The Sherando Times

Stephens City • Middletown • Kernstown
January 19 – 25, 2011 Volume III, Issue 3
The Sherando Times
FREE FREE
5
Governor pushes
school choice
3
FREE
Sales tax
could help
2
Va. Tech survivors rally for gun
control. But what do YOU think?
Page • Te Sherando Times • January 19 – 5, 011 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
Politics
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Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 540-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 540-551-07
Virginia Tech survivors rally for gun control.
By Katherine Coates
Capital News Service
RICHMOND – Armed with
duct tape, Colin Goddard bal-
anced on a chair to hang a
screen so people could watch
a flm at the Richmond YWCA
gymnasium.
Goddard appears to be fairly
athletic. But four years ago,
he was barely able to do one
spin on a bicycle because of
gunshot injuries he sufered
during the shooting rampage
at Virginia Tech on April 16,
007.
Goddard and others gath-
ered in Richmond this week
to share their thoughts about
gun violence as “Living for 3”
– a documentary about the
Tech massacre – was screened
at the YWCA.
Goddard was one of the
people who survived when a
fellow Virginia Tech student,
Seung-Hui Cho, entered their
classroom and began shoot-
ing. Cho, who had a history of
mental health problems, killed
3 people before killing him-
self.
Since then, Goddard and
other survivors have become
activists for gun control.
Te flm screening in Rich-
mond was organized Mon-
day by the Virginia Center for
Public Safety. Colin Goddard’s
father, Andrew Goddard, is
president of the nonproft
group.
Gun control is the subject of
debate in the General Assem-
bly as the 011 legislative ses-
sion gets under way. It’s also a
national issue after a gunman
killed six people and wounded
a dozen, including U.S. Rep.
Gabrielle Gifords, in Arizona
on Jan. 8.
Several bills before the as-
sembly would relax existing
frearms laws. Some would
make it easier to get a permit
to carry a concealed weapon,
prohibit the state from re-
stricting frearms or exempt
guns made in Virginia from
federal regulation. Te Vir-
ginia Center for Public Safety
opposes such measures.
Te center supports bills
that would provide more gun
control. One measure, for ex-
ample, would require crimi-
nal background checks before
people can buy frearms at gun
shows. Other would ban fre-
arms from libraries, the Capi-
tol and the General Assembly
Building.
“Tey have to keep guns out
of the State Capitol,” Andrew
Goddard said. “We don’t want
consequences.”
To underscore how lax exist-
ing laws are, Colin Goddard
goes to gun shows and demon-
strates that he can buy weap-
ons with cash – and without
an ID or background check.
Te flm screening at the
YWCA drew an audience of
concerned citizens and vic-
tims and survivors of gun vio-
lence.
Omar Samaha, a Virginia
Tech graduate, joined Colin
Goddard in presenting the
flm and answering questions
from the audience.
Samaha’s sister, Reema Sa-
maha, was killed during the
Virginia Tech shooting. Sama-
ha now works with Students
for Gun Free Schools, a grass-
roots campaign to ban con-
cealed weapons from college
campuses. Te campaign was
started in honor of Samaha’s
sister.
“Students feel they need to
carry because they don’t feel
safe ... it is a variety of social
issues,” Samaha said.
Te flm recalls events that
happened nearly four years
ago. For many in attendance,
the emotions were as raw as
if the ordeal happened yester-
day.
Alex Evans was the chaplain
for the Blacksburg police and
pastor at Blacksburg Presbyte-
rian Church. He was present
the day of the shootings and
said the flm carried him back
to the day.
“I felt a very emotional re-
sponse,” Evans said. “But also
very logical and practical.
[Colin Goddard] is calling on
us to improve our law and so-
ciety.”
Goddard says he is not anti-
gun; however, he believes so-
ciety needs more control over
violent weapons.
“Living for 3” will premiere
at the Sundance Film Festival
in Utah at the end of January
and at Virginia Tech in Febru-
ary. Students can request the
flm to be shown at their uni-
versity.
What do YOU think?
Colin Goddard was wounded 4 times during the Vir-
ginia Tech shootings.
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January 19 – 5, 011 • Te Sherando Times • Page 3 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
By Amanda Iacone
Virginia Statehouse News
RICHMOND — Drivers in
northern Virginia could be seeing
more orange construction bar-
rels under a Republican proposal
to transfer some state sales tax
dollars to pay for transportation
projects in the region.
Del. Tom Rust, R-Fairfax, is
sponsoring legislation that would
take $100 million of sales tax rev-
enue generated from northern
Virginia each year and redirect
the money to road and transit
projects.
Another $50 million in state
sales tax revenue generated in
Hampton Roads would provide
similar support there.
Detractors say it would reduce
already-limited funding for core
services like law enforcement,
education and social services.
Te proposal is part of the trans-
portation plan Gov. Bob McDon-
nell is hoping to pass through the
General Assembly this session.
His proposal centers around bor-
rowing $3 billion and using an-
other $1 billion in available cash
to pay for up to 900 projects dur-
ing the next three years.
But McDonnell is also endors-
ing several smaller a la carte
transportation proposals, includ-
ing a bill sponsored by Sen. Mark
Herring, D-Loudoun County,
which would provide incentives
to businesses that allow employ-
ees to work from home and keep-
ing them of the region’s busy
roads.
Rust also is sponsoring a bill
that would reclassify Virginia’s
primary, secondary and local
roads to refect modern driving
patterns. Tose designations are
used to prioritize state transpor-
tation dollars.
Some roads in northern Vir-
ginia currently designated local
roadways are carrying more traf-
fc than some primary roads in
southwest Virginia, Rust said.
“It’ll put money where the traf-
fc is,” Rust said. “Yes, it’ll help
northern Virginia but it is not a
northern Virginia-centric bill.”
According to a list of projects
released Friday that the gover-
nor’s plan would fund, Loud-
oun County has $105 million in
projects awaiting funding. Henry
County and Martinsville have
$6.5 million in projects needing
funding.
Any transportation funding
solution must have a statewide
component, said Del. Ward Arm-
strong, D-Patrick, whose districts
includes areas in Henry County
and Martinsville.
“You can’t just address northern
Virginia and Hampton Roads and
not address the rest of the state,”
Armstrong said.
Armstrong, the House Minor-
ity leader, said he is concerned
about taking sales tax revenue of
the general fund to pay for roads,
but said the idea deserves scru-
tiny and discussion.
Personal income taxes, sales
taxes and corporate taxes are the
three largest sources for the $30
billion general fund — but about
half of that money goes to educa-
tion, Armstrong said. Federal gas
tax revenue, state gas tax revenue
and taxes on auto insurance help
pay for transportation projects.
“We keep taking money out of
the general fund to pay for trans-
portation. While transportation
is very important, I don’t think
we ought to be robbing school
kids to build roads,” he said.
Te governor’s plan also would
use the state’s cash balance to
fund road projects, again divert-
ing general fund dollars away
from core services, Armstrong
said.
Te proposal also comes a year
after lawmakers had to cut $4 bil-
lion to balance the budget — edu-
cation and other core services all
took a hit, Herring said.
Lawmakers should consider all
the ideas on the table, Herring
said, but some may not be do-
able.
In the end, Herring may support
McDonnell’s proposal to borrow
money to pay for road projects.
He wants to work with the gover-
nor to provide a long-term solu-
tion that doesn’t raise taxes — a
goal McDonnell campaigned on,
Herring said.
Herring said he also would like
to make it easier for the state
and localities to share in the cost
of transportation construction.
Currently there is a $1 million
cap on state revenue sharing,
which could help pay for installa-
tion of a new trafc light or add a
turn lane, he said.
But two projects in Leesburg
could cost millions. Te Sycolin
Road fyover project would cost
an estimated $0 million, and the
Route 7 interchange would cost
about $60 million, according to
published reports.
In 006, voters supported bor-
rowing $38 million to build the
Route 7/Loudoun County Park-
way interchange that is now open
to trafc.
Loudoun County
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Middletown
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By Samantha Mazzotta
Reseed Lawn Now
Q:
I’ve got a couple of bald
spots in my lawn that I
plan to either reseed or resod this
spring. My neighbor told me that
I can reseed them right now — in
the middle of winter — without a
problem. Won’t the newly sprout-
ed grass just freeze and die? — Joe
in White Plains, N.Y.
A:
It’s possible, and often rec-
ommended, to go ahead and
reseed bare spots in the middle of
winter. Most of the seeds will lie dor-
mant through the cold month or two
left, but as soon as the days length-
en and warm up, you’ll begin to see
fresh green growth in those spots.
There’s no guarantee that an early-
spring cold snap won’t freeze and kill
the grass, but buying the right variety
of grass seed for your climate will
help prevent this, as the new grass
will be hardy enough to withstand
brief freezing temperatures.
Make sure the bald spots are free
of snow and ice — working on an
above-freezing or sunny day is best.
Clear away debris and loosen matted
thatch with a rake or thatcher. Sow
grass seed over the bare spot and then
put down a layer of straw to protect
the seeds from foraging birds, wind
and water.
If you’d rather put down sod instead
— sometimes bare patches are just too
big to seed well — hold off until late
winter or very early spring to make
sure the sod “takes” well, the ground
isn’t frozen and there’s less chance of
cold snaps.
For sod, you’ll need to clear the
bald spot, then dig out old sod to a
depth of about 3 inches. Puncture the
soil underneath with a pitchfork to
make it more porous. Pack the new
sod pieces tightly into the cleared
spot and tamp them down so they’re
almost level with, but slightly higher
than, the surrounding lawn. The sod
will settle downward over the next
few weeks. Keep the sod damp for 10
to 12 days
Send your questions or home tips
to ask@thisisahammer.com, or write
This Is a Hammer, c/o King Features
Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475. When in
doubt as to whether you can safely or
effectively complete a project, con-
sult a professional contractor.
© 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.
—33—
De-thatching
your lawn in
early spring
helps loosen
and aerate the
soil and grass
roots, giving the grass more oppor-
tunity to grow in thick and green.
Ripchair: Mobility
for Disabled Vets
Did you see the Discovery Channel
episode on Howe and Howe’s Rip-
chair? Mike and Geoff Howe build
high-tech toys for the military. Part of
their arsenal includes a remote-con-
trolled tank called the Ripsaw. For
SWAT teams, they have the world’s
smallest manned assault tank, the
Badger. Now they’ve built an all-ter-
rain wheelchair for disabled veterans.
Think what that could mean for a
disabled veteran who wants to get
into the woods for a little fishing, or
anything else.
The bottom of the Ripchair is simi-
lar to the treads on a tank but with big-
ger teeth to grab dirt and forge ahead.
It runs on a 30-horsepower diesel
engine, climbs hills up to 50 degrees
and runs at 10 mph. It’ll go through
mud and sand. Even more, it’s made
of steel.
An online video shows an employee
giving the prototype Ripchair a test
run. He ran it around a dirt parking
lot and then took it into woods, going
down steep inclines and mowing
down small trees.
In an interview with the Portland
Press-Herald, the Howe brothers said
they’re not going to make the Rip-
chairs for profit. Instead, they’ll look
for donations and create a non-profit
so they can give the chairs away to
disabled veterans.
Check the Internet for more infor-
mation. Use this as your search
parameter: Ripchair Howe and
Howe. And check this site: www.
pressherald.com and put Operation
Enduring Mobility in the search box
on the right side.
Also check them out at www.howe-
andhowetechnologies.com — don’t
miss the demonstration videos of
their other equipment.
Want to send a donation to help get
their non-profit off the ground so they
can start giving Ripchairs to disabled
veterans? Send a check and a copy of
this column to:
Howe & Howe Technologies, Inc.
661 Main St.
Waterboro, ME 04087
Write to Freddy Groves in care of
King Features Weekly Service, P.O.
Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-
6475, or send e-mail to column
reply@gmail.com.
© 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.
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Sales tax shift could help Loudoun County; spurs debate
Page 4 • Te Sherando Times • January 19 – 5, 011 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
By Amanda Iacone &
Stephen Groves
Virginia Statehouse News
RICHMOND – Te repeal of
the federal “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell”
law has put a new twist in an old
debate for Virginia lawmakers.
For several years bills have been
ofered in the General Assembly
that would include sexual orien-
tation as a protected class and
prohibit discrimination against
gay, lesbian and transgender pub-
lic employees.
Several bills have been pro-
posed ahead of the upcoming
General Assembly session that
could enhance gay rights or erode
them.
Te latest bill, announced
Wednesday, would ensure that
Virginia’s eligibility requirements
for the National Guard would
mirror national standards set by
Congress and the U.S. Depart-
ment of Defense and refect the
repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell.
Del. Joe Morrissey, D-Henrico,
said he will fle that bill to coun-
teract an efort by Del. Bob Mar-
shall, R- Manassas, to ban gays
from serving in the Virginia Na-
tional Guard.
Following Congress’ repeal of
the law last week, Marshall pro-
posed legislation that would con-
tinue “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” for
Virginia guard members.
“Tat’s the law of the land right
now. Virginia must adhere to fed-
eral law,” Morrissey said during a
news conference.
Morrissey said the U.S. Consti-
tution gives states little latitude
in running its militia and gives
sole authority for setting eligibil-
ity standards to the Congress. He
called on Attorney General Ken
Cuccinelli to repudiate Marshall’s
proposed legislation, which Mor-
rissey said is inconsistent with
the U.S. Constitution and is a
“backward” policy proposal.
“It has no place in Virginia,”
Morrissey said.
Earlier this year, Cuccinelli is-
sued an opinion to the state’s
public colleges and universities
advising that sexual orientation
isn’t a protected class, sparking
outrage on campuses throughout
the state. Te attorney general
said he was simply advising the
colleges that the Legislature has
not identifed gays and lesbians
as a protected class.
Several bills were fled last year
that would have ofered that pro-
tection to state and local govern-
ment workers, but the measures
failed to garner support in both
chambers.
Tis year Del. Adam Ebbin,
D- Alexandria, plans to fle the
bill again. And Del. Jim Scott, D-
Fairfax County, has already fled a
bill that would extend protection
for gay workers to all employers,
both public and private.
Scott said he introduced a simi-
lar bill eight or nine sessions ago,
and it quickly died for lack of
support.
But two things have changed
since then, Scott said.
Gov. Bob McDonnell issued an
executive directive stating that
discrimination based on factors
like a person’ s sexual orienta-
tion or parental status violates
the equal protection clause of
the U.S. Constitution. An ear-
lier executive order prohibiting
discrimination was missing the
words “sexual orientation,” which
the two previous governors had
included in their orders.
Te other change that spurred
Scott was the repeal of the federal
Don’t Ask Don’t Tell law, he said.
“Had those two things not hap-
pened it would be more difcult,”
Scott said of passing such a law.
“Several things have come to-
gether to make it, I believe, an
appropriate time to deal with this
problem.”
Ebbin supports Scott’s efort to
provide protection to all workers
in the state, adding that it would
keep bright and talented workers
in Virginia.
Ebbin said he is the lone openly
gay member of the General As-
sembly and that he has never
been discriminated against in the
workplace.
Claire Gastañaga, a spokes-
woman for Equality Virginia, said
it doesn’t matter how many peo-
ple face discrimination. It’s about
doing the right thing and provid-
ing a mechanism for relief.
She said the public already sup-
ports anti-discrimination legisla-
tion, and the Legislature should
follow.
“Te public is ahead of the Leg-
islature on these things,” Gasta-
ñaga said.
Te Virginia-based Fam-
ily Foundation said the pro-
posed legislation is unwarranted
and could hamper private busi-
nesses and religious institutions.
Church-based schools and social
services could be forced to serve
or hire gay people or shut down,
said spokesman Chris Freund.
Freund said Catholic adoption
agencies in Massachusetts closed
after anti-discrimination laws
were expanded there.
“We are very concerned about
the threat to religious liberty,” he
said.
Still, Freund said he doesn’t see
the bills making progress. He said
the Family Foundation is review-
ing Marshall’s proposal to see if
it meets legal muster. Te group
said that “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell”
was a good policy and should not
have been repealed.
Marshall doesn’t believe the
anti-discrimination bills will go
far this session. And extending
the requirements onto private
employers decreases their chanc-
es of passing, he said.
Marshall also questioned Mor-
rissey’s legal interpretation, ar-
guing states do have authority to
make enlistment decisions when
the guard troops are under the
governor’s control, not the pres-
ident’s. He said states can enact
regulations that are stricter than
federal law, and cited California’s
tough environmental laws as an
example.
“No Supreme Court has ever
held that there is a constitutional
right to serve in the military,” he
said.
Marshall said that some men
and women would choose not
to serve if the gays were able to
openly serve, and that a military
draft would be needed to provide
enough manpower.
Marshall added that he hopes
that the General Assembly lead-
ership allows the bills to be de-
bated.
Politics
Gay rights debate takes twist in Virginia
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McDermott: dan@sherandotimes.com
January 19 – 5, 011 • Te Sherando Times • Page 5 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
By Amanda Iacone
Virginia Statehouse News
RICHMOND — Sen. Mark
Obenshain wants public schools
to be the frst choice for Virginia
parents.
And he said two initiatives
— one to provide scholarships
for low-incomes students and
another to fund a pilot perfor-
mance pay program for teachers
— would help make that hap-
pen.
Gov. Bob McDonnell an-
nounced his Kindergarten
through 1th grade legislative ini-
tiatives Tuesday. He said he wants
to improve student achievement
to keep them competitive nation-
ally and internationally.
Obenshain, R-Harrisonburg,
will sponsor a bill that would
provide tax credits to businesses
that donate to nonprofts provid-
ing scholarships to low-income
students who attend private
schools.
Providing school choice to stu-
dents and parents improves pub-
lic schools because a competitive
environment would yield innova-
tions and improvements within
public schools, he said following
the governor’s presentation.
“We have outstanding public
schools in most areas, but they’re
not good enough,” Obenshain
said.
McDonnell said even President
Barack Obama supports school
choice and merit pay for teach-
ers, and Virginians should take
steps to encourage innovation
and leadership.
“We cannot be complacent,”
McDonnell said. “A young per-
son’s opportunity should not be
constrained by their zip code,”
Te state plans to ofer grants
of up to $5,000 per teacher to
schools interested in a pilot per-
formance pay program. About
190 schools around the state,
which have difculties retaining
or recruiting staf, would be eli-
gible.
McDonnell included $3 million
to pay for the program in budget
amendments he is seeking from
lawmakers.
But the some lawmakers are
skeptical that this is the right fx
or the right time.
Sen. Jill Vogel, R- Winchester,
said teachers in her district
say that each student and each
school district is diferent. Stan-
dard evaluations and test-based
performance evaluations don’t
paint a complete picture of the
student’s progress or the teacher’s
efectiveness.
Vogel said that she supports
the idea of merit pay, but she
questioned how it could be fairly
rolled out.
And Sen. George Barker, D-
Prince William County, said that
schools need a steady stream of
funding from the state before
they could aford to implement
performance-based pay.
Schools are currently operating
at 006 funding levels because of
the state’s dire budget problems.
Cuts in state support were passed
along to local districts, Barker
said.
Delegate Clay Athey, R-Front
Royal, said educational organiza-
tions will likely oppose the gov-
ernor’s initiatives, arguing that
it takes money away from public
schools. Athey disagrees and said
that tax credits to support schol-
arships have worked very well in
other states, and Virginia should
do it, too.
“Te worst thing in the world is
to lock a child in a public school
that is failing and failing them,”
Athey said.
Some Democrats support the
governor’s proposal. Delegate Al-
gie Howell, D-Norfolk, a former
public school history teacher,
stood with McDonnell Tuesday
because the proposed bills would
help underprivileged children, he
said.
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By Amanda Iacone
Virginia Statehouse News
RICHMOND — Virginians
could be toting fewer plastic bags
when they go to the grocery store
or pharmacy.
At least two delegates have pro-
posed legislation that would limit
the availability of the commonly
used bags.
Del. Onzlee Ware, D-Roanoke,
has fled a bill that would ban re-
tailers from providing the bags
to customers. And Del. Joe Mor-
rissey, D-Henrico, said he will fle
legislation that would add a 0
cent tax per bag for customers
who choose plastic over paper or
reusable bags.
A bill to ban the bags died last
year in committee, Morrissey
said.
But he is hopeful that a tax
would have the same impact by
drastically reducing the use of
the bags and is more likely to gain
lawmakers’ support. His intent
is not to provide a new revenue
stream for the state, he said.
“Te purpose is to have people
stop using plastic bags,” he said.
Morrissey said similar taxes
in Washington, D.C., and in Ire-
land have drastically curbed the
number of bags that are used and
reduced the number of bags sent
to landflls. Here in Virginia bags
also make their way to rivers,
streams and agricultural felds,
he said.
Retailers would no longer have
to provide both paper and plastic,
saving them money, Morrissey
said.
“It’s good for the environment.
It’s good for businesses and re-
tailers and it’s good for consum-
ers,” Morrissey said.
But increasing a tax while Vir-
ginians are still hurting for jobs
and the economy is still shaky
will be a tough sell during the
upcoming General Assembly
session, which ofcially begins
Wednesday, said Del. Todd Gil-
bert , R-Woodstock.
“We should be talking about
other things,” Gilbert said. “We’ve
got bigger problems right now
than trying to legislate how peo-
ple behave.”
Gilbert said that while the new
revenue would be welcome, gov-
ernment should live within its
means and there is little appetite
to impose another tax on con-
sumers.
“I abhor the idea of taxing peo-
ple to change their behavior. I
just think that’s not good public
policy,” he said.
Washington, D.C., enacted a
5-cent tax, which took efect a
year ago. Te tax applies to paper
and plastic bags provided at busi-
ness that have a food or alcohol
license, said Tom Moir, with the
District’s city council committee
on the environment and govern-
ment operations.
“We have seen a great reduction
in unnecessary bag use, as well as
a great upswing in folks bringing
reusable bags to supermarkets
and grocery stores,” Moir wrote
in an e-mailed response.
Neighboring North Carolina
has banned the bags from the
Outer Banks and West Virginia
has no tax, according to the Na-
tional Conference of State Legis-
latures.
More states and municipalities
are adopting laws to limit plastic
bags, including laws that enact
taxes, said J.R. Tolbert, assistant
chapter director for the Virginia
Chapter of the Sierra Club.
“It’s a very, very efective way to
reduce plastic bag use,” he said.
Limiting plastic bags reduces
fossil fuel use and keeps the bags
out of the waterways and pro-
tects crops. Te bags can destroy
Virginia cotton crops, he said.
Ware’s bill is House Bill 1498
and will likely go before the Com-
mittee on Agriculture, Chesa-
peake and Natural Resources.
Legislators have until Wednes-
day morning to fle bills for the
upcoming session.
Economy
1. GEOGRAPHY: In what body of
water are the Seychelles Islands locat-
ed?
2. MOVIES: Who directed the mov-
ies “Stagecoach” and “The Grapes of
Wrath”?
3. CHEMISTRY: What element’s
symbol is C?
4. MUSIC: What rock ‘n’ roll band
included members Marty Balin and
Paul Kantner?
5. HISTORY: What Union general
captured Vicksburg, Miss., after a 40-
day siege?
6. SCIENCE FICTION: What fic-
tional character had a flying lab called
Sky Queen?
7. LITERATURE: Who wrote “Rid-
ers of the Purple Sage”?
8. MYTHOLOGY: Hera was the sis-
ter and the wife of which Greek god?
9. U.S. PRESIDENTS: What U.S.
president was born in West Branch,
Iowa?
10. INVENTIONS: When was the
ballpoint pen invented?
Answers
1. Indian Ocean
2. John Ford
3. Carbon
4. Jefferson Airplane
5. Ulysses S. Grant
6. Tom Swift
7. Zane Grey
8. Zeus
9. Herbert Hoover
10. 1938
© 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.
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1. Who gave up the last of Hank
Aaron’s 755 home runs?
2. Of George Brett and Pete Rose,
who hit the most triples during his
career?
3. N.C. State’s QB Russell Wilson
set an NCAA record in 2009 for most
passes without an interception (379).
Which ACC team finally picked him
off?
4. How many NBA Finals did Mag-
ic Johnson play in, and how many did
his teams win?
5. How many consecutive Stanley
Cup Finals have the Philadelphia
Flyers lost?
6. When was the last time there was
an all-South American men’s soccer
final in World Cup?
7. Against whom was Lennox
Lewis’ last heavyweight boxing title
fight?
Answers
1. California’s Dick Drago, on July
20, 1976.
2. Brett hit 137 triples; Rose, 135.
3. Wake Forest.
4. He was in nine NBA Finals, win-
ning five.
5. Six consecutive series.
6. It was 1950, when Uruguay
defeated Brazil.
7. Current WBC heavyweight box-
ing champion Vitali Klitschko, in
2003.
© 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.
1. Who sang “Seasons in the Sun”
in 1974? Bonus for knowing what the
song is about.
2. In the 1964 bossa nova hit “The
Girl from Ipanema,” what is she doing
that attracts so much attention? Bonus
for knowing where Ipanema is.
3. Name the artist who first sang
“Red Red Wine.”
4. Name the 1972 hit by Climax.
5. Name the Tommy Edwards hit
that had a melody written by a U.S.
vice president.
6. Who had hits 20 years apart with
“I Think We’re Alone Now,” in 1967
and 1987?
Answers
1. Terry Jacks. The singer is dying
and is saying goodbye to friends and
family. The song also was covered by
the Kingston Trio with different lyrics
in 1963.
2. She’s walking. That’s it, just walk-
ing. Ipanema is a neighborhood in Rio
de Janeiro, Brazil.
3. Neil Diamond, in 1968. He also
wrote the song. The more well-known
version was done reggae-style by
UB40 in 1983.
4. “Precious and Few.” The song hit
No. 3 on the charts.
5. “It’s All In the Game” in 1958.
The 1911 melody was composed by
Charles Dawes, who would be the
30th vice president. The song was
used in the movie “October Sky.”
6. Tommy James and the Shondells,
and then Tiffany.
© 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.
K
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Delegates target plastic bags

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J a n u a r y 1 7 , 2 0 1 1
January 19 – 5, 011 • Te Sherando Times • Page 7 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
By Amanda Iacone
Virginia Statehouse News
RICHMOND — Northern
Virginia lawmakers agree with
Gov. Bob McDonnell’s priori-
ties for the newly minted Gen-
eral Assembly session, but they
aren’t necessarily in total accord
with his proposed solutions.
In his second State of the Com-
monwealth address Wednesday
night, McDonnell gave somber
acknowledgement to the shoot-
ings this past weekend in Tuc-
son, Ariz., that have gripped the
nation. But the governor quickly
moved on to tout his work dur-
ing the past year and reiterated
his current legislative agenda,
which he has rolled out during
the past month.
Nothing new was introduced
during the speech but the gov-
ernor has revealed an aggressive
itinerary for lawmakers, said
Del. Tom Rust, R-Herndon.
“I thought the governor laid
out some very good goals for us,
and they are goals that I share,”
said Sen. Mark Herring, D-Lou-
doun County.
Jobs, economic development,
transportation and higher
education are all priorities for
residents in and around the
Leesburg area as well as all Vir-
ginians, Herring said.
“It gives us at least some com-
mon ground to start from,” he
said.
But Herring said there are in-
consistencies to the plan that
Republicans, led by McDonnell,
have unveiled.
McDonnell has proposed add-
ing $50 million in tuition assis-
tance for undergraduates study-
ing in science and math-related
felds. But Republicans were
responsible for taking money
away from state colleges and
universities, forcing the schools
to raise tuition, he said.
Herring said he’s glad the issue
of increased funding for public
institution is on the table, and
he would support sending ad-
ditional funds to state colleges
and universities.
He also questioned the gov-
ernor’s proposal to borrow $3
billion for transportation and
transit projects. McDonnell’s
plan doesn’t provide a long-
term funding solution to fx
northern Virginia’s congested
roads, and it doesn’t provide
a revenue stream to repay the
bonds, Herring said.
“What are we going to do over
the next 17 years while we’re re-
paying this? (McDonnell) kind
of punched the problem to his
successor instead of being bold
and dealing with it now,” Her-
ring said. “On the other hand,
this is something I’m going to
have to look at very carefully.
We’ve got some of the worst
trafc in the nation.”
Rust expects debate about the
proposal to accelerate the issu-
ance of transportation bonds.
But he supports the move be-
cause the bonds were approved
in 007, and interest rates are
low and construction costs are
cheap right now.
“I think the stars are appropri-
ately aligned,” he said.
Rust plans to introduce leg-
islation that would infuse new
revenue for transportation by
taxing out-of-state business.
Another would shift existing
sales tax revenue from north-
ern Virginia and the Hampton
Roads area to transportation
projects in those areas.
Both Rust and Herring sup-
port the new $54 million incen-
tives and grants McDonnell has
proposed to spur job growth,
they said — a small amount
when compared to the state’s
almost $80 billion biennial bud-
get.
“Tere’s very little argument
that we need to continue to
grow the economy,” Rust said.
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Page 8 • Te Sherando Times • January 19 – 5, 011 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
By Amanda Iacone
Virginia Statehouse News
RICHMOND – Western Vir-
ginia lawmakers on Wednesday
ofered strong support for Gov.
Bob McDonnell’s plans to reform
higher education and increase
funding for transportation proj-
ects.
In his second State of the Com-
monwealth address Wednesday
night before a joint session of the
Virginia House of Delegates and
Senate, McDonnell gave somber
acknowledgment to the shoot-
ings this past weekend in Tuscon,
Ariz., that have griped the nation.
But the governor quickly moved
on to tout his work during the
past year and reiterated his cur-
rent legislative agenda, which he
has rolled out during the past
month.
McDonnell said his administra-
tion during the past year has put
the state in the black fscally and
created almost 70,000 jobs. His
speech capped of the frst day of
the 011 General Assembly. Law-
makers spent the day greeting
one another and getting ready for
the next 46 days.
Legislators face retooling the
state’s ailing public pension sys-
tem, curbing tuition cost in-
creases and infusing billions into
transportation and transit proj-
ects.
Te governor has proposed $50
million in new funding to provide
aid to undergraduate students
and to encourage colleges and
universities to operate more ef-
fciently while increasing gradu-
ation rates.
While the governor wants to
reinvest in higher education, he
said the funding will come with
more fscal accountability and
cost-saving innovations from
schools.
McDonnell said it is “uncon-
scionable” that college tuition has
doubled during the past 10 years.
“Tis will help keep those costs
down,” Del. Steven Landes, R-
Weyers Cave, said of the gover-
nor’s higher education reform
proposals.
Colleges and universities have
increased tuition and fees to
make up for dwindling state sup-
port – reductions that came as
lawmakers tried to balance the
state budget, Landes said.
He said the governor’s plan will
rebalance how universities are
funded. And the focus on science
and math-related felds is the
right move, Landes said.
“Tat’s where the jobs of the fu-
ture are going to be,” he said.
Frank Tamberrino, president
and chief executive ofcer of
the Harrisonburg-Rockingham
Chamber of Commerce, is among
community leaders in Harrison-
burg watching closely how much
money is budgeted for public col-
leges and university.
Harrisonburg is home to Blue
Ridge Community College and
James Madison University.
State dollars to the universities
impacts tuition, and rising tuition
coupled with the weak economy
have slowed the growth in JMU’s
student population, Tamberrino
said.
“Everything we have heard so
far, keeping the budget under
control, trying to live within our
means, resonates very well with
our members here,” Tamberrino
said of the governor’s other pri-
orities.
Del. Edward T. Scott, R-Madi-
son County, said the most im-
portant goal for this session is to
continue creating new jobs. And
while the governor’s transporta-
tion plan would not only reduce
congestion on Virginia roads,
it would put people to work, he
said.
“It is clearly doable,” he said of
the plan to borrow up to $3 bil-
lion.
Te governor’s total road and
transit plan would pay for up to
900 projects during the next four
years.
It would also expand an exist-
ing revenue sharing program
that both Albemarle and Cul-
peper counties have used to build
roads.
Sen. Edward Houck, D-Cul-
peper, said he supports the gov-
ernor’s transportation plan.
“I’m not at all concerned about
it,” Houck said. “It’s a great way to
get people working.”
But he said the governor’s plan
to privatize state-run liquor
stores has a long shot of gaining
support. Houck said the Legisla-
ture isn’t in the mood to tackle
the unnecessary issue.
He noted that the governor did
not dedicate much time to the
privatization plan in his speech.
Te governor said selling the
ABC stores would generate up to
$300 million for transportation.
Houck praised the governor for
making re-funding higher educa-
tion a priority.
Te governor has also proposed
that public employees from uni-
versity professors to state police
begin contributing to their re-
tirement. He would ofset their
contribution with a 3 percent pay
raise.
Tat would send an additional
$300 million to the retirement
system in a year. Te system cur-
rently is $17.6 billion short. Te
state borrowed more than $600
million from the pension system
to balance the 010 budget.
Scott said the proposal is a bold
frst step. He said reforms are
needed to ensure the state can
fulfll its promises to state em-
ployees and to ensure the state is
being responsible with taxpayers’
dollars.
All three legislators agreed the
governor set the right tone for
the session. McDonnell said that
respectful, civil discourse will
best serve the state.
“Tat sets the stage for the rest
of the session,” Landes said.
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To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
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or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 540-551-07
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Stephens City, VA
22655
(540) 868-0386
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Western Va. lawmakers support McDonnell transportation, higher ed plans
January 19 – 5, 011 • Te Sherando Times • Page 9 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
By Amanda Iacone
Virginia Statehouse News
RICHMOND — Sen. Emmett
Hanger wants to make it easier
for Virginia drivers to go green.
Hanger, R-Mount Solon,
is proposing legislation that
would exempt the new car title
tax for Virginians who buy an
electric car, hoping the bill will
spur shoppers to choose the all-
electric Chevrolet Volt.
General Motors is releasing
the car in selected markets, in-
cluding the Washington, D.C,.
area.
Within the next year to 18
months, the $41,000 car will be
available throughout Virginia
and the rest of the county, said
Carolyn Markey, a spokeswom-
an for General Motors.
Hanger said his bill would
beneft both car buyers and tax-
payers alike. Increasing the use
of electric vehicles reduces the
country’s dependence on for-
eign oil and helps Northern Vir-
ginia meet stringent air quality
standards set by the Environ-
mental Protection Agency.
Although the state would lose
some tax revenue, it would save
money in the long-term for tax-
payers, he said.
Car buyers now pay a title tax
worth 3 percent of a vehicle’s
value. His bill would help car
buyers for three years, Hanger
said, when the tax exemption
would expire.
Maryland has already adopted
a similar tax exemption. Virgin-
ia is the second state to consider
such a move, said Jim Kiley, also
with GM.
Volt drivers can also apply
for a federal income tax credit
worth $7,500, which also helps
to bring down the cost of the
new technology, he said.
But Sen. George Barker, D-
Prince William County, worries
about losing more state rev-
enue.
He said there is enough inter-
est in the electric cars without
any help from the state. And
the $1,00 beneft is small com-
pared to the total cost of the car,
Barker said.
Politics
EMPLOYMENT
The
Sherando
Times
News Reporter
The Sherando Times
is currently searching
for a sports & general
assignment reporter
for Stephens City.
If you are interested,
please contact Dan
McDermott:
dan@sherandotimes.com

1
8
— K i n g F e a t u r e s W e e k l y S e r v i c e
J a n u a r y 1 7 , 2 0 1 1
To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 540-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 540-551-07
Volt sparks small tax exemption talk
Page 10 • Te Sherando Times • January 19 – 5, 011 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
Stephens City Town
Meetings

January 20
Water/ Sewer Committee
5:30pm
Public Works Committee
6:00pm
*All Committee Meetings are
subject to change without noti-
fcation*
Middletown Meetings
Work Session First Monday
7pm.Regular Council Second
Monday 7pm. Committees Third
Tuesday 7pm. Planning Com-
mission Fourth Monday 7pm.
Public Hearings as scheduled
and properly advertised.
All meetings are and always
have been open to the public
Bingo in Middletown
Every Tuesday at the Middle-
town Volunteer Fire and Res-
cue. Doors open at 5pm. Bin-
go starts at 7pm. Located in
the social hall rear of building.
Concessions sold by Middle-
town Voluteer Fire and Rescue
auxillary.
Winter reading program
at Bowman Library
Feb 9, 2011 11:00 am
Feb 12, 2011 11:00 am
Feb 16, 2011 11:00 am
Feb 19, 2011 11:00 am
Feb 23, 2011 11:00 am
Feb 26, 2011 11:00 am
Mar 2, 2011 11:00 am
Mar 5, 2011 11:00 am
Mar 9, 2011 11:00 am
Mar 12, 2011 11:00 am
Mar 16, 2011 11:00 am
Mar 19, 2011 11:00 am
Mar 23, 2011 11:00 am
Mar 26, 2011 11:00 am
Mar 30, 2011 11:00 am
Apr 2, 2011 11:00 am
Bowman Library, 871 Task-
er Road, Stephens City, VA
This reading program’s pur-
pose is to encourage early lit-
eracy, so all the materials pro-
vide information for reading
stages of young children, infant
to kindergarten. The reading
stages include print motivation
and awareness, phonological
awareness, letter knowledge
and vocabulary, and narrative
skills. 540-869-9000
Angels Light The Way
Gift Shop
Recently, Angels Light The
Way Gift Shop opened its door
October 1st, to help children to
heal from domestic and sexual
violence. However, I cannot
do this alone. Therefore, I am
asking for assistance from the
corporations and individuals
for donations of monetary to
gently used items from cloth-
ing, household furniture and
goods in order to continue the
assistance. I cannot be that
one voice alone to help so
many children, but together
we can heal the pain and hurt
thus, these children can grow
up to be productive adults and
to stop the chain of child abuse
in that family. Lastly, it takes
one voice to be that person to
take a stand and speak out for
the children helping to heal the
body, mind and spirit. Every
child deserves a safe and lov-
ing environment. All funds and
items can be sent to the follow-
ing location:
Angels Light the Way Gift
Shop, 45 Featherbed Lane
Winchester, VA 22602. Marcia
Coon,owner. 540-686-5769 or
angelsaver04@yahoo.com .
Store hours Tuesday through
Saturday 10am to 6pm. Fund-
raisers in the spring: Your com-
pany’s name will be announced
on the tv and radio stations for
your contributions as well as
listed in the store and the stores
events throughout the full year.
All contributions are tax deduct-
ible. Thank you for your sup-
port in helping me to stop the
hurt and begin the healing in a
child’s life today.
Talent show auditions
Sherando High School 18th
Annual talent show auditions
January 20 & 21
Thursday, January 20th at 7pm
Friday, January 21st at 7pm
Contact Melana Humphreys
to set up an audition at 540-
868-9048 or email at mhum-
phreys3@verizon.net
Sherando High School host-
ing
6th annual flm festival
6th annual flm festival hosted
by Sherando High school
Wednesday, January 19, 2011
@ 7 p.m.– Sherando High
School 6th Annual Film Fes-
tival at Alamo Theater. The
Sherando High School FBLA
is hosting the festival which
will feature flms produced by
area students. Ten percent of
the proceeds from ticket sales
to the event will be donated to
the Stephens City Food Pantry.
Awards will be presented after
the flms have been shown.
(The snow date is January 26,
2011)
Blood drive
Jan 24, 2011 10:00 am - 4:00 pm
Lord Fairfax Community Col-
lege,
173 Skirmisher Lane,
Middletown,VA
To be eligible to donate, you
must be 17 years of age (Note
that 16 year olds may donate
in some states with parental
permission-check with the Red
Cross), at least 110 pounds,
and be in reasonably good
health. A person can give ev-
ery 56 days. All blood types are
needed, but especially O nega-
tive and O positive. (540) 662-
0923 Sign up on-line at www.
redcrossblood.org
Wayside Theatre
Wayside Theatre pres-
ents Southern Crossroads:
The New Orleans Adven-
ture Jan 29, 2011 7:00 pm
A musical by Warner Crocker
and Steve Przybylski. 7:00 PM
Social / 7:30 PM Play. Beneft
night sponsored by The Rotary
Club of Clarke County. Tickets -
$30 donation. Proceeds to ben-
eft Rotary community service
projects. Ticket information
call: Dale Coumes – (540) 955-
2722 home; (703) 999-3395
cell / email: dalecoumes@e-
elec.com
Job club
Jan 25, 2011 8:30 am
Virginia Workforce Con-
nection, 100 Premier
Place, Winchester, VA
Meet with other job seekers
to discuss the joys and frus-
trations of job hunting, share
ideas, tips and job leads. Every
Tuesday @ 8:30am 540-722-
3415 www.vawc.virginia.gov
The news
To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 540-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 540-551-07
McCoy’ s Cookie Jars
540-683-9197
For Sale by owner.
Good condition, runs great, new
inspection, new brakes, great gas
mileage, interior clean and GC,
A/C,AM/FM/CASS, T/C/PWR-W-
L, Auto, 4-cyl, 117,500K, full size
spare, Kelly blue book valued @
$5,700... available now for $4,500!
Call 540-551-2072
1998 Toyota Camry
SOLD!!!
From this
paper!
DON’T GET LEFT ON THE SIDELINES,
GET SACKED AT MCCOY’S
THIS SUNDAY FROM 12-8 GRAB YOUR SACK OF BURGERS FOR
THE FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES!!!
10 BURGERS FOR $12
DAILY BREAKFAST AND LUNCH SPECIALS
STARTING AT $3.99
CALL AHEAD – (540) 686- 7391
MCCOY’S DAIRY BAR AND GRILL
980 MILLWOOD PIKE
WINCHESTER, VA 22602
• PC & Mac
• New & Used Sales
• In-Home Repairs
• In-Shop Repairs
510 N. Royal Ave. • Front Royal
540-622-8055
SpringfieldComputers.com
Springfield
Computers
Tired of Rising
Heating Costs?

100% Wood Heat for
your home, water, shop
540-722-8005
Arnette Landscapes, Inc.
Winchester, VA
Outdoor Wood Furnace
Warren County Fairgrounds
Indoor Flea Market
Antiques & Collectables
OPEN Saturdays and Sundays
from 9am-5pm
Space Available and New Vendors are Welcome
Rt 522 North • Front Royal, VA
540-635-5827
www.warrencountyfair.com
Don’t pay “Mall” prices! We have something for everyone!
January 19 – 5, 011 • Te Sherando Times • Page 11 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
SAAA country
music concert
The Shenandoah Area Agency
on Aging is having a Country
Music Concert featuring the lo-
cal band From the Heart with
John Landes on Sat. Feb. 12
from 7 to 9 P.M. This will be
held at the Chimney Field Com-
munity Center on 11th Street in
Front Royal, Va. This concert is
to help the Agency raise money
to help with fuel assistance for
senior citizens. For ticket infor-
mation contact Bill Crawford at
(540)631-7141.
Groundhog day celebration
Feb 2, 2011 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Bowman Library, 871 Task-
er Road, Stephens City, VA
Groundhog Day Celebration.
So, will Bowman Bill see his
shadow and jump back inside
his hole for 6 more weeks of
winter? Or will he stay out-
side and welcome spring right
around the corner? Come
to Bowman on Wednesday,
February 2 to fnd out. Enjoy
games, activities, songs, sto-
ries, and ice cream that are all
included in the program. Our
resident groundhog, Bowman
Bill, will emerge during the pro-
gram to predict the weather. All
Winter Reading program activi-
ties are open to children of all
ages and free of charge. 540-
869-9000
Serv Safe
Feb 3, 2011 Call for time
Winchester Medical Center-
Systems Support Building
ServSafe is a “National Restau-
rant Association Food Safety
Certifcation” course provided
by Virginia Cooperative Exten-
sion, through Virginia Tech.
Certifcation is accomplished
through course participation
and passing of written exam.
Karen Ridings, 540-665-5699
Free pizza and
parenting classes
Feb 7, 2011 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
Valley Health Wellness Center
Free parenting class held by
Healthy Families. The classes
are held the frst Monday of
each month. Please call at least
24 hrs in advance to register
and to fnd out the topic of the
class. Pizza and light refresh-
ments will be served. A certif-
cate will be given upon comple-
tion of the class.
Liesl Baldwin 536-1663
Winchester storm
basketball team juvenile
diabetes awareness day
Feb 13, 2011 2:00 pm Ad-
miral Byrd Middle School
Please mark your calendars
for 2/13/11 at 2pm! The Win-
chester Storm Basketball Team
will be holding a Juvenile Dia-
betes Awareness Day at Admi-
ral Byrd Middle School whereby
$1.00 of each $5.00 ticket sold
will go to the Juvenile Diabetes
Research Foundation. Please
come out, enjoy the game and
support JDRF!
Free computer workshops in
January & February
The library is offering free com-
puter workshops at Bowman
and Handley libraries. Check
the Handley Regional Library
website events calendar for
changes-www.handleyregion-
al.org. Classes are free and
open to the public, but limited
to six participants. Get your
reservations early by calling
the library where the class is of-
fered: Handley Library, 540662-
9041 ext. 19 and Bowman Li-
brary, 540-869-9000 ext. 203.
You may register now for work-
shops in January & February.
Evendale elementary school
homework club
Evendale Elementary School
has started a new initiative to
help students be successful.
The school’s Homework Club
after school on Mondays and
Wednesdays from 3:30-4:30
p.m. Staff stays after school to
help students with their home-
work and/or studying for a test.
2011 Young
Naturalist Program
Jan 29, 2011 Time varies
Feb 12, 2011 Time varies
Feb 26, 2011 Time varies
Mar 12, 2011 Time varies
Blandy Experimental Farm,
Route 50 in Clarke County, about
10 miles east of Winchester.
Students in Grades 1 to 5 can
earn a Young Naturalist Cer-
tifcate in a series of fve Satur-
day programs. The 2011 Young
Naturalist Program is presented
by the Foundation of the State
Arboretum, and sponsored
by The Adams Companies.
Students can participate in
one, two, or all fve programs.
Those who attend at least four
programs will receive a Young
Naturalist certifcate. The frst
program, offered Jan. 15, is
Winter Feast. Other dates and
topics include Water in Winter,
on Jan. 29; Art in Nature, on
Feb. 12; Caves, on Feb. 26;
and Signs of Spring, on March
12. Grades 1-2 attend from 9
to 11:30 a.m.; Grades 3-5 at-
tend from 12:30 to 3 p.m. The
cost is $22 per session ($17
per session for members of the
Foundation of the State Arbore-
tum). Parents may register and
pay in advance for four or more
programs for the same child, or
The news
To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 540-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 540-551-07
EMPLOYMENT
The Sherando
Times
Advertising Representative
The Sherando Times is cur-
rently searching for a top-notch
sales representative for Frederick
County.
The ideal candidate would be
organized and self-motivated.
Great people skills and a profes-
sional demeanor are key. This
individual should enjoy the free-
dom of setting his or her own
hours and meeting new people.
Previous advertising sales expe-
rience is a plus. The candidate
must be dependable, reliable and
be a self-starter. This is a com-
mission-based position.
If you are poised and ready to
take the next step in your sales
career, email:
angie@sherandotimes.com
—32—
Train Set
Q:
I have a Lionel Electronic
Train set 4110WS. It was
made in 1948, and I am wondering
what it might be worth. Although
the original boxes are fairly beat
up, the set is intact and everything
works. — Jim, Rochester, N.Y.
A:
One of the better references is
the Standard Catalogue of Lio-
nel Train Sets 1945-1969 by David
Doyle (Krause, $29.99). According
to Doyle, in mint condition, your set
is valued at $3,700, and in excellent,
$2,000. To a collector, it might be
worth even more. Condition and scar-
city are two factors that are extremely
important when it comes to any col-
lectible, whether it is a train sets or a
first-edition book.
***
Q:
During the 1980 Winter
Olympics at Lake Placid,
N.Y., I was part of the security
force assigned to the U.S. hockey
team. As the result of my relation-
ship with some of the players, I
was able to obtain the signatures
of team members and coach Herb
Brooks on a schematic picture. I
am missing signatures of two of the
players. I have two questions. Does
it have any value, and would it be
more valuable if I obtained the sig-
natures of the two that are missing?
— Al, East Pembroke, N.Y.
A:
Even though acquiring the
two missing signatures might
not add all that much to its value,
something complete is always worth
more than an item that is incomplete.
Craig R. Perlow is a dealer of Olym-
pic memorabilia and is a member of
the International Society of Olym-
pic Historians. He might be able to
advise you about your signed picture.
His address is P.O. Box 923311, Nor-
cross, GA 30010-3311. Check out his
Web site at www.olympianartifacts.
com.
***
Q:
I have an antique Victorian
tiger maple frame with glass,
and I would like to know its cur-
rent value. I paid $75 for it years
ago when I lived in Kansas City.
— Marie, Sun City West, Ariz.
A:
You should show your frame
to some of the antique dealers
in nearby Glendale, Ariz., to see what
they think it might be worth. Tiger
maple frames vary in value depend-
ing on design and condition.
Write to Larry Cox in care of King
Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box
536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or
send e-mail to questionsforcox@aol.
com. Due to the large volume of mail
he receives, Mr. Cox is unable to per-
sonally answer all reader questions.
Do not send any materials requiring
return mail.
© 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.
Bad Breath
DEAR PAW’S CORNER: My
dog has such terrible bad breath.
How can I improve this? — Beth in
Rhode Island
DEAR BETH: Take your dog to the
veterinarian to be checked out, espe-
cially if the bad breath just started
or just got worse in recent days or
weeks. Sometimes bad breath is just
a hygiene issue, but it also can signal
an underlying illness that might not
have any other symptoms.
If your dog is diagnosed with an ill-
ness, follow your vet’s instructions
on care. Give it prescribed medica-
tion if needed and feed any diet that’s
recommended.
Provided your dog checks out
health-wise, your vet may recom-
mend that it get a professional clean-
ing to remove plaque and improve
overall dental health. In between
cleanings, you should brush your
dog’s teeth regularly using a brush
and toothpaste specifically designed
for dogs. You can purchase these from
the vet or at any pet supply store.
Diet also may play a role in your
dog’s breath. Try different types of
dog food or add variety to its diet with
fresh foods and homemade treats a
few times a week. Keep in mind that
dogs can’t eat all the same foods that
we humans do — like chocolate and
onions, which are poison to them —
so look for dog recipe books at your
local bookstore or online for pet-safe
ingredients.
Finally, chewing is important to
a dog’s oral health. Make sure that
plenty of chew toys are available,
which strengthen the jaw and teeth
and also, in some cases, help to keep
teeth clean.
Send your pet questions and tips to
ask@pawscorner.com, or write to
Paw’s Corner, c/o King Features Week-
ly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,
FL 32853-6475. Find more pet advice
and resources at www.pawscorner.
com.
© 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.
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The Sherando Times
Alison Duvall
Advertising Sales
Cell: (540) 551-2072
alisond@sherandotimes.com
The Sherando Times
Angie Buterakos
Advertising Sales
Cell: (540) 683-9197
angie@sherandotimes.com
McCoy’ s Cookie Jars
540-683-9197
Page 1 • Te Sherando Times • January 19 – 5, 011 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
for two or more children for the
same program, and the cost
drops to $20 per session ($15
for FOSA members). To reg-
ister, call 540-837-1758 Ext. 0,
or download a registration form
from the Blandy web site, www.
virginia.edu/blandy. For pro-
gram details, call Steve Carroll
at 540-837-1758 Ext. 287
Newcomers club
being formed
A branch of the national orga-
nization of Newcomers Club is
forming in Winchester to wel-
come women new to the area.
There will be many fun activities
including coffees, crafts, hiking,
golf, book club, cards, dinners
with spouses, and trips to get
to know the area,(whatever
the women decide they’d like
to do) and chance to meet and
become involved with other in
the community.All interested
women are encourage to at-
tend a coffee on Oct. 20 at
10:30For directions or info call
or email: Susan at 540-247-
0712 sr28409@gmail.com or
Melanie at 540-722-8043 mel-
henry2@yahoo.com
Network for aging support
Meets the 3rd Monday of every
month at Westminster Can-
terbury in “The Abbey” on the
2nd foor. Social time 11:30am-
noon. Share ideas & topics
on senior issues 12-1 pm . All
business associated with se-
niors are invited. Contact: Lisa
Carper 540-722-7458.
Spay today
Local low-cost, non-proft spay
and neuter program for cats
and dogs in this area. Spay
Today works with local vets to
obtain lower prices for spaying
and neutering cats and dogs +
initial tests and shots at the time
of surgery. To fnd out more,
please call: 304-728-8330 or
go on-line at www.baacs.org.

Walk in faith nonproft
ongoing event
“To Walk In Faith, a grass root
nonproft formed to provide
homeless aid, support and
relief in Winchester and Fred-
erick Co area is currently con-
ducting an ongoing donation
drive of recyclable items includ-
ing: inkjet and/or laser printer
cartridges, cell phones, alu-
minum cans, copper wire
(stripped or unstripped) and
other recyclable metals. Pick-
up is available in immediate
Winchester and Frederick Co.
areas. Please contact us at:
towalkinfaith@hotmail.com or
(540)550-9146 leave voicemail
please
Become a certifed master
naturalist
The Shenandoah Chapter of
the Virginia Master Naturalist
program is inviting nature lov-
ers, from the Northern Shenan-
doah Valley, to take part in ten
weeks of classes, feld training
and volunteer work starting the
15th of March, 2011. The pur-
pose of the program is to de-
velop a corps of active, skilled
volunteers.The Virginia Master
naturalist program is sponsored
by the following Virginia State
agencies:
Department of Conserva-
tion and Recreation
Department of Forestry
Department of Game and
Inland Fisheries
Museum of Natural History
Cooperative Extension
Service
The Virginia Master Natural-
ist (VMN) program involves
over 10 weeks of classroom
and feldwork, initially, plus 40
hours of volunteer service and
8 hours of advanced training for
certifcation. Classroom ses-
sions generally last three hours
for each topic, and about half of
those classes involve hands-on
work in the feld. The classes,
offered over ten weeks, include
nature interpretation, research
skills, wildfowers, trees, in-
sects, fsh, mammals, birds,
geology, soil science, weather
and climate, general ecology,
land use, aquatic habitats, rep-
tiles and amphibians. The VMN
program is for anyone interest-
ed in natural history, age 18 and
up (or a high school student ac-
companied by a parent or adult
who also applies and partici-
pates). The Virginia Master Nat-





uralist program was launched
in April 2006. The Master Nat-
uralist program is now growing
strong in many states. It is pat-
terned loosely on the master
gardener programs that have
gained popularity nationwide.
Classes for the Shenandoah
chapter session of the Master
Naturalist program will begin
on March 15, 2011 and will be
held on Tuesday evenings from
6PM until 9PM and feld trips
are scheduled on Saturdays
from 9AM until 4PM. Cost of
the program is $125.00, which
covers costs of presenting the
material. The evening classes
will be held at the Blandy Ex-
perimental Farm and State Ar-
boretum of Virginia, on Route
50, just East of Route 340. A
few scholarships are avail-
able for qualifed applicants.
To apply for the classes or to
get more information, contact:
Tom Adkins at 540-869-8649 or
Dunloch@gmail.com Virginia
Master Naturalist programs are
open to all, regardless of race,
color, national origin, sex, re-
ligion, age, disability, political
beliefs, sexual orientation, or
marital or family status.
Tops weight loss meetings
Take off Pounds Sensibly
Wednesday’s at 5:30 PM
333 W Cork Street Confer-
ence
Room 2 Winchester, VA
Let’s start the New Year out
right! TOPS is an economical
weight loss club with a small
annual registration fee and a
monthly fee of only $6.00. For
more information call Michelle
at 869-9144 or visit TOPS.org
Weigh in weekly with us and
get the support you need in
2011 and lose that unwanted
weight.
CHURCH BRIEFS
Prayer shawl group meeting
Beauty for Ashes Prayer shawl
group of The Camp of Faith
Church meets the second Sat-
urday of each month at the
Martins coffee shop at 9 am.
Any and all knitters or crochet-
ers are welcome to join us.
Questions can be directed to
secretary@faithbap.org or by
calling 540.869.0497.
Art of marriage conference

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC! On
February 11-12, 2011 Shenan-
doah Valley Baptist Church
(Stephens City) will be hosting
the Art of Marriage Conference.
This is a new one and a half day
video event built on the same
biblically based content as the
FamilyLife Weekend to Re-
member marriage getaway. The
Art of Marriage brings together
some of the most respected
and infuential pastors and ex-
perts on marriage and family all
in one setting. It also brings a
fresh approach to a video event
by weaving together some of
the following elements to help
couples fully experience God’s
design for marriage: Engaging
stories, real-life testimonies,
man-on-the-street interviews
and humorous vignettes. For
more details, visit http://www.
svbcfamily.com.
Roast Beef & Ham Dinner
and Silent and Live Auction
Jan 22, 2011 4:00 pm
Grace United Methodist
Church,
Middletown
Silent auction 4-6 pm, Dinner at
5 pm, Live Auction at 6:30 pm.
Anne Legge, 869-1761
5th annual CRC chocolate
festival
Feb 12, 2011 11:00 am - 2:00 pm
Braddock Street United Meth-
odist Church/enter Braddock
Street doors Bake Sale. Choc-
olate Fountain fowing w/dipped
treats for sale. Cake Walks for
persons of all ages. Lunch fare
for sale. Silent Auction from
11a.m.-1:30p.m. Activities for
children. Bad Weather Day is
SUNDAY, Feb. 13th, 12 noon
- 3p.m. Megan C. Pugh 662-
4738
The news
To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 540-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 540-551-07
“Serving The Valley with High-tech
Dentistry and Old-fashioned Service”
www.thomasfamilydentistry.com
540-465-3980
33820 Old Valley Pike (Rt. 11) • Strasburg, VA 22657
All Phases of Dentistry Including:
• Cleanings And Exams • Invisalign
• Orthodontics • Extractions
• Partials And Dentures • Implants
Patient Friendly Payment
Plans Available
Thomas Family Dentistry, PC
Dr. Stephen J. Thomas DDS
Dr. Kenneth J. Thomas DDS
Come See Our
New Ofce
Beside Denny’s
Rt. 11 North, Strasburg
General Dentistry
See Our Website for
Monthly Promotions
NEW PATIENTS WELCOME!
HOURS:
Monday through Thursday
7am - 5pm
Weddings are our specialty!
Sweet sixteen, clubs, bars,
any type of private parties!
Any style music for any
occasion!
For bookings call
540-551-2447
DJ Donnie
DJ Donnie
DJ Donnie
DJ Donnie
January 19 – 5, 011 • Te Sherando Times • Page 13 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
Classifeds
For Sale? Yard
Sale? Wanted?
List them here for
FREE!
Send your ad to:
angie@sherandotimes.com

1987 Wedding Dress. Pro-
fessionally sealed. Long
Sleeve. White satin with elabo-
rate beading and lace. V-cut
back. Cathedral length train and
veil. Includes train carrier. Size
6 to 8. $500. Can email photos.
Call 571-405-8350
2007 Ford Focus SES Black, 50K,
PW/PL/PM, Sunroof, Leather in-
terior, 30 MPG. $12,000 OBO.
Call 540-877-1217
20 ton wood splitter $900, used
once.Rototiller $700.00, used
once.Call 869-2452
1902 Price & Teeple Fancy Ma-
hogany Upright Piano. Works,
but needs to be restored. $2500.
OBO.Day Call 540-868-1138
Golf Cart, battery operated,
cherry red, new paint, runs great!
$2700.00.Call 540-551-2128
2004 White Yamaha Golf Cart.
Battery operated, rear seat, full
lights, runs great, excellent con-
dition, garage kept since pur-
chased. Charger and cover in-
cluded. $2,800 OBO.
Call 540-667-2735
Guitar, black, 6-string acoustic,
wonderful Christmas gift, exc.
cond., $600, Guitar, Jackson, 6-
string electric, loaded, a “scream-
er”, $800, Keyboard, Yamaha
Motif 77, full midi, exc. cond.,
$3,000, Keyboard, Roland RD
700 (88), exc. cond., $2,800, Ro-
land Fantom Synthesizer, loaded,
$2,600, ‘92 Cadillac D’Elegant,
4-door, good engine, new tires,
good paint, gray, $3,500,
Call 540-869-3333
2008 Chrysler Town and Country.
Call 540-550-5380
Vending machine business for
sale. Asking $38,000. This is an
established route with excellent
clients. There are 9 locations and
a total of 16 machines.
Call 540-514-9858
King size Simmons frm pillowtop
mattress, low profle box springs, &
low profle frame. Excellent, prac-
tically new condition.$999/set. 7
Foot Air Hockey Table - New Can
E-Mail picture $250.00.
Call 540-723-0285
1999 Dodge 1500 Ram con-
version van. 7 passenger 4
captains seats/ rear bench.
Auto, V- 6. Nice Chrome
wheels. Green in color. 109,000
miles, very sharp & well main-
tained in good condition. New
inspection. In the Stephens City
area. $3350 OBO.
Call 540-327-0811
4 black metal swival bar stools
24” high, like new. $100 for the
set or $30 each.
Call 540-465-3898
War for the Unions by Allan Nev-
ins-brand new series of 4 books:
1861-1862 The Improvised War
1862-1863 War becomes Revo-
lution 1863-1864 The Organized
War1864-1865 The Organized
War to Victory$25.00 for all 4
books Call 540-539-7206
Pitbull Puppies part red nose and
blue nose. $50.00 540-336-4435
Handyman/repai r/remodel i ng
business assets for sale. 2002 14
foot freightliner/sprinter van fully
loaded with tools. Ready to run
business now. To much informa-
tion to list so if you are interested
please email me. $28,000 for all
or willing to split tools and van.
$22,000 for van and $6,000 for
tools. Call 703-930-343
1998 EIT Civil Review for the
Fundamentals of Engineering
Exam by Donald G. Newman,
Ph-d P.E. $25.00. 1998 Engineer-
ing in Training-License Review
by Donald G. Newman, Ph-d P.E.
$25. Call 540-539-7206
Sirius Audio Satellite Radio
Starmate 5 dock and play radio,
complete vehicle kit, also FM di-
rect adapter and cigarette lighter
adapter. Brand new in box $50.00
Call 540-539-7206
Peavey DJ system for sale. Load-
ed with 2600 watt amp, speak-
ers with stands, lights with foot
controls, mic, headphones, &
cables. Control panel enclosed
in hard case. Great system to get
started in your own DJ business.
In excellent condition. All you
need are your own music cds and
you can immediately start your
own business. Pictures avail-
able. $3000.00.(540) 535-7315.
Need someone to cut a few trees
from my property, You keep wood
for compensation.
Call 540-869-2163
“To Walk In Faith”, is conducting a
donation drive of aluminum cans,
copper wire and recyclable met-
als. Pickup is available in immedi-
ate Winchester and Frederick Co.
areas.Call 540-550-9146
FOR SALE
WANTED
To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 540-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 540-551-07
Page 14 • Te Sherando Times • January 19 – 5, 011 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
Diversions
To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 540-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 540-551-07
Tips to Ease
Winter’s Chill
Now that we’re halfway through
winter, how are the drafts in your
house? For all the winterizing we do in
the fall, it sometimes can take a good
blast of frigid air to see where the leaks
really are.
Use a stick of lighted incense to
check for leaks around windows and
doors.
Although you can’t caulk outside
while the temperatures are so low,
windows can be caulked on the inside.
Then install clear plastic insulating
film. If your sill is deep enough, two
layers 2 inches apart will give even
better coverage against drafts.
Invest in thick thermal drapes. Open
them on the sunny side of the house
during the day and close them once the
sun goes down. They’ll help keep out
heat in the summer, too.
Uncarpeted floors can be chilly,
especially if you have small children
who run around in bare feet or who
play on the floor. If you have wood,
laminate or ceramic floors, consider
getting a few inexpensive 5-by-8-foot
carpets from a big-box store. A dark
carpet that collects heat from the sun
all day will add warmth to the house
and also provide insulation. They can
be rolled up and put under a bed dur-
ing warm weather.
If you have an attic with insulation,
measure how much is there. Get a free
energy audit or take a sample to the
hardware store and get advice on how
much of what kind to put down. (If
you get the roll type, remember to ask
about whether the foil side goes up or
down, depending on what you already
have in place.) If you need the blown-
in kind of insulation, you’re better off
not doing it yourself. Get references
from whomever you decide to hire to
do the job.
Is cold air coming through your bed-
room walls? It’s possible, especially
on the north side of your house that
never gets the sun. One way to block
the cold is to hang a tapestry on the
wall behind the head of your bed.
Check unused electrical plugs on
exterior walls: Do you feel a cold draft
on windy days? Invest in those plastic
plug covers.
A final note: Change your air filter,
even if you did that in the fall.
David Uffington regrets that he can-
not personally answer reader ques-
tions, but will incorporate them into
his column whenever possible. Write
to him in care of King Features Weekly
Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,
FL 32853-6475, or send e-mail to
columnreply@gmail.com.
© 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.
—23—
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January 19 – 5, 011 • Te Sherando Times • Page 15 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
It was American astronomer, astrophysi-
cist and author Carl Sagan who made the
following sage observation: “The fact that
some geniuses were laughed at does not im-
ply that all who are laughed at are geniuses.
They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at
Fulton, they laughed at the Wright brothers.
But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.”
•••
If you’re like the average American
woman, you will eat 4 to 6 pounds of lip-
stick during your lifetime.
•••
You probably won’t be surprised to
learn that Alaska is the most northern and
western state in the Union, but would you
believe that it’s also the easternmost state?
Yep. Because the state crosses over into the
Eastern Hemisphere, it’s technically farther
east than Maine.
•••
In Alabama, lawmakers once thought
it necessary to pass a law forbidding the
operation of a vehicle while wearing a blind-
fold.
•••
Traffic is so bad in Tokyo that for most
trips shorter than 50 minutes, it’s faster to
ride a bicycle than it is to drive a car.
•••
You’re almost certainly familiar with the
grouping of stars known in the U.S. as the
Big Dipper, made up of the seven bright-
est stars in the constellation Ursa Major.
You might not know, though, that other
cultures call it by different names. In India,
for example, the stars are known as the
Seven Sages, and Mongolians call them the
Seven Gods. Many in Northern England
see a Butcher’s Cleaver rather than a dip-
per. Scandinavians think it looks like King
Charles’ Wagon, those in Finland call it the
Salmon Net, and the Dutch have named it
the Saucepan.
•••
A shrimp’s heart is located in its head.
•••
Thought for the Day: “If history repeats
itself, and the unexpected always happens,
how incapable must Man be of learning
from experience.” -- George Bernard Shaw
•••
(c) 011 King Features Synd., Inc.
Diversions
To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 540-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 540-551-07
ARIES (March 21 to April 19) The
week continues to encourage the
forming of new personal relation-
ships and the shoring up of those that
might be weakening. New contacts
also dominate the workaday world.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)
While the bold Bovine might want
to move quickly to deal with sudden
plan changes, it might be best to wait
until you can come up with some sol-
id facts behind the unexpected turn of
events.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) It’s
a good week to consider how you’ll
move on matters both personal and
professional. In either case, the more
you know about them, the more
likely it is that you’ll make the right
decisions.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22)
Although you might find more col-
leagues ready to support your plans,
some of them could ask for changes
you don’t approve of. Be ready to
defend your position if necessary.
LEO (July 23 to August 22) This is
a good time for Leos and Leonas to
think about opportunities that might
be outside your usual interests. You
could be surprised to find something
well worth your consideration.
VIRGO (August 23 to Septem-
ber 22) You can turn a troublesome
workplace issue to your advantage
by prompting that Virgo penchant
for preciseness to take over where all
else has failed. An old friend makes
contact.
LIBRA (September 23 to Octo-
ber 22) A friend’s unexpected work-
related news could be a wake-up call
to get you to reassess your position.
See if you need to make changes to
strengthen your position at this time.
SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem-
ber 21) You might want to review a
decision to work alone on a project.
You might see it as efficient and pru-
dent, but some might see it as unneces-
sary secretiveness, even for a Scorpio.
SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to
December 21) Don’t be put off by a
lukewarm response to a recent effort.
Perhaps you didn’t present a strong
enough argument. Rebuild your case
with more facts, and try again. Good
luck.
CAPRICORN (December 22 to
January 19) A surprise development
in the early part of the week could be
linked to an ongoing situation. Before
you decide to take further action, con-
sider calling for a group discussion.
AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru-
ary 18) Your sensitive side helps you
work through an emotionally difficult
situation with a minimum of bruised
feelings all around. A welcome
change bows in by the week’s end.
PISCES (February 19 to March 20)
While the week still favors new pur-
suits, some things from the past also
make a claim for your attention. The
weekend is open for good times with
some of the people closest to you.
BORN THIS WEEK: You have a
wonderful gift for seeing the best in
people.
© 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.
—21—
• On Feb. 6, 1820, the first organized
immigration of freed slaves from the
United States departs New York har-
bor on a journey to West Africa. The
immigration was largely the work of
the American Colonization Society.
However, the expedition also was par-
tially funded by the U.S. Congress,
which appropriated $100,000 to be
used in returning displaced Africans.
• On Feb. 5, 1878, Andre Citroen,
later referred to as the Henry Ford of
France for developing his country’s
first mass-produced automobiles, is
born in Paris. Citroen allowed poten-
tial customers to take his vehicles for a
test drive — then a new concept — and
also let people buy on credit.
• On Feb. 4, 1938, Walt Disney
releases “Snow White and the Seven
Dwarfs,” his first full-length animat-
ed color feature. Naysayers warned
Disney that audiences wouldn’t sit
through a feature-length cartoon fan-
tasy about dwarfs. In June 2008, the
American Film Institute chose it as the
No. 1 animated film of all time.
• On Feb. 3, 1959, rising American
rock stars Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens
and J.P. “The Big Bopper” Richard-
son are killed when their small plane
crashes in an Iowa cornfield. Singer
Don McLean memorialized the musi-
cians in the 1972 hit “American Pie,”
which refers to “the day the music
died.”
• On Feb. 1, 1974, Ted Bundy kills
his second victim, marking Bundy as
a serial killer. That summer Bundy
attacked at least seven young women
in Washington. He was caught in 1977
in Florida and eventually confessed to
36 murders. He was executed in 1989.
• On Feb. 2, 1980, details of
ABSCAM, an FBI operation to uncov-
er political corruption in the govern-
ment, are released to the public. Thir-
ty-one public officials were targeted
for investigation. In the operation,
FBI agents posed as representatives
of Abdul Enterprises, Ltd., a fictional
business owned by an Arab sheik.
• On Jan. 31, 1990, the Soviet
Union’s first McDonald’s fast-food
restaurant opens in Moscow. Throngs
of people line up to pay the equivalent
of several days’ wages for Big Macs,
shakes and french fries.
© 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.
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1. GEOGRAPHY: In what body of
water are the Seychelles Islands locat-
ed?
2. MOVIES: Who directed the mov-
ies “Stagecoach” and “The Grapes of
Wrath”?
3. CHEMISTRY: What element’s
symbol is C?
4. MUSIC: What rock ‘n’ roll band
included members Marty Balin and
Paul Kantner?
5. HISTORY: What Union general
captured Vicksburg, Miss., after a 40-
day siege?
6. SCIENCE FICTION: What fic-
tional character had a flying lab called
Sky Queen?
7. LITERATURE: Who wrote “Rid-
ers of the Purple Sage”?
8. MYTHOLOGY: Hera was the sis-
ter and the wife of which Greek god?
9. U.S. PRESIDENTS: What U.S.
president was born in West Branch,
Iowa?
10. INVENTIONS: When was the
ballpoint pen invented?
Answers
1. Indian Ocean
2. John Ford
3. Carbon
4. Jefferson Airplane
5. Ulysses S. Grant
6. Tom Swift
7. Zane Grey
8. Zeus
9. Herbert Hoover
10. 1938
© 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.
—12—
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1. Who gave up the last of Hank
Aaron’s 755 home runs?
2. Of George Brett and Pete Rose,
who hit the most triples during his
career?
3. N.C. State’s QB Russell Wilson
set an NCAA record in 2009 for most
passes without an interception (379).
Which ACC team finally picked him
off?
4. How many NBA Finals did Mag-
ic Johnson play in, and how many did
his teams win?
5. How many consecutive Stanley
Cup Finals have the Philadelphia
Flyers lost?
6. When was the last time there was
an all-South American men’s soccer
final in World Cup?
7. Against whom was Lennox
Lewis’ last heavyweight boxing title
fight?
Answers
1. California’s Dick Drago, on July
20, 1976.
2. Brett hit 137 triples; Rose, 135.
3. Wake Forest.
4. He was in nine NBA Finals, win-
ning five.
5. Six consecutive series.
6. It was 1950, when Uruguay
defeated Brazil.
7. Current WBC heavyweight box-
ing champion Vitali Klitschko, in
2003.
© 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.
1. Who sang “Seasons in the Sun”
in 1974? Bonus for knowing what the
song is about.
2. In the 1964 bossa nova hit “The
Girl from Ipanema,” what is she doing
that attracts so much attention? Bonus
for knowing where Ipanema is.
3. Name the artist who first sang
“Red Red Wine.”
4. Name the 1972 hit by Climax.
5. Name the Tommy Edwards hit
that had a melody written by a U.S.
vice president.
6. Who had hits 20 years apart with
“I Think We’re Alone Now,” in 1967
and 1987?
Answers
1. Terry Jacks. The singer is dying
and is saying goodbye to friends and
family. The song also was covered by
the Kingston Trio with different lyrics
in 1963.
2. She’s walking. That’s it, just walk-
ing. Ipanema is a neighborhood in Rio
de Janeiro, Brazil.
3. Neil Diamond, in 1968. He also
wrote the song. The more well-known
version was done reggae-style by
UB40 in 1983.
4. “Precious and Few.” The song hit
No. 3 on the charts.
5. “It’s All In the Game” in 1958.
The 1911 melody was composed by
Charles Dawes, who would be the
30th vice president. The song was
used in the movie “October Sky.”
6. Tommy James and the Shondells,
and then Tiffany.
© 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.
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—22—
• It was American cartoonist,
humorist and journalist Kin Hubbard
who made the following sage obser-
vation: “There’s no secret about suc-
cess. Did you ever know a successful
man who didn’t tell you about it?”
• Next time you’re in Iowa, you
might want to stop by the rural town
of Riverside, which touts itself as the
future birthplace of Captain James T.
Kirk. Yep, the future birthplace. It
seems that “Star Trek” creator Gene
Roddenberry asserted that the charac-
ter of James Tiberius Kirk was born in
Iowa, but he didn’t specify exactly
where. In 1985, the Riverside City
Council voted to declare their town
the future birthplace of the character,
later writing to Roddenberry and
receiving his approval. In honor of its
newfound claim to fame, the city
began hosting an annual Trek Fest,
complete with a Spockapalooza battle
of the bands.
• If you enjoy cooking, you might
have heard of some of the following
cookbooks: “Kill It and Grill It,” “The
Joy of Pickling,” “Full of Beans,”
“The Stinking Cookbook” and “I
Can’t Believe It’s Not Meat!” Then
again, maybe not.
• The term “bric-a-brac,” usually
used to refer to a collection of tawdry
trinkets, comes from the French,
where its original meaning was “at
random.”
• Most parents of small children
know that trampolines can be danger-
ous, and they are. Every year, nearly
100,000 people receive emergency-
room treatment for injuries sustained
while using trampolines. Those
injuries are hardly ever fatal, though.
Pools, on the other hand, are far more
deadly; more than 1,000 people in the
United States die in swimming pools
annually.
***
Thought for the Day: If living con-
ditions don’t stop improving in this
country, we’re going to run out of
humble beginnings for our great men.
—Russell P. Askue
© 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.
By Samantha Weaver
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NASCAR in Wonderland
Tis is the time of year
when everything is going to
be better. In part, this is be-
cause the NASCAR season
hasn’t started.
Te same driver who fretted
and commiserated over the
notion that Daytona Interna-
tional Speedway was going to
be repaved is now describing
that occurrence as the great-
est thing since the frst NAS-
CAR track (Darlington Race-
way) was paved in 1950.
“It’s so smooth. I think we
might race four-wide. On ev-
ery lap. Five wide on the last
lap. Guaranteed photo fn-
ish.”
Te same guy who said
brand loyalty was something
of an obsolete concept is now
exulting because changes in
design are going to “promote
brand loyalty again.”
Te same guy who once de-
clared that the Chase should
only be open to legitimate
contenders is now poised to
jump up and down and use
party favors while chanting,
“Te more the merrier! Te
more the merrier! ...”
Pep rallies come to mind,
and they actually might be
just as interesting, and more
festive, than the current press
conferences in which all the
drivers do their best Rob-
ert Gibbs and recite talking
points.
With six you get egg roll,
and with pep rallies, you get a
band, cheerleaders and pom-
pons. Guys such as I might
balk a little at having to clap
along with the fght songs,
but there would be enough
radio and TV networks to
throw together a decent card
section.
“Te weather outside is
frightful, but the fre is so de-
lightful.” It doesn’t just apply
to the weather. Te fre will
get even more delightful in a
couple weeks when NASCAR
media attend a tour (and de-
spite it being a “tour,” much of
it will be in the same place).
More than the season might
be brand-new. Tere could be
a new Chase, a new Nation-
wide format, a new fuel, a
new engine, new front ends
... NASCAR might even take
credit for the Panthers’ new
coach, the START Treaty and
a vital new breakthrough in
video gaming.
It’s a shame, really, that
Lawrence Welk died before
he could raise a baton in
NASCAR.
It’s what the of-season is:
“Wunnerful. Wunnerful.”
•••
Monte Dutton covers motor-
sports for Te Gaston (N.C.)
Gazette. E-mail Monte at nas-
carthisweek@yahoo.com.
(c) 011 King Features Synd., Inc.
—37—
Biffle Is Racing
as Hard as He Can
This hasn’t been the season Greg
Biffle expected, though he certainly
has time to pick up the pieces.
The 39-year-old Biffle didn’t win
during the 2008 regular season, but
after making the Chase, proceeded to
win its first two races. He wound up
third in the Sprint Cup standings.
For now, Biffle’s first priority is
making the Chase, but that doesn’t
mean he’s going to back off.
“We’re certainly not racing conserv-
atively,” he said. “We’re racing to win,
but we’re not going to do anything stu-
pid.
“We know we have to stay in (the top
12 in order to qualify for the Chase).
It’s tight ... and we’re doing all we can
do.”
Roush Fenway Racing put Biffle in
what was then still the Winston Cup
Series back in 2003. He finished sec-
ond in the Chase standings two years
later. A year ago, three Roush Fenway
drivers — Biffle, Carl Edwards and
Matt Kenseth — made the Chase.
They could do it again, but the posi-
tions of Biffle and Kenseth are hardly
secure as the regular season enters its
final four races.
“We’re just going to have to be bet-
ter,” said Biffle. “We know that. We’re
nervous about getting in (the Chase),
and anything can happen. ... There are
some races we’re concerned about
leading up to the cutoff (end of the reg-
ular season), and we know we’re on
the bubble, so it’s important to have
good finishes right now.”
Biffle, from Vancouver, Wash., is
one of only two drivers to have won
championships in both the Nation-
wide and Camping World Truck
series. (Johnny Benson is the other.)
Biffle also was rookie of the year in
both series. He came up through
NASCAR’s developmental system,
winning track championships early in
his career at Tri-City Raceway in West
Richland, Wash., and Portland (Ore.)
Speedway.
“Really, we’re working as hard as we
can every week to bring the best race
cars we can to the track,” said Biffle.
“It’s important that we have the best
possible equipment right now.
“We’re racing as hard as we can.
We’re not taking big risks, but, at the
same time, we’re racing for the win.”
Monte Dutton has covered motor-
sports for The Gaston (N.C.) Gazette
since 1993. He was named writer of
the year by the National Motorsports
Press Association in 2008. His
blog NASCAR This Week
(http://nascar.rbma.com) features all
of his reporting on racing, roots music
and life on the road. E-mail Monte at
nascar_thisweek@yahoo.com.
© 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.
Roush Fenway driver Greg Biffle says his first priority is making the Chase,
but that doesn’t mean he’s going to back off from trying to win races. (Photo:
Getty Images)
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The track at Daytona
I n t e r n a t i o n a l
Speedway is now as
smooth as a baby’s rear
end. Or so the story
goes with NASCAR’S
pre-season yay-sayers.
(John Clark/NASCAR
This Week photo)
Page 16 • Te Sherando Times • January 19 – 5, 011 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com