Task Explain procedures for creating a Celerra file system with existing volumes or using the AVM feature. click the roadmap symbol at the center bottom of the page. Mount a Celerra File System on a Mount Point on a Data Mover on page 23 For a detailed synopsis of the commands presented in this section or to view syntax conventions. To return to this roadmap from other pages. 18 of 66 Version 5.Managing Celerra File Systems Roadmap This roadmap shows the process for configuring and managing file systems. refer to the online Celerra man pages or the Celerra Network Server Command Reference Manual on the user information CD. click the text in the roadmap to access that phase. Note: When viewing online. any nonsequential phases are represented in blocks at the base of the roadmap. Create a mount point on a Data Mover for a file system Mount a Celerra file system on a Data Mover Procedure Create a Celerra File System on a Celerra Network Server on page 20. Table 4 lists the tasks to manage Celerra volumes as described in this technical module.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . This process contains components that represent the sequential phases of the roadmap. In addition. Each phase contains the tasks required to complete the process. Create a Mount Point for a Celerra File System on a Data Mover on page 22.

4 19 of 66 .Create a Celerra File System on a Celerra Network Server Create a Mount Point for a Celerra File System on a Data Mover Mount a Celerra File System on a Mount Point on a Data Mover Enable NFS Access to a Celerra File System Enable CIFS Access to a Celerra File System Enable FTP Access to a Celerra File System Enable TFTP Access to a Celerra File System Enable MPFS Access to a Celerra File System Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5.

). For an explanation of AVM. Action To create a file system with existing volumes. refer to Celerra File System Concepts on page 7. Creating a Celerra File System by Volume Use this procedure to create a Celerra file system that includes existing volumes. and periods ( .Create a Celerra File System on a Celerra Network Server The following sections explain procedures for creating a Celerra file system with existing volumes or using the AVM feature. Refer to the Celerra Network Server Command Reference Manual on the user information CD for information about the options available for creating a file system with the nas_fs command. use this command syntax: $ nas_fs -name <name> -create <volume_name> Where: <name> = the name assigned to a file system <volume_name> = the name of the existing volume Example: To create a file system with existing volumes called ufs1.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . 002806000209-007. underscores ( _ ).d5. type: $ nas_fs -name ufs1 -create mtv1 Output id = 18 name = ufs1 acl = 0 in_use = False type = uxfs volume = mtv1 rw_servers= ro_servers= rw_vdms = ro_vdms = symm_devs = 002806000209-006. 002806000209-009 disks = d3. but cannot begin with a hyphen or period. 20 of 66 Version 5.d4. including hyphens ( . Prerequisite: Perform the procedure for creating a metavolume in the Managing Celerra Volumes technical module on the user information CD. It can include up to 254 characters.).d6 Note A file system name must be unique on a particular Celerra Network Server. 002806000209-008.

Use this procedure to create a Celerra file system using AVM. WRE00100100430-0011 disks = d7. Action To create a file system using AVM. you do not have to create volumes before setting up the file system. including hyphens ( . but cannot begin with a hyphen or period. and automatically creates any required volumes when it creates the file system. It can include up to 254 characters.Creating a Celerra File System by Size Using AVM When you create a Celerra file system using the AVM feature. For information about AVM and storage pools. The Celerra Network Server Command Reference Manual on the user information CD identifies the nas_fs command options available for creating a file system. Example: To create a file system using AVM called ufs1. Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. For information about TimeFinder/FS as well as SRDF/S. use this command syntax: $ nas_fs -name <name> -create size=<size> pool=<pool> [storage=<system_name>] Where: <name> = the name assigned to a file system <size> = size of a file system in megabytes <pool> = the storage pool for the file system <system_name> = the backend storage system from which to allocate space for the file system Note: If you do not specify a storage system. refer to the technical modules Using TimeFinder/FS with Celerra and Using SRDF/S with Celerra for Disaster Recovery on the user information CD.). any single storage system with available space for the specified pool will be used. underscores ( _ ). refer to Celerra File System Concepts on page 7 and storage pools in the Managing Celerra Volumes technical module on the user information CD. and periods ( . type: $ nas_fs -name ufs1 -create size=10G pool=clar_r5_performance Output id = 24 name = ufs1 acl = 0 in_use = False type = uxfs volume = v121 pool = clar_r5_performance member_of = root_avm_fs_group_3 rw_servers= ro_servers= rw_vdms = ro_vdms = symm_devs = WRE00100100430-0010.4 21 of 66 . ).d13 Note A file system name must be unique on a particular Celerra Network Server. AVM allocates space to the file system from the storage pool you specify.

4 Managing Celerra File Systems . type: $ server_mountpoint server_3 -create /ufs1 Output server_3: done 22 of 66 Version 5. use this command syntax: $ server_mountpoint <movername> -create <pathname> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover <pathname> = path to mount point Example: To create a mount point called server_3. Action To create a mount point on a Data Mover.Create a Mount Point for a Celerra File System on a Data Mover Use this procedure to create a mount point on a Data Mover for a file system.

You can use the: ◆ ◆ nas_server -list command to view Data Mover names.4 23 of 66 . Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. the name of the mount point on the Data Mover. separated by commas <fs_name> = named file system to be mounted <mount_point> = path to mount point for the specified Data Mover Example: To mount a file system on a mount point on a Data Mover with a nolock option. Action To mount a file system on a mount point on a Data Mover. ◆ Use this procedure to mount the file system on the mount point on a Data Mover. use this command syntax: $ server_mount <movername> -option <options> <fs_name> <mount_point> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover <options> = specifies mount options. you must know the name of the Data Mover that contains the mount point. type: $ server_mount server_2 -option nolock. To mount a Celerra file system on a Data Mover. nas_fs -list command to list existing file systems. server_mountpoint <movername> -list command to view mount points on a specified Data Mover.accesspolicy=NATIVE ufs1 /ufs1 Output server_2: done File systems are mounted permanently by default.Mount a Celerra File System on a Mount Point on a Data Mover Prerequisite: Create a Mount Point for a Celerra File System on a Data Mover on page 22. the file system is remounted automatically. If you unmount a file system temporarily and then reboot the file server. and the name of the file system you want to mount.

Enabling Access to Celerra File Systems
This section discusses how to enable access to file systems using the NFS, CIFS, FTP, TFTP, and MPFS protocols.

Enable NFS Access to a Celerra File System
To enable NFS protocol access to a Celerra file system, you export the file system explicitly for NFS access from a Data Mover and then, on the client system, mount the exported Celerra file system using the NFS tools available on that system. For how to enable NFS access to a Celerra file system, refer to the Managing NFS Access to the Celerra Network Server technical module on the user information CD. For how to mount the Celerra file system on the client system, refer to the documentation provided with the client’s NFS software.

Enable CIFS Access to a Celerra File System
To enable CIFS protocol access to a Celerra file system, you share (export) the Celerra file system explicitly for CIFS access from a Data Mover and configure CIFS service and CIFS user authentication on the Celerra Network Server. Then, on the client system, connect to the shared Celerra file system using the CIFS tools available on that system. For how to enable CIFS access to a Celerra file system, refer to the guides Configuring CIFS on Celerra and Managing Celerra for the Windows Environment available on the user information CD. For how to set up and manage simultaneous CIFS and NFS access to a Celerra file system, refer to the Configuring CIFS on Celerra for a Multiprotocol Environment technical module on the user information CD. Note that the Celerra Network Server lets you map Windows users and groups to UNIX UIDs (user IDs) and GIDs (group IDs) to provide users with seamless access to shared file system data; for details, refer to the Configuring Celerra User Mapping technical module on the user information CD. For how to connect to the Celerra file system from the client, refer to the documentation provided with the client’s CIFS software.

Enable FTP Access to a Celerra File System
To enable FTP protocol access to a Celerra file system, you configure the FTP feature on the Celerra Network Server to allow FTP access to the file system by specified users. For how to configure the FTP feature on the Celerra Network Server, refer to the Using FTP on Celerra Network Server technical module on the user information CD.

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Enable TFTP Access to a Celerra File System
To enable TFTP protocol access to a Celerra file system, you configure the FTP feature on the Celerra Network Server to allow TFTP access to the file system by specified users. For how to configure the TFTP feature on the Celerra Network Server, refer to the Using TFTP on Celerra Network Server technical module on the user information CD.

Enable MPFS Access to a Celerra File System
You must enable MPFS (multiplex file system) protocol access to a Celerra Network Server if you intend to use the EMC Celerra HighRoad product. For how to enable MPFS access to a Celerra Network Server, refer to the Using HighRoad on Celerra technical module on the user information CD.

Managing Celerra File Systems

Version 5.4

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Managing Celerra File Systems
The following sections explain procedures you use to manage Celerra file systems. Unless otherwise noted, the procedures apply to all Celerra models.

Listing All Celerra File Systems on a Celerra Network Server
Use this procedure to view a list of all file systems on a Celerra Network Server.
Action
To view a list of all Celerra file systems on a Celerra Network Server, type: $ nas_fs -list

Output
id 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 inuse n y y y y n n n n n n n n n n y n n type 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 1 acl 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 volume 166 168 170 172 174 176 178 180 182 184 186 188 190 192 194 196 245 247 name root_fs_1 root_fs_2 root_fs_3 root_fs_4 root_fs_5 root_fs_6 root_fs_7 root_fs_8 root_fs_9 root_fs_10 root_fs_11 root_fs_12 root_fs_13 root_fs_14 root_fs_15 root_fs_common root_fs_ufslog ufs1 server 1 2 3 4

4,3,2,1

Note
Column definitions: id — ID of the file system (assigned automatically). inuse — Whether the file system registered into the mount table of a Data Mover; y indicates yes, n indicates no. type — Type of file system. acl — Access control value for the file system. volume — Volume on which the file system resides. name — Name assigned to the file system. server — ID of the Data Mover accessing the file system.

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d5.002806000209-007.4 27 of 66 . The number of inodes defines the number of filenames and directory names (folder names) the file system can contain. You can also check the inode capacity of a Celerra file system or of all file systems on a specific Data Mover.002806000209-008. Action To view configuration information for a specific file system.d6 Checking Celerra File System Capacity You can check the space capacity of a Celerra file system or of all file systems on a specific Data Mover. used. Checking inode capacity tells you the total. Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. and free number of inodes for the file systems. and used disk space allocated to the file systems.Listing Configuration Information for a Celerra File System Use this procedure to list the configuration information for a Celerra file system. type: $ nas_fs -info ufs1 Output id = 18 name = ufs1 acl = 0 in_use = False type = uxfs volume = mtv1 pool = rw_servers= ro_servers= rw_vdms = ro_vdms = symm_devs = 002806000209-006. free. Checking the space capacity tells you the total.002 806000209-009 disks = d3. A specific number of inodes is allocated to a file system when you create it.d4. use this command syntax: $ nas_fs -info <fs_name> Where: <fs_name> = name of the file system for which you want to view information Example: To view configuration information on ufs1.

etc_common /ufs1 /ufs2 /ufs1_snap1 / 28 of 66 Version 5. and the percentage of used space. Action To see the total amount of space allocated to every file system on a Data Mover. use this command syntax: $ nas_fs -size <fs_name> Where: <fs_name> = name of the file system Example: To view the total space available on ufs1. Action To see the total amount of space allocated to a file system. use this command syntax: $ server_df <movername> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover Example: $ server_df server_2 Output server_2: Filesystem root_fs_common ufs1 ufs2 ufs1_snap1 root_fs_2 kbytes 15360 34814592 104438672 34814592 15360 used 1392 54240 64 64 224 avail 13968 34760352 104438608 34814528 15136 capacity 9% 0% 0% 0% 1% Mounted on /.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . the amount of free and used disk space available to the file system. the free and used space available to each file system. the file system is mounted Checking Space Capacity of All File Systems on a Data Mover Use this procedure to check the space capacity of all file systems on a Data Mover. and the percentage of space used. type: $ nas_fs -size ufs1 Output total = 8654 avail = 8521 used = 133 ( 1% ) (sizes in MB) Note In this example.Checking Space Capacity of a File System Use this procedure to check the space capacity of a file system.

Checking Inode Capacity of a File System Use this procedure to check the inode capacity of a file system on a Data Mover. use this command syntax: $ server_df <movername> -inode <fs_name> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover <fs_name> = name of the file system Example: To view the inode allocation. and availability on ufs2. the number of used and available inodes for the file system. capacity — Percentage of total inodes in use. type: $ server_df server_2 -inode ufs2 Output server_2: Filesystem ufs2 inodes used avail capacity Mounted on 12744766 8 12744758 0% /ufs2 Note Column definitions: Filesystem — Name of the file system. inodes — Total number of inodes allocated to the file system. use. Mounted on — Name of the mount point of the file system on the Data Mover. Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. Action To see the number of inodes allocated to a file system on a Data Mover. and the percentage of total inodes in use by the file system. avail — Number of free inodes available for use by the file system.4 29 of 66 . used — Number of inodes in use by the file system.

inodes — Total number of inodes allocated to the file system.4 Managing Celerra File Systems .Checking Inode Capacity of All File Systems on a Data Mover Use this procedure to check the inode capacity of all file systems on a Data Mover. the number of used and available inodes for each file system. Mounted on — Name of the mount point of the file system on the Data Mover. avail — Number of free inodes available for use by the file system.etc_common /ufs1 /ufs2 /ufs1_snap1 / Note Column definitions: Filesystem . Finding Out If a File System Has an Associated Storage Pool All file systems created using the AVM feature have an associated storage pool.Name of the file system. used — Number of inodes in use by the file system. Use this procedure to find out if a file system has an associated storage pool. For details. refer to Creating a Celerra File System by Size Using AVM on page 21. use this command syntax: $ server_df <movername> -inode Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover Example: $ server_df server_2 -inode Output server_2: Filesystem root_fs_common ufs1 ufs2 ufs1_snap1 root_fs_2 inodes 7870 4250878 12744766 4250878 7870 used 14 1368 8 8 32 avail 7856 4249510 12744758 4250870 7838 capacity 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% Mounted on /. type: $ nas_fs -info ufs1 30 of 66 Version 5. capacity — Percentage of total inodes in use. Action To see the number of inodes allocated to each file system on a Data Mover. and the percentage of total inodes in use by each file system. Action Check the file system configuration to determine if the file system has an associated storage pool: $ nas_fs -info <fs_name> Where: <fs_name> = name of the file system whose configuration you want to check Example: To check the file system configuration for associated storage pool on ufs1.

You can extend a file system with any unused disk volume. the file system has no associated storage pool. You extend a file system either by volume (by adding volumes to it). the total size of its underlying metavolume is also extended. refer to the Managing Celerra Volumes technical module on the user information CD. For information about storage pools. refer to Celerra File System Concepts on page 7. So when you extend a file system.4 31 of 66 . or metavolume. which is the storage pool associated with the file system. WRE00100100430-0011 disks = d7. If the metavolume underlying the file system is made up of stripe volumes. To figure out if a file system has an associated storage pool. Extending a Celerra File System by Volume Note: If the file system has an associated storage pool. use the procedure Finding Out If a File System Has an Associated Storage Pool on page 30. or by size (using the AVM feature to add space if the file system has an associated storage pool). we recommend that you extend it using the procedure Extending a Celerra File System by Size Using AVM on page 33. Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. If the pool line contains no value (is blank). Note: For information about AVM.Output id = 24 name = ufs1 acl = 0 in_use = False type = uxfs volume = v121 pool = clar_r5_performance member_of = root_avm_fs_group_3 rw_servers= ro_servers= rw_vdms = ro_vdms = symm_devs = WRE00100100430-0010. slice volume. you should extend the file system with stripe volumes of the same size and type. Extending a Celerra File System If a Celerra file system nears its maximum capacity. The following sections explain procedures for extending a Celerra file system by volume or by size using AVM.d13 Note The pool line includes the value clar_r5_performance. you can increase its size by extending the file system. Adding volume space to a file system adds the space to the metavolume on which it is built. stripe volume.

Action Check the size of the file system before extending it: $ nas_fs -size <fs_name> Example: $ nas_fs -size ufs1 Output: total = 67998 avail = 67997 used = 0 (0%) (sizes in MB) volume: total = 69048 (sizes in MB) 2.002804000190-0037.d4.d16.d18 disk=d3 symm_dev=002804000190-0034 addr=c0t3l8-15-0 server=server_2 disk=d4 symm_dev=002804000190-0035 addr=c0t3l9-15-0 server=server_2 disk=d5 symm_dev=002804000190-0036 addr=c0t3l10-15-0 server=server_2 disk=d6 symm_dev=002804000190-0037 addr=c0t3l11-15-0 server=server_2 disk=d15 symm_dev=002804000190-0040 addr=c0t4l4-15-0 server=server_2 disk=d16 symm_dev=002804000190-0041 addr=c0t4l5-15-0 server=server_2 disk=d17 symm_dev=002804000190-0042 addr=c0t4l6-15-0 server=server_2 disk=d18 symm_dev=002804000190-0043 addr=c0t4l7-15-0 server=server_2 32 of 66 Version 5. To extend the file system.002804000190-0042.002804000190-0043 disks = d3.0028040001900041. emtv2b profile = rw_servers= server_2 ro_servers= rw_vdms = ro_vdms = symm_devs = 002804000190-0034.002804000190-0040. Step 1.Use this procedure to extend a file system by adding a volume to it. <volume_name> = the volume you want to add to the file system.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . Example: $ nas_fs -xtend ufs1 emtv2b Output: id = 18 name = ufs1 acl = 0 in_use = True type = uxfs volume = mtv1.d5.d6. use this command syntax: $ nas_fs -xtend <fs_name> <volume_name> Where: <fs_name> = the name of the file system.0028040001900036. The name of the volume you added appears in the volume output field.002804000190-0035.d15.d17.

refer to Creating a Celerra File System by Size Using AVM on page 21. WRE00100100430-0011 disks = d7.Step 3. you can extend it by specifying only the file system name and the extension size. AVM handles the extension by creating and allocating new storage from the storage pool already associated with the file system. $ nas_fs -info <fs_name> Example: $ nas_fs -info ufs1 Output: id = 24 name = ufs1 acl = 0 in_use = False type = uxfs volume = v121 pool = clar_r5_performance member_of = root_avm_fs_group_3 rw_servers= ro_servers= rw_vdms = ro_vdms = symm_devs = WRE00100100430-0010. If a file system has an associated storage pool.4 33 of 66 . For details. Use this procedure to extend a file system by size using AVM. Step 1. For information about storage pools. If you see a pool defined in the output. refer to Celerra File System Concepts on page 7. refer to Storage Pools in the Managing Celerra Volumes technical module on the user information CD.d13 Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. Note: For information about AVM. Action Check the file system configuration to confirm that the file system has an associated storage pool. Action Check the size of the file system after extending it to see how much the size increased: $ nas_fs -size <fs_name> Where: <fs_name> = the name of the file system Example: $ nas_fs -size ufs1 Output: total = 138096 avail = 138096 used = 0 ( 0% ) (sizes in MB) volume: total = 138096 (sizes in MB) Extending a Celerra File System by Size Using AVM All file systems created using the AVM feature have an associated storage pool. the file system was created with AVM and has an associated storage pool.

use the command syntax: $ nas_fs -xtend <fs_name> size=<size> [pool=<pool>] [storage=<system_name>] Where: <fs_name> = the name of the file system <size> = amount of space you want to add to the file system <pool> = storage pool for extending the file system <system_name> = the backend storage system from which to allocate space for extending the file system Note: If you do not specify a storage system. Check the size of the file system after extending it to confirm that the size increased. Example: $ nas_fs -size ufs1 Output: total = 138096 avail = 138096 used = 0 ( 0% ) (sizes in MB) volume: total = 138096 (sizes in MB) 34 of 66 Version 5.Step 2.d13.d25 3. Example: $ nas_fs -xtend ufs1 size=10G Output: id = 24 name = ufs1 acl = 0 in_use = False type = uxfs volume = v121 pool = clar_r5_performance member_of = root_avm_fs_group_3 rw_servers= ro_servers= rw_vdms = ro_vdms = symm_devs = WRE00100100430-0010. 500M). 250G) or in megabytes by typing <number>M (for example. WRE00100100430-0011 disks = d7.d19. the default storage system is the one on which the file system resides. $ nas_fs -size <fs_name> Where: <fs_name> = the name of the file system. Action To extend the file system. If the file system spans multiple storage systems. Enter the size in gigabytes by typing <number>G (for example.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . the default is to use all the storage systems on which the file system resides.

type: $ server_export server_3 -Protocol cifs -name ufs2 /ufs2 Output For both command examples: server_3: done Note NFS protocol is the default.1.1 /ufs2 To export a Celerra file system on an CIFS client. use this command syntax: $ server_export <movername> -Protocol <Protocol> -name <sharename> /<pathname> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover <Protocol> = NFS or CIFS.1. Action To export a file system on an NFS client. NFS is default <sharename> = CIFS sharename <pathname> = pathname of the file system to export Example: To export the file system ufs2 on an CIFS client. NFS is default <options> = NFS export options <pathname> = pathname of the file system to the export Example: To export the file system ufs2 on an NFS client. Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5.4 35 of 66 . use this command syntax: $ server_export <movername> -Protocol <Protocol> -option <options> /<pathname> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover <Protocol> = NFS or CIFS.Exporting a Celerra File System Use this procedure to export a Celerra file system. type: $ server_export server_3 -Protocol nfs -option root=10.

Action Back up from the Celerra file system all data that you want to keep. type: $ nas_fs -rename ufs ufs1 Output id = 18 name = ufs1 acl = 0 in_use = False type = uxfs volume = mtv1 rw_servers= ro_servers= rw_vdms = ro_vdms = symm_devs = 002806000209-006.Renaming a Celerra File System Use this procedure to rename a Celerra file system.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . Action To rename a file system. The file system deletion does not delete data from business continuance volumes associated with the file system. Step 1. In case of file system with checkpoints. use this command syntax: $ nas_fs -rename <old_name> <new_name> Where: <old_name> = current name of file system <new_name> = new name of file system Example: To rename a file system ufs1. Use this procedure to delete a Celerra file system and free its associated disk space.002806000209-008. all the checkpoints should be deleted prior to the file system deletion.d4.002 806000209-009 disks = d3.002806000209-007.d5.d6 Deleting a Celerra File System and Freeing Its Disk Space ! CAUTION ! Deleting a file system deletes all the data of the file system. 36 of 66 Version 5.

7. continue with step 9. The volume field contains the name of the metavolume.4 37 of 66 . Action Check the file system configuration to determine if the file system has an associated storage pool (you will need this information for a later step): $ nas_fs -info <fs_name> If the pool output line includes a value (is not blank). Permanently unmount the Celerra file system from its associated Data Movers: $ server_umount <movername> -perm <fs_name> Refer to Unmounting a File System Permanently on page 42 for more information.Step 2. The volumes underlying the file system were created manually and must be manually deleted. AVM deletes all underlying volumes and frees the space for use by other file systems. use a command of the form: $ server_export <movername> -Protocol cifs -unexport <sharename> 5. permanently unmount and then delete the checkpoints and their associated volumes. 3. continue with step 4. If the Celerra file system does not have an associated storage pool. If the Celerra file system has associated business continuance volumes. If the Celerra file system has an associated storage pool. Delete the Celerra file system from the Celerra Network Server: $ nas_fs -delete <fs_name> If the Celerra file system had an associated storage pool. the file system has an associated storage pool. As part of the file system delete operation. break the connection between (unmirror) the file system and its business continuance volumes. use a command of the form: $ server_export <movername> -Protocol nfs -unexport -perm <pathname> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover <pathname> = NFS entry For CIFS-shared file systems. continue with step 3. 6. If the Celerra file system has associated checkpoints. For how to unmirror a business continuance volume. The disks field lists the disks that provide storage to the file system. If the Celerra file system had no associated storage pool. you are finished. Determine and note the name of the metavolume on which the Celerra file system is built (you will need this name for a later step): $ nas_fs -info <fs_name> Refer to Listing Configuration Information for a Celerra File System on page 27for example output. 4. Permanently disable client access to the Celerra file system: For NFS-exported file systems. refer to the Using TimeFinder/FS with Celerra technical module on the user information CD. 8. Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5.

38 of 66 Version 5. If the metavolume included stripe volumes. delete all slice volumes associated with the metavolume until the disk space is free: $ nas_volume -delete <slice_volume_name> Refer to deleting a slice volume in the Managing Celerra Volumes technical module on the user information CD for more information. stripe volumes.Step 9.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . To finish freeing the disk space. 10. check for slice volumes. delete unused volumes until you free all of the disk space you want to free. 12. delete all stripe volumes associated with the metavolume until the disk space is free: $ nas_volume -delete <stripe_volume_name> Refer to deleting a metavolume or strip volume to the Managing Celerra Volumes technical module on the user information CD for more information. and metavolumes that are not in use (n in inuse column) with these commands: $ nas_volume -list $ nas_slice -list As needed. If the metavolume included slice volumes. Action Delete the metavolume on which the Celerra file system was created: $ nas_volume -delete <meta_volume_name> Refer to deleting a metavolume or stripe volume to in the Managing Celerra Volumes technical module on the user information CD for more information. 11.

perm.etc_common /ufs1 /ufs1_snap1 Listing All Celerra File Systems Mounted on a Data Mover You can view a list of all Celerra file systems currently mounted on a specific Data Mover and the options assigned to each mounted file system. use this command syntax: $ server_mount <movername> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover Example: To list all Celerra file Systems mounted on server_3.perm.4 39 of 66 .rw Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. Action To list the mount points on a Data Mover. Use this procedure to view a list of file systems mounted on a Data Mover.perm. type: $ server_mount server_3 Output server_3: fs2 on /fs2 uxfs.rw fs1 on /fs1 uxfs.Listing Mount Points on a Data Mover Use this procedure to list the mount points on a Data Mover. use this command syntax: $ server_mountpoint <movername> -list Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover Example: To list mount points on server_3. Action To view a list of all Celerra file systems mounted on a Data Mover. type: $ server_mountpoint server_3 -list Output server_3 : /.rw root_fs_3 on / uxfs.

For how to unmount a file system from a Data Mover. refer to Mount a Celerra File System on a Mount Point on a Data Mover on page 23. If a file system is mounted for read/write access. Use this procedure to mount a file system for read-only access on Data Movers. Action If the file system is mounted for read/write access on a Data Mover. it cannot be mounted for read/write access on any Data Mover. Use the server_mount command to mount the file system for read-only access on each Data Mover from which you want to provide read-only access to the file system. 40 of 66 Version 5. 2. Step 1. refer to Unmounting a Celerra File System from a Data Mover on page 41. Mounting a File System for Read-Only Access A Celerra file system can be mounted for read-only access on several Data Movers. Use this procedure to mount a file system for read/write access on a Data Mover. refer to Mount a Celerra File System on a Mount Point on a Data Mover on page 23. For how to mount a file system on a Data Mover. Step 1.. use the server_umount command to unmount the file system permanently from that Data Mover. Use the server_mount command to mount the file system on a Data Mover for read/ write access.Mounting a File System for Read/Write Access A Celerra file system can be mounted for read/write access on only one Data Mover. refer to Unmounting a Celerra File System from a Data Mover on page 41. Action If the file system is mounted on any Data Mover.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . For how to unmount a file system from a Data Mover. If a file system is mounted for read-only access. 2. For how to mount a file system on a Data Mover. it cannot be mounted for read-only access on any Data Mover. use the server_umount command to unmount the file system permanently from all Data Movers on which it is mounted.

Unmounting a File System Temporarily Use this procedure to temporarily unmount a file system from a Data Mover. The option for a temporary unmount. -temp.4 41 of 66 . Note: It is good practice to unexport NFS exports and unshare CIFS shares of the file system before unmounting the file system from the Data Mover. or unmount all Celerra file systems from a Data Mover at once. Action To temporarily unmount a file system by specifying the file system name.Unmounting a Celerra File System from a Data Mover You can unmount a single Celerra file system from a Data Mover temporarily or permanently. use this command syntax: $ server_umount <movername> -temp <fs_name> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover <fs_name> = name of file system to unmount Example: To temporarily unmount a file system named ufs1. type: $ server_umount server_2 -temp ufs1 Output For both command examples: server_2: done Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. is the default and need not be specified as part of the command. You specify the file system you want to unmount either by the file system name or the name of its mount point on the Data Mover.

Action To permanently unmount a file system from a Data Mover by specifying the file system name. Note: It is good practice to unexport NFS exports and unshare CIFS shares of the file system before unmounting the file system from the Data Mover.Unmounting a File System Permanently Use this procedure to permanently unmount a file system from a Data Mover.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . use this command syntax: $ server_umount <movername> -perm <fs_name> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover <fs_name> = name of file system to unmount Example: To permanently unmount a file system named mtv1. type: $ server_umount server_2 -perm /ufs1 Output For both command examples: server_2: done 42 of 66 Version 5. type: $ server_umount <movername> -perm <mount_point> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover <mount_point> = path to mount point for the specified Data Mover Example: To permanently unmount a file system to server_2. type: $ server_umount server_2 -perm ufs1 To permanently unmount a file system from a Data Mover by specifying the name of its mount point.

Unmounting All File Systems on a Data Mover Temporarily Use this procedure to temporarily unmount all file systems on a Data Mover. Action To temporarily unmount all file systems on a Data Mover.Unmounting All Celerra File Systems from a Data Mover Use the procedures in this section to temporarily or permanently unmount all file systems from a Data Mover. The option for a temporary unmount.4 43 of 66 . type: $ server_umount server_2 -temp all Output Unmount all file systems output: server_2: done Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. Note: It is good practice to unexport NFS exports and unshare CIFS shares of the file system before unmounting the file system from the Data Mover. is the default and need not be specified as part of the command. use this command syntax: $ server_umount <movername> -temp all or $ server_umount <movername> all Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover Example: To temporarily unmount all file systems on server_2. -temp.

you must rebuild the mount table by remounting each file system on the Data Mover. Action To permanently unmount all file systems on a Data Mover. Use this procedure to permanently unmount all file systems on a Data Mover.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . type: $ server_umount server_2 -perm all Output Unmount all file systems output: server_2: done 44 of 66 Version 5.Unmounting All File Systems on a Data Mover Permanently ! CAUTION ! Permanently unmounting all file systems from a Data Mover should be done with caution because the operation deletes the contents of the mount table. We recommend that you unexport NFS exports and unshare CIFS shares of the file systems before unmounting the file systems from the Data Mover. To reestablish client access to the file systems after this operation. use this command syntax: $ server_umount <movername> -perm all Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover Example: To permanently unmount all file systems on server_2.

Action To change the size threshold for all file systems.Changing the Size Threshold for All File Systems Use this procedure to change the file system size threshold for all file systems on a Celerra Network Server. To make the change take effect.4 45 of 66 . Action $ server_param <movername> -facility <facility_name> -modify <param_name> -value <new_value> Where: <movername> = name of Data Mover <facility_name> = facility for the parameters <param_name> = name of parameter <new_value> = new value for parameter Example: To change the size threshold for all file systems on server_2. To make the change take effect. Step 1. type: $ server_param ALL -facility file -modify fsSizeThreshold -value 85 2. Step 1. reboot the Data Movers: $ server_cpu ALL -reboot now Changing the Size Threshold for a Data Mover Use this procedure to change the file system size threshold for all file systems on one Data Mover. use this command syntax: $ server_param <movername> -facility <facility_name> -modify <param_name> -value <new_value> Where: <movername> = name of Data Mover <facility_name> = facility for the parameters <param_name> = name of parameter <new_value> = new value for parameter Example: To change the size threshold for all file systems to 85%. reboot the Data Mover: $ $ server_cpu <data_mover> -reboot now server_cpu server_2 -reboot now Example: Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. type: $ server_param server_2 -facility file -modify fsSizeThreshold -value 85 2.

4 Managing Celerra File Systems . This default mechanism should be turned off if the read access pattern for files in the file system involves small random accesses. refer to Turning On the Uncached Write Mechanism for a File System on page 48. Action To turn off the read prefetch mechanism for a file system.noprefetch ufs1 /ufs1 Output server_3: done 46 of 66 Version 5. The read mechanisms are designed to optimize reads of large files and are turned on by default on the server. separated by commas <fs_name> = name of the file system <mount_point> = path to mount point for the specified Data Mover Example: To read the prefetch mechanism on ufs1. that have many connections to a large file. type: $ server_mount server_3 -option rw. For how to turn on the write performance improvement mechanism. Turning Off the Read Prefetch Mechanism for a File System Use this procedure to turn off the read prefetch performance improvement mechanism for a file system. For how to turn off this mechanism for all file systems on a Data Mover. These mechanisms can improve read speed up to 100 percent on large files. The write mechanisms are designed to improve performance for applications.Enhancing File Read and Write Performance The Celerra Network Server includes internal mechanisms for enhancing read/write performance characteristics for particular types of files. use this command syntax: $ server_mount <movername> -option <options>. refer to Turning Off and On the Read Prefetch Mechanism for a Data Mover on page 47. For how to turn off this mechanism for a file system. The mechanism is off by default and can be turned on by file system. refer to Turning Off the Read Prefetch Mechanism for a File System on page 46.noprefetch <fs_name> <mount_point> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover <options> = specifies mount options. These mechanisms can enhance databases access through the NFS protocol by 30 percent or more. such as databases.

Step 1. use this command syntax: server_param <movername> -facility <facility_name> -modify <param_name> -value <new_value> Where: <movername> = name of the data mover <facility_name> = facility for the parameters <param_name> = name of parameter <new_value> = new value for parameter Example: To turn off the prefetch mechanism for all file systems on server_2. To make the change take effect. use this command syntax: server_param <movername> -facility <facility_name> -modify <param_name> -value <new_value> Example: To turn on the read prefetch mechanism for all file systems on server_2.Turning Off and On the Read Prefetch Mechanism for a Data Mover Use this procedure to turn off the read prefetch performance improvement mechanism for all file systems on one Data Mover. reboot the Data Mover: $ server_cpu <data_mover> -reboot now Example: $ server_cpu server_2 -reboot now Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. type: $ server_param server_2 -facility file -modify prefetch -value 1 2. Action To turn off the read prefetch mechanism for all file systems on one Data Mover.4 47 of 66 . type $ server_param server_2 -facility file -modify prefetch -value 0 To turn on the read prefetch mechanism for all file systems on one Data Mover.

Turning On the Uncached Write Mechanism for a File System Use this procedure to turn on the uncached write performance improvement mechanism for a file system.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . Action To turn on the write performance improvement mechanism for a file system. use this command syntax: $ server_mount <movername> -option <options>.uncached ufs1 /ufs1 Output server_3: done 48 of 66 Version 5. separated by commas <fs_name> = name of the file system <mount_point> = path to mount point for the specified Data Mover Example: $ server_mount server_3 -option rw.uncached <fs_name> <mount_point> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover <options> = specifies mount options.

..30.. Starting and Monitoring a File System Check Use this procedure to start and monitor fsck on a specified file system. Action To start ACL check a specified file system.100 100 Done In Progress. type: $ nas_fsck -start ufsl -aclchkonly Output ACLCHK: in progress for file system ufs1 Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5.20..Finding and Fixing File System Storage Errors The following sections explain procedures you use check file system consistency.60.... Action To start and monitor fsck on a specified file system. type: $ nas_fsck -start ufsl -monitor Output id name volume fsck_server inode_check_percent directory_check_percent used_ACL_check_percent free_ACL_check_status cylinder_group_check_status = = = = = = = = = 27 ufs1 mtv1 server_2 10. use this command syntax: $ nas_fsck -start <name> -monitor Where: <name> = name of the specified file system Example: To start fsck on ufs1 and monitor the progress. use the following procedure.80.. use this command syntax: $ nas_fsck -start <name> -aclchkonly Where: <name> = name of the specified file system Example: To start ACL check on ufs1 and monitor the progress..40.0.100 0.Done Starting ACL Check on a File System To start ACL check on a specified file system.4 49 of 66 ..70.

Action To display information about a file system check on a single file system. use this command syntax: $ nas_fsck -info <name> Where: <name> = name of the specified file system Example: To display information about file system check for ufs2.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . use the following procedure. type: $ nas_fsck -list Output id 23 27 type 1 1 state FSCK ACLCHK volume name 134 ufs2 144 ufs1 server 4 1 Displaying Information on a Single File System Check To display information on a file system check for a single file system. use the following procedure. use this command syntax: $ nas_fsck -list Example: To list current file system checks. Action To list current file system checks. type: $ nas_fsck -info ufs2 Output name id volume fsck_server inode_check_percent directory_check_percent used_ACL_check_percent free_ACL_check_status cylinder_group_check_status = = = = = = = = = ufs2 23 v134 server_5 100 100 100 Done In Progress 50 of 66 Version 5.Listing Current File System Checks To list all current file system checks.

use this command syntax: $ nas_fsck -info -all Example: To display information on all files system checks currently running. type: $ nas_fsck -info -all Output name id volume fsck_server inode_check_percent directory_check_percent used_ACL_check_percent free_ACL_check_status cylinder_group_check_status name id volume fsck_server inode_check_percent directory_check_percent used_ACL_check_percent free_ACL_check_status cylinder_group_check_status = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = ufs2 23 v134 server_5 30 0 0 Not Started Not Started ufs1 27 mtv1 server_2 100 0 0 Not Started Not Started Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5.4 51 of 66 .Displaying Information on all Current File System Checks To display information on all file system checks currently running. Action To display information on all file system checks currently running. use the following procedure.

Use this procedure to create a nested mount file system. type: $ nas_fs -name nmfs4 -type nmfs -create Output id = 719 name = nmfs4 acl = 0 in_use = False type = nmfs worm = off volume = 0 pool = rw_servers= ro_servers= rw_vdms = ro_vdms = stor_devs = disks = Note There is no volume allocation. Action To create a nested mount file system. 52 of 66 Version 5.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . use this command syntax: $ nas_fs -name <name> -type <nmfs> -create Where: <name> = name of the nested mount file system <type> = type of file system Example: To create a nested mount file system. nmfs1.Managing Celerra Nested Mount File Systems The following sections explain procedures you use to manage Celerra nested mount file systems. Creating a Nested Mount File System A NMFS must be initially created.

4 53 of 66 . type $ server_mount server_3 -o ro nmfs4 /nmfs4 Output server_3: done Deleting the Nested Mount File System To delete a NMFS. Action To mount the NMFS. you must first permanently unmount all component file systems in the NMFS and then you permanently unmount the NMFS. After permanently unmounting all the component file systems and the NMFS. Action To permanently unmount the NMFS. delete the file system using the nas_fs command. use this command syntax: $ server_umount <movername> -perm <fs_name> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover <fs_name> = name of file system to unmount Example: To permanently unmount a file system named nmfs4. A NMFS must be mounted as read/only. Refer to Unmounting a File System Permanently on page 42 for more information. use this command syntax: $ server_mount <movername> -o ro <nmfs name> /<nmfs path> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover <nmfs name> = name of nested mount file system <pathname> = path to mount point Example: To mount a NMFS named nmfs4. type: $ server_umount server_3 -p nmfs4 Output: server_3 : done Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. Step 1.Mounting a Nested Mount File System Use the following procedure to mount the NMFS.

nmfs4. Action To delete the NMFS.Step 2. use this command syntax: $ nas_fs -delete <fs_name> Where: <fs_name> = name of file system to be deleted Example: To delete a nested mount file system.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . type: $ nas_fs -d nmfs4 Output: id = 719 name = nmfs4 acl = 0 in_use = False type = nmfs worm = off volume = 0 pool = rw_servers= ro_servers= rw_vdms = ro_vdms = stor_devs = disks = 54 of 66 Version 5.

Adding an Existing File System to the NMFS If you are creating a new component file system to add to the NMFS. Action If the existing file system is mounted. separated by commas <component file system name> = name of the component file system <nmfs pathname> = pathname of the nested mount file system <component file system name> = name of file system to be mounted <mount_point> = path to mount point for the specified Data Mover Example: To mount a file system on a mount point on a Data Mover with a nolock option. use the following procedure to add the file system to a NMFS. Step 1. use this command syntax: $ server_umount <movername> -perm <fs_name> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover <fs_name> = name of file system to unmount Example: To permanently unmount a file system named fs1. see Creating a Celerra File System by Size Using AVM on page 21. Mount the file system in the nested mount file system using this command syntax: $ server_mount <movername> -option <options> <component file system name> /<nmfs pathname>/<component file system name> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover <options> = specifies mount options. type: $ server_mount server_3 fs5 /nmfs4/fs5 Output: server_2: done Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. permanently unmount the file system using this command syntax: To permanently unmount a file system from a Data Mover by specifying the file system name. type: $ server_umount <movername> -perm <mount_point> Where: <movername> = name of the specified Data Mover <mount_point> = path to mount point for the specified Data Mover Example: To permanently unmount a file system to server_2. type: $ server_umount server_2 -perm /fs1 Output: For both command examples: server_2: done 2. If the file system you want to add to the NMFS already exists. type: $ server_umount server_2 -perm fs1 To permanently unmount a file system from a Data Mover by specifying the name of its mount point.4 55 of 66 .

perform the following steps: 1. 2. To permanently remove a component file system from the NMFS. To temporarily remove a component file system from the NMFS. 3. Refer to Mounting a Nested Mount File System on page 53 for more information.Exporting a Component File System To export a component file system. Mount the NMFS on the new Data Mover. To do this. Removing a Component File System You can both permanently and temporarily remove component file systems from the NMFS. use the full path to the component file system. refer to Exporting a Celerra File System on page 35. 56 of 66 Version 5. Refer to Unmounting a File System Permanently on page 42 for more information. 4. Refer to Unmounting a File System Permanently on page 42 for more information. When exporting a component file system. Refer to Adding an Existing File System to the NMFS on page 55. the component file system has to be shared. refer to Unmounting a File System Permanently on page 42. Moving a Nested Mount File System You can move a nested mount file system from one Data Mover to another Data Mover.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . If you are a CIFS client. refer to Unmounting a File System Temporarily on page 41. Permanently unmount each of the component file systems. Permanently unmount the NMFS. Mount each component file system on the NMFS on the new Data Mover.

Troubleshooting File Systems This section provides guidance for troubleshooting problems you may encounter using Celerra file systems. Refer to the Celerra Network Server Error Messages Guide on the user information CD for additional information on error messages. Error Messages This section contains two tables to assist in troubleshooting Celerra file system problems. and then retry.com. Table 5 File System Error and Event Messages Server error log filesystem is mounted. Mount the file system. Table 5 presents error messages.EMC. permanently unmount the file system. Corrective Action Verify that this is the correct file system to be deleted. and then retry.4 57 of 66 . The file system is still mounted. If the error message reappears. or report a Celerra technical problem to EMC at Powerlink™. their definition. and corrective action. For additional information about using Powerlink and resolving problems. Type a slash before entering the mount point name. at http:// powerlink. and then retry. refer to the Problem Resolution Roadmap technical module on the user information CD. can not delete Definition You may be trying to delete a mounted file system. The file system is already mounted by another Data Mover. The mount point was not entered correctly or does not exist. item is currently in use by movername Mount Point Name [name] is not valid. When entering the mount point name. check your list of mount points. You can query the EMC WebSupport database for related problem information. obtain release notes. the slash (/) that precedes the mount point name may have been omitted. in some cases more than one cause. filesystem unavailable for read_write mount Verify the list of mounted file systems. Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. EMC’s secure extranet site. Note: There can be more than one symptom for the same problem and. Please Re-enter Unmount the file system. and then retry. filesystem is not mounted You may be attempting to execute a command to file system that must be mounted.

The netgroup you are trying to export for is not recognized. Create a new mount point. Note: All mount points begin with a forward slash (/). refer to the Configuring Celerra Naming Services technical module. This reduces the percentage of used space. The value being typed either does not exist or does not exist as typed (typing error). The amount of space in use in the file system (<fs_name>) has reached its maximum threshold (##%). and then retry. or unmount the file system.Table 5 File System Error and Event Messages (continued) Server error log must unmount from server(s): movername Definition You may be trying to execute a file system check against a mounted file system. a file exists error appears. Confirm that the mount point is on the specified Data Mover. File system performance may degrade when a file system is almost full. Filesystem size threshold (##%) crossed (fs <fs_name> Note: This message appears in the event log on the server. The threshold default is 90 percent space in use. and then retry. Check the list of mounted file systems to verify that the path is already successfully mounted. and then retry. Corrective Action Unmount the file system. For information about entering the netgroup name into the system. retry the command as a root command by prepending it with the word root. Path busy: filesystem fsname is currently mounted on mountpoint requires root command A file system is already using the mount point you are attempting to mount. no such file or directory Check that you are entering the correct value and ensure that the uppercase and lowercase letters match. Enter the name of the netgroup into the system. and then retry.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . Do not try to create files or folders in the NMFS root directory. Alternately. When you create a new file in the NMFS root directory. Select a non root volume or file system. using this command syntax: root<command>. server_x: Device busy You may have tried to execute the same command more than once. You may be attempting to execute a command against a root file system or volume to which you do not have access. refer to Extending a Celerra File System on page 31. For how to extend a file system. Extend the file system to increase its available space. 58 of 66 Version 5. NMFS root directory is read/ only. server_x: No such file or directory undefined netgroup The mount point may not exist on the specified Data Mover.

Perform server_mount -all to activate all entries in the mount table. Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. Obtain a list of mounted file systems. Table 6 File Systems Known Problems and Workarounds Known Problem The Celerra Manager does not provide an interface for renaming a file system. Table 6 describes known problems that might occur when using Celerra file systems and workarounds. Many will provide an error message. Refer to the Release Notes for additional and late-breaking information about using the management applications. and then observe the entries. If the file system in question is already mounted (temporary or permanent).4 59 of 66 . perform the necessary steps to unmount it. When you create a new file in the NMFS root directory. there will not be one. There are many probable causes for this scenario. or directly in the CLI. In this case. though occasionally. you can enter the appropriate CLI command in the CLI command entry page available in Celerra Manager. You are unable to mount a file system. NMFS root directory is read/ only. and then retry. An unmounted file system reappears in the mount table after a system reboot.Known Problems and Limitations This section explains known limitations and restrictions of the Celerra management applications. a file exists error appears. Do not try to create files or folders in the NMFS root directory. the mount table entry already exists. Perform a permanent unmount to remove the entry from the mount table. Symptom Workaround To rename a file system. The file system may have been temporarily unmounted prior to reboot.

Related Information For specific information related to the features and functionality described in this technical module. Want to Know More? EMC Customer Education Courses are designed to help you learn how EMC storage products work together and integrate within your environment in order to maximize your entire infrastructure investment. EMC customer training courses are developed and delivered by EMC experts. EMC Customer Education features online and hands-on training in state-of-the-art labs conveniently located throughout the world.emc. For course information and registration. refer to EMC Powerlink. which is available at Powerlink at http:// powerlink.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . refer to the Celerra Network Server User Information CD.com. refer to the following publications.emc. our customer and partner website on http://powerlink. 60 of 66 Version 5.com. ◆ ◆ ◆ Celerra Network Server Command Reference Manual Online Celerra man pages Celerra Network Server Parameters Guide For general information on other EMC Celerra publications. which are available on the user information CD.

there is a maximum limit of 64.000 GIDs per file system. a message appears indicating that the UIDs are being forced to 0 and the GIDs are being forced to 1. you risk truncating the GID values when the data is restored if you use any of the following server_archive formats: • emctar up to 31-bit • ustar up to 21-bit • cpio up to 15-bit • bcpio up to 16-bit • sv4cpio up to 21-bit • sv4crc up to 21-bit • tar up to 18-bit If you use these server_archive formats to back up file systems with 32-bit GIDs. ◆ Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5. If you back up a file system with 32-bit GIDs. the following restrictions apply: ◆ Enabling 16-bit GID support on a Data Mover does not decrease its maximum of 64. and the 16-bit GID support works only for file systems created with the parameter set to 0.4 61 of 66 . Ensure that the application can handle 32-bit UIDs/GIDs. The 32-bit GID support works only for file systems created with the parameter set to 1.000 GIDs per file system. and cannot convert file systems created with 16-bit GID support to use 32-bit GIDs.Appendix: GID Support The Celerra Network Server software supports 32-bit GID (group IDs) on both NFS and CIFS file systems. Restrictions for GID Support With GID support. ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ Some backup applications have restrictions. File systems with 16-bit and 32-bit GIDs can co-exist on a single Data Mover. This support enables a maximum GID value of 2147483647 (approximately 2 billion). Conversely. You cannot convert file systems created with 32-bit GID support to use 16-bit GIDs. Regardless of the GID support setting (32-bit or 16-bit). There is no NAS command you can use to find out whether a file system supports 16-bit or 32-bit GIDs. Changing the gid32 parameter setting from 1 to 0 allows you to create file systems with 16-bit GIDs without disabling 32-bit GIDs on file systems already created with the parameter set to 1. changing the gid32 parameter value from 0 to 1 allows you to create file systems with 32-bit GIDs without disabling 16-bit GID support on existing file systems.

4 Managing Celerra File Systems .62 of 66 Version 5.

47 FTP access to Celerra file systems 3. 47 Free space all file systems on Data Mover 28 checking on Data Mover 27 file system 28 fsck listing file system checks 50 starting ACL check 49 starting and monitoring 49 fsSizeThreshold parameter 45. 11 renaming 36 requirements 8 size guidelines 9 TFTP access 25 troubleshooting 57 types 7 unmount all 43 permanent 44 temporary 43 unmounting from Data Mover 41 permanent 42 temporary 41 used space 28 file system check listing 50 starting ACL check 49 starting and monitoring 49 File system size threshold 11 change for all file systems 45 for Data Mover 45 change for Data Mover 47 fsSizeThreshold parameter 45. file system 8 Creating file system 20 D Data Mover checking free space 27 system capacity 27 creating a mount point 22 free space 27.4 63 of 66 C Capacity checking file system 27 Data Mover 27 Celerra Native Manager 17 Celerra WORM 12 Character support.Index A Access CIFS and Celerra file systems 24 FTP and Celerra file systems 3 MPFS and Celerra file systems 4 NFS and Celerra file systems 24 TFTP and Celerra file systems 3 Automatic Volume Management Celerra Manager support 12 command line interface support 12 creating file system using 21 definition 4 extending file system using 33 AVM. international 6 CIFS access 24 CIFS and Celerra file systems 24 Considerations. 24 Version 5. 28 listing mount points 39 mounted file systems 39 unmounting file system permanent 42 temporary 41 Deleting file system 36 Disk volume freeing file system space 36 Displaying mounted file systems 39 E Exporting file system 35 Extending file system 31 Managing Celerra File Systems . see Automatic Volume Management 4 F File system capacity 27 CIFS access 24 configuration information 27 creating 20 definition 4 deleting 36 displaying mounted 39 exporting 35 extending 31 extending capacity 9 free space 28 freeing disk space allocated to 36 FTP access 24 inode capacity 29 listing all 26 managing 26 mounting 10 mounting on Data Mover 23 MPFS access 25 NFS access 24 permanent mount 23 planning considerations 8 quotas 6.

48 Size Threshold changing for a data mover 45 changing for all file systems 45 Slice volume definition 5 Storage pool associated with file system 30 definition 5 finding out if file system has 30 System storage errors finding and fixing 49 S M Metavolume definition 4 Monitoring file system size 11 Mount point creating 22 listing 39 Mounting file system 10 file system on Data Mover 23 MPFS access to Celerra file systems 4. 25 Trivial File Transfer Protocol. file system 28 User interface choices 17 N Nested Mount File System 15 Nested mount file system definition 4 managing 52 NFS access 24 NFS and Celerra file systems 24 V Volume metavolume definition 4 slice volume definition 5 P Parameters fsSizeThreshold 45. See TFTP Troubleshooting 57 file system 57 U Unicode characters 6 Unmounting file systems from Data Mover permanent 44 temporary 43 Used space.4 Managing Celerra File Systems . 25 T TFTP definition 3 TFTP access to Celerra file systems 3. 11 64 of 66 Version 5. definition 4 server_mount command 46. 47 Performance enhancements file read/write 46 turning off read for Data Mover 47 read for file system 46 turning on write for file system 48 Powerlink 16 Q Quotas for file system 6.G GID support restrictions 61 R Renaming file system 36 Restrictions Celerra file systems 6 GID support 61 Symmetrix volumes 6 TimeFinder/FS 6 H HighRoad 25 I Information training 60 Inode capacity 29 Interface choices Celerra Native Manager 17 command line interface 17 International character support 6 Interoperability Matrix 16 L Listing all file systems 26 LUN.

Notes Managing Celerra File Systems Version 5.4 65 of 66 .

com with your opinions of this document. Use. please contact your EMC representative for a hardware upgrade or software update. EMC from time to time releases new revisions of Celerra hardware and software. and distribution of any EMC software described in this publication requires an applicable software license. If your Celerra system does not offer a function described in this document.4 . THE INFORMATION IN THIS PUBLICATION IS PROVIDED “AS IS. and overall quality of the user publications. Therefore. Please send a message to celerradoc_comments@emc. AND SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Comments and Suggestions About the Documentation Your suggestions will help us continue to improve the accuracy. The information is subject to change without notice. For the most up-to-date information on product features. copying.” EMC CORPORATION MAKES NO REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND WITH RESPECT TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PUBLICATION. organization.About This Technical Module As part of its effort to continuously improve and enhance the performance and capabilities of the Celerra Network Server product line. All rights reserved. 66 of 66 Version 5. see your product release notes. EMC believes the information in this publication is accurate as of its publication date. some functions described in this document may not be supported by all revisions of Celerra software or hardware presently in use. Copyright © 1998–2005 EMC Corporation.

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