Government of Rajasthan

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION

“City Development Plan For Ajmer & Pushkar”
Submitted to PDCOR Limited

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar

Table of Contents
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ...................................................................................................vii SECTION I ...............................................................................................................................1 BACKGROUND TO THE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN...............................................2 Introduction..............................................................................................................................2 The Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission ...................................................4 The Planning Process...............................................................................................................7 Key Challenges in Preparing the City Development Plan .................................................11 SECTION II ...........................................................................................................................12 AJMER ...................................................................................................................................12 1 1.1 1.2 1.3 2 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 3 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 4 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 CITY PROFILE.........................................................................................................13 Introduction..................................................................................................................13 Demographic characteristics........................................................................................15 Economic Development...............................................................................................17 LAND USE AND SPATIAL GROWTH .................................................................20 Land Use ......................................................................................................................20 Housing ........................................................................................................................22 Development Objectives..............................................................................................23 Strategies......................................................................................................................23 Major initiatives / Projects ...........................................................................................23 Basis of Prioritisation...................................................................................................26 Project Summary..........................................................................................................26 ROADS AND TRANSPORT ....................................................................................27 Road Network ..............................................................................................................27 Transport System .........................................................................................................28 Development Objectives..............................................................................................29 Strategies......................................................................................................................29 Major initiatives / Projects ...........................................................................................29 Basis of Prioritisation...................................................................................................31 Project Summary..........................................................................................................31 WATER SUPPLY......................................................................................................35 History of Water Supply in Ajmer...............................................................................35 Existing Situation.........................................................................................................35 Development Objectives..............................................................................................40 Major strategies for addressing above problems .........................................................40

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City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar

4.5 4.6 4.7 5 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 6 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 7 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 8 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 9 9.1

Major initiatives / projects ...........................................................................................40 Basis of Prioritization ..................................................................................................42 Project Summary..........................................................................................................42 SEWERAGE AND SANITATION ..........................................................................44 Existing Situation.........................................................................................................44 Issues............................................................................................................................46 Future Projections ........................................................................................................46 Development Objectives..............................................................................................46 Strategies......................................................................................................................47 Major initiatives / projects ...........................................................................................47 Basis of Prioritization ..................................................................................................47 Project Summary..........................................................................................................47 DRAINAGE................................................................................................................49 Current Situation Analysis...........................................................................................49 Development Objectives..............................................................................................52 Strategy ........................................................................................................................52 Major initiatives / projects ...........................................................................................52 Basis of Prioritisation...................................................................................................52 Project Summary..........................................................................................................52 LAKE REJUVINATION ..........................................................................................54 Situation Analysis ........................................................................................................54 Developmental Objective.............................................................................................55 Strategies......................................................................................................................55 Major Initiative or Projects ..........................................................................................55 Basis of Prioritization ..................................................................................................55 Project Summary..........................................................................................................56 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT ..........................................................................57 Situation Analysis ........................................................................................................57 Development objectives...............................................................................................61 Major strategies for addressing above problem ...........................................................61 Major initiatives/ projects ............................................................................................61 Basis of prioritization for implementation of MSW in the city ...................................61 Project Summary..........................................................................................................62 TOURISM AND HERITAGE CONSERVATION ................................................63 Existing Situation.........................................................................................................63

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.............................................................................................................108 Land Use .......................................................................68 Project Summary..................................................................70 Existing Situation..........112 Existing Situation......................................................2 1..................................................................................................................................................................................104 Economic Development..............................................108 Strategies................................................4 10..................................6 9.................................2 9.............................................5 9................72 Major initiatives / Projects ...............3 2....................1 2............................................................................................................73 Ajmer Municipal Council .............68 Major initiatives / Projects .................72 Project Summary...............................................................................................................68 Basis of Prioritisation...................................2 CITY PROFILE..............3 Issues..........101 PUSHKAR .....................70 Issues............................7 10 10.........1 10...................................90 Capital Investment Plan ...................................................................................................................2 10..68 BASIC URBAN SERVICES FOR POOR ........City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 9......102 Climate...72 INSTITUTIONAL STRENGTHENING................................................................................................................................................................101 1 1........3 10..2 2.............................................................................................................................1 1..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................103 Demographic characteristics..................................................................................................................105 LAND USE AND SPATIAL GROWTH ......6 1................110 Major initiatives / Projects ...............................................................................................................................4 9.....................................................7 2 2..............................................73 Urban Improvement Trust.....................................................................5 11 11..................103 History of Pushkar .......................................................1 11........................................................................................................................................................68 Strategies............97 SECTION II .....................112 Developmental objective ...5 1....................................71 Development Objectives..............................................................1 3............................ Ajmer .........2 11........................3 9..........110 Basis of Prioritisation....................5 3 3............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................102 Regional setting .......3 1.....4 2.....................................................................................................................................................................4 1........................................102 Introduction.............102 Mythology associated with Pushkar ................111 WATER SUPPLY..................................................................111 Project Summary...........67 Development Objectives......................................................................................................113 iii ..............................

.......................................................................................117 Project summary ............................................................................2 6.............................................116 Basis of Prioritization .......................................5 3..........................................................4 6...........................City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 3......................................................119 LAKE REJUVENATION ...............5 4..1 5.............................................4 3..............................................113 Major initiatives/ Projects .............................................................................131 TOURISM .......................1 7............................120 Developmental Objective.......................................114 SEWERAGE AND SANITATION ................1 6.........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................113 Basis of Prioritization ..........................................................................................................131 Basis of prioritization for improvement of MSW.................................................3 4...............122 Basis of Prioritisation....................................4 7...............................118 Basis of Prioritization .............................................................6 5 5...6 4 4........................................................................................................................................................116 Existing Situation......3 5..............................114 Project summary .........................117 Drainage System......1 4.........................................................................5 6......125 Project Summary.....................................................120 Existing Situation.................................128 Development objective ......3 6.........131 Major initiatives/ projects .....................2 Strategy ...............3 3..........................................................................................................2 5......................................................................131 Project Summary.....118 Major initiatives/ projects ....133 Issues.......................5 7.........................................................................................2 7..........................................................................................................................................................................118 Strategy ....................................4 4.............................................................................................................118 Existing Situation................................................................................................................................116 Major initiatives/ projects .......................................................................133 Existing Situation........................................125 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT ...............................................................................................................121 Major strategies for addressing above problems: ................................................................................................................................116 Developmental objective ...........................................................137 iv ..........5 5.....................................118 Developmental objective ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................121 Major Initiative / Project.................6 8 8.....................................6 6 6.................................6 7 7.....................1 8........................................128 Existing Situation............................4 5................2 4...............118 Project summary .....116 Strategy ....................3 7.............................130 Strategy .....

...................................................................................................................................3 9........5 10 10........................142 Major initiatives / Projects ...........................................................................3 8............................................................................................................................................................................................4 8...City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 8.......................................................................6 8..................................................138 Basis of Prioritisation.........144 Organisation Structure .........................................143 INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENT .......................................................140 Issues..........................................................1 10............................................................................1 9......................................4 9..............................................2 9..................................................................142 Development Objectives..................140 v ................................137 Major initiatives / Projects ..............................138 Project Summary.......................................150 Table: Below Poverty Line Occupation Classification..................................................7 9 9...........137 Strategies...........2 Development Objectives.........................144 Financial Operating Plan........................................................................................................................................................138 BASIC URBAN SERVICES FOR POOR ......................................5 8.......................140 Existing Situation....142 Project Summary.....................

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar EXECUTIVE SUMMARY vi .

In order to access funds through the Mission. to be implemented over a period of 7 years with a financial outlay of around Rs 50. It thus provides the overall framework within which projects will be identified and put forward in a City Investment Plan. Transport. cities will need to prepare a City Development Plan (CDP) and develop Detailed Project Reports for projects for which assistance is sought. the Mission requires State Government and Cities seeking assistance to sign up to a set of reforms covering various areas of urban management and good governance. the Urban Improvement Trust (Ajmer).City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The City Development Plan under JNNURM The Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission is an ambitious programme of the Government of India to bring about improvement in the existing urban service levels and urban infrastructure in a financially sustainable manner. representatives from trade and commerce. The Project Development Corporation of Rajasthan (PDCOR) has been mandated with the task of preparing CDPs for the mission towns. Railways. The primary objective is to create economically productive.000 crores from the Government of India. a Preliminary Stakeholders workshop was held on 21 February 2006 in both Ajmer and Pushkar. The planning process therefore needs to be a consultative one. PWD. will be executed in 63 cities and towns across India. The CDP and will set a “vision” for the future development of the city. the city of Jaipur and the cities of Ajmer-Pushkar (jointly) have been selected as eligible cities which can seek assistance under the JNNRUM. In addition to one-on-one interactions. A second Stakeholders Workshop was held on ___ March 2006 in Ajmer. identification of priority sectors and projects. the draft CDP for Ajmer and Pushkar was presented to the stakeholders presented and consensus was sought on the projects identified in the CDP along with the prioritisation of these projects. In this workshop. vii . both institutional and individual. A draft “vision” was also finalised in these workshops. Tourism et al. NGOs. The CDP for Ajmer and Pushkar was then finalised on the basis of this feedback. efficient. A rapid city assessment was presented in each of these workshops and consensus was sought on the key issues facing each of these cities. Irrigation. In addition. with stakeholders representing a wide spectrum of interests taking part in the discussions and dialogue leading to the formulation of a vision and development objectives. This programme. slum inhabitants. 1 Refer to Section I: Background to the City Development Plan for details on the planning process followed. The Planning Process The ethos around which a City Development Plan is built is the notion of participatory planning so as to ensure buy-in of the plan from a cross-section of stakeholders. representatives of education institutes. equitable and responsive cities. The nodal agency for the JNNURM in Rajasthan is the Rajasthan Urban Infrastructure Finance and Development Corporation Limited (RUIFDCO). Exhaustive consultations were carried out with key stakeholders. prominent citizens of Ajmer and Pushkar. In Rajasthan. These stakeholders included key representatives (both elected and administrative) of Ajmer Municipal Council and Pushkar Municipal Board. line departments of the state government such as PHED. The Planning Process1 followed for preparing the CDP for Ajmer-Pushkar has remained faithful to this ethos. a set of objectives and goals which the city aims to achieve and identifies thrust areas in various sectors which need to be addressed on a priority basis in order to achieve the objectives and the vision.

Some of the core issues which emerged during interaction with stakeholders include provision of adequate and quality water supply to all the residents of both cities. traditional cultural events and by retaining the historical character and conserving the built and natural heritage” Issues have been generalized in this section. conservation of heritage monuments and improving the financial and technical capacity of both the municipal bodies2. emerging issues in the sector. The “Vision” for Development The Vision for Development for Ajmer as identified through stakeholder discussions is as follows: “Ajmer aspires to be an international destination for religious tourism and a centre for learning by leveraging the existing regional setting. religious and educational institutions and government establishments and by making the city efficient and livable for all.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Core Issues The City Development Plan is an assimilation of a number of “Sector Plans”. decongestion of the Dargah area and reducing traffic bottlenecks in Ajmer.” The Vision for Development for Pushkar. For details on issues in each sector for each of the cities. historical significance. The sectors covered in the CDP are: • Land Use and Spatial Growth • Roads and Transport • Water Supply • Sewerage and Sanitation • Drainage • Lake Rejuvenation • Solid Waste Management • Tourism and Heritage Conservation • Basic Urban Services for the Poor • Institutional Strengthening Each Sector Plan covers the current status in each sector. likely future demand. development objectives and strategies for improvement and identified projects to meet these objectives. also identified through stakeholder discussions is as follows: “Pushkar aspires to be a centre of religious and cultural tourism based on the history and mythology associated with the town. refer to the individual Sector Plans for Ajmer and Pushkar. 2 viii . improvement in solid waste management and augmenting the sewerage systems in both cities (both currently impacting the physical environment in a negative manner). rejuvenation of lakes in both cities.

Y 2009.23 0.52 0.04 Lining and Restructuring of 18.71 0.42 Km of Drains 0.71 0.50 0.91 3.43 Areas Construction of Public toilets near 0.72 1.29 11.85 15.23 0.88 Km of 7.Total 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 Desilting of 8.72 1.F.67 2.F.69 Sewers in Anasagar Zone Laying of Secondary Sewers in City 2.67 8.31 0.71 0.85 7.61 Dargah Area Construction of toilets at 0.F.91 3.72 1.55 Colonies Two STPs (50+ 8) MLD 9.10 0.91 3.29 2.00 2.10 0.49 1.53 Aforestation and Soil conservation measures Desiltation of Anasagar lake Equipment for Deweeding Construction of community toilets complexes Public Awareness and Training Lab for Water quality monitoring & biological research Creation of Lake conservation Authority 0.50 1.90 15.00 18.Y 2010.72 1.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Identified Projects for Ajmer Name of the Sector Projects Investments Required (Rs in Crores) F.68 3.31 0.49 0.50 0.Y 2008.49 3.52 1.Y 2006.15 0.29 2.29 2.49 0.90 0.Y 2012.00 9.91 19.F.00 Laying of Secondary and Tertiary 7.91 0.Y 2011.23 0.90 1.00 Zone Civil and Electro-Mechanical works of 0.71 3.91 3.35 6.23 0.23 0.90 7.50 0.68 3.00 Area Sewerage Network in Newly Developed 2.Y 2007.00 Vishramsthali’s Design & Supervision Consultancy Cost 0.30 Drainage Waste Water Lake Rejuvenation i .00 4.15 0.49 0.F.60 8.F.67 2.49 0.80 Drains Construction of New drains in New 3.35 1.20 SPS in Anasagar Zone Laying of Secondary Sewers in Dargah 2.71 0.72 1.23 0.29 2.00 1.

Y 2007.F.00 4.Y 2011.75 1.F.F.00 25.00 ii .30 5.00 35.00 0.00 30.65 2.00 70.00 4.00 100.00 25.00 0.Total 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 1.00 20. Spatial Development and Housing Roads and Transport 35.00 10.00 20.F. Traffic improvement of Dargah Area Decongestion of Railway Station Area Road widening and improvement of Taragarh road Widening and strengthening of internal roads Shifting of Pvt.00 25.00 25.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Name of the Sector Investments Required (Rs in Crores) F.00 2.Y 2006.00 5.00 2.00 20.00 25.14 2.Y 2012.00 1.50 20.00 20.75 10.00 15.00 2.00 25.00 2.00 2.F.00 4.F.00 2. Bus terminal from Daulat bagh to HBU Ext.00 20. Construction of ROB/RUB 2.00 Projects Land Use.00 4.00 4.00 20.00 5.Y 2008.00 20.65 0.00 5.00 150.30 0.14 1.00 5.27 Solid Waste Management Equipment for solid waste management Solid waste composting plant Laboratory for solid waste treatment plant Awareness Decentralising wholesale commercial activities Large scale housing development EWS Housing Traffic Improvement of Hathi Bhata Area Traffic Improvement of Railway Station Area Improvement of road geometry for Pushkar road.30 0.Y 2009.Y 2010.50 10.

00 10.44 68.00 3.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Name of the Sector Projects Tourism and Conservation Pre-paid counters at bus stands and railway station Establishment of tourist information centers Promotion of Ajmer as a tourist destination Development works in and around Dargah Sharif Construction of New Vishram sthali A Promenade around Anasagar near ACR Conservation of Heritage monuments Development of Arts and Crafts village Rope way from Dargah to Taragarh Sound and light show at Tara garh fort Investments Required (Rs in Crores) F.33 1.33 0.00 2.50 2.Total 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 0.00 8.F.00 5.Y 2006.00 2.00 116.68 65.33 1.19 141.50 2.Y 2010.00 703.F.99 10.63 99.00 2.Y 2009.00 5.Y 2008.00 2.00 8.05 0.25 1.F.05 0.00 1.Y 2007.41 99.F.Y 2011.00 10.25 10.50 20.00 3.00 3.F.63 113.Y 2012.F.00 Total (All Sectors) iii .

01 0.16 0.25 0.Y 2008.07 Implementation of Geographical 0.25 iv .01 0.15 4.18 0.64 0.30 0.64 0.88 Meters Establishing DMAs (4 DMAs) 2.18 0.16 0.64 1.10 0.16 0.69 0.10 Energy Efficiency Study 0.08 0.93 Distribution Network for water supply from Bisalpur Electro-Mechanical Works 0.60 Program for Water Supply System Extension of Water Supply to New Colony Areas Bulk Meters (3nos) Construction of CWR for Pushkar Mela (4ML) 0.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Identified Projects for Pushkar Sector Projects Investments Required (Rs in Crores) F.80 0.16 0.01 0.25 0.F.03 0.25 0.F.14 0.Y 2007.03 0.20 Establishing Customer Connection 0.25 0.03 0. CWR for Zone-1 0.03 0.37 &3 Rising main and extension of 0.18 0.Y 2012.Y 2009.01 0.30 0.03 0.10 Participation Programme Modernising Office Infrastructure 0.Y 2011.Y 2006.03 0.18 0.10 0.Total 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 0.F.69 1.25 0.F.15 2.01 0.18 0.27 Services Communication and Citizen 0.16 0.08 Implementation of Double Entry Accrual based Accounting Training and Institutional Strengthening 0.F.10 Construction of OHSR.29 Leak Detection Study and Rehabilitation 0.14 0.F.50 Institutional Strengthening Water Supply 0.Y 2010.50 Information System E-Governance System for Municipal 0.10 0.

training and lining of Kharkheri Feeder.50 0.47 2.Y 2010.75 0.11 0.67 v .7 MLD Laying of Sewer Network in IDSMT Colony and Parashar Colony and Uncovered area Desilting of Open Sewers Sewerage Network in New Areas Public toilet for Pushkar fair Channelization.67 0.10 1. Savitri and Kharkheri Investments Required (Rs in Crores) F.11 0.10 0.16 0.47 1.11 0.18 0.F.50 1.11 1.Total 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 0.90 0.Y 2009.04 0.18 0.18 0.10 0.10 0.00 0.10 0.19 0.72 0.F.11 0.90 0.Y 2011.23 0.18 5.03 0.18 1.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Sector Projects Waste Water Drainage STP 0.50 0.04 0.44 Construction of New drains in New Colonies Aforestation of Nag Pahar.50 0.18 1.40 0. Nand Narwar Lake Rejuvenation &Kanas Makrawali Soil conservation measures Desiltation of Lake Water treatment plant Laboratory Public awareness & Training Solid Waste Management Equipment for solid waste management Solid waste composting plant Laboratory for solid waste treatment plant Pedestrianisation of the heritage precinct Provision of parking spaces Conservation of the abandoned Ghats 1.10 0.11 0.Y 2007.50 0.50 0.75 0.F.04 0.75 0.25 0.04 0.F.Y 2008.16 0.F.23 0.20 2.Y 2012.25 0.23 1.05 1.18 0.23 1.03 0.Y 2006.00 1.25 0.36 2.20 0.93 0.F.04 0.25 0.50 2.11 1.67 0.72 0.10 0.40 0.20 Land Use and Conservation 1.

11 vi .25 2.40 6.00 0.Y 2006.Y 2010.Y 2009.F.00 1.00 1.50 4.Y 2008.93 0.33 2.00 0.25 2.00 0.Total 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 0.00 1.F.F.Y 2007.50 1.27 14.Y 2011.25 0.Y 2012.76 Total (For all Sectors) 13.F.50 41.47 0.F.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Sector Projects Tourism Establishment of tourist information centers Improvement of the approach roads to various religious and archeological sites Development of Mela Ground Development a new camping site Development of tourist circuits Development of arts and crafts village Construction of Heritage hotels.F.50 0.00 1.25 1.25 0. budget hotels and dharamshalas Development of Pushkar helipad Investments Required (Rs in Crores) F.

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar SECTION I BACKGROUND TO THE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 1 .

The emergence of the “urban space” as a vanguard of evolution and progress in socioeconomic development has largely been an organic process. which includes the Vision for the city. prosperity and social well-being in cities across the world. sectoral strategies for achieving these objectives and projects to be implemented for executing the strategies. as well as centres of culture. the proposed role of the JNNURM in assisting the development of city level infrastructure and basic services backed by a strong delivery mechanism. • Physical character – the physical spaces. • Cultural character – the artistic.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar BACKGROUND TO THE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN Introduction This City Development Plan has been prepared for the cities of Ajmer and Pushkar. • Institutional character – the urban governance mechanism. In addition. The “urban space” is typified through a complex and multi-dimensional interactions between various characteristics. composition and socio-economic make-up of the urban residents. Urbanisation as a Phenomenon It is widely acknowledged that the 21st Century will emerge as the era of urbanisation. In this introductory section (Section I). its implication on city level planning. innovation and knowledge management. • Historical character – the temporal changes experienced by the city. topography and climatic environment. Section II details the development plan for Ajmer. as part of the initiative of the Government of Rajasthan to access funds from the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM). details of the planning process undertaken during the preparation of the CDP and some of the challenges of preparing such a plan. infrastructure and built environment. a Capital Investment Plan has also been prepared for the 7 year time period of CDP. Section III details the development plan for Pushkar and follows a similar structure as Section II. goods and people. with rapid global economic integration driving forward growth. including: • Social and demographic character – size. Cities will emerge as important nodes in a network of flowing investments. the background and context to this City Development Plan has been established by providing a perspective on the phenomenon of urbanisation being faced by cities around the world. development objectives. intellectual and literary milieu. • Geographical character – largely driven by location. 2 . information. • Economic character – economic activities that enables sustenance and growth.

Table 1: The “Capitals” Framework Capital Intellectual and Social Capital Democratic Capital Focus People and Knowledge resource Transparency. participation and partnerships Values. published by PricewaterhouseCoopers 2006 3 . equitable and productive.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar A recent analytical framework3 (outlined in Table 1) captures the above characteristics and defines six types of “Capitals” which need to be managed and developed to ensure that urban growth is sustainable. The efficacy of this framework lies in the fact that it captures all the characteristics of an “urban space” as outlined above and also provides the platform for a more inclusive and integrated mode of urban planning. behaviours and public expressions Natural resources Man-made capital infrastructure Money and assets Cultural and Leisure capital Environmental Capital Technical capital Financial Focus Social & Demographic Character Intellectual & Social Capital Socio-economic Plan Land Management & Housing Plan Historical Character Democratic Capital Geographical Traffic & Transport Plan Water Supply Plan Economic Character Cultural & Leisure Capital Sewerage & Sanitation Plan Cultural Character Environmental Capital Drainage Plan Physical Character Technical Capital Institutional Character Financial Capital Lake Conservation Plan Solid Waste Management Plan Tourism & Heritage Conservation Plan Institutional Strengthening Plan Figure 1: The Planning Framework 3 “Cities of the Future – Global Competition. Local Leadership”. Figure 1 depicts this relationship and also highlights the inter-linkages with the “sectoral plans” considered in this City Development Plan.

Urbanisation in India Cities in India have not been immune from the rapid changes taking place globally. viz. duplication or gaps in mandates and responsibilities. infrastructure and physical environment. while having helped build a level of technical specialisation has also been the cause of some of the ills in urban management in India. Agencies engaged in planning and regulating the urban environment. especially in large cities. however. around a third of India’s population will be an urban resident.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Till recently. urban planning was primarily considered as planning for physical spaces in anticipated new human settlements. Regulation too was focussed on ensuring compliance with designated use of land and built environment. Multiplicity of urban agencies. competitive forces driving inward investment into cities and the need to create a socially. developing integrated multi-disciplinary strategies for achieving the “vision” and specific and identifying specific action plans and initiatives for implementing the identified strategies supported by a robust financial and capital investment plan. investments and operations. agencies that focussed on planning and infrastructure creation were typically different from agencies that operated and managed cities on a day-today basis (usually urban local bodies). will be executed in 63 cities and towns across India. incongruent investment and operational plans between different agencies. From an institutional perspective too in the Indian context. urban planning therefore acquires an even wider meaning to include – socio-economic development with focus on urban poverty alleviation.000 crores from the Government of India. financial sustainability of investments being made and participation of citizens and civil society in the process of governance and service delivery. The urban population has increased from 21% in 1975 to around 28% in 2003 and it is expected that by 2015. as encapsulated in a “vision”. In recent times. planning has evolved into developing a long-term perspective. urban local bodies are emerging as the focal point of city management and there is an increasing focus on making the these institutions the centre of all urban management plans. creating and managing infrastructure services and economic actors need to constantly recognise and adapt to the changing characteristics of the city. This programme. The Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission The Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission is an ambitious programme of the Government of India to bring about improvement in the existing urban service levels and urban infrastructure in a financially sustainable manner. In the era post the 74th Constitutional Amendment Act. to be implemented over a period of 7 years with a financial outlay of around Rs 50. Herein lies the genesis of the City Development Plan. Indian cities have been experiencing rapid change characterised by burgeoning population growth. urban planning has transformed into managing and building on the six types of “capitals” as identified in the framework above. efficient. 4 . equitable and responsive cities. The primary objective is to create economically productive. The key objective of such a plan was to guide public investments. In view of the mandate ordained in the 74th Constitutional Amendment Act. apart from the traditional areas of land-use. programmes and plans of various government agencies and also to identify opportunities for community and private sector participation. Therefore. and poor levels of accountability to one another and to the citizens. and therefore was primarily focussed on ‘land-use planning’. as outlined in the earlier section. pressure on urban services and infrastructure. economically and environmentally conducive living space.

However. these are as follows: 5 . renewal of inner city areas. cities will need to prepare a City Development Plan (CDP) and develop Detailed Project Reports for projects for which assistance is sought. Cities/Urban Agglomerations with 1 million plus but less that 4 million population as per 2001 census 3. urban transport. Cities/Urban Agglomerations with 4 million plus population as per 2001 census 2. preservation of water bodies and integrated development of slums. it is expected that urban local bodies and parastatal agencies will have achieved the following: • Modern and transparent budgeting. In brief. accounting. in order to access funds through the Mission. and accountability of urban local bodies/ parastatal agencies towards citizens.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Mission Statement: The aim is to encourage reforms and fast track planned development of identified cities. The Project Development Corporation of Rajasthan (PDCOR) has been mandated with the task of preparing CDPs for the mission towns. In addition. Focus is to be on efficiency in urban infrastructure and service delivery mechanisms. There are a 3 categories of cities selected for financial support under the JNNURM. with each city being founded on and thriving on their unique characteristics. In Rajasthan the city of Jaipur and the cities of Ajmer-Pushkar (jointly) have been selected as eligible cities which can seek assistance under the JNNRUM. solid waste management. The Mission. Selected Cities/Urban Agglomerations (these are state capitals and other cities and urban agglomerations of religious. will support projects in various sectors such as water supply. designed and adopted for all urban service and governance functions • City-wide framework for planning and governance will be established and become operational • All urban residents will be able to obtain access to a basic level of urban services • Financially self-sustaining agencies for urban governance and service delivery will be established. politically and geographically separate identities. Each category of cities has a specific financing pattern with variable grant funding from the Government of India and the respective State Government. financial management systems. there are a number of commonalities which can be seen to have driven the choice of Ajmer and Pushkar as a “single urban entity” under the JNNURM. through reforms to major revenue instruments • Local services and governance will be conducted in a manner that is transparent and accountable to citizens • E-governance applications will be introduced in core functions of urban local bodies/para-statal resulting in reduced cost and time of service delivery processes. On completion of the Mission period. Rationale for Selection of Ajmer and Pushkar as a “Single Urban Entity” under JNNURM Although the cities of Ajmer and Pushkar have historically. The nodal agency for the JNNURM in Rajasthan is the Rajasthan Urban Infrastructure Finance and Development Corporation Limited (RUIFDCO). community participation. The categories are as follows: 1. sewerage and sanitation. historic and tourist importance). the Mission requires State Government and Cities seeking assistance to sign up to a set of reforms covering various areas of urban management and good governance. comprising of 2 sub-missions – one each for Urban Infrastructure & Governance and Basic Services to Urban Poor.

City Development Plans under JNNURM The City Development Plan is an essential element of a State Government’s overall application for funds under the JNNURM. with the visible presence of ecological pressures on water bodies and green cover. Seen in this light. the City Development Plan differs from a traditional Master Plan which focuses on development trends based on land use and related controls. However. Prepared through a participatory process with various urban stakeholder groups. A visible imprint of this rich historical and religious significance of both cities is the presence of a large number of historical monuments and places of religious importance and the large number of tourists visiting both cities. the cities are being treated as a “single urban entity”. The CDP and will set a “vision” for the future development of the city. The genesis of Pushkar is interwoven with Hindu mythology and it forms one of the five places of pilgrimage held in high esteem by Hindus. Although CDPs are a mandatory requirement to access large investible funds from GoI. The tourist potential of both cities also leads to the need to explore the role of common tourism infrastructure wherever possible. Ajmer was founded in the early 7th Century by Ajaipal Chauhan and has witnessed a succession of rulers (including the Mughals and the Marathas). In addition to the above. who spent his last years in the city. each city also has its unique needs. Infrastructure Needs – both cities have mutual dependencies and similarities when it comes to basic infrastructure such as water supply. with the British finally taking over the city in 1818.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar • • • • Geographical Proximity – both cities are located in Ajmer District separated by a distance of around 12 km. CDPs provide cities the opportunity to achieve convergence of opinion and ideas across various infrastructure. Geophysical Similarities – both cities are located in a semi-arid region of the state bounded by hills in the Aravalli range. housing and environment protection. although for the purposes of the Mission. the investment needs of both the cities if considered as a single entity is likely to be more amenable to leveraging funds from multiple sources and managed and executed by a common institutional mechanism. identifying common initiatives wherever it has been deemed feasible. Historical and Religious Antecedents – both cities are old by any chronological standard and have a rich historical past. service delivery and institutional reforms agenda. Therefore. The importance of Ajmer as a religious centre came about with presence of Hazrat Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti. they should be seen by State Governments and ULBs as an initiative to usher in a new era of urban local self governance. a set of objectives and goals which the city aims to achieve and identifies thrust areas in various sectors which need to be addressed on a priority basis in order to achieve the objectives and the vision. This close geographical proximity has implications on developing common transport linkages as well as movement of sections of the population between the cities and common economic activities. sewerage and sanitation. this City Development Plan has been prepared keeping the requirements of each city in mind. It thus provides the overall framework within which projects will be identified and put forward in a City Investment Plan. Features of a City Development Plan A City Development Plan should have the following features: 6 .

highlighted in Figure 2. financing and implementation is ingrained Institutional reforms and capacity enhancement measures of urban local bodies and / or other civic agencies are integral to such plans The Planning Process The ethos around which a City Development Plan is built is the notion of participatory planning. their representatives and other stakeholders from civil society Poverty alleviation and needs of urban poor are important elements of such plan with commensurate allocation of resources The plans focus on resources available. 7 . such plans are based on past trends.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Prepared for a 5-10 year horizon. the following process. with stakeholders representing a wide spectrum of interests taking part in the discussions and dialogue leading to the formulation of a vision and development objectives. development objective and plan of action Private sector role in preparation of such plans. The planning process therefore needs to be a consultative one. objectives and targets from socio-economic needs and quality of life needs as articulated by their citizens. seek to balance needs and priorities with available resources Multiple stakeholder agencies are involved in such planning to ensure a shared and commonly owned vision. Keeping this in mind. identification of priority sectors and projects. existing strengths and limitations The planning horizon is set to be foreseeable and achievable The plans seek to integrate infrastructure requirements and environmental concerns together with land-use patterns and regulation of the same The plans derive the vision. has been followed in preparing the City Development Plan for Ajmer-Pushkar.

Preparation of Plans Task 7: Demand Analysis Demand analysis taking citizen . Convey requirements for data. PHED). empirical considerations . demographic & socio-economic & ULB financial and orgn. Strategy and Plans for all sectors into draft CDP Task 10: Workshop 2 . maps. ULB performance in poverty schemes Task 5: Rapid Assessment of Institutional Capacity ULB and UIT organisation structure and staffing and Municipal finances Consultations: Consultations with ULB councillors.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Task 1: Initial consultation Initial meeting with PDCOR. Task 4: Rapid Assessment of SocioEconomic Issues Rapid assessments of local economy. parastatal officials. Rapid review of relevant Acts. Urban Renewal etc Task 9B: Institutional Strengthening Plan . Consolidation of Vision. Task 6: Workshop 1 (Stakeholder Workshop) – A full day stakeholders workshop for Ajmer and Pushkar with a presentation on State of City and identified priority issues. priorities into account. Projection of ULB finances. ongoing portfolio of projects. key occupations primary health and education services (if relevant). ULB leadership and other key parastatal agencies (eg. capacity Task 9A: Project Identification Based on population norms. Development Objectives/Goals. income profile. For Infrastructure. Service Delivery. UIT. Assess infrastructure & service delivery gap Task 8: Supply Analysis Coordination mechanisms . Inception Report Field Level Situation Assessment Task 3: Rapid Assessment of: Infrastructure Land Use & Environment Rapid field assessments with ULB / PHED / UIT and other stakeholders.Prioritisation of Project Proposals and Consensus on draft CDP A full day workshop of all key stakeholders Task 11: Finalisation of the CDP Figure 2: The Planning Process 8 . unit costs. Task 2: Analysis of secondary data Analysis of secondary data. representatives of religious bodies etc. information. between all city level agencies. DLB. prominent local citizens. existing project reports. org. drawings. NGOs.

Discussions were held with PDCOR. regional and local government departments and civic officials. Task 2: Analysis of Secondary Data: This task was carried out in parallel with Task 1 and involved desk research and analysis of data provided by PDCOR.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Task 1: Initial Consultation: The first task following mobilisation. the municipal bodies in Ajmer and Pushkar. Elements of the vision for each of the cities were also discussed in the workshop. NGOs and representatives of various occupational categories5. Ajmer Urban Improvement Trust and RUIDP. citizens’ societies. the overall approach to preparing the CDP. This focus was on achieving institutional convergence through developing mechanisms for joint / coordinated 4 5 Refer to Annex for a full list of stakeholders consulted during the CDP preparation process Refer to Annex for a full list of stakeholders consulted during the CDP preparation process 6 Refer to Annex for a full list of stakeholders consulted during the CDP preparation process 9 . Land Use and Environment: This consisted of discussions and consultations with key officials from various government departments. Ajmer Improvement Trust. Ajmer Municipal Council. Task 3: Rapid Assessment of Infrastructure. Tourism. through group discussions. this task is an important first step in the whole consultative process. a field visit plan and counterpart responsibilities were discussed and finalised. During these preliminary discussions. This task was important as it provided an initial background and context to the socio-economic and historical development. examining institutional and financial issues and identification of key constraints. Task 6: Stakeholder Workshop (Workshop I): State of City and consensus on priority issues: A full day Stakeholder Workshop was held on 21st February 2006 at Pushkar and Ajmer to present the findings of the rapid assessment and also to obtain feedback from the stakeholders. geo-physical characteristics. data requirements and availability. identify key issues and critical infrastructure gaps and bottlenecks as well synthesize suggestions for improvement from the various stakeholders. list of key stakeholders in Ajmer and Pushkar. civil society organisations4 to understand the current situation. Task 7: Demand Analysis for Infrastructure and Basic Services: A demand analysis for infrastructure and service delivery requirements was carried out to ensure that the proposed initiatives and action plans as outlined in the CDP not only fills the critical gaps and bottlenecks but also caters to future demand given the growth in population and the urban sprawl. discussions were held with various economic stakeholders such as entrepreneurs. and points of citizen interface. Discussions were also held on the potential for revenue mobilisation and leveraging the municipal asset base. on the priority issues affecting the growth and development of the respective cities. Pushkar Municipal Board. Task 8: Supply Analysis: The purpose of this task was to focus on the financial and human resources capacities of the various urban agencies to develop and manage the infrastructure that is proposed to be created during the implementation of the CDP. various line departments of the state government including PHED. Task 5: Rapid Assessment of Institutional Capacity: Assessment comprised of discussions with municipal officials in Ajmer and Pushkar as well as officials of Ajmer Improvement Trust6. Task 4: Rapid Assessment of Socio-Economic Issues: Assessment comprised of primarily of field visits to identified slums to obtain feedback on socio-economic issues as well as infrastructure gaps. In addition. present status of infrastructure. as well as key emerging issues in both Ajmer and Pushkar. PWD.

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar working of multiple city level agencies. The plan also projects municipal finances. 10 . Task 9A: Project Formulation: Based on the demand analysis carried out and the issues identified earlier. This draft also included a phased Capital Investment Plan. and better asset management through public-private partnerships. introduction of e-Governance and GIS. Task 10: Workshop II . The final CDP was then submitted to the Government of Rajasthan. During this workshop organised for key stakeholders from Ajmer and Pushkar. the draft CDP was presented with the objective of obtaining consensus on project prioritisation. sharing responsibilities as well as achieving financial synergies. communication and citizen participation programmes and modernising office infrastructure. a draft CDP was compiled.Prioritisation of Project Proposals and Consensus on draft CDP: Following task 9B. the plan for strengthening the municipal bodies in Ajmer and Pushkar as well as the Ajmer Improvement Trust include measures to improve its organisational performance through capacity building. Task 11: Finalisation of the CDP: Feedback obtained from Workshop II was used in making alterations to the draft CDP. specific projects were conceptualised. Details of project plans have sought to articulate key project parameters such as: • Current situation / standards of service • Targeted situation / standards of service • Location and sizing of the project package • Estimated one-time capital investment requirements (based on unit-cost estimates normative costs) • Estimated time required for execution • Opportunities for direct collection of user charges from beneficiary group/ opportunity for public-private partnerships Task 9B: Institutional Strengthening Plan: Incorporated in the CDP. options for improvement in finances through resource mobilisation.

they currently have very limited experience and technical capacity in planning Limited mechanisms exist for multi-agency coordination in planning and execution of their mandates Higher levels of participation from citizens often raises expectations that local bodies / State agencies find themselves incapable of managing and fulfilling Priorities and needs of different stakeholders within a city may often contradict one another. Further capacity augmentation needs to be carried out through a focussed capacity building plan identified in the CDP Agencies need to develop closer working relationships and need to articulate a clear mechanism in the CDP Citizen expectations should be managed from the initial stages of the CDP preparation process through pro-active dialogue with various citizens forums The prioritisation process should be transparent and as objective as possible. while smaller investments can make existing assets useful. The CDP process should emphasize on developing a vision and creating a rationale for the initiatives and interventions through identified projects. Where possible.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Key Challenges in Preparing the City Development Plan There were significant challenges faced during the preparation of the City Development Plan. This can be achieved by including NGOs and representations from poor communities (such as CDS) in the planning process The prioritisation of identified projects should be such that the high priority projects are of a relatively short duration and visible in nature. meeting immediate gaps and priority needs. The following table highlights some these challenges (in a generalised form) and also lists measures undertaken/to be undertaken to mitigate these challenges in the future. tackle priority issues and be accomplished in shorter time frame In absence of high quality / reliable data. with a particular focus on the needs of the urban poor. Comprehensive quantitative data will form the basis of Detailed Project Reports to be taken up following the preparation of the CDP The Institutional Strengthening Plan which forms part of the CDP should clearly focus on building organisational and financial capacities of the urban local bodies which will ensure that they are in a position to implement the plan There is a tendency for prioritising resources for new / green-field projects. planning will need to rely on empirical evidence and best estimates Plans for building institutional capacities needs to be commensurate with needs and requirements of development objectives and targets set in the CDPs. This will be a useful guide for agencies involved in similar endeavours in future. Prioritisation is also impacted by a scenario of limited financial resources Infrastructure needs in a city will tend to crowd out need for financial resources leaving little attention to other socio-economic needs Mitigation Measure Involving key officials from the municipal bodies at all stages of the planning process will be the preliminary basis of building capacity. a clear prioritisation framework should be developed in consultation with various stakeholder groups A conscious effort needs to be made during the planning process to cover socio-economic issues. else they will remain unachieved 11 . Table 2: Challenges in Preparing a CDP Challenge Faced Although the municipal bodies need to be at the centre of a participatory planning process.

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar SECTION II AJMER 12 .

Ajmer is an important tourist destination from historic and pilgrimage aspect. Govt.Jodhpur. Ajmer is connected to the state capital Jaipur & other important cities of the region by rail & roads.1. Also traditionally Ajmer has been an important education centre in the region.0 MSL.2 Climate The city has moderate climate.40C during May. The rainfall in the region is very erratic. daily temperature ranging from 26.1. Mayo College (1875).1 CITY PROFILE Introduction The historic city of Ajmer is situated in the geographic centre of Rajasthan and lies about 135 kms South-west of Jaipur. This great Sufi saint’s Dargah is equally sacred for the followers of Islam. as well as Hinduism. 1. 13 . Madar hills & Taragarh hills at an average of 486. Anasagar forms the natural boundary in the north-west direction. The average rainfall is about 50cm and average humidity is 57%.60C to 22. The strategic position of this city has been the key to its long and rather turbulent history.4mm in 1975 leading to severe floods.90C to 39. It is surrounded by three hills of Aravalli Ranges i. next only to Mecca.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 1 1. Sophia School (1919). Nag hills. College are premium institutes in the city imparting knowledge since the last century. 1. the coldest month.50C during January.e. It is a transit point between important tourist destinations –Jaipur. Jaipur-Udaipur.1 Regional setting Ajmer is situated in the cradle of the Aravalli mountain range in the centre of Rajasthan. The Dargah of Khwaja Mouinuddin Chisti in Ajmer is one of the most sacred pilgrimage centres for the Muslim. and 7. The city recorded maximum rainfall of 1200.

In 1659 a battle was fought in Ajmer between the Mughal princes. military and railway establishments in Indo Sarsenic style redefined the spatial structure in the new expansion areas of the old city that served both native and European population. With the setting up of Urban Improvement Trust in Ajmer in 1962 new developments took place. certain state level functions had been located in Ajmer viz. Beginning of 20th century marked the development of planned residential colonies like Kesarganj. The advent of railways in 1870-85 marked a turning point in the history of growth and development of the city. Revenue Board etc. Aurangzeb and Dara Sukoh. at the foot of which the present city stands. in 7th century. In 1818. but only parts of the 4045-yard (3735-m) long wall remain. Ajmer was a Chauhan stronghold till 1194. He made Ajmer a full fledged province and the base for his operations in Rajputana. the Ranas of Mewar. colleges. During British rule. that Muhammad of Ghori invaded India. 14 . Ajmer was affected by the political chaos in Delhi and the Scindia rulers of Gwalior took over Ajmer. In the first half of the 18th century. Post independence. it became a bone of contention between the Sultans of Delhi. water supply and sanitation facilities. Secondary Education Board. the city became the military headquarters of the British government. Christianganj.the new colonial city and the indigenous city. Setting up of new institutions like schools (Mayo College and Sophia school). High influx of refugees from Pakistan after independence resulted in sharp population increase and haphazard growth of the city. finally the Marathas ceded Ajmer to Sir David Ochterlony and. during which Taragarh was greatly damaged. In 1960s the establishment of regional College. However. as part of the British empire. in 1194. the development activity slowed down as Jaipur. He fortified the city. hospitals. south of Anasagar. a neighbouring city became the state capital. law courts. the Rathores of Marwar and the Sultans of Gujarat. Gulab Bari.1. it remained under the care of successive superintendents. Ajmer derives its name from ‘Ajaya Meru’ the invincible hill. Subsequent growth took place around the old city. It was during the regime of Prithviraj Chauhan. Here he built India’s first hill fort Taragah. the situation became more complex with the involvement of the Marathas. Post independence. The inception of colonial era marked the birth of two distinct cities . Adarsh Nagar.1.3 History of Ajmer Ajmer was founded by Ajaipal Chauhan. After 1818 the city came under the British empire and subsequently Ajmer Municipal Council was established in 1869. with the reorganization of the princely states Ajmer became a part of Rajasthan. In 1755.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 1. Ajmer remained under the Sultanate till 1326.4 Growth of Ajmer Till the 18th century the town grew organically around the Dargah of Khwaja Mouinuddin Chisti. 1. Peace was restored with the accession of Akbar to the Mughal throne in 1556. Thereafter. which had wide roads. Medical College and Hindustan Machine Tools accelerated the growth of the city. The only remains of their times are the fort and the beautiful Anasagar lake built in 1150 by Anaji. public Service commission.

00 2. Vaishali NagarAnasagar Circular Road. retail bazaars. The colonial urban fabric departed substantially in morphological structure. In 1980-90 Jwala Prasad Nagar.5 Issues During the colonial era new colonies were planned. with no regulations to guide their development. Nagar colonies were planned. Maharana Pratap Nagar. B.B.4 lakhs (at the rate of 2% annual growth).2. from the native settlement around Dargah Sheriff which was distinct in community structure and morphology.1 Demographic characteristics Population Growth The present population of Ajmer is estimated at around 5.00 Municipal jurisdiction was increased to 0. Recent Growth trend is towards North and South along the major transport corridors (NH-8) along Jaipur and Beawar Road. In 1981 the Ajmer 1. 1.00 1981 and 1991 Census.2 1.00 include the nearby villages but in 1987 the 1941 1951 1961 1971 1981 1991 2001 2011 2021 Year municipal boundary was changed to the present area of 55 sq.00 Establishment of Regional college. the old city however continued to be ignored but for some rudimentary infrastructure inputs.47 lakhs in 1941 to 4.85 lakhs in 2001.00 resulted in 33% increase in population. 1990-2000 witnessed the growth of H.K. while non residential densities are swelling in the fast deteriorating fabric. Arjunlal Sethi Nagar and M. Shastri nagar Ext.U Nagar. Kaul Nagar. Chnadravardai Nagar. This population growth of the city could largely be attributed to: Population Growth Post independence high migration which 8..00 college and Hindustan Machine Tools in 5. As shown in the able below population of the city in the last six decades has grown more than three folds from 1.00 1960s accelerated city growth 4. 7. Bhagwan Ganj. Rail network across the city and the interspersed hills formed limitations for development resulting in a high density city core. Dhola Bhata residential project were developed.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar In 1970-80 Shastri Nagar.D. building typologies and architectural character.00 Change in municipal jurisdiction before 3. The development of the Colonial part of the town led to over crowding in the old city of functions like wholesale markets.km Population (lakh) 15 . Intense commercialization in the old city has continued unabated post independence. 1. warehousing and other services. Medical 6. The built fabric has undergone maximum misuse and transformation in the absence of building regulations.1.

5 17. 32. During Urs. the holy festival related to the Dargah. 29.2001 Density (Persons/sqkm) 140000 120000 100000 80000 60000 40000 20000 0 13 16 19 22 10 31 34 37 25 46 28 52 40 43 49 Ward No. 22. 17. The densely populated wards are – Ward no. 19.4 Issues 55 1 4 7 16 .2 20.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Table 1. 30. Decadal Growth 49375 34607 33051 111302 27107 82875 Growth Rate 33.3 42.6 14. the city has a high floating population (avg. 20. 16.2.25 lakh/month.14 21. In 1991 there were 45 wards in Ajmer. 1. with population density of over 50000 persons/sq. While the gross average density of the city is 5750 persons/sq. Besides this the residential schools like Mayo College and Sophia school and college also generate transit population into the city.2001 1.2. The Anasagar zone consisting of Anasagar area.6 107491 124543 22.km. however the wards were increased to 55 in 1995 and the population of 45 wards was redistributed into 55 wards.000. 1.3 Density Ajmer is a low density city with a very high density inner core.00 Source: Census of India .km. 1.2 Issues Apart the resident population. Vaishali Nagar and Chaurasiyawas have the lowest density of less than 2000 persons/sq. 15. The wardwise density is shown in the graph below. Wardwise Population density . i. 4000 tourists/day).2. daily tourist traffic is about 30. Being the district head quarter the numerous administrative functions result in regular floating population from the entire district.1: Population Growth of Ajmer Year 1941 1951 1961 1971 1981 1991* 2001 Projected 2006 2011 2021 Population (lakh) 147258 196633 231240 264291 375593 402700 485575 539321 593066 717609 Avg.e.1 7.km.

Others Total Source: Ajmer Master Plan 2001-2003 No. 1. Quasi Govt.2 6. of which 90% population constitutes main workers whereas the rest 10% fall under marginal workers category.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar The abnormally high density within the inner city has led to unhygienic living conditions and is a potential health hazard.1 Economic Development Economic Base The working population of Ajmer comprises 28% of the total population of the city. There are around 350 primary and secondary schools in Ajmer.5 Literacy Ajmer has a fairly high literacy rate of 83. Ajmer has traditionally been an important education centre with a number of schools and colleges. 1.3: Employment in the Government offices Office Central Govt.6%.2 29. Engineering College and Polytechnic.7% against the State average of 63.3. State Govt. transportation and education centre of the region. Medical College.2 11. The number of offices and the number of people employed are given in the following table: Table 1. Regional College.6 100 Ajmer being the district head quarter houses most of the state and central administrative offices and district level education institutions. of workers 9330 33384 28311 8246 14938 39648 133857 % 7.0 24. Local Govt. administrative. Table 1. With the presence of world famous Dargah of Sufi Saint in the city and close proximity to Pushkar (the religious town) tourism is also a major contributor to the city’s economy. For higher education there is Maharishi Dayanand University.2 Occupational Pattern Traditionally.3. 1.3 1.2.9 21. storage & Communication Others Total Source: Ajmer Master Plan 2001-2003 No. of Offices 45 167 59 5 61 337 Employees 30573 15902 5085 2047 1965 55572 17 .2: Occupational distribution (2001) Occupation category Primary sector Industry Trade & Commerce Construction Transport. The low density in the remaining part of the town has led to urban sprawl thus increasing the distribution network of the urban services. Ajmer has been an important commercial.

Local crafts such as bangles and silver jewelry also employ a large number of women. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Type of Industry Food Processing Bidi manufacturing Iron Works Wire. Bidi and gota manufacturing constitute a significant part of the informal household industry. No.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Central government is the largest employer – approx 10000 people are employed in Railway workshop. transport operators. Ajmer also acts as a wholesale commercial centre for the surrounding towns and villages.4: Details of Registered Industrial Units with the District Industry Centre (DIC) Sr. There are also a large number of poultry farms in and around Ajmer. of Units 14 14 24 9 18 7 4 19 5 5 9 3 4 6 4 2 7 6 4 1 165 Labour Force 364 2403 403 83 345 43 70 212 474 238 68 52 169 60 26 39 650 650 34 18 6401 Source: Ajmer Master Plan With presence of Dargah in the city and proximity to Pushkar. Ajmer is also a large market for metal scrap – thus resulting in a number of small scale industries such as foundries & iron works. retail trade. Table 1.hotels. There are 165 industrial units providing employment to around 6500 individuals. The moderate climate of Ajmer is conducive to poultry farming and it supply poultry products to the other cities in the state. 18 . News Print & News Papers Paper products Printing & Publications Sewing Machines Automobile Parts Furniture Works Cotton Waste & sizing works Gas Plant Total No. tourism is also a key economic driver. restaurants. one third of which is engaged in bidi manufacture. RIICO has developed two industrial estates (small scale industries) at Parbatpura and Makhupura. tour operators. Tourism related services provide employment to a considerable percentage of the population in the formal and informal sector . Railway workshop and HMT factory are the only major industrial centres in the city. Cable & Machines Scientific Equipment & Machine Parts Plastic Works & Utensils Cement products Stones & Mineral grinding works Refrigeration & Dairy Electronic Goods Chemicals & products Paan masala & Gutkha Press.

2006. religious and educational institutions and government establishments and by making the city efficient and liveable for All.” 7 As discussed in the Stakeholder Workshop held in Ajmer on 21 February. historical significance. 19 .City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar The Vision for the City7 is: “Ajmer aspires to be an international destination for religious tourism and a centre for learning by leveraging the existing regional setting.

6 6.8 133.3 2.1 100. which was further extended to 2001.3 3.2 53.4 9.8 % 44.0 2.1. 85% of the total urban area is developed so far.2 4.4 16.7 1.3 14.5 12.0 Ajmers’ urban development is typical of any old historic town in the country with a high density historic urban core and a vast low density urban sprawl.km) of which 11482 acres (45. the commercial activities are still concentrated in and around the inner city.3 0.0 11.444 acres (53.7 5.9 2. Table 2.km) 6000 564 586 140 1571 138 2483 510 656 796 13444 24.5 3. 2. Prominent occurrence of mixed land uses.km) is the developed area.6 4.3 0.1 12.1 1. The pattern of growth is a ring and radial pattern with a central nucleus.8 4.2 11.9 sq. Indian Railways is the largest land owner in the city.5 3.1 Land Use Existing Situation As per the existing land use plan the total urbanized area is 13.1 2. Subsequently a Revised Master Plan for the period 2001 to 2023 was prepared which was sanctioned in April 2005. Reserved Waterbodies Hilly area Total Source: Ajmer Master Plan 2001-2003 Land Use 2001 Area Acres (sq. The remaining 10% comprises of open spaces and water bodies.4 1.7 2.6 6. Of the total developed area the largest land is under residential use (45%) followed by transport (18%) and public and semi public (12%). 20 .0 Land Use 2023 Area Acres Sq. The high portion of land use under transport is because of national highway 8 passing through the city and the newly built NH-8 by pass.1 3.2 1.6 3.1: Land Use 2001 and 2023 Landuse Residential Commercial Industrial Govt. While the residential developments over the last few decades have been spreading outwards. in the inner city is a key feature.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 2 LAND USE AND SPATIAL GROWTH The spatial growth and sprawl of the city is guided by Master Plan prepared by the Town and Country Planning Organisation.8 sq.km 15423 1155 1044 355 4135 3078 3688 1233 574 902 1704 33291 61.0 2.7 4. The first Master Plan of the city for the period of 1971-1991 was notified in 1976. Public/Semi Public Recreation Transport Green area/Open spaces (including dairies and poultry farms) Govt.8 4.9 100.3 3.6 9.9 5.2 % 46.0 18. This Sanctioned Master Plan is the guiding plan for spatial development of Ajmer till 2023. 5% of the total area is government reserved land under CRPF and Defence force.9 2.6 4.7 1.

2003 21 .City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar LAND USE MAP – AJMER .

Presently there are two brick kilns operating in the reclaimed land in Anasagar besides residential colonies.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 2. These houses lack basic amenities.500 units.719 Housing stock available as per Census 2001 is 86576 units. 22 . Its is estimated that almost 25% of the houses within the inner city area are more than 100 years old.2 Issues The current supply of formal housing does not meet the entire incremental requirement of housing.1 Housing Existing Situation Urban Improvement Trust and Rajasthan Housing Board are the two agencies involved in planning various schemes and providing houses or plots for development. Most of the buildings in the inner city area are 3-4 storey high without proper access and poor or no ventilation at all. There is lack of hierarchy of commercial spaces. and the deficit as per 2001 population works out to be around 10.1.2 2.2. which require urgent renewal. 2. 2.2 Issues The natural topography and the rail network across the city posed limitations for development thus resulting in a high density city core. Recently some wholesale activity has been shifted to Beawar Road and other wholesale markets and warehouses have been proposed along Jaipur Road and Beawar Road as a measure to decongest the core. Both electricity and water supply within the inner city are frugal and the sewage lines remain chocked. UIT developed colonies by reclaiming northern part of Anasagar thus paving way for further development/encroachment upon the lake.3 Development Objectives To promote a spatial structure of the city that caters to the emerging economic activities and population growth by integrating land use and transport development that preserves natural assets and overcomes constraints imposed by railways.1. The land use map clearly shows acute shortage of recreation and sports facilities.5). In spite of large area under circulation (18. encroachment on the streets by the shopkeepers and unabated conversion of residential to commercial use. The total number of plots or houses provided by UIT are 18. Severe shortage of supply of formal housing has resulted in overcrowding in the inner city. This has led to 25% population living in slums. This deficit is expected to double by 2021. 2. the internal road network in the city is inadequate as most of the roads pass through railways property and are not being made available for public use. The growth in the city clearly shows lack of implementation of development controls.2. The most peculiar feature of Anasagar is that in the absence of water in the lake it is privately owned. Both whole sale and retail commercial activities exist within the city core. There is excessive mixed land use in the inner city. still wholesale trade continues to operate from the inner city. The existing land under recreation use is only 1% of the total area. This increases congestion in the city and also stresses the already strained infrastructure services. Lack of access to planned spaces for the urban poor has resulted in encroachment on hill slopes and water bodies. while the land submerged in water is under Municipal Council.

3 Development Objectives The objective of the housing sector is to accelerate the supply of formal housing so that the proportion of slums is reduced to 5%. 2. however.T. Water tap and toilet seat are built on the plot. Simultaneously basic services and land tenure will have to be extended to the slum dwellers to make them liveable habitations/ settlements.4 Strategies Given the topographical constraints the focus of planning and development control should be on city management and urban renewal with strict controls on new developments To discourage large scale commercial activities in the inner city and shifting the wholesale trade from the core to the periphery along the development corridors. At least 10% of land should be reserved in all major schemes of U. providing clear land titles so that land could be used as effective collateral for housing finance. Jaipur Road and Beawar road as a measure to decongest the core. 2. Such schemes have been successfully implemented under the World Bank assisted projects in Chennai (Arumbakam) and Mumbai (Charkop).) with pedestrian accesses and water and sewerage facilities are provided. i.e. Housing for EWS: In the short run. By ensuring water and sanitation the environmental hygiene is ensured.I. Permitting higher FSI for reconstruction or redevelopment of old buildings constructed prior to 1940 as an incentive for urban renewal. In this case smaller plots (25 to 30sq. 2.5 Major initiatives / Projects Short term Decentralising wholesale commercial activities towards Jaipur Road and Beawar Road – It is proposed to shift following whole sale activities from the city core and reuse the available land for parking: o Wholesale grain market o Fruit-vegetable market o Wood market and o Building material market New land development and Large scale Housing Projects – Considering the present shortage of housing supply it is proposed to develop new housing colonies at the rate of 1000 units/year. This need not be in the form of fully built houses but in the nature of sites and services.m. Encouraging development of medium density mid-rise buildings (both residential commercial and institutional) to restrict the urban sprawl. public agencies will have to play a role provider of housing for the EWS.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Most of the buildings outside the city core comprise of low density low rise buildings leading to urban sprawl thus increasing the distribution network of the urban services. for urban poor The increase in formal supply has to be achieved not necessarily by provision houses by public agencies. The plot allottee can then build the shelter and improve it as his income improves. adopting simplified rules for sub-division and layouts of land. However a scheme need not be 23 . but more by facilitating the market. allowing high FAR high density housing where adequate infrastructure exists or is planned. Extending infrastructure to new areas.

Even with increased supply of housing there would be 28000 slum households by 2011. this core transforms itself into an inner city. To the extent feasible community involvement may be secured in maintaining the facilities particularly community toilets. A five year programme of 3000 to 4000 serviced sites could be undertaken by the public agencies (UIT or Housing Board) at two or three locations. in time to come. The total area required would be about 25 ha. Unless renewal of inner cities takes place. Ravindra Prasad City growth is a dynamic and continuous process. Similarly public interventions will be required in providing basic services to the slums. which includes redevelopment. Due to rapid growth of industrialization and consequent urbanization.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar exclusively of such plots alone. it will throw the people to face a future of decline. This core can be a market place or it could be a historic core. Problems of inner cities are a pointer to lack of attention to them. plots at road junctions. On the contrary. Such plots could be sold at market price to be able to charge affordable prices to the poor. conservation and rehabilitation. street lights. “The overwhelming emphasis on small areas. become misfits. narrow streets with buildings devoid of proper light and ventilation are some of the common problems faced. There is lack of open spaces and circulation system is also haphazard. Provision of basic services like paved street. Granting security of land tenure to slums (individually or preferable to groups) will be a major intervention that would enable slum dwellers to access housing finance and improve their shelters over a period of time. solid waste management etc. Thus there is a need to revitalize these areas by the process of urban renewal. on the collector roads could be larger and for shops and high income groups. Dilapidated buildings. While the city expands and spreads to the suburbs adding to the intermediary and peripheral zones that are supported by faster means of communication. The usual process of city development begins from a “core” where people congregate to give the characteristics of urban form to an area. unsanitary conditions due to lack of proper infrastructure facilities. because of changing scales and functions and are unable to provide modern standards of living befitting healthy urban development. community (or individual) water supply. towns face multifarious physio-socio-economic and infrastructure problems. Turok and Shutt 24 . the inner city becomes more and more congested because of its centrality and has a tendency to slide back economically and physically because of overuse and obsolescent economic activities. economic decline and social disintegration. As the city grows. Inner city is a microcosm of deprivation. community toilets will have to be extended to these settlements. as in case of Ajmer. discrete projects and output related funding has left little room for broader considerations.D.” . Such inner cities. Long term Projects Renewal of Dargah area / City core “Urban development is a cyclic phenomenon depicting continuous decline and renewal in physical as well as socio-economic aspects of human settlements. There has been little or no attempt to devise a strategic view of what should happen to cities as a whole or to individual conurbations”.

Currently a significant portion of land is locked between the railway lines passing from Madar to Ajmer junction. These have been discussed in the following sections under roads and transport. Any delay in this regard would only aggravate the situation. economic and psychological needs of the people by involvement of participation of groups in the redevelopment process. 25 . defective circulation and traffic bottlenecks. Redevelopment approach would be designed to meet the social. The inner city of Ajmer is in urgent need of renewal. There are proposals of Developing Dorai station as an alternate station for the city. mixed land use.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Ajmer suffers from unbalanced development which has resulted in extreme congestion in the urban core. inadequate public amenities and utility services thereby deteriorating the healthy living environment in the core especially the area around The Dargah. This section has seven level crossings which are a major cause of congestion. Development of a new CBD Madar station is in the process of being developed as a junction for extending the railway line to Pushkar. An integrated and comprehensive approach for redevelopment. As a long term initiative it can be suggested to dismantle the rail network around Pal Beechala and develop the present land locked area into a High Rise. However as a short term measure it has been proposed to provide basic facilities such as water supply. sanitation and appropriate access to Dargah as a measure to prevent the decay process. conservation and rehabilitation is proposed to be adopted in Ajmer. water and sanitation. Currently Station road is the only access for north-south movement of traffic. High Density Modern Business District. over crowding. sluggish drainage and poor sanitation. The objective is to generate appropriate physical environment around the Dargah complex so as to highlight its historical and religious significance and improve the quality of life in the surrounding area.

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar

2.6

Basis of Prioritisation
To identify short term projects which can be implemented in the first few years. Priority to be given to projects which do not include land accusation as land accusation is not covered under the JNNURM. To identify projects which can be executed in public-private-partnership mode.

2.7 2.7.1

Project Summary
Decentralising commercial activities towards Jaipur Road and Beawar Road – wholesale commercial activities are proposed to be shifted to the new development corridors as a measure to decongest the core. Large scale Housing Projects – Public housing projects are proposed to be under taken by UIT, Rajasthan Housing Board with private sector participation for catering to the current deficit in housing Housing for EWS – Provision of housing for urban poor is proposed to be undertaken by the public sector to restrict growth of slums in the city.
Sr. No. 1 2 3 Estimated Cost (Rs. Cr) 70 150 20 240

2.7.2

2.7.3

Projects Decentralising wholesale commercial activities Large scale housing development EWS Housing Total

Sr. No. 1 2 3

Projects Decentralising wholesale commercial activities Large scale housing development EWS Housing

Year 1

Year 2

Implementation Period Year Year 4 Year5 3

Year6

Year7

26

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar

3
3.1 3.1.1

ROADS AND TRANSPORT
Road Network Existing Situation –Road Network
The city is well connected by road to other major cities in the state. NH-8 passes through the city connecting Jaipur in the north to Ahmedabad in the south. NH-89 connects Ajmer with Pushkar in the west and Kota in the east. Municipal Council, UIT and PWD are engaged in maintaining roads. UIT maintains the roads within the schemes developed by it, PWD maintains state highways and national highways and the Municipal Council maintains the internal city roads.

Ajmer city comprises of 455 km of roads of which 10% is cement concrete, 47% black topped, 11% WBM and the rest 32% constitutes earthen roads. The road network maintained by PWD in Ajmer is about 96.7 km of which 5% (4.6km) is intermediate lane width, 6% (5.7km) is 4-Lane divided carriageway and the remaining 89% (86.4km) is 2 lane.

Type Cement Concrete Bituminous top WBM Earthen (kutcha) roads Total

Length 46 214 50 145 455

%

10 47 11 32

100

Width of Roads maintained by PWD
5% 6%

2- lane intermediate 4-lane divided carriagew ay

89%

The roads in Ajmer are wide enough to cater to the present day traffic demand. Due to frequent interference of on-street parking, encroachment by informal sector, uncontrolled stoppage of intermediate public transport vehicles for long duration on the carriageway, insufficient facilities for pedestrians have aggravated the traffic problems in the city. The road network map is enclosed in Figure--. The road network map reveals that there is only one north-south corridor, which is carrying almost the entire city traffic between Gandhi Bhawan and Martindale Bridge. The Ajmer city by pass (NH-8 bypass) is effective in carrying the entire National highway commercial through traffic.

3.1.2

Issues
Absence of road hierarchy and traffic carrying corridors. Most of the internal city roads are single lane or intermediate lane. Due to improper planning, rapid urbanization and increase in vehicles have resulted in exceeding the carrying capacity on city road network Improper utilization of the available road network and insufficient enforcement measures has further deteriorated the situation. Encroachments on streets by shop owners and vendors further reduce the width of carriageway.

27

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar

Basic problem of traffic movement along major arterial road network is the absence of alternative road network. Presently there is only one north-south corridor, which is carrying almost the entire city traffic between Gandhi Bhawan and Martindale Bridge. Rail network acts as a constraint on free flow of traffic. A number of level crossings causing regular traffic congestion. Hindrance to pedestrian movement because of absence of foot paths Absence of adequate parking lots leading to On-Street parking Uncontrolled / congested junctions

3.2 3.2.1

Transport System Existing Situation –Transport System
Public Transport : RSRTC has a fleet of 222 buses with 873 arrivals and departures. RSRTC buses mainly serve long distance inter-city trips and medium distance shuttle services from the bus terminus near the Collectorate on Jaipur Road. There are 3 major routes and 2 minor routes on which the buses operate. The distribution of RSRTC buses from Ajmer terminal are: 34% towards Jaipur along NH-8 20% towards Jaipur along NH-8 18% towards Naseerabad along NH-89 28% towards Bikaner via Pushkar along NH-89 and other nearby areas. Private buses also make long distance inter-city trips from different locations in the city. Presently they operate from Ghooghra Ghati for Jaipur side and from Ramganj for Udaipur side. The long distance private buses do not have any authorized off-street terminals so they are seen to occupy carriageways at Ramganj causing problems to traffic movement. There is also another terminal for private buses near Baradari, for making trips to the nearby villages. Absence of public transport system in the city has led to operation of Intermediate Public Transport (private vehicles) which operate from different parts in the city. Intermediate Public transport consists of 150 mini buses 600 Tempos / mini doors 3500 auto rickshaws Mini buses and tempos operate on a fixed route and fixed fare basis for short distance trips within Ajmer, while auto rickshaws operate on free route pattern without any fixed rate. Mini buses and tempos do not have proper terminal facilities or amenities for passengers. The city also lacks designated stops for public transport operation.

3.2.2

Issues
Absence of public transport system in the city has resulted in improper operation of intermediate public transport vehicles causing traffic congestion. Heterogeneity of traffic – Animal carts are commonly used for carrying people and goods within the city. This obstructs the traffic flow and causes congestion on arterial roads. Ineffective traffic control and management measure – Most of the roads in the city are used for haphazard on-street parking.

28

5.5 3. This would ensure reduction of load on station road as well as on the railway station.3 3.5. 3.5.4 29 .1 Major initiatives / Projects Provision of another entry/exit to the railway station from Pal Beechala side. 3.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Lack of awareness among road users 3. The road leading to the proposed second entry on Pal Beechala side needs to be widened from 3.4 Strategies To provide alternate routes for decongesting the traffic on the major traffic corridors in the city.3 Development Objectives To design a transport system commensurate with the spatial structure of the city in order to provide improved access. safety and high mobility across the city.2 3. Decongest the traffic on Station road which is currently the only access for north-south traffic movement.0m to cater to future traffic requirement. This road would ensure reduction of traffic on Station Road as well as on the Railway station Junction Improvement Railway Station Gandhi Bhawan Agra Gate Collectorate Circle Mahavir Circle Widening and strengthening of various roads of various internal roads and arterial roads Dargah to Tripolia gate and from Adhai Din ka Jhonpara to Inderkot upto new road from Nagphani hill Ajmer Jaipur road from Agra gate to Jaipur Bypass junction Srinagar road from Martindal Bridge to Jaipur Road via Madar Ajmer Lohagal road from circuit house to Zanana Hospital Ram ganj Police station to Beawar Road Mayo Circular Road Agra gate to Martindal Bridge 3. This has been considered by Railways department and they are preparing the proposal for the same. It is necessary to decongest the station Road by an alternate road along Pal Beechla side.5.5m to 9. Ensure free flow of traffic through junction improvement and traffic control and management measures.

Regional college junction.5. Agra gate junction. Mahaveer circle.7 3.6 3. Agrasem Circle. Savitri School junction.10 Improvement of road geometry for Pushkar road. Narishala Road-Beawar road junction.5. Railways shall share 50% of the cost for construction of ROB.5. Pedestrian facilities in terms of providing footpaths free of encroachment. pedestrian phases at the signalised junctions.5. shall be provided.9 3. Makadwali road junction. Railway station Diggi Chowk Naya Bazar Kesar Ganj Dargah Area Channelisation and Signalling at major junctions – It would be necessary depending on the land availability to provide channelisation of the junctions wherever possible. which are highly vulnerable to accidents.8 3. India Motors junction. It is therefore necessary to provide better facilities for pedestrian movement in the areas where pedestrian movement is predominant. pedestrian zebra crossings at the junctions. Jwahar Rangmanch junction.5 Construction of New Roads at following locations Kutchery road to Srinagar Road via Pal Beechala Construction of ROB/RUB at various railway level crossing Topdara Jones ganj Lalphatak Old Octroi Road Gulab bari Subhash Nagar Road As per the directives of railway Board for level crossings with TVU> 1 lakh. Parking lots Kutchery Road. exclusive pelican signals at the mid blocks and at institutional areas etc.5. Pushkar road from Nag Pahar is an important traffic corridor. Pedestrian guard rails along foot paths in order to segregate them from the traffic on the road.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Agra Gate to Mahaveer Circle Government College to Diggi Chowk Madar Gate to Dargah via Nala Bazar Beawar Road to Nasirabad road via Narishala Pal Beechla Colony to Vijay Nagar and Dada bari 3. Considering the safety aspect it is proposed to improve the road geometry around the bends. Signallization would become necessary with or without channelisation for easy handling of traffic at the following junction: Bajrangarh Junction. Martindal Bridge junction. Street furniture and pedestrian facilities where pedestrian movement across the junction is high – Pedestrians are most vulnerable road users in cities. 30 .5. 3. It is a winding road with 30 bends.

Taragarh fort Built in the 7th century by Ajaipal Chauhan. Prithviraj Marg.5.14 Another railway station at Madar and at Dorai – The proposals suggested to relieve the congestion on Station Road and the railway station would not be sufficient to achieve desired results. 3.5.6 Basis of Prioritisation Minimum land acquisition Optimum utilisation of existing road network Diversion of through traffic Technical feasibility 3.15 Truck terminal near RIICO Industrial Area near Parbatpura – The RIICO industrial area and two major national highways NH-8 and NH-89 meet at Parbatpura.5.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 3. 3. 3. bus bays etc shall have to be provided. There is a need to gradually eliminate the IPT mode and replace them with the regular bus service to meet the city’s travel demand.13 Public transport system for Ajmer – Presently IPT system of the city is providing service to short and medium distance trips. is famous for its 7km long fort wall which today is in ruins. road between Agrasen circle and India Motor junction and Kutchery road. Minimum infrastructure such as terminal facilities. The trains passing through Ajmer may also be segregated for their stoppages at Madar and Dorai station. thus attracting huge amount of traffic. All the above mentioned roads have heavy commercial activities on both sides and residential areas behind the commercial establishments.11 Road widening and improvement of Taragarh road.1 Project Summary Traffic improvement of Hathi Bhata Area Hathi Bhata Area is bounded by four major road stretches namely.5. near Pushkar Road. These proposed ancilliary railway stations would ensure the reduction of congestion on Station road and also the load on railway station. 3.12 Shifting of private bus terminal from Daulata Bagh to HBU Ext.5.7 3. The available on-street parking on Kutchery road is inadequate The Hathi Bhata area needs immediate attention due to the magnitude of problems related to traffic movement. It would therefore become necessary to develop the existing railway stations at Madar and at Dorai so that north bound trains can be operated from Madar station and south bound trains from Dorai station. The present road network is unable to take the ever increasing load of traffic and parking demand due to improper use of the same. The new commercial complexes on Kutchery road without parking provisions further increase the parking demand.7. In order to improve the traffic circulation in thos busy 31 . a part of Jaipur road. With the expansion of the city and increase in its population. 3. In order to cope up with the growing demand of road traffic (truck movement) and truck parking. The available carriageway has been encroached upon by shopkeepers and road side vendors. The access road to the fort is a winding bridle path around 7 km long which needs improvement in order to promote it as a tourist attraction. Footpaths are not available for pedestrian movement and pedestrians are forced to walk on carriageway risking their lives. is also being used for on-street parking. it would be necessary to develop another truck terminal near RIICO industrial area close to Parbatpura junction. it becomes difficult for IPT alone to meet the demand.

This would ensure reduction of load on station road as well as on the railway station. Encroachment of foot path and carriageway by shopkeepers and vendors along with on-street parking leave very little space for traffic movement.4 Construction of ROB/RUB at Jones Ganj railway level crossing This section is an important connector between Beawar road and Naseerabad road. Five roads intersect at this junction. Kutchery Road from India Motors junction to Gandhi Bhawan junction. The clock tower junction is the most important junction. 3. C.7.7. Hence it is necessary to construct a grade separator at railway crossings for easing congestion. 3. Prithviraj Marg from Gandhi junction to Agra gate junction. a part of Jaipur road from Agra Gate junction to Agrasen circle and the road between Agrasen circle and India Motors.0m to cater to future traffic requirement. This has been considered by Railways department and they are preparing the proposal for the same. The area is characterised by unorganised movement of traffic to and from the railway station and Madar commercial area. The internal road between Madar and Station Road can be used for off street parking. Considerable amount of commercial vehicles and two wheeler traffic is observed on this stretch. Provision of another entry/exit to the railway station from Pal Beechala side. The proposed one-way system would perhaps increase the distance of travel for certain direction movements but in totality the benefits would be highly appreciated if successfully implemented.7. It is necessary to reduce the congestion along Station road with proper traffic management measurements as there is neither any scope for further widening of this road nor any alternative route available. Decongestion of Station Road A.5 32 . This proposal shall have to be implemented in conjunction with the proposed one-way Gandhi Bhawan junction-Agrasen circle-India Motors junction and Gandhi Bhawan. as it provides entrance to the railway station and to the Madar commercial area.3 3. The roads leading to Madar from clock tower junction has been proposed for one-way movement away from the junction. It is necessary to decongest the station Road by an alternate road along Pal Beechla side. Unorganised operation of intermediate transport vehicles has further deteriorated the situation. Decongest the traffic on Station road which is currently the only access for northsouth traffic movement. This road would ensure reduction of traffic on Station Road as well as on the Railway station 3. The introduction of one-way system would increase the capacity. This stretch crosses two railway lines. speed and quality of environment along with reduction of number of conflict points at all these major junctions. These proposals of movement restrictions would enhance the safety of the traffic along with increased flow from this busy area.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar area a one-way traffic circulation has been proposed on the circumferential roads viz.2 Traffic improvement of Railway Station Area Station road is the busiest section in the city.5m to 14. which is controlled by traffic signals. Traffic improvement of Dargah Area.7. There are four roads connected to station road from Madar commercial area. B. The road leading to the proposed second entry on Pal Beechala side needs to be widened from 3. Construction of ROB/RUB at Topdara railway level crossing is essential in order to reduce congestion on station road.

2km) Parking Ganj area (6355 sq. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Projects Traffic Improvement of Hathi Bhata Area Traffic Improvement of Railway Station Area Improvement of road geometry for Pushkar road.00 15. No. is famous for its 7km long fort wall which today is in ruins.00 0. Traffic improvement of Dargah Area Decongestion of Railway Station Area Road widening and improvement of Taragarh road Widening and strengthening of internal roads Shifting of Pvt. It is a winding road with 30 bends.75 1.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Road development Four laning of approach road from Ganj to Dargah via Delhi Gate (0. Cr) 2. Pushkar road from Nag Pahar is an important traffic corridor.00 2.00 30. Construction of ROB/RUB Year 1 Year 2 Year 6 Year 7 33 . Taragarh fort Built in the 7th century by Ajaipal Chauhan. Bus terminal from Daulat bagh to HBU Ext.00 155. Traffic improvement of Dargah Area Decongestion of Railway Station Area Road widening and improvement of Taragarh road Widening and strengthening of internal roads Shifting of Pvt.7. 3.km) Development of existing parking at Nagphani By pass road Development of existing vegetable market at Agra gate in to city parking mall. Construction of ROB/RUB Total Estimated Cost (Rs. The access road to the fort is a winding bridle path around 7 km long which needs improvement in order to promote it as a tourist attraction.00 20.7. Bus terminal from Daulat bagh to HBU Ext.75 Implementation Period Year Year Year 3 4 5 Sr.km) Nagphani area near Adhai Din ka Jhonpara (2000 sq.6 Improvement of road geometry for Pushkar road. which are highly vulnerable to accidents.0km) Four laning of Pushkar road to Adhai Din ka Jhonpara (3. No. 3.km) Veterinary Hospital (6800 sq.7 Sr.00 100.975km) Four laning of approach road from Madar to Dargah (Nallah Bazar) (1.00 5. Road widening and improvement of Taragarh road.km) Kotwali area (1632 sq. Considering the safety aspect it is porposed to improve the road geometry around the bends. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Projects Traffic Improvement of Hathi Bhata Area Traffic Improvement of Railway Station Area Improvement of road geometry for Pushkar road.

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 34 .

Charasiyawas village.50 m and live capacity of the reservoir is 893. Naseerabad. Makhupura and nearby localities. Bhopon ka bada.2 4. Kekri and Sarwar towns. Anted and Vaishali Nagar. and complementary provisions for supplying water to other areas including Beawer. Under RUIDP few areas were identified for provision of additional or new pumping and storage facilities.000 of the town. Kishangarh.1 WATER SUPPLY History of Water Supply in Ajmer Piped water supply in Ajmer started in 1884 from Anasagar reservoir to the then population of 50. Subsequently the water supply to the Ajmer city was augmented from ground water source near Banas river which is about 110 km away from the city.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 4 4. Apart from these developments of sources of water for Ajmer some measures were taken to improve the water supply to the city. Banas phase-I was taken during the year 1962-68 and subsequently second phase was taken up during the year 1978-83. In subsequent sections projects undertaken in RUIDP are discussed. 4.6 MLD water for supply from Foysagar. The Bisalpur-Water Supply Project (BWSP) phase-I was commisioned in year 1995 to deliver water from the existing Bisalpur dam to Ajmer city to address the city's scarcity of water. Ratidang. about 18 Km from Ajmer city. In year 2000 Rajasthan urban improvement and development program (RUIDP) with financial support from the Asian Development Bank has taken projects related to water supply in the town. 35 . Indira Colony. Foysagar road area. Nayaghar-Kalyanipura Gulab badi. The areas identified were as follows: Mershah Ali.1 Existing Situation Source Bisalpur Phase-1 Presently Ajmer is mostly dependent upon Bisalpur dam for its water supply which is 115 Km away from the city.91 m3. Topdara. The water supply scheme from Budha Pushkar and Leela Saori has now become abandoned. Shakti nagar. The height of the Foysagar was increased by 1.2. In 1982 wells were drilled at Budha Pushkar to supply water to the city and Pushkar too. Ghograh ghati. The total withdrawl from the dam is 139 MLD for six towns. A few tube wells were also drilled at Leela Saori during 1990 to 1995 to supply water to Ajmer as well as Pushkar town. Jaipur road. The full reservoir level of Bisalpur dam is 315. Growth in the population of the town made these two water supply sources insufficient therefore Bhewanta well field was developed on Sagarmati River in 1952.22 m to increase the carrying capacity of the lake. In 1892 Foysagar Lake was constructed to cater the increased population of the town. There is one tube-well which is used for water supply to the city from Foysagar Lake. hand pumps and water tankers. Presently the city is receiving 0. The newly developed areas were not supplied by pumping and storage reservoirs. The areas developed after Bisalpur phase-1 were meeting their demands through tapping of nearby passing rising mains.

A bulk meter is installed at SR-7. Presently it is conveying water at approximately 33 % of its designed capacity.2. There are two clear water reservoirs known as SR-7 at Makhupura. The designed capacity of the main is 48.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 4. One of which is abandoned due to high leakage losses. A major portion of 30″ MS dia.5 Km length was laid during Bisalpur phase (1993-95).40 MLD. Out of 132 MLD water produced at Kekri 85 MLD is allocated for Ajmer city. The CWR dedicated to Beawar town is of 22 ML capacity.1: Water Share of Six Towns from Bisalpur Water Supply Scheme-I Ajmer 85 MLD Beawer 16 MLD Kishangarh Nasirabad Town 14 MLD 12 MLD Total : 132 MLD Kekri Sarwar 5MLD & The treated water is then pumped from Kekri WTP by PS -11 to Goyla (PS -12) through 1200 mm dia PSCC pipe line of approx. 36 .1 Table 4.70 Km to treatment plant at Kekri (PS-11). The other is 25 ML capacity which was constructed during Bisalpur water supply scheme.86 Km length.5 Km was laid when Banas system was undertaken (1965 – 1968). The other pipeline 800/700 mm dia PSCC of 8. The water storage capacity at SR-7 is only 25 ML. it was constructed when Banas system was developed.2 Transmission System Raw water from intake well at Bisalpur dam is pumped through 1700 mm dia MS/PSCC pipeline of 5. gravity main is damaged due to its old age and non-corrosive covering which results in leakage. From Naseerabad pumping station (PS-13) water is pumped to SR-7 for Ajmer town. The air valves of the 30” transmission main are not in working condition.86 Km. At Kekri WTP 132 MLD of water is produced. Then water is pumped from PS-12 via PS-13 at Naseerabad to SR-7 clear water reservoir through 1200 mm dia PSCC pipeline of 37. Hence there is a proposal of construction of a new clear water reservoir near SR-7 of one day capacity.31. The first transmission main of diameter 762 mm (30”) MS pipe line of 8. which is insufficient in case of power failure. The pipe has served its design period. Beawar CWR for Beawar town and Kishangarh CWR for Kishangarh town. The other towns get treated water from Kekri as given below in Table 4. Operation and maintenance of conveyance of water from Bisalpur dam to SR-7 has been contracted out to a private contractor. Water from SR-7 is transmitted through gravity by two number of transmission mains to Alwar Gate Chauraha via Parbatpura Chauraha. Presently 25 ML CWR is being used for water supply to the Ajmer town.7 Km upto Thadoli and then through 1500 mm dia PSCC pipe line of 35. There is a raw water reservoir of 29 ML capacity at Thadoli. There is a clear water reservoir of 12 ML capacity at Kekri filter plant.

Whereas the water requirement for present population based on CPHEEEO norms at a rate of 150 lpcd is 81 MLD. 4.2. Which is less than the amount of water allocated for the city.00 0. Water Storage and Pumping System The city is divided into four administrative zones namely sub-division-I. These CWRs subsequently fill 18 OHSRs and 15 SRs to supply Ajmer City. Out of 9 Km 6.590 industrial connections in the city. 90%. Water is also supplied through 700 numbers of stand posts. Non-functional Airvalves of 30” MS pipe RUIDP : To improve the water supply to the city laying of 1000 mm dia PSCC pipeline of 9 Km from SR-7 to Alwar gate was been taken in ADB project under RUIDP. Vaishali Nagar and Bus-stand CWRs. The present water supply in the city is only for one to one and a half hour in 48 hours which is a very serious problem for the city. over head service reservoirs (OHSRs) or ground level service reservoirs (GLSRs). Water from these CWRs is further pumped into clear water reservoirs.2.1: CWRs in Ajmer City S. In these four zones there are total 14 numbers of CWRs are filled through gravity or pumping. subdivision-III and production sub-division for water supply. The prime reason behind inadequate supply is uneven distribution of water. Table 1.95 0. Kesar ganj. Approximately 2200 handpumps are operating in the city. The water supply network coverage in the city is approx. sub-division-II.649 ML.085 37 . There are 78500 number of domestic.3 Distribution System Water from SR-7 is transmitted to the Alwar gate CWR from where water is further transmitted to CWRs at Naka madar. Individual storage capacity of these CWRs and SRs is given in Table : 1.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar As per PHED estimates presently these two transmission mains are conveying only 68 MLD collectively to fulfill the demand of the city out of total 85 MLD water allocated from Bisalpur phase-1.227 0.1 and Table : 1. 81 commercial and 2. Filter plant.908 0. Daulat Bagh. The total water storage capacity of these service reservoirs is 31. CWR Sub-Division -I CWR CWR Subhash Nagar CWR HMTPH CWR CV Nagar CWR RHB CWR Taragarh Sub Total 1.05 4.No.48 Km has been laid till date. The per capita water available in Ajmer is 140 lpcd but citizens of Ajmer are not getting at the estimated rate.95 0.

71 0.27 0.27 1.603 0.1 0.50 0.816 1.76 1.00 0.302 1.45 0.28 0.363 0.12 9.83 0.52 0.91 0. 8 CWR Bus Stand CWR Ghoora Ghati Sub Total Sub-Division -III CWR Madar Naka Production Sub-Division CWR Filter Plant CWR Vaishali Nagar CWR BK Kaul Nagar CWR HBU Nagar Sub-total Total CWR Capacity 2.07 Sub-Division-I 1 SR (Hillock) Ajay Nagar 2 SR (Hillock) Bada Peer -I 3 SR (Hillock) Bada Peer -II 4 SR (Hillock) Pahad Ganj 5 Subhash Ganj 6 CV Nagar 7 AL Sethi Nagar 8 RHB Dorai 9 Tara Garh 10 Bankar Manda Sub-Total Sub-Division-II 11 Babugarh-I (Hillock) 12 Babugarh-II (Hillock) 13 Babugarh-III (Hillock) 14 Shastri Nagar Taramani (Hillock) 15 Kundan Nagar (Hillock) 16 Police LInes 17 Christian Ganj (Hillock) 18 Jatiya Hills (Hillock) 19 Ghoogra Ghati Sub-Total Sub-Division-III 20 Alwar Gate 21 Adarsh Nagar (Hillock) 22 Makhupura Industrial Area 23 Professor Colony 24 Naka Madar (Hillock) 25 MD Colony 26 JP Nagar Sub-Total Production Sub-Division 38 .03 0.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Sub-Division -II CWR PS No. Table: Service Reservoirs in Ajmer City Service Reservoir Capacity (ML) 3.45 2.545 0.362 0.76 0.70 3.3 10.573 0.464 1.71 0.57 0.50 0.803 11.30 2.816 2.061 S.No.67 0.136 0.39 1.00 2.16 0.91 6.

813 31. Keeping in view the large area catered by Babugarh Zone and having large elevation difference in various areas of the zone. RUIDP: To address the problems of storage and uncovered areas RUIDP has taken construction of ten service reservoirs. Following areas are identified in Ajmer city for expansion and strengthening of existing system: Faridabad Zone: In this area Faridabad colony.N. Stephen Chhatri Yojna Sub-Total Total SRs Capacity 1. In these areas water is not supplied at adequate pressure. The location.65 ML which is approx. Mumtaz colony. Babugarh GLSR is fed through 450 mm dia MS rising main from PS8 which presently has many leakage points.65 Hence total available storage capacity of service reservoirs is 31. Hence the water storage capacity of service reservoirs is sufficient for 11-12 hours.22 0. Inderkot Areas: Keeping in view the topography of the zone it is proposed to supply water to GLSR and BP tank of Inderkot area from PS8 through online booster pump near Babugarh GLSR. Jharneshwar road.68 0. part of Bhagwanganj is located at tail end as well as at higher altitude with respect to Paharganj GLSR which is supplying water in these areas.75 1.75 Status commissioned Civil structure completed Commissioned Commissioned Civil structure completed 39 .City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 Nagtani (Hillock) HBU Nagar Kotra Vaishali Nagar Panchsheel Nagar St.50 0. Replacement of existing pumps with higher capacity pumps is also proposed to fulfill the future demand also. it is proposed to isolate upper settlement areas from the lower area settlements and provision of additional storage and pumping facilities exclusively for the isolated zones.70 0. In order to resolve the problem of uneven water supply in these areas it is proposed to provide an OHSR and GLSR for Babugarh upper zone exclusively for Noor Colony.00 0.481 1.93 ML capacity are supplying water in Babugarh Zone. Babugarh is the biggest zone of the city and covers approximately 25% of the population of the city. It is proposed to supply water to this newly isolated zone through Subash Nagar pumping station in place of PS-9 which is presently supplying water to these areas. 47 % of the total available water. Replacement of this rising main has been included to reduce the non-revenue water and improvement of water supply in this area. It is advised to remove these areas from existing zone. their storage capacity and their status of completion is given in table: Table: List of Reservoirs taken under RUIDP S. The pipe has served its life.122 5.25 0. Babugarh Areas: Presently two GLSRs are of total 5.00 0. Ishar Colony etc.36 1. 1 2 3 4 5 Location/name Shakti nagar Kalyanipura Sraswati nagar Ratidang I Charasiyawas Capacity (ML) 1.

50 Work in progress Civil structure completed Work in progress Not taken up Not taken up Out of these ten reservoirs construction of two reservoirs namely Anted and Makhopura was not taken up due to the land was not allotted to the contractor within the stipulated time mentioned in contract.50 9. With the help of district metering areas it is planned to provide water at the tail end of the system with adequate pressure.75 1. At present Ajmer is getting water supply for one and a half hour in two days. Water is supplied to these vishramsthalis through pipeline during Urs. The present condition of the laboratory and its equipments in not known. Presently the available water allows to supply water at 140 lpcd whereas actual supply is much lower than this.50 0. In case of long power failure the city does not have adequate storage capacity to supply water. It is targeted to provide water supply at a rate of 40 lpcd during Urs to the pilgrims/ziyareen at various vishramsthalis. Vishramsthalis (rest house) are constructed for stay of these tourists in Ajmer.4 Major strategies for addressing above problems Improvement in water distribution system by controlling leakages. Hence 40 . 4. to carry out physical and chemical tests to monitor the water quality. Mainly the water is supplied from sub-division –II and a little supply from Production sub-division at filter plant. Water quality There is a water quality monitoring laboratory at filter plant. replacing water meters and establishing DMAs for uniform distribution of water.5 Major initiatives / projects Following projects are proposed to be undertaken to improve the water supply of the city: i) CWR of 75.3 Development Objectives It is proposed to increase the population coverage from 90% to 95%. Although there is no information on Non Revenue Water in Ajmer our experiences in other cities in India state that about 50-60% NRW is expected. 4.5 ML Capacity: Construction of a clear water reservoir is required because SR-7 is filled by pumping. For this a leak detection study is proposed and to carry out rehabilitation program of the water supply network based on the outcome of the study. Earlier the filter plant was used for treatment of water supplied from Pushkar to Ajmer.25 1. Water Supply for Urs Average inflow of pilgrims (ziyareen) during Urs is 1 lakh. As per PHED all the fourteen parameters are tested including bacteriological tests.50 0.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 6 7 8 9 10 Vaishali nagar Foy sagar Topdara Anted Makhupura Total 1. Water is also supplied through tankers. 4. It is targeted to supply water at the rate of 150 lpcd. the objective is to supply water at least for five to six hours in a day. The aim is to reduce the NRW upto 20-30%.

175 Km rising main from Babugarh Booster station to BP tank Laying of 1 Km pipe line to Prabhat Mohalla 0. it is proposed to replace these pumps with the higher capacities to cater the future population Bus stand Pumping Station (PS) Vaishali Nagar PS 41 .45Km rising main from proposed booster Pumping Station to Proposed Faridabad OHSR Laying of 1.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar a clear water reservoir of one day capacity (75. in which it is proposed to extend or lay the new distribution system: Babugarh : In Babugarh it is proposed to lay network of 4. Construction of OHSR/GLSR v) Due to the uneven and inadequate water supply in some area construction of over head service reservoirs (OHSRs) and ground level service reservoirs (GLSRs) is proposed for the following areas: OHSR for Babugarh zone of 0.5 Km ranging from 100 to 150 mm. ii) Laying and jointing of gravity main / rising main Laying of 0.1 Km rising main from Babugarh Booster station to BP tank Laying of 0. vii) Replacement of Old Pumpsets Pumps are found old which have served their life. Laying of rising main from PS9 to Prabhat Mohalla of 2 Km ranging from dia 80 mm to 150 mm) Virat Nagar: In Faridabad zone it is proposed to lay a water supply network of 2.75 ML GLSR for Inderkot Zone of 0. iv) Extension of distribution network There are few areas which are recently developed or were not covered under Bisalpur Phase 1.7ML Reservoir for Virat Nagar of 0.65ML OHSR for Faridabad Zone of 0.725Km Gravity main from BPT to Inderekot GLSR iii) Bulk Meter For metering of water and to reduce the unaccounted for flow water ten bulk meters are proposed to install at remaining reservoirs that are not covered under RUIDP.30 Km ranging from 80 mm to 200 mm dia.5ML vi) Civil & Electromechanical Works For the above proposed reservoirs pumping machinery would be required to pump water.5ML) is proposed near SR-7 to fulfill the demand of the city during long power failures. Faridabad Zone: In Faridabad zone it is proposed to lay a water supply network of 4. Electro mechanical works are proposed including pumping sets Faridabad Zone Virat Nagar Babugarh Area Inderkot.31 Km ranging from 80 mm to 150 mm.6 Km ranging from dia 80 mm to 350 mm.35ML BP Tank at Inderkot of 0.45Km Rising main from Dhola Bhatta to Virat nagar OHSR 0. Inderkot: In Inderkot it is proposed to lay a water supply network of 4.

4. pumps and distribution line at Kayad Vishramsthali (proposed) Construction of GLSR and Pump room at Pushkar Road Vishramsthalis x) Strengthening of Water Testing Laboratory at Filter Plant Keeping in view the requirement of regular water quality monitoring at user end it is proposed to strengthen the laboratory at filter plant to carry out bacteriological and physico-chemical tests.5 ML Capacity Estimated Cost (Rs) Cr 4. xiv) Extension of Water Supply to New Colony Areas Ajmer is rapidly growing towards Jaipur road and around Anasagar area.2 42 . xi) Establishing Customer Connections Meters To increase revenue it is proposed to establish customer connections meters. 4. it is proposed to take up the following : Construction of OHSR (1 ML Capacity) including rising main and distribution network for Ajmer Road Vishramsthali Laying of 4 Km pipeline for Transport Nagar Vishramsthali Construction of High level Reservoir including rising main. ix Improvement of water supply for Urs There is high influx of tourists during urs. To address the problem of different parts of the city collectively a proposal has been made to rectify the problems. The pipelines are leaking thus adding huge amount to non-revenue water. Approximately 40 DMAs are estimated to be prepared for Ajmer city. It is proposed to cover the future projected population. xii) Establishing DMAs (40 DMAs) To solve the problem of uneven distribution and metering it is proposed to prepare district metering areas.7 Project Summary Project Name CWR of 75.6 Basis of Prioritization Those projects are taken on priority which are low cost projects and resolve the present drawbacks of the system.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar HBU Nagar PS Subhash Nagar PS(2 nos) PS9 Naka Madar PS PS8 viii) Gross Improvement of Distribution pipeline In many areas of the city it is found that distribution system is quite old. Due to the absence of regular and adequate water supply to the vishramsthali’s where ziyareen stays. xiii) Leak Detection Study and Rehabilitation Program for Water Supply System To reduce the non-revenue water and improve service delivery it is proposed to carry out leak detection study and rehabilitate the water supply system as per the findings. xv) Energy Efficiency Study To optimize the efficiency of the electro-mechanical machinery it is being proposed to carry out the energy efficiency study.

00 3.24 Phasing & Implementation (by year) – in a bar chart Name of the Project CWR of 75.5 ML Capacity Laying and jointing of gravity main / rising main Bulk meters (10 nos) Extension of distribution network Construction of OHSR/GLSR Civil & Electromechanical Works Gross Improvement of Distribution pipeline Strengthening of Water Testing Laboratory at Filter Plant Establishing Customer Connections Meters Leak Detection Study and Rehabilitation Program for Water Supply System Extension of Water Supply to New Colony Areas Energy Efficiency Study 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 Institutional Mechanism for Implementation These project will be implemented by the PHED .City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Laying and jointing of gravity main / rising main Bulk meters (10 nos) Extension of distribution network Construction of OHSR/GLSR Civil & Electromechanical Works Replacement of Old Pumpsets Gross Improvement of Distribution pipeline Improvement of WS for Urs Strengthening of Water Testing Laboratory at Filter Plant Establishing Customer Connections Meters Establishing DMAs (40 DMAs) Leak Detection Study and Rehabilitation Program for Water Supply System Extension of Water Supply to New Colony Areas Energy Efficiency Study Design & Supervision Consultancy Cost Total 0.61 0.552 0.63 0.24 0.675 2. Government of Rajasthan 43 .33 94.3 40 10 15.5 7.5 5.7 1.85 1.15 0.

Khadim Mohalla. The sewerage network collects wastewater form Plaza Cinema. Dargah area which is the most densely populated part of the city had very poor sanitation condition. Khazana Gali Areas.1: Sewerage Works undertaken in Dargah area Sl. Ghee mandi station road and finally discharge into drain opposite to nursing home. In view of the high density of the area. Sanitation practices in the rest of the city (other than Dargah area) are discussed below: The waste water from kitchens & bathrooms is discharged into open drains / nalli which ultimately join storm water drains. Nalla Bazar. PHED took over the work and completed by year 1999 as given in the Table 5. Bhaudana Gali. The sewage collected from these areas is conveyed through sewer lines ranging from 150 mm to 800 mm dia pipes via Nalla bazaar. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Particulars Area of Nala Bazar Khari Quaie to Railway station area From Panigram chowk upto Moinia Islamia Madar Gate to Saint Francis Hospital Intercepting work 800 mm dia. These storm water drains finally ends into Anasagar lake and Escape channel and thus polluting the water bodies like Anasagar.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 5 5. line in front of Saint Francis Hospital Intercepting Chamber/ Line work both side of Nala Bazar Area Length (m) 2526 1070 1150 990 3011 154 450 Manhole (nos) 186 69 68 44 645 6 93 Under this project total 9.35 km of sewer network was laid and commissioned in year 1998. The sewage flows into escape channel and is finally discharged into Khanpura lake. Due to the continuous discharge of wastewater into the Anasagar Lake the water quality has deteriorated. Diggi Chowk. The network was designed to carry 4000 house connections out of which only 462 connections had been taken till october 2004. Pal Beechla Lake and Khanpura Lake.1 Table 5. 44 . laying of sewerage network in the area was sanctioned in year 1995. Dargah Sharif. Finally the drain discharges into Anasagar escape channel and ends up into Khanpura lake.1 SEWERAGE AND SANITATION Existing Situation Ajmer had no underground sewerage system in the past. The untreated sewage is then used for irrigation purpose that has serious health hazards. Presently the sewage remains untreated due to absence of any treatment plant in the city. Chapachan Gali. Sali Langar Khan.

The collected raw sewage is discharged into Khanpura tank. HBU Nagar. Sewage Treatment Plant There is no treatment facility in the town.40 MLD. one near Anasagar for Anasagar zone and other near Khanpura tank for City zone. The other method prevalent in the city is septic tanks with and without soak pits. Jaipur Road. Mayo College.3 Table 5. The deterioration of water quality of Anasagar Lake is a serious problem for the city Total strength of domestic and foreign tourists in Ajmer during 2005 was 1. The peak time of influx of tourists in Ajmer is urs of Khwaja Moin-uddin Chishti. The area covered under each zone is given in Table 5. Lohagal Road. Due to large number of visitors open defecation become a practice and creating nuisance around the vishramsthalis. Bhajan Ganj. Naka Madar.. 099. Nari Shala Road etc. Construction of two sewage treatment plants (STP) was taken under Rajasthan Urban Improvement and Development Program (RUIDP). Raja ganj etc. The designed capacity of STP near Anasagar zone is 8 MLD and 40MLD for City Zone. Adarsh Nagar. The designs for the 45 . 531. Pushkar Road etc. Foy Sagar Road. Hence the treated waste wastewater from these septic tanks is directly discharged to open drains passing through the streets which ultimately find its way into storm water drains and finally discharged into Anasagar lake and Pal Bichola lake through open drains. Link Road etc. Subash Nagar. The status of works executed under RUIDP is discussed in subsequent sections. Based on the topography of the city the sewerage system is divided into two zones: • Anasagar Zone • City Zone City Zone is further divided into four zones. Mayo Link Road etc. RUIDP Laying of sewerage network and construction of decentralized treatment facility for the city was proposed under RUIDP..2 Sewerage Zones of Ajmer City Zone Anna Sagar Zone City Zone -1 City Zone -2 City Zone -3 City Zone -4 Area Covered Vaishali. Shastri Nagar. Wastewater Generation: The total wastewater generation from the city is 54. Kesar ganj. Regional College. During Urs these sanitation facilities are insufficient. Only four public toilets have being constructed near vishramsthalis. Which is further reused for irrigation purpose. But due to contractual reasons the STPs were not constructed. Kundan Nagar. A major percentage of these pilgrims (ziyareen) stay in vishramsthalis. Generally the newly developed areas have septic tanks but without soak-pits.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar The wastewater from toilets is discharged into open drains which creates unsanitary conditions. Baewar Road. Ajai Ngr. The two STPs were meant to cater the two sewerage zones. Christian Ganj.

93.83 50. 100 4. 74.00 50.15 44.90.3 Future Projections As discussed above the city is divided into two zones based on topography of the city.3: STP Capacity 2001 Wastewater generation (MLD) Population 2006 Wastewater generation (MLD) Population STP Capacity Required (MLD) 2011 Wastewater generation (MLD) 8. 09 6. polythene etc Silted sewers Unhygienic Conditions near Vishram sthalis during Urs due to lack of adequate Sanitation facility for Jaireen Health hazards due to use of raw sewage for irrigation 5.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar STP were based on Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) technique which has higher capital cost but lower operation and maintenance cost. 31.00 Anasagar Zone City zone Total 59.59 71. 5.58 62. 39. 016 4. 5. 066 The wastewater generation for the year 2011 has been calculated on the basis of water supply at the rate of 150 lpcd in the town. Provision of decentralized treatment facility for the new upcoming areas.4: Table 5.00 45. 288 5. 138 6.33 56. Beside this the objective is to cover those areas which were not covered under RUIDP and future projected population. 033 4. The Anasagar zone is highly dense and the receiving body for wastewater is Anasagar Lake. 97 65.00 58.552 5.514 5. Future population projections for Anasagar zone and city zone have been made for year 2011 and STP capacity requirement for present population and 2011 is given in Table 1.766 49.00 71.2 Issues Following are the identified issues in the sewerage system: System coverage is very low Existing system is not utilized to its designed capacity Interconnections between sewer lines and natural drains leads to: – Indiscriminate flow of untreated waste into lakes – Water quality deterioration of Anna Sagar – Flooding during rainy season – Chocking of sewers due to garbage i. Hence for the calculation of STP capacity required for Anasagar zone the coverage of sewerage collection system is assumed to be 95% population.4 Development Objectives The main objective is to put of use the sewerage system laid under RUIDP by constructing sewage treatment plants which are left in RUIDP due to contractual issues. 21.e. Whereas the STP capacity required to cater City Zone has been arrived with a coverage of 80% population. 17 Population STP Capacity Required (MLD) 8.00 39. 321 6. 46 .

5.7 Basis of Prioritization The projects have been prioritized based on the need of the project. iv) Laying of Secondary Sewers in Dargah Area Streets and lanes are very narrow in the Dargah area. Main trunks have already been laid but in few areas secondary and tertiary sewers are left. 5. iii) Civil and Electro-Mechanical works of SPS in Anasagar Zone A sewage pumping station in Anasagar zone was proposed under RUIDP and could not be taken up because of the failure of construction of STP. viii) Sewerage Network in Newly Developed Areas A provision of sewerage network coverage has been made for the future projected population.5 Strategies Increasing the coverage of sewerage network by increasing the number of house service connections and treatment of sewage before disposal. Solha Khamba Behind Akbari Masjid Subhash Udyan Inside Madar Gate vi) Construction of toilets at Vishramsthali’s 20 blocks having 10 toilets each has been proposed at Vishramsthali’s. Hence the remaining area is proposed to be taken. Hence remaining 10% area uncovered with the secondary sewers is included. Construction of two STPs is proposed of 8 MLD capacity for Anasagar zone and 50 MLD capacity for city zone.6 Major initiatives / projects i) Two STPs (50+ 8) MLD Construction of decentralized sewage treatment facility was proposed under RUIDP which wasn’t taken due to contractual problems.8 Project Summary Project Name Estimated Cost (Rs) 47 . To improve the sanitation condition during the peak influx of tourists. 5. Construction of STPs and works in the Anasagar zone has been put on priority to check continuous contamination of Anasagar Lake.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 5. Hence this has been included. construction of public toilets has been proposed. Public toilets are proposed at these locations. v) Construction of Public Toilet Complex near Dargah Area The sanitation condition near Dargah area during Urs is very poor. vii) Laying of Secondary Sewers in City Zone 90% of the area in the city zone is covered with the secondary sewers. ii) Laying of Secondary and Tertiary Sewers in Anasagar Zone Due to failure of construction of STP at Anasagar zone the laying of secondary and tertiary sewers were stopped. Main trunk sewers has been laid or are in the progress under RUIDP.

00 11. Government of Rajasthan. 48 .69 4.43 0.61 1.2 8.00 3.46 Phasing & Implementation Name of the Project Two STPs (50+ 8) MLD Laying of Secondary and Tertiary Sewers in Anasagar Zone Laying of Secondary Sewers in City Zone Civil and Electro-Mechanical works of SPS in Anasagar Zone Laying of Secondary Sewers in Dargah Area Sewerage Network in Newly Developed Areas Construction of Public toilets near Dargah Area Construction of toilets at Vishramsthali’s 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Institutional Mechanism for Implementation These project will be implemented by the PHED.2 62.00 0.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Cr Two STPs (50+ 8) MLD Laying of Secondary and Tertiary Sewers in Anasagar Zone Laying of Secondary Sewers in City Zone Civil and Electro-Mechanical works of SPS in Anasagar Zone Laying of Secondary Sewers in Dargah Area Sewerage Network in Newly Developed Areas Construction of Public toilets near Dargah Area Construction of toilets at Vishramsthalis Design and Supervision Consultancy Total 18.00 15.

80% (420 m) of its total stretch. All the drains in Anasagar zone have nearly similar kind of problems. Foysagar lake and Khanpura pond.1 DRAINAGE Current Situation Analysis Average annual rainfall of the city is 50 mm and city’s topography is bowl shaped surrounded by hills in three directions. Hathi Khera drain and Kotra drain. 49 . Hence during rainy season runoff gets diverted.80 Km2 and total length is 5.72 Km2 and total length is 2. There are three main storm water channels in the zone known as Kazi ka nallah. silt and sullage. The drainage system of Ajmer is well designed.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 6 6. Kazi ka Nallah The total catchment area of the drain is 6. the drain has two main tributaries namely Bhopon ka bara drain and Mehndi Khola-Shastri nagar drain. Depending upon the natural topography.20% of its total length. The drain is lined for only 7. While passing through built up area drain receives wastewater and solid waste from the colonies. The drain is unlined except 16. Presently Anasagar Lake is not used for water supply but for recreational purpose. plain and built up area ultimately discharging into Anasagar Lake. Including main channels and its tributaries there are five main and six secondary storm water drains in Anasagar Zone.5 Km. The overflow from Anasagar is conveyed by Anasagar Escape channel to Drain chocked with Solid waste Khanpura Talab. Kazi ka nallah generally discharge water from the hills and nearby areas in to Anasaar Lake. the city is divided into two zones in view of drainage pattern of the city namely Anasagar zone & City zone. Due to the absence of proper sewerage system the drains carry the municipal wastewater and finally discharging into Anasagar Lake thus deteriorating the water quality of the lake. Finally it discharges into Anasagar near Vishramsthali in Ajmer Pushkar Road. A brief description of these drains is discussed: Bandi Nadi The total catchment area of the drain is 16. The drain has three tributaries namely Kazi pura drain. (See photoplate) The hills have very steep slope and are devoid of vegetation resulting in heavy run-off and soil erosion causing silting of drains and thus Anasagar lake. inter-connecting the major drains and main water bodies.5 Km Bandi Nadi functions as overflow channel for Foysagar discharges into Anasagar Lake and it also collects storm water from the hills. Mostly the drains are chocked with municipal solid waste. Anasagar Zone: In Anasagar zone a natural lake known as Anasagar Lake is formed by the natural topography of the surrounding hills. The Foysagar Lake is used for intermittent water supply to the Ajmer city and also for recreational purpose. Bandi Nadi discharge storm water from the hills and carries overflow from the Foysagar to Anasagar in case of heavy rainfall. The third main water body of the city is Khanpura pond which receives storm water along with municipal wastewater of the city which is used for irrigation purpose. There are three important water bodies in the city namely Anasagar lake. Bandi Nadi and Anasagar escape channel. The drain channelizes storm water from hilly terrain. The major issue with this drain is it does not have a defined alignment.

61 % stretch of its total length is lined. Hathi Khera drain and Kotra drain.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Thus the drain is chocked with municipal solid waste. Vaishali Nagar – Diversion Channel The total catchment area of the drain is 1. The drain collects surface run-off from the Taragarh hill and Nagphani and receives water from Boraj drain and Naghphani drain in its course.82 Km2 and total length is 1. ponding is an observed phenomenon in this area.21 Km2 and total length is 400 m. This channel finally discharges into Khanpura talab.88 Km2 and total length is 1. During rainy season this channel causes flooding throughout stretch. The drain has two tributaries collecting surface runoff from Nahar Mohalla and Agrasen nagar.17 Km2 and total length is 1.761 Km2. The main drains discharging into the Anasagar Escape channel are discussed below: Ganj Drain The total catchment area of the drain is 1.8 km out of which 57. silt and sullage. Anted Chatri Yojna Drain The total catchment area of the drain is 0. The drain has three tributaries namely Kazi pura drain.5 Km. the drain has two main tributaries namely Boraj drain and Nagphani drain. The carrying capacity of the channel is not sufficient to carry rub-off during rainy season . 50% of the drain is lined out of the total stretch. This is a tributary of Charasiawas drain which discharges into Anasagar Lake. Wastewater from nearby colonies finds its way through open drains into the Mahaveer nagar drain and finally discharged into Anasagar Lake resulting in unhygienic condition and deterioration of water quality of the lake. silt and sullage.5 Km. The drain does not have a defined course thus cause flooding near Mahaverr circle. The channel does not have proper alignment hence the surface run-off spreads onto low lying area before Sagar Vihar Colony. the surface runoff from city zone finds its way into Khanpura talab through Anasagar Escape channel. Silting has also reduced the carrying capacity of the channel. Earlier this drain used to function as overflow from Anasagar Lake. 0. City Zone Besides the overflow from Anasagar Lake.5 Km. Shiv Kund Nagina Bagh Drain The total catchment area of the drain is approx. Police line is located in low lying area. Anasagar Escape Channel The total length of the channel is 8. Anasgar Escape Channel The drain is lined with stone masonry through its length. Education Board –Frazer road drain The total catchment area of the drain is 3.80 Km2 and total length is 2. The drain is chocked with municipal solid waste. Mahaveer Nagar – Arihant Colony drain The total catchment area of the drain is 0. The main tributaries joining to the drain are drain from overflow of Kazi ka Nallah near Jawahar Nagar.5 Km. drian from overflow of Kazi ka Nallah near its 50 . silt & sullage. it carries wastewater from peripheral colonies. There are seven main drains and four secondary drains discharging into the Anasagar Escape channel. The drain in most of the stretch is lined but fully chocked with municipal solid waste.

51 Km2 and total length is 500m. Masuda Nadi The total catchment area of the drain is1.Kuthcheri road The total catchment area of the drain is 0.5 NA 51 . The regular and proper cleaning of the drains is not possible. Shantipura Drain Ganj drain with its tributaries Shiv Kund Nagina Bagh Drain Education Board – Frazer Road drain GPO to Todpara (Kutchery Road) Drain from Clock Tower to Moinia Islamia Inderkot – Madar gate drain Masuda Nadi Escape Channel 0.445 0.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Board of Secondary Education office and Kundan Nagar drain. The drain starts from Taragarh hill and ends into Anasagar Escape channel.O to Topdara.73 Name of drain Kazi ka Nallah on Upstream Mehndi Khola/shanti nagar drain (Tributary of Kazi ka Nallah) Bandi Nadi Mahaveer Colony Vaishali Nagar Anted.22 0. The identified flood prone areas in the city are: – Station Road and Railway Station yard – Kutchery Road – Gujar Dharati .42 Rehab under (Km) done RUIDP 2.4 0.37 Km2.5 1.5 0. Puran mandi drain is discharging into Inderkot-Madar gate drain. the drain is passing through service lane and it is encroached.7 2 2.74 Km2 and total length is 2 Km. Clock Tower to Moinia Islamia Drain The length of the drain is 500 m and the catchment area is 0.69 0.5 0. The drain is chocked with municipal waste throughout its stretch.5 9 Stretches Lined before RUIDP (Km) 0.5 Km.1 mentioning the stretch of the drain lined before RUIDP and under RUIDP.Chatri Yojna D. Total length (Km) of the drain 2.5 0.P.27 Km2 and total length is 2.53 0. The main stream joining the drain is Hathi Bhata drain. collecting sewage from Dargah area. Inderkot-Madar Gate drain The total catchment area of the drain is 1.75 1. Jhalkari Nagar – Sector III of Housing Board Colony of Vaishali Nag A summary of all the main drains and secondary drains in Anasagar zone and city zone is given in Table 6. The drain has similar problem of chocking with solid waste as discussed above.166 0 0 0. The drain also receives sewage from outfall of 800 mm dia sewer line near Loco ground opposite Dadabhai Colony.588 0.383 0 0 0.5 2.5 NA 5. The portion between G andhi Bhawan to escape channel is most chocked stretch of the drain.524 0 0 0.4 NA NA 1. The carrying capacity of the drain has remarkably reduced due to excessive silting G.5 1.

6 Project Summary Project Name Desilting of 8.8 0.3 Strategy Cleaning and widening of existing drains and construction additional drains in new areas to avoid flooding during rainy season.80 19.9 to Railway crossing Drain from Topdara to Petrol pump No.9 to Railway crossing Drain from Topdara to Petrol pump No.2 Development Objectives It is being targeted to restructure and line the remaining drains.42 Km of Drains Lining and Restructuring of 18.65 6.42 Km of Drains Lining and Restructuring of 18.88 Km of Drains 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 52 . Lining and Restructuring of 18. silt and sullage.9 Construction of New drains in New Colonies A provision has been made for construction of new drains in the colonies coming up in future on the basis of projected population.42 Km of Drains Desilting of all the drains has been proposed.55 36.9 Total NA 1.88 Km of Drains Construction of New drains in New Colonies Total Estimated Cost (Rs) Cr 1. however this should be the regular practice.5 Basis of Prioritisation Prioritisation has been made on the basis of low cost project and need of the project 6.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Bhopon ka Bada Petrol Pump No. 6.035 15.2 2. During rainy season all the drains gets chocked and causes flooding in some areas. Desilting of all the drains is required because almost all the drains are highly chocked with solid waste. 6. Bandi Nadi Mahaveer Colony Education Board – Frazer Road drain Escape Channel Petrol Pump No.45 Phasing & Implementation Name of the Project Desilting of 8.5 33. ii) iii) 6.926 6.88 Km of Drains The following drains have been identified for lining and restructuring which was left under RUIDP.4 i) Major initiatives / projects Desilting of 8.

Government of Rajasthan. 53 . These projects will be implemented by the Municipal Council of Ajmer.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Construction of New drains in New Colonies Institutional Mechanism for Implementation Presently in Ajmer there is no authority responsible for operation and maintenance of the drainage system.

It gives a stinking smell and poor ambience to the public visiting the garden. Subhash Park is situated near the lake and large number of people come for picnic daily.1 LAKE REJUVINATION Situation Analysis There are three lakes in Ajmer of which Anasagar is the biggest and has the largest catchment area. Due to the steep slope of the hills the surface run-off carries boulders and silt from erosion of the hills to the lake. Fig. Presently the lake is used for recreational purpose. A Baradari had been construction from Mugal emperor Shahjahan at the bank of lake which is a symbol of nature love.88 sq. It shows higher nitrate and phosphate concentration causing eutrophication. Ajmer receives average rainfall 296 mm. The colour of water shows deterioration of its quality in figure 7. The maximum and minimum depth is Fig.2: Showing Deteriorated Water Quality of Ana Sagar Lake Table: 8. It had been constructed in the 12th centaury AD and has socio-economic and ecological importance.1: Circle Shows Encroachment 16 feet and 3 feet. Waste water and sewage of many garage and hospital and houses is flowing into lake. Silt and sewage laden Bandi river which flowing from foy Sagar to Ana Sagar also contributes water pollution and siltation in Ana Sagar lake. Anasagar was source of water supply to Ajmer city in the past. This is also the natural cause of siltation and lake capacity reduction.1 The monthly average of various physico-chemical parameters at Anasagar Lake of Ajmer during November 2000 to April 2001.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 7 7. kilometer and its circumference is 12.1. 7. Many brick kilns have been setup in the lake area. The lake area is gradually shrinking due to encroachment over the dried area of the lake and it results reduced carrying capacity of lake.55 sq. km. A Physico-chemical analysis of water quality was conducted in year 2000-2001 which is given in Table 8. During rainy season. A public garden named Daulat Bag/ Subhash Garden is maintained by Municipal Corporation on the bank of Anasagar Lake. 7.2 near Baradari. 54 . The catchment area of lake is 70. There are encroachments in the lake bed due to soil dump and solid waste dump as in given in the Figure 7. reduced carrying capacity of lake creates flood in the adjacent area of lake. siltation and water quality is deteriorating gradually due to flowing of sewer and waste water and solid waste from the adjacent area. It is situated at 74038’74042’E and 26025’-26029’N. Presently capacity of lake is reduced due to various reasons like encroachment.1. It had been made from people participation.

55 9.35 210.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Sl. 2000 22. Parameters Water Temp.e.4 9.2 Developmental Objective The developmental objective is as follows Water quality improvement.92 0.6 3.3 4.29 216.5 5. 2001 21.10 397 761 2725 1. 3. 5. 2.3 8.30 Jan.33 Mar.00 April 2001 24. 3.35 176.89 0. Conductivity (µmhos/cm) Total Dissolved Solids (mg/1) Phosphate (mg/1) Nitrate (mg/1) Total Hardness (mg/1) Nov. 4.95 9.50 7. 2. 6.5 4.32 411 821 2861 1. 1. 7.73 0. 2001 21.90 0. ( °C) Transparency (cm) pH Dissolved Oxygen (mg/1) Total Alkalinity (mg/1) Elec.7 8. 6. 7.97 397 746 2650 1.50 Dec.02 9.12 9. The prioritized projects are as follows: 1. 4.32 278. deweeding equipment Implementation of silt protection measures Regular monitoring of lake water quality Review of constructed hotel and residential and commercial houses in the lake area 7.66 Feb. feasibility of project implementation and ability to show desired results in short time. Increasing water level in the lake as well surrounding area Controlling encroachment Use of lake for recreation Revenue generation 7. Prevention of sewage and waste water discharge into the lake Cleaning of the lake by biological and mechanical method Construction and maintenance of bathing Ghat and public toilet Plantation of suitable species in catchment area Public awareness campaign Establishment of laboratory for water quality monitoring Creation of Lake conservation Authority 55 .3 Strategies Infrastructure development for cleaning of lake i. construction of check dams etc to hold soil and reduce siltation.7 9. Construction of community toilet complexes Provision of water monitoring laboratory for regular monitoring of water quality.90 370 729 2610 1.91 415 779 2691 1.22 10. 7.81 0. catchment area should be protected from wire barrier or thick and thorny shrubs layer.2 9. No.90 0. identification of pollution sources and research.5 8. Arranging public awareness campaigns to improve public awareness rejuvenation. 2000 23. 8 9.8 5.35 9. Implementing soil and water conservation measures like gully control measures.5 4.17 453 806 2821 1. 10.36 214. 2001 22.33 206.5 Basis of Prioritization The projects are prioritized based on their low capital cost. 5.4 Major Initiative or Projects Deweeding and desilting of lake Plantation in the lake catchment area to reduce flash floods To prevent grazing.

41 Phasing and Implementation Name of the Project 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 Aforestation &soil conservation Desiltation of Anasagar lake Equipment for Deweeding Construction of community toilets Public Awareness and Training Laboratory Creation of lake authority Institutional Mechanism for Implementation Aforestation and Soil conservation measures Desiltation of Anasagar lake Equipment for Deweeding Construction of community toilets complexes Public Awareness and Training Lab for Water quality monitoring & biological research Forest Department Irrigation Department Irrigation Department PHED NGO PHED Proposed Lake Authority It is suggested that an agency preferably called Lake .3 crore. The total capital cost of the project is Rs. 23. periodic desilting and deweeding. The Chairman of such an agency will opt members from concerned government department.91 0. Since such an agency will have status of public sector body it can receive fund and operate them in the best interest of public.9 1.35 6.35 1. water quality improvement and also contribute revenue enhancement.3 23. retired engineers.0 1. 56 .Authority is crated by the state government as autonomous body to undertake all the construction and other works related to the conservation of lakes like fisheries development.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 7. improvement in landscape around lake. public.6 8. Project Name Aforestation and Soil conservation measures Desiltation of Anasagar lake Equipment for Deweeding Construction of community toilets complexes Public Awareness and Training Lab for Water quality monitoring & biological research Creation of Lake conservation Authority Total Estimated Cost (Rs) Cr 3. scientists and social workers on its managing body.6 Project Summary The various projects for lake rejuvenation will increase the ground water level. This agency will review the work of lake conservation and suggest measures as and when needed.

Heaps of MSW along the road side Vegetable and fruit market: There are six vegetable and fruit markets and various wholesale and trade centers in the city. The MSW generated in the city mainly consists of domestic refuses (including slum area). Past reports clearly state that the solid waste management in the market area is not satisfactory. Approximately 12 TPD of wastes are generated from these areas.5 times. transportation and disposal are not taken care properly and regularly.1 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT Situation Analysis Solid Waste Management Practice The Municipal Solid Waste Management MSWM system of the city was primitive. Apart from wastes generated from these areas. bio-medical waste.1. under which MWSM Ajmer has undergone some transformation along with other developmental activities in different places. Slum Area: There are 69 slum areas identified within Ajmer city. slaughter houses. Though the wholesale markets have been shifted to outskirts of the city and Krishi Upaj Mandi Samity. Quantity and Quality of Municipal Solid Waste The study conducted under RUIDP estimated that at present Ajmer produces approximately 150 TPD. 57 . with no scientific collection. Photoplate 8. The present MSWM system was developed under RUIDP. With financial assistance provided by Asian Development Bank (ADB). wastes are also collected from drains in the form of wet silts. wastes from hotels and restaurants and industrial solid wastes. A study conducted by NEERI states that the estimated quantity of MWS generation in the city in 2014 and 2021 is expected to be 204 and 252 TPD respectively at a rate of 360 gm/capita/day considering an annual increase in MSW generation by 1. transportation and disposal system. Meat Market and FCI godowns have been shifted to Beawar road. Medium Income Group (MIG) and Low Income Group (LIG). High Income group (HIG). 260 gm/capita/day in MIG and 130 gm/capita/day in LIG. waste collection. There are approximately 75. Residential and commercial area: The residential area of the city has been divided into three groups viz.000 house holds where MSW generation is estimated to be 300gr/capita/day in HIG. which are dried along the side of the road itself. In these areas.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 8 8. wastes from commercial areas. and eventually huge piles of waste was found indiscriminately around the city. The collection of MSW in Ajmer has been divided into different zones for better performance in SWM. vegetable fruit market. state government of Rajasthan implemented Rajasthan Urban Infrastructure Development Project (RUIDP). whole sale vegetable market. Waste disposal Not In My Back Yard (NIMBY) was a concept adopted widely.

Hotels and restaurants: There are approximately 230 hotels and restaurants in the city with total waste generation of approximately 10 TPD. These wastes from depots are collected and transported to the waste dumping site. Apart from these. Transportation of the waste from 70 percent of the depots has been outsourced to private parties and remaining 30 percent is catered by municipality. Bio-medical Waste generation and management: Prior to 1998. divert the wastes to municipal waste dumping ground. shop and establishments are thrown on the road side (or sometimes on roads) and open drains as there is no door to door waste collection practiced in the city. Wastes are collected outside slaughter houses unattended and disposed into the drains along with municipal wastes. These wastes then pile up to form huge heaps of solid wastes along the road side (Photoplate 8. Jawaharlal Nehru hospital and railway hospital (both being government establishment) have their own incinerators. Collection and disposal system: The city of Ajmer has been divided into three zones for managing municipal solid waste. The wastes from houses. Rest of the butchering is done by unauthorized slaughtering houses. HMT. There are 130 medical establishments in Ajmer with total bed capacity of 1500 beds. Total number of butchered animals in the city can not be calculated as there are only two authorised slaughter houses in the city which butchers about 20%-30% of the total animal butchered.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Slaughter houses: There are six meat and fish markets with an expected waste generation of 2 TPD. discarded glass wares and disposables. Bio-Medical Waste (Management and Handling) Rule 1998. These heaps of MSW is then collected and transported by open hand carts to 365 designated primary collection points/ depots. but due to lack 58 . The present scenario of bio-medical waste management and disposal system existing in Ajmer is disposal at municipal waste dumping ground even if it is not recommended under BioMedical Waste (Management and Handling) Rule 1998.2 percent of the total bio-medical wastes are infectious in nature. The primary collection system of MSW in the city still remains primitive. According to All India Institute of Health and Personal Health Hygiene (AIIHPH) 47.1). around the city. while other establishments which do not have this indoor facility. Industrial solid waste: There are approximately 165 industries at two industrial areas namely Prabhatpura and Makhpura on Nasirabad road. stipulates special consideration for disposal of bio-medical wastes under which wastes are categorized under 10 categories with different treatment and disposal options. dairy plant etc. bio-medical wastes generated from medical establishments were considered as municipal wastes and was disposed in dumping ground along with other municipal wastes. Health care establishment is supposed to have a full fledged bio-medical waste disposal system individually or a common bio-medical waste disposal system in the city. there are two railway workshops. It is reported that the total quantity of bio-medical waste generated in Ajmer is approximately 5 TPD. CPCB. Some hospitals eg. Each of the three zones are further divided into three circles that are further divided into four to nine wards depending upon population size and area in each zones. Sweepers (cleaners) sweep the wastes to a certain point making heaps of wastes along the road side. This system was accepted not as an encouragement of private participation in the waste management in the city. Bio-medical wastes consist of waste sharps. human infected and discarded parts.

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar of transportation systems available to municipality. most of the time. hazardous industrial wastes. MSW are neither stored nor segregated at source. In slum areas and low income group residential areas.Unattended and broken bins • • • • • • • • • • Street sweeping is done only for 50 percent of the area. They are littered on the streets. Apart from the MSW. rather thrown at some low lying areas. (Photoplate 8. other wastes that find its way to the MSW dumping ground are the bio-medical infectious wastes. The location of the waste dumping site is at Makhupura. Collection and storage points are open lands or broken bins. 59 . Photoplate 8. There is a lack of institutional accountability.2.). There is no control over activities by private contractors which accounts for over 70 percent of the city cleanup activity. wastes are not at all carried to the dumping yard. There is a lack of civic awareness. MSW collection and transportation system is totally neglected. developing unhygienic condition in the surrounding. Assessment of collection facility: • • • The collection system in the city is found primitive. Double handling practice of wastes by the sweepers and collectors reduces the productive output to a significant level. necessity of segregation and proper storage of wastes among the citizens Strength and distribution of sweepers in not adequate. footpaths. community bins and their conditions are poor. open spaces drains or water bodies indiscriminately. which is located on the western side of Ajmer-Naseerabad highway. tractor trolley. responsibility and performance monitoring for MSW management. mostly unattended. hygiene. No complaints can be lodged against the working of the staffs for not cleaning regularly and not attending the wastes.2. unsatisfactory and inefficient. at a distance of 10 km from centre of the city. There are inadequate numbers of wheel barrows. Assessment of transportation facility: • • Transportation of MSW to the dump site in the city is not done on regular basis Due to lack of vigilance.

The rotten vegetable wastes will lead to bad odour in the locality. 60 . Though there are two more disposal sites viz. Leachate management is no where in purview of the MSW management of the dumping ground. Health hazards • • • Indiscriminate littering of waste everywhere in the city leads to growth of unhygienic condition in the city. Assessment of MSW disposal facility: • • • • • • • • • There is only one site in the city (Makhupura) where disposal of MSW is carried out. Capacity of tractor trolleys is not sufficient to carry the desired quantity of waste generated. The degrading wastes may lead to growth of various diseases and insects like flies and mosquitoes. Many times it is observed that the private contractors do not at all dump wastes at specified location. A bright example is sited around the existing Vishramsthali. There is no liner system at the base of the dumping ground and the improper topographic condition of the site restricts uniform disposal of the MSW. No compaction is done on the dumped wastes which are recommended in Municipal Solid Waste (M&H) Rule 2000. Also their operational efficiency and operational cost is far more in comparison to the dumper placers in similar situation. No environmental impact assessment studies have been carried out so far for the existing landfill. which are not legally recommended. Citing of the depots in the city is also not systematically carried out. this dumping ground facilitates dumping of bio-medical wastes and industrial hazardous wastes. distance between two depots is more than a kilometer while at some place the distance is found to be less than 15 m. It is also found that the position of technical staff in workshop has been vacant for quite a long time. these sites are kept abandoned due to no reason. the same is not being implemented. The dumping site at Makhupura is unscientifically developed leading to possibility of occurring various environmental hazards including ground water contamination and contamination of nearby Khanpura talab. adequate technical work force and machines. rather prefer to dump the wastes at available low lying areas near the entrance of the dumping ground. The dumping site is not fenced and hence there is continuous encroachment of slums and rag pickers around the site. At some places. About 70 percent of the vehicles are old and inefficient. Frequent breakdowns. Apart from MSW. Vishramsthali and Lohagal. The garage also lacks fuel storage facility. heavy operational and maintenance costs are burden under financial considerations. Dumped solid wastes at various parts of the city (prior to the construction of dumping site) have still not been cleared and the huge compacted MSW still lies at the very location. leading the obstruction of other vehicles to utilize the unused spaces at the interior of the dumping ground.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar • • • • • • • Waste transportation system in not synchronized with primary collection and storage timings. Even though a legal provision of removal of construction wastes exists in the city. But interestingly this site is not approved by pollution control board and hence illegal. leading to the storage of huge piles of MSW around the city and especially at the storage areas.

8. Restricting entry of bio-medical and industrial hazardous wastes into the municipal waste disposal facility and developing separate bio-medical and hazardous waste disposal facilities in the city.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar • • • • Unattended wastes encourage the rag pickers to collect the discarded plastic bottles and other recyclable wastes which are brought to the market again.3.) d.3. hygiene and municipal waste management at source among the citizens of the city including residential and commercial areas.4 Major initiatives/ projects a. planning and application of schemes to not only augmentation of the present existing system but to meet the necessary demand for future growth of the city area and population. adequate equipment like wheel barrow.5 Basis of prioritization for implementation of MSW in the city 61 .) c. Decentralized composting plants for treatment of MSW A incineration plant is proposed for incineration of bio-medical waste A good quality laboratory is also proposed to monitor all chemical and biological activity. Institutional and scientific management. The needles. 8. transportation.2 Development objectives • • • • • • • Cleaning of all the city area on regular basis Coverage of managing MSW in 100 percent area to cater 100 percent population. Encourage awareness of health. Encourage performance based incentives to enhance efficiency and output. treatment and disposal of MSW system by involving private sector participation. dumper placer container. Solid wastes in the drains chock the flow of water Photoplate 8.) To develop infrastructure i. Photoplate 8. syringes and other usable wastes in the form of bio-medical wastes are again brought back in the market by the rag pickers and local agencies which are again illegal as well as dangerous. Choked drains by MSW Water contamination due to MSW leads to various water borne diseases to the consumers.) b. causing unhygienic condition and growth of various diseases. Entrusting responsibilities to the authorities to hold them accountable for any non conformation. transportation and disposal.e. 8. dumper placer machine and volume of storage device for collection. and lead to flooding of drains in the locality. 8. These are dangerous for further utilization in health perspective.3 Major strategies for addressing above problem Improvement in collection.

The prioritized projects are as follows: • • • • • First priority shall be given to the implementation of those programmes for which master plans has already been prepared. transportation. The total capital cost of the project is 7. Involving private sector participation in collection. the initiative was taken up by RUIDP for construction of physical assets for the system while Municipal Council manages the operation and maintenance part of it.27 5.30 0. feasibility of project implementation and ability to show desired results in short time. This will reduce the time consumption for making another study. At Ajmer. Shifting of the present dumping ground to a legal and scientific MSW disposal landfill to restrict any further damage to the ground and surface water. There is a need to have continuous serious interaction between the two authorities for the need of augmentation of the existing system. collection and transportation of wastes. disposal and monitoring facility. 62 . Further.87 crore.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar The projects are prioritized based on their low capital cost. Procurement of mechanical equipments for cleaning.87 Phasing & Implementation Name of the Project Equipment for SWM Composting plant Laboratory Awareness 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Institutional mechanism for Implementation A single institution shall be made responsible for taking up the management of solid waste in the city.6 Project Summary The various projects for solid waste management include best collection. transportation and treatment of MSW facilities 8. This can be achieved by contracting MSW management operation and maintenance to private sector and municipality to work as regulating and monitoring authority.30 7. Encourage various drives for keeping the city clean and encouraging segregation of wastes at source to the common mass. Project Name Equipment for solid waste management Solid waste composting plant Laboratory for solid waste treatment plant Total Estimated Cost (Rs) Cr 2. the municipal council shall need to strengthen itself for managing operation and maintenance activities.

1. The building itself has been constructed of red sandstone which have been laid down in a square pattern. It has a marble dome and the actual tomb inside is surrounded by a silver platform. surrounded by Aravali hills offers a distinctive character to the city. Akbar improved and extended the fortification of the city and made Ajmer his headquarters for the operations in Rajputana and Gujarat. 9.1 Key tourist sights The Dargah The Dargah is the tomb of a sufi saint. In 1193 AD Mohammad Ghori destroyed the college and hurriedly put together. Later it was used as the Rajputana Arsenal” and earned the popular name Magazine. has been a place of pilgrimage. Adhai-Din-Ka Jhonpara One of the finest examples of Indo-Islamic architecture. was buried here. The sacred lake of Pushkar believed by Hindus. The city is a genuine amalgam of rich Hindu and Islamic heritage. a feature that gives the city its character. giving it a fabulous look. a great centre of pilgrimage. as well as Hinduism. for time immemorial. Sir Thomas Roe presented his credentials to Jahangir here on January 10. 1616. The great Sufi saint Khwaja Moin-ud-din-Chisti of Persia.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 9 9. 63 . The tomb attracts hundreds of thousands of pilgrims every year on the saint's death anniversary. for ages. Construction of the shrine was completed by Humayun. and his Dargah is equally sacred for the followers of Islam. a mosque within two and a half days (Adhai Din) with the remains of several neighbouring temples. He visited Ajmer frequently to attend to political matters as well as to pay homage at the sacred shrine of Garib Nawaz. Constructed of white marble.1 TOURISM AND HERITAGE CONSERVATION Existing Situation Ajmer has been. to be as old as the temple of Brahma. Khwaja Muin-uddin Chisti. this mosque was a Sanskrit college in the 12th century. The British occupied this palace in 1818 and it was extensively fortified during the 1857 uprising. who came to Ajmer from Persia in 1192. Akbar’s Fort It is the most important Mughal building from the historical perspective. for both Hindus and Muslims. The picturesque setting of this city. The mosque was built on pillars and surprisingly no two pillars are alike. The Royal Palace of Akbar was converted into a Museum and today it houses a rich collection of Mughal and Rajput armoury. it has 11 arches and a Persian inscription running the full length of the building. Some of the fine and delicate sculptures of the region have been displayed here.

These gates make the fort inaccessible to invaders. The first entrance to the fort is known as Lakshmi Pol or gate of wealth. This is the principal entrance to Taragarh fort. Ana Sagar Lake This lake was built by Anaji during 1135-1150 AD. It has illustrative representations of the birth and life of Rishabhadev. gilt wooden figures from Jain mythology depicting the Jain concept of the ancient world. The 'Baradari'. the fort gives birds eye view of the city. The fort has some important gates which make access to the fort very difficult. The temple complex contains the Svarna Nagari Hall which is a double storey hall containing a fascinating series of large. the second one is named by locals as Phuta Darwaza or broken gate. Taragarh fort or the ' Star fort ' is situated on a hill is nearly 2-3 km in circumference on top of the hill. a marble pavilion was built by Shah Jahan and the ' Daulat Bagh ' gardens were laid by Jahangir. the third is the Gaudi Ki Phatak and the last one is called the Gate of Victory.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Nasiyan (Jain Temple) The Red temple near Mahaveer Circle is a Jain temple built in the 19th century. the roof is covered with excellent glass mosaic. This lake is located towards the north of Ajmer city. When viewed from the valley down below at night the fortress on the crest of the hill looks like a star adorned. Taragarh Fort Built in the 7th century by Ajaipal Chauhan. 64 . The hall is richly painted and decorated. Later the Mughal emperors made additional constructions to beautify the lake.

02 1. like the world over. 9. Mount Abu. Jaipur and Pushkar attract the maximum number of tourists both domestic and foreign. In 2005 Ajmer attracted 8% of the total domestic tourists coming to Rajasthan while the share of foreign tourists was only 1%.07 1. It plays a vital role in the country’s economy with a contribution of 5. which was destroyed by Mohammad Ghori. Rajasthan continues to be one of the most favourite tourism destinations for tourists witnessing an unprecedented growth of more than 50% in domestic and foreign tourist influx. Table--: Tourist Arrivals in 2004-05 2005 Domestic Foreign 1515960 15139 8.3 lakh foreign tourists and 187 lakh domestic tourists during 2005. Pushkar and Jaisalmer.3% to India’s GDP. visit four and half centuries later. The reminiscence of the fort wall reflects the history of the once important fort of the region. in the Dargah precinct.1. followed by Jaipur. tourism has emerged as an important segment of the economy with a potential to earn foreign exchange and generate large employment opportunities. It had a record arrival of more than 11. Presently around 200 families live inside the fort. witnessing a 17% rise in domestic tourists and 16% increase in foreign tourists as against 2004 figures. Foy Sagar Situated on the outskirts of thew city this picturesque lake is named after the engineer responsible for its construction. Maximum number of tourists are attracted by Udaipur.17 16033896 971772 Ajmer % of state share Rajasthan 65 .City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Taragarh is also important for a mosque and the shrine of Miran Sayyad Hussain. Out of the total tourists in Rajasthan. Shah Jahan's Mosque This mosque is the most beautiful of all the structures. governor of the fort. Sanctity was attached to this shrine only after Akbars.2 Tourist Arrivals In India.34 18787298 1131164 2004 Domestic Foreign 1125421 11415 7. delicately carved with trellis-work. It is made of white marble. who died in 1202. Udaipur.

On an average 4000 tourists visited Ajmer daily (2005) May-July are the lean months.5 lakhs in 2004 to 4 lakhs in 2005.-: Tourist Arrivals in Ajmer from 2001-2005 Tourists 2001 2002 2003 1269309 1330557 970255 Domestic 54040 51230 5422 Foreign Total 1323349 1381787 975677 Source: Rajasthan Tourism Department. The unique feature of tourism in Ajmer is the large number of day tourists who stop over at Ajmer on their way from Jaipur to Jodhpur or Udaipur which are popular destinations.Ajmer 1600000 1400000 1200000 1000000 800000 600000 400000 200000 0 2001 2002 2003 Domestic Foreign 2004 2005 Monthwise Tourist Arrivals . The nearest airport is at Jaipur which is 132km away. 9. Table . But the number of foreign tourists has decreased sharply from 54.1. The Dargah attracts large number of tourists all round the year.Foreign 3000 2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun 2005 Jul Aug 2004 Sep Oct Nov Dec The nature of tourism in Ajmer is mainly religious. The number of pilgrims attending Urs has shown a sharp increase from 1. Ajmer – January 2006 2004 1125421 11415 1136836 2005 1516035 15139 1531174 Tourist Arrivals . but the tourist flow peaks during Urs. 66 .139 in 2005.Domestic 500000 400000 300000 200000 100000 0 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun 2005 Jul Aug Sep Oct 2004 Nov Dec Monthwise Tourist Arrivals . 2005 recorded a 34 % increase in tourist arrivals as against 16% the previous year.040 in 2001 to only 15.3 Tourism Infrastructure Ajmer is well connected to Jaipur and other cities in the state and to the national capital by rail and road. except for 2003 when there was a drop in both domestic and foreign tourist.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Over the last five years there has been a steady increase in the domestic arrivals in the city.

Arrangements made for Urs Most of the pilgrims who visit the Dargah during the festival are very poor and cannot afford to pay for accommodation. of Rooms 2260 17 2277 No. Poor parking facilities near monuments etc. The approach road to Taragarh is a bridled path with steep slope. • • • • • 67 . the city has failed to leverage its historical past to attract tourists. Classic example is of Akbar’s fort which lies behind the Municipal Council Office. Rajasthan State Road Transport Corporation arranges for extra 125 buses to bring pilgrims from various cities. considering the large number of tourists visiting the city. Taragarh Fort. These pilgrims are accommodated free of cost at Vishram Sthalis located at Anasagar. There is inadequate information about the historical sights the city has to offer. The narrow approach roads to the Dargah are incapable of handling lakhs of pilgrims. There is clearly a lack of promoting heritage tourism in Ajmer. often causing stampedes. of Units 117 4 121 No. near Transport Nagar on Beawar Road and at Kayad near MDS University. eg. The sanitary conditions at these vishram sthalis are very poor.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar The accommodation facilities available in the city are inadequate. Lack of focus on a “religious tourism” circuit Most domestic visitors to Ajmer are poor pilgrims visiting the Dargah with a very low paying capacity. Adhai din ka Jhonpara. There is only one star hotel in Ajmer. which is hardly visited by tourists. The poor approach to the historical sights is also a deterrent in attracting tourists. These are temporary camps with basic water and mobile toilets provided by UIT and Municipal Council of Ajmer.2 • Issues In spite of presence of historic monuments from different eras. of beds 4397 39 4436 9. Because of paucity of funds a lot of monuments lie in derelict condiction. Traffic and transportation facilities near the Dargah are insufficient causing mayhem. Table --: Accpommodation available in Ajmer Type of Accommodation Hotels & Dharamshalas Paying Guest Houses Total No. The facilities provided to the pilgrims at vishram stahlis are highly inadequate.

6 Basis of Prioritisation Short term project which can improve city level facilities and accelerate tourist inflows Projects capitalising on the uniqueness of the city eg. 9. Investments in tourism could be either through public. Investments more suited for private sector include: Accommodation Facilities Entertainment and Leisure Facilities Tourist Vehicles and Buses Internet Facilities Sectors that require public sector intervention are: Information Dissemination Arts and Crafts Villages and Museums Adventure and Ecotourism Facilities Civic infrastructure and Beautification Heritage conservation of important monuments Tourism Training Parks and Gardens 9.7 Project Summary Development of a promenade around Anasagar near ACR Establishment of tourist information centres Pre-paid counters at bus stands and railway station Conservation of heritage monuments – heritage monuments which have integrity and character and which have elements of historicity need to be protected. private sector or a combination of the two. 9.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 9. the built and natural heritage. o For domestic tourists the focus would be more as a Leisure/Sightseeing destination with a background of • religion/culture • wildlife/nature o For international tourists the positioning would be more on • Heritage tourism • Cultural tourism and Arts & Crafts • Ecotourism/Adventure tourism on surrounding hills and sand dunes Improving city level infrastructure to provide a pleasant experience to the tourists 9.3 Development Objectives To double the number of tourists (both domestic and foreign) visiting Ajmer in the next 5 years and accordingly up grade the tourism infrastructure to meet the enhanced demand.4 Strategies To devise different marketing plan for domestic and international tourists to bring them to Ajmer and prolong their stay.5 Major initiatives / Projects Tourism development requires a wide array of projects ranging from accommodation facilities to transportation. information and telecommunication. 68 . Arena for pedestrians to be planned for easy accessibility and enriched surrounding environment.

Taragarh fort.00 10. No.05 0. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Projects Year1 Pre-paid counters at bus stands and railway station Establishment of tourist information centres Promotion of Ajmer as a tourist destination Development works in and around Dargah Sharif Construction of New Vishram sthali A Promenade around Anasagar near ACR Conservation of Heritage monuments Development of Arts and Crafts village Construction of Heritage hotels and budget hotels Rope way from Dargah to Taragarh Sound and light show at Taragarh fort Year2 Implementation Period Year3 Year4 Year5 Year6 Year7 69 . no.00 10. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Projects A Promenade around Anasagar near ACR Development of Arts and Crafts village Construction of Heritage hotels and budget hotels Pre-paid counters at bus stands and railway station Establishment of tourist information centres Promotion of Ajmer as a tourist destination Rope way from Dargah to Taragarh Sound and light show at Tara garh fort Conservation of Heritage monuments Construction of New Vishram sthali Development works in and around Dargah Sharif Total Estimated Cost (Rs.05 Sr. Development of arts and crafts village Construction of Heritage hotels and budget hotels Construction of New Vishram sthali at Kayad Development works in and around Dargah Sharif Sr.00 0.00 2.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Building heights around heritage structures or monuments to be restricted by developing a field of reference. Cr) 20. providing a rope way to Taragarh and organizing a sound and light show at Taragarh.50 8.00 2.50 2.00 57.00 2.

open drains and roads is poor. Similarly in Kumhar Basti. The recent below poverty line estimates for the city show that there are 15. On the other hand there is a Sashi basti. where 95% of the households are primarily employed in Railways.22. solid waste disposal. Table 10. there is no land tenure and they also lack access to basic facilities. sewage and water supply are far improved in comparison to Gulab Bari. gotta stiching.1: Below Poverty Line Occupation Classification Category of workers Agricultural Labour Other Labour Agriculture Non-farm activities Craftsmen Others Total Families 401 7957 600 1636 89 4661 15344 The occupational pattern of urban poor in Ajmer varies.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 10 BASIC URBAN SERVICES FOR POOR The paradox of economic growth in the urban areas is the growing urban poor. construction labourers. whereas the migrant population such as those who have come from Bihar. almost all the households have secure land tenure and access to basic infrastructure such as drains. tenure security rests with few households in the regularised settlements. In spite of Ajmer’s prominent role in the economy of the region.344 families which are below poverty. urban population and especially the urban poor faces serious problems due to population pressure. other major source of primary occupation is informal sector where families work as labourers.1 Existing Situation According to information available from the AMC and UIT. Women employment is mostly confined to household level economic activity which includes beedi rolling.590) of the city population. the slum has grown along the railway track. Till 1975. bangles. roads. most of the regularised households have their shops along the access road to the Dargah and shops around Dargah area. Predominantly these families reside in the slums. trade and services. The level of access to basic infrastructure varies across the slums. where while they have access to safe drinking water. For example in Harijan Basti (Nagbai). it is limited. rickshaw pullers and work as labourer in the market. Ajmer has 73 slums sprawling the city and constitute one-fourth (1. Economic activities vary across the slums and within slums also there are distinct separation. In Gulab Bari. are employed as daily labourers. Railways provide employment to large section of urban poor and the slum development has been along the railway factory. Access to other amenities such as sanitation. As per the existing information 67 of the 73 slums are regularised. however. where even girl child is employed. Besides this. there is a high dropout of students from school as they are employed for making agarbattis. West Bengal and Uttar Pradesh. For example. where brewing of local alcohol is one of the main occupation. 10. 70 . deterioration in the physical environment and quality of life. of which nearly 50% are employed in informal sector of different types of labour activities. in the Idgah (Andarkot).

the physical environment in most of them is of poor quality. the public distribution system for distribution of subsidised foods and kerosene oil is often inadequate and there is diversion of the essential commodities. once in 3 days. Exceptions are slums such as Gurjar Dharti and Lohakhan where most of the households have direct water connection. Level of education infrastructure is quite adequate across the slums as they have either Anganwadis. drainage. The conditions of public toilets constructed under different schemes are in poor state. Street lights are mostly on the main access roads and inner roads are dark. Across all the slums. The access to basic infrastructure in the slums leaves lot of scope for improvement. the supply is every 2 days for same duration.2 Issues The condition in the most of the slums barring few is precarious. The drinking water supplies in the slums are not adequate and even the hours of supply poses difficulty. individual toilets and public toilets. the survey shows that a very small fraction of households have direct water supply connection and rely on 2-3 taps in addition to some hand pumps. However. In summer months. For example in Namkaran ka Hatha.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar before the floods. the drinking water is not potable. due to large household size. which most of the women amongst the surveyed population expressed as concerns for their security. the landlord has stopped collecting the rent. For example. In terms of access to toilet facility. these families used to pay a rent to landlord. These health centres are also not equipped to provide antenatal and postnatal care. which is close to the Railway factory. the health centres are not adequately equipped with medicines and the households have to procure medicines from open market. in another slum. which were among the 12 surveyed slums in Ajmer. post 1975. the disposal of waste water from the factory passes through the slum. in remaining months. most of which are not functional. 71 . Primary school and Secondary school or a combination of them. while many households have constructed individual toilets. water availability is a problem and lack of maintenance by the assigned staff. In terms of road infrastructure. the survey in Namkaran ka Hattha. most of the slums have roads. The other main problem is lack of covered drains and sewer facility. whereas. Rambagh and Sanshi Basti provided evidence that the public toilets constructed under Sulabh Sauchalay were not used mostly because they are not clean. and garbage disposal. as there is lack of maintenance and as a result they are not used. For example. Lack of access to these safety nets and limited information about government schemes increases their vulnerability and pushes them further into poverty traps. With the exception of Nagbai and Rambagh settlements. This is further complicated by inadequate number of taps available. but majority of the bye-lanes are not metalled and street lighting is inadequate. the supply is for 45-60 minutes. however. one of the main problems which exist across all the slums is the lack of knowledge about government programmes and limited reach of social security safety nets. all other slum settlements lack access to adequate drinking water facility. Kumhar Basti. The other problem is related to duration of water supply (45-60 minutes) and frequency of supply (once in 48 or 72 hours). open defecation is a common practice. In addition to these access to community facilities and health centres in these settlements is limited and not adequate. For example. 10. Since most of the slums are located in marginal areas encroaching on drains. However.

however. Even in slums where these exist. This need not be in the form of fully built houses but in the nature of sites and services. Provision of basic services like paved street. solid waste management etc. public agencies will have to play a role provider of housing for the EWS.3 Housing for EWS 72 . resulting in flooding.3 Development Objectives To promote an integrated slum development project to improve the living condition and quality of life of urban poor. and inadequate social security safety nets. the other major issues pertain to lack of adequate health infrastructure. The growth in the slums clearly shows lack of implementation of development controls.4 Major initiatives / Projects Integrated Slum Development focusing on improving roads. Water tap and toilet seat are built on the plot. 10. the open disposal of garbage in drains blocks the drainage system. sanitation facility and solid waste management. drainage. In addition to basic services. and lessons from them can be used in Ajmer. Public interventions will be required in providing basic services to the slums. the drains are open and not covered. Drinking water supply scheme aimed at improving the number of taps and hours of supply Housing for EWS: In the short run. One of the common grievance across all the surveyed slums was absence of identified location within a slum location for garbage disposal.5. To the extent feasible community involvement may be secured in maintaining the facilities particularly community toilets. 10. Granting security of land tenure to slums (individually or preferable to groups) will be a major intervention that would enable slum dwellers to access housing finance and improve their shelters over a period of time. As a result of them being open drains they are often choked as the garbage is dumped in them. 10. By ensuring water and sanitation the environmental hygiene is ensured. especially during monsoon periods. Since most of the slums are on the hill tracts.5. however.m. Few households have constructed toilets. as land availability is a constraint. There are experiences of such schemes in India.2 Drinking water supply 10. and community toilets will have to be extended to these settlements.5 Project Summary 10.1 Integrated Slum Development 10. as the current mechanisms are not adequate. street lights. open defecation is common and uses of public toilets are also limited. limited knowledge regarding government schemes. For example the slum in the Idgah (Andarkot) has expanded towards the hills and now has started to merge with the slums around the Taragarh fort. Community infrastructure is not sufficient and in most of the slums there is limited possibility of adding new community infrastructure. The plot allottee can then build the shelter and improve it as his income improves. they are hardly used by the people. Garbage disposal is another major issue for the urban poor.5. community (or individual) water supply.) with pedestrian accesses and water and sewerage facilities are provided. Even with increased supply of housing there would be 28000 slum households by 2011. In this case smaller plots (25 to 30sq.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Across the slums.

MPS and MLAs of local constituency Commissioner (Administration) Commissioner (Development) Secretary AMC Executive Engineer Sections/Department/Cells Vice-Chairman Accounts Officer Health Officer • • • • • • • • • General Administration House Tax Department Other Revenue Department General Works Building Plan Establishment Accounts Law Section Health Department Functional Committees(Nil) Ward Committees . The Deputy Chairman assists the Chairman in his duties and is elected from among the councillors. no Ward Committees have been constituted by the Municipal Council. Figure 1: Organisational Structure of Ajmer Municipal Council AMC – Organisation Structure Chairman in Council (55 Councillors.1 INSTITUTIONAL STRENGTHENING Ajmer Municipal Council 11. 73 . till date. This structure is depicted in the figure below. proposes the constitution of five such committees for Ajmer Municipal Council. The Rajasthan Municipalities Bill. 3 Nominated Members by GoR. 2005.(Nil) Revenue Officers Law Officer Garden Supervisor Chief Sanitary Inspector Officer in charge (Kasturba Hospital) Community Officer Fire Officer Elected Members The Elected Members of the AMC comprises of the Chairman and councillors representing each of the 55 wards. leading to the centralisation of functions at Chairman-in-Council level. decentralisation of functions and active citizen participation. Formation of Ward Committees is essential for Ward level or decentralised planning. Functional Committees The Municipal Council has not constituted any Functional Committees.1. Ward Committees The Municipal Council has a total 55 Wards.1 Organisation Structure of Ajmer Municipal Council Organisational Structure of the Municipal Council The governance structure of the Ajmer Municipal Council consists of both the elected members as well as the administrative staff. but. The term for both the Chairman and Deputy Chairman is five years.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 11 11.

The following table highlights the responsibilities of various institutions involved in planning and design. AMC Roads/Bridges/flyovers/RoB/Multilevel Parking Traffic Control and Management System City Public Transportation Storm Water Drainage Solid Waste Disposal Street Lighting Parks. Town and Country Planning Board. The accounting and budgeting procedures at AMC need to be upgraded. RUIDP. UIT. AMC Operation and Maintenance UIT. heads the Administrative wing. operation and maintenance of assets. RUIDP UIT. often leading to administrative inconvenience as well as inconvenience to the citizens. RHB UIT. construction. Around 22 % of the total Municipal posts are currently lying vacant. AMC AMC AMC. RTO RUIDP AMC UIT. RUIDP. This has led to the concentration of powers and functions at a single location. UIT.AMC RUIDP. Computer usage is limited and most of the municipal processes are still manual.AMC AMC UIT.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Administrative Wing Some key points to note are: The Commissioner (Administration). AMC. UIT. RTO RUIDP AMC UIT. Table 1: Institution Responsibility Matrix Institutional Responsibility Urban Infrastructure Land Use/Master Plan Building Byelaws Water Supply Sewerage Planning and Design UIT. RTO Private operators RUIDP AMC UIT. AMC. Effective coordination among and delegation of authorities and responsibilities with a proper calendar of activities is critical for asset creation and maintenance. UIT. RUIDP. who is also the executive head of the Council. clerical staff and other non-technical staff. Due to this the Municipal Council currently lacks technical capability and is not able to take on/ manage large capital works.AMC ASI UIT.AMC PHED. with no ward wise or zonal level budgetary planning. AMC UIT. RUIDP. AMC 74 . operation and maintenance of all Infrastructure Assets are handled by a large number of organisations. water and noise pollution control Slum Development Urban Poverty Programmes Housing for EWS Public Convienance Heritage Building Conservation UIT. UIT. Playgrounds. The Administration of the Council is largely centralised. RUIDP. Database and Information Management Some key points to note are as follows: The Database and Information Management System in the Municipality is relatively poor with no centralised information management systems in place. PWD UIT. Accounting is still on single entry cash basis and budgeting is done on the basis of past trends. at both the local level as well as the state level. AMC PHED. A significant proportion of the total municipal staff strength (about 97%) consists of cleaning staff. beautification of road intersections Air . Land Records are not updated on a regular basis. PHED. The Building Plan Sanction Records are incomplete and therefore it is difficult to monitor whether the construction of assets is in accordance with the sanctioned plan. RUIDP. AMC RSPCB RUIDP. UIT. Institutional Responsibility Matrix The construction. AMC Construction UIT. PWD. AMC UIT. UIT PHED.

geared to shoulder the responsibility of future governance and service delivery demands. particularly in service delivery.4 Major Initiatives and Projects 75 . It will also ensure a citizen-friendly environment in the municipal office. Many a times there is no proper coordination. they need to initiate a process of transition by adopting various organisation management principles such as improved accounting techniques. and improved budgeting methods. Focus on developing the skills of municipal staff on a regular basis Human resources are the key to efficient service delivery in any organisation.1. decision making. Implement GIS and MIS – this will lead to an improvement in day to day municipal management. 11. Decentralisation of functions Decentralisation of municipal functions. and clear cut demarcation of responsibilities. leading to duplication of efforts and neglect of certain critical areas of service delivery.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar The above table clearly shows that multiple agencies are involved for execution of capital works and operation and maintenance of assets. AMC will need to emphasize on developing core skills of municipal staff in order to ensure that these skills are relevant to the ever changing operational environment. Therefore. Leverage developments in Information Technology AMC will need to adopt IT applications wherever these applications assist them to improve service delivery. Ensure all Municipal Administrative Staff are fully computer literate – this will lead to an improvement in the efficiency and overall productivity of staff. Another important facet is to introduce a performance culture among all municipal staff and provide adequate incentives for inducing improved staff performance levels. Implement double entry accrual accounting – this will lead to an improvement in overall municipal management and governance.1.1. Develop interactive channels of communication with citizens – this will lead to an improvement in citizen interaction and service delivery. citizen interface and planning will greatly enhance the operational capabilities of AMC. Providing a conducive working environment for municipal staff The municipal facilities should be upgraded and well maintained in order to ensure that the municipal staff has a good working environment. 11. 11.3 Strategies for Development Transition to modern organisation management principles Municipalities need to gear themselves for meeting future challenges in service delivery. Upgrade municipal infrastructure and facilities – this will lead to enhanced productivity of municipal staff.2 Development Objectives The following long term development objectives have been identified for the Ajmer Municipal Council in order to transform it into an efficient and productive organisation. monitoring and evaluation of projects (including social audit). municipal management and to create a transparent and accountable basis of governance.

11.75 0. the list of prioritised projects.64 6. Sl No.No Name of the Project Cost (Rs in Crores) 0.5 Basis of Prioritisation of Projects Projects in Institutional Development have been prioritised based on the following parameters: Time to completion Initial capital cost Clearly identified linkage with Development Objectives and Strategies Clearly identified source and availability of funding 11. Name of Project Year 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 Implementation of Double Entry Accrual based Accounting Training and Institutional Strengthening Implementation of Geographical Imformation System E-Governance System for Municipal Services Citizen Communication and Participation Programme Modernising Office Infrastructure Year 2 Implementation Period Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 Institutional Mechanism for Implementation of Projects A number of institutional mechanisms. Implementation of Double Entry Accrual based Accounting Training and Institutional Strengthening Implementation of Geographical Information System E-Governance System for Municipal Services Communication and Citizen Participation Programme Modernising Office Infrastructure Total Phasing and Implementation The following table outlines the proposed phasing of the projects identified above.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar This section outlines the parameters which form the basis of prioritisation of projects identified to implement the above strategies. 3. Table 2 : Project Listing by Priority S. Use of local Chartered Accountancy firms in implementing Double Entry Accrual based Accounting 76 . The sequence of the projects reflects the priority. This will ensure that the implementation is carried out efficiently and will enable AMC to meet the objectives it has laid down in area of Institutional Development. 5.1. Project profiles are provided in the Annex.22 0. based on a partnering policy.80 0.1.42 3. 2.83 1. can be adopted for implementing the projects listed above.6 Project Summary The Projects as listed in the table below have been prioritised based on the above parameters. 4. 6.00 1.

11. The Following table shows the comparison of various taxes permitted under the Act and Various taxes being imposed currently by the Ajmer Municipal Council Table 3 : Levy of Taxes by the Ajmer Municipal Council 77 . Leveraging the Role of the State level Steering Committee on Accounting Reforms The State Level Steering Committee on Accounting Reforms can be leveraged in obtaining technical guidance on implementation of accounting reforms as well as adapting the National Municipal Accounting Manual to suit local needs. training of AMC staff and handholding support following implementation.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Local Chartered Accountancy firms can be brought on board for providing field level support to AMC staff in preparation of opening balance sheet. The Rajasthan Municipal Bill.7 Financial Operating Plan of Ajmer Municipal Council Analysis of Current Situation Levy of Taxes The Rajasthan Municipalities Act. 1959 provides for the levy of obligatory and other taxes by the ULBs.1. 2005 also provides for the levy of obligatory and discretionary taxes by the ULB. Leveraging the Presence of Training Institutes in Ajmer and Jaipur Ajmer and Jaipur have a large number of educational and vocational training institutes which can partner with AMC in developing focussed training programmes for AMC staff.

Local Bodies receiving Compensation in Lieu of Octroi. bridges and ferries owned by. driving. Tax on deficit in parking spaces in any nonresidential building 9. 78 . Tolls on roads. Tax on Congregations 5. No No No Obligatory Taxes 1. 4. Scavenging Tax 13. Tax on Vehicles and other conveyances plying for hire or kept within the Municipality 2. Toll on Vehicles and other Conveyances and on animals entering the Municipality 12. Octroi on Goods or Animals brought within the Municipal Limits Tax on Professions and Vocations Surcharge on Electricity Consumption within the Municipal Area [1] 5. Tax on Advertisement other than Advertisements published in the news papers 7. Tax on Animals used for riding . Fire Tax 8. 1959 and The Rajasthan Municipal Bill.A No No Yes Yes No No No No No No No The above table clearly shows that AMC is not charging and recovering all the taxes. Sanitary Tax 3. Tax on Pilgrimages and Tourists 6. 2005. The Municipal Finances of the Council can be broadly summarised in the following figure.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar S. draught or burden when kept within the Municipality 11. Lighting Tax 4. or built from the funds of the Municipality [2] Discretionary Taxes 1. Tax on boats moored within the Municipality 3. House Tax 2. Tax on Dogs kept within the Municipality 10. permitted under the Rajasthan Municipalities Act. The account keeping of municipal finances of the Ajmer Municipal Council is currently based on single entry cash basis.No Taxes as per Act Taxes Levied by Ajmer Municipal Council Yes Abolished by the State Government. No N.

70 216.56 1.232.859.Y 2002-03 F.106.80 109.75 2.68% 0. which turns out to be negative if inflation is taken into account.19 317.06) 2.29 433.993.17 251.92% 4.18 63.68 % for Revenue Receipts and .Y 2004-05.42 563.888.75 295.80 584.81 247.105.34 437. The Increase in receipts is very low (2.68% 4.Y 2001-02. advances Other Assets Specific Purpose Grants •Rental Income •Fees and User Charges Interest Others The summarised financial statements of the Ajmer Municipal Council for the last four years are as follows Table 4: Summarised Financial Statement of Ajmer Municipal Council Particulars Actuals Actuals Actuals Actuals F.81 1. 79 .164.83 (186. Contribution and Subsidies Non Tax Revenue • • • • • • Revenue Expenditure Establishment Administrative Operation and Maintenance Interest Others • • • • • • • • • Capital Expenditure Fixed Assets CWIP Investments Stock Loans. as compared to 12 % of total revenue receipts in F.341.77 CAGR Revenue Receipts Capital Receipts Less: Revenue Expenditure Capital Expenditure Revenue Surplus/(Deficit) Capital Surplus/(Deficit) 2.92 % for Capital Receipts). it has come down to 5% in F.Y 2003-04 F.06 170.Y 2004-05 Rs (in Lakhs) Rs (in Lakhs) Rs (in Lakhs) Rs (in Lakhs) 2.13 129.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Figure 1: Overview of Municipal Finances Ajmer Municipal Council-Finance Municipal Finance Receipts Payments Revenue Receipts • • • • • • • • • Capital Receipts Specific Purpose Grants Loans Deposits Received Other Liabilities Tax Revenue Assigned Revenues and Compensations Revenue Grant.75 2.Y 2001-02 F.67% A perusal of the above summarised financial statements will reveal the following Revenue Surplus of Ajmer Municipal Council is decreasing.64 1.62 520.44 22.57 2.

981.97 6.31 2.96% The composition of Revenue Income under Tax.38 2002-03 8.34 84.79% 4.17 33.Y 2004-05 Rs (in Lakhs) Rs (in Lakhs) Rs (in Lakhs) Rs (in Lakhs) 2.99 108.00 50.40 44.50 0.00 60. the transfer including grant is as high as 87.47 55.00 89.88% 6.00 113.641.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Revenue Receipts Revenue Receipts of the Ajmer Municipal Council for the Last four years are stated below: Table 5: Revenue Receipts of Ajmer Municipal Council Particulars Actuals Actuals Actuals Actuals F.00 81.42 140.22 45. Non-Tax and Transfer Including Grants is shown in the following figure Figure 2: Composition of Municipal Revenue Receipts Composition of Municipal Revenue Receipts 100.59 0.48 5.Y 2001-02 F.40 0.724.27 CAGR Revenue Receipts Tax Revenue Assigned Revenues and Compensation Rental Income .36% 5.106.80 4.14 86.Municipal Properties Fees and User Charges Sale and Hire Charges Revenue Grants.822.00 109.62 54.Y 2002-03 F.40 8.34 2.52 87.19 1.00 0.19 101.77 0. Contributions and Subsidies Income from Investments Interest Earned Other Income 2.18 44.52 0.00 40.54% -6.54% for rental Income) 80 .Y 2003-04 F.00 47.17 113.34 2.04 56.69 2001-02 10.341.94 1.31% All own sources of Municipal Income has shown a negative growth rate (As high as 15.89 10.00 80.93% -5.80 7. in 2004-05.90 0.00 63.74 2004-05 The key findings from the composition of Revenue Receipts and further analysis of the details of individual head of Revenue Receipts are as follows High dependence of the Municipal Council on Transfers and Grants .95 4.20 0.83 1.81% -15.00 80.25 1.105.68 2003-04 7.00 20.80 110.98 0.68% -5.00 50.164.31 Transfer Including Grants (Rs in Lakh) Non-Tax Revenue (Rs in Lakh) Tax Revenue (Rs in Lakh) 12.07 3.

Revenue Expenditure Revenue Expenditure of the Ajmer Municipal Council for last four years are stated below Table 6: Revenue Expenditure of Ajmer Municipal Council Particulars Actuals Actuals Actuals Actuals F.F.09 27.75 2.00% 35.859.68 0.29 1.31 25.00 203.62 1.50% The Composition of Revenue Expenditure of Ajmer Municipal Council for the last four years can be summarised in the following figure Figure 3: Composition of Revenue Expenditure Composition of Revenue Expenditure 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% F.F.26 254.00 224.82 0. 25.22 247.61 1.Y 2003. out of about 1.31 CAGR Revenue Expenditure Establishment Expenses Administrative Expenses Operations and Maintenance Interest and Finance Charges Program Expenses Revenue Grants.Y 2003-04 F.993.Y 200402 03 04 05 71% 78% 75% 75% 15% 13% 12% 9% 14% 11% 14% 11% Others O&M Establishment The key findings from an analysis of Composition of Revenue Expenditure are as follows 81 .00 242.70% 0.Y 2001.888.61% 4.Y 2002.56 0.15 19.52 178.62 35.00 -100.232.99% -7.34 1.497.68% 5.F.673.Y 2001-02 F.89 1.19 1. Contributions and Subsidies Miscellaneous Expenses 4.47 226.Y 2004-05 Rs (in Lakhs) Rs (in Lakhs) Rs (in Lakhs) Rs (in Lakhs) 1.00 193.52 0.49 0.51 0.000 total properties only 45000 properties have been assessed.02 0.25 46.475.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar The revenue demand and collection mechanisms are very poor.326.65 26. Proper survey of the properties and collection procedures can increase the property tax demand to an estimated amount of Rs 5-7 Crores.03% 0.Y 2002-03 F.11 13.75 -6.

83 156.00 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 62.22 13.95 0.Y 2004-05.98 2.49 0.63 242. Establishment Expenditure as a percentage of own sources of income (tax and non-tax) is very high.00 40.45 19.00 0.02 18.Y 2003-04 F. The Break up of the Capital Receipts of the Council for last four years is stated in the following table: Table 7: Capital Receipts of the Ajmer Municipal Council Particulars Actuals Actuals Actuals Actuals F.Y 2001-02 F.00 48.00 11. they account for over 5.00 0.56 251.57 382.88 Capital Receipts Grants.6 times.57 0.51 11.93 20.00 60.72 0. Capital Receipts The Council funds its Capital works mostly by grants from the Central and State Government under different project schemes.Y 2004-05 Rs (in Lakhs) Rs (in Lakhs) Rs (in Lakhs) Rs (in Lakhs) 563.37 502.01 0.30 10.00 0.24 76. The ratio of Revenue Expenditure to Revenue Income is as high as .03 Others Sale of Land including one time lease Grants 82 . Contributions for Specific purposes Secured Loans Unsecured Loans Deposits Received Deposit Works Other Liabilities (Other Liabilities constitutes sale proceeds from Land and one time receipt of lease) The Composition of Capital Receipts of Ajmer Municipal Council can be depicted in the following figure Figure 4: Composition of Capital Receipts Composition of Capital Receipts 100.00 129.00 42. The Capital Receipts of the Council does not display any specific trend during the last four years. leaving little or no surplus for capital planning and expenditure.81 584.00 46.26 85.00 70.01 0.00 67.99 9.Y 2002-03 F.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Establishment Expenses Constitutes about 75 % of the total Expenditure.00 51.68 0.64 317.95 in F.00 80.44 0.00 0.00 0.05 23. due to which the Council is not able to undertake any proper capital planning.00 32.

00 0.00 0.06 520.00 80.90 50.00 319.46 0.62 95.Y 2004-05 Rs (in Lakhs) Rs (in Lakhs) Rs (in Lakhs) Rs (in Lakhs) 433.43 Development 83 .50 Repayment of Loan and Deposits 30.25 58.00 40.01 19.81 437.80 85.34 0.00 19.00 0.00 0.Y 2002-03 F.00 0.70 295.19 85.00 0. Grants from the Central and State government constitutes as high as 86% of the total Capital Receipts. Figure 5: Composition of Capital Expenditure Composition of Capital Expenditure 100.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar The above composition clearly shows the sole dependence on Grants for Capital Works. advances and deposits Other Assets Grants.00 0.00 20.22 0. The break up of the Capital Expenditure by the Ajmer Municipal Council for the last four years is stated in the following table: Table 8: Capital Expenditure of Ajmer Municipal Council Particulars Actuals Actuals Actuals Actuals F.00 0.00 0. .05 51.00 130.00 218.19 166.43 6.19 155.60 31.00 0.55 0.00 0.63 52.00 257. Capital Expenditure The Major heads of Capital Expenditure for Council are on roads and development works carried out in accordance with the guidelines of various schemes.75 29.82 17.00 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 21. Contributions for Specific purposes The following figure depicts the composition of Capital Expenditure of AMC for last four years.00 0.74 0.Y 2001-02 F.94 Fixed Assets 61.00 88.00 0.00 0.65 34.00 60.00 0.Y 2003-04 F.00 0.91 Capital Expenditure Fixed Assets Capital Work-in-Progress Investments – General Fund Investments – Other Funds Stock in hand Loans.

Y 2004-05 Wherever the growth is inconsistent. 11. the items of income and expenditure have been assumed to grow at a rate of 5% 84 .9 Financial Projections (Business as Usual) The following table summarises the Projected Revenue Income. Out of a total Grants amounting to Rs 503 lakhs received by the Council.8 Financial Improvement Plan A Financial Improvement Plan is a Multi Year Financial operating plan prepared by projecting financials on a “Business As Usual” basis (using a simple CAGR) and then superimposing the financial implications of specific financial improvement initiatives.Y 2003-04 and F.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar The above figure shows that most of the Capital Expenditure incurred by ULB is on the utilisation of the grants from the Central and State Government. Grants amounting to Rs 320 were utilised during the year.Y 2002-03 .1. Revenue Expenditure and Revenue surplus/ (Deficit) for the next ten years The various underlying assumptions for preparation of these projections are • • The various items of income and expenditure have been projected on the basis of CAGR (Compounded Annual Growth Rate). computed on the basis of actual figures for the F. 11. however the ULB is not able to make full utilisation of the grants from the Central and State Government.Y 2001-02.1. F. F.

41 (200.941.487.65) 3.78 2.970.Y 2011.63 (12.Y 2014.50 2.782.F.440.962.448.693.49 75.F.491.35 88.F.107.F.14 (84.Y 2005.20 (46.Y 201506 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 2.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Table 9: Financial Projections (Business as Usual) Particulars Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected F.F.05 2.03 3.359.46) 3.F.24 3.38) 3.05 60.823.Y 2012.112.170.912.567.83 2.15 41.692.93 3.F.01 4.F.67 3.Y 2008.Y 2007.82 20.280.97 3.40) Revenue Receipts-(A) Revenue Expenditure-(B) Revenue Surplus/(Deficit)=(A)-(B) (Figures are in Rs Lakhs) 85 .25) 3.27 2.Y 2010.02 2.608.98 2.93 (128.Y 2013.82 3.Y 2009.45 2.28 (5.F.784.00) 3.293.632.Y 2006.66 2.F.

It is desirable to increase the current rate of Rs 1. to make good the loss of Octroi income of Urban Local Bodies.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 11. to increase the income from pilgrimage tax Compensation in lieu of Octroi The ULBs were charging Octroi on the Goods coming into the Municipal Limits from outside.Y 2001-02. stabilising at 85% in F. The next reassessment has been assumed to be in F. On the Basis of Assessment the Current Demand is expected to be around Rs 2. assuming an increase of 10% every year.Y 2006-07. with year to year increase of 5%. 2005 provides revision of assessment list once in three Years.The Collection efficiency for the arrear demand is expected to be about 40% in F.Y 2006-07 for Compensation in Lieu of Octroi has been prepared.Y 200607.11 crores and arrear demand is expected to be around Rs 6. The Collection efficiency for the current demand is expected to be 60% from F. The Projections from F.Y 2011-12.96 crores. the State Government is giving grant in aid every month based on actual Octroi income for the year 1997-98.Y 2015-16. on the passengers coming to Ajmer outside 51 Kms at the rate of Rs 1 per passenger. stabilising at 85% in F.e. With the abolition of Octroi w.10Proposed Financial Initiatives The following financial initiatives have been proposed to assist the AMC augment its existing revenue base. The Second State Finance Commission has requested the State Government to restore the annual increase in octroi grant to 10%. The Rajasthan Municipalities Bill.f 1st August 1998. The annual increase of 10% has been reduced to 5% from F. The financial impact of these initiatives has also been discussed below: Improving Collections from House Tax AMC is currently conducting House to House Survey for assessment of the property tax demand on the basis of Unit Area Method. Increase in Rental Income 86 . Improvements in Collection of Pilgrimage Tax AMC is currently collecting Pilgrimage Tax from RSRTC (Rajasthan State Roadways Transport Corporation). The Assessed Properties are expected to grow annually at 2%. with an increase of 10% every Year. The rate of Rs 1 per passenger is as per 1990 agreement. with a year to year increase of 5%.1. It is assumed that reassessment would lead to yearly increase of demand by 10%.Y 09-10.

which can lead to increase of Fees from Grant of permit to 5 times. It is assumed that from 2006-07. It is assumed that proper survey. Increase in income from License Fees Currently AMC is receiving license fee from 288 Hotels and Restaurants and Food license from about 1000 establishments. From F. is expected to increase substantially. would lead to estimated increase of about 25% in revenue from license fees in F.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Ajmer Municipal Council has about 738 shops.Y 2007-08. The Implementation of a Geographical Information System would be of great help in identifying the total demand from license fees.Y 2006-07. General Grant General Grant is the untied grant. Increase in Fees for Grant of Permit AMC is currently charging the Building Plan Sanction fees.Y 2008-09 would increase to at least three times of the income in F. in accordance with the present rates. A proper survey of all the Licensees should be taken by the ULB to identify all the current license holders and the potential license holders. which is received by the ULB on the basis of population as per the immediately preceding census.50 on the basis of 1991 census. only from the Plans which are coming for approval to ULB. The rent agreements should have inbuilt clause for year to year increase of the rents The revision of the Rental agreements would lead to a substantial increase in the income of the ULB.Y 2006-07.Y 2008-09 (refer table 6). The rent for these shops has not been revised for a long time. the Income from Fees for Grant of Permit. Licenses are not renewed every year and there is no demand or bill raised by the Municipality for the same. given on rent. this grant would be available to the AMC 87 . The Rental agreements should be revised. With the Implementation of GIS in F. The general grant being received by Ajmer Municipal Council is Rs 17.Y 2009-10. With the Introduction of GIS. income is expected to grow at 5% annually . AMC will be able to know all the buildings being constructed in the City. It is assumed that income in F. For most of the shops the Rental agreements were entered way back in 1983. A year to year growth rate of 5% is assumed from F. The general presumption is that only 10-20% of the total buildings being constructed come for the approval.

stabilising at 90% in F. with an annual increase of 5%.Y 2014-15. 88 . the general grant would be available to the ULBs on the basis of 2011 census.Y 2010-11.Y 2006-07.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar on the basis of 2001 census. From 2012-13.Y 2006-07. Improving collections from Lease Money AMC collects lease money from the colonies transferred from the UIT. with an annual increase of 5%. The arrear demand (including interest) is about Rs 89 lakhs and current demand is Rs 8 Lakhs. stabilising at 90% in F.Collection Efficiency for the Arrear Demand is assumed to be at 50% in F. It is assumed that the current lease income would grow at 10%. Collection Efficiency for the Current Demand is assumed to be at 70% in F. Currently AMC is conducting a survey to identify the current and arrear demand from the lease income.

05 2.318.256.59 3.067. 89 .76 1.Y 2014.Y 2011.F. Revenue Expenditure and Revenue Surplus/Deficit for the next ten years have been projected as follows Table 10: Projected Financial Statements Particulars F.20 3.805.Y 201507 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 3.10 624.Y 2008.487.783.782.28 3.Y 2013.F.912.F.93 4.632.F.96 5.38 1.072.41 581. the Revenue Surplus will stand at Rs 2067.Y 2009.14 3.39 6.693.696.481.112.51 4.754.49 2.40) lakhs.535.04 4.46 2.76 1.77 3.15 2.82 3.941.37 5.F.69 944.89 812.01 4.Y 2007.11Projected Financial Statements On the basis of above Financial Initiatives the Revenue Income.Y 2012.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 11.1.237.04 3.63 3.Y 2006.F.491.16 Revenue Receipts-(A) Revenue Expenditure-(B) Revenue Surplus/(Deficit)=(A)-(B) (All Figures are in Rs Lakhs) A comparative with the Base Case Scenario shows that by 2015-16.57 2.23 1.F.F.293.398.Y 2010.F.16 lakhs with the implementation of the suggested financial strategies against the Base Case figure of Rs (200.104.170.72 698.057.228.

61% 90 .75% A perusal of the above summarised financial statements will reveal the following There is a sharp decline in the total receipts of the UIT Ajmer at a CAGR of -5.11.95 0. Ajmer 11.95 2902.1 Organisation Structure of UIT The UIT is responsible for carrying out the Improvement works in the Ajmer City.37 2162.948 0.17 2195.Finances (Rs in Lakhs) 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 3062.61% -6.22 235.903 CAGR -5.48 224.124 2004-05 2431.896 1.46 2547.89 1937.06 159.97 2863.49 -315.2.2 Urban Improvement Trust.11 0. The sources of the UIT Finance can be broadly summarised in the following figure Figure 6: Overview of UIT Finances UIT Finance Receipts Payments Revenue Receipts Urban Assessment Rental Income Interest Miscellaneous Receipts Capital Receipts Sale of Land Loans Grants Others Revenue Expenditure Capital Expenditure Establishment Expenses Administrative Operation and Maintenance Expenses Interest Others Land Acquisition Expenditure in Development Works Expenditure on Buildings Expenditure on Informal Settlements The summarised financials of the UIT Ajmer for the last four years are as follows: Table 11: Summarised Financials of UIT-Ajmer Particulars Total Receipts Total Expenditure Surplus/Deficit Operating Ratio(TE/TR) UIT.

33 81.24 6. The details of the Revenue Receipts for the last four years are stated below Table 12 : Revenue Receipts –UIT Ajmer Revenue Receipts (Rs in Lakhs) Particulars 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 Income from Hire Purchase 73. does not leaving sufficient surplus for proper capital planning.46 7.99 52.24 590.68 8.06 Rental Income 43.11 12.51 130.38% 0.44 11.22 18.65 9.91% 11.00 24.55 2004-05 36. Rental Income and Miscellaneous Receipts.99 0% 2001-02 7.80 93.22 56.39 8.99 20.87 Interest 126.49 109.17 2004-05 2002-03 2003-04 Income from Hire Purchase The key findings from an analysis of the Composition of Revenue Receipts are as follows: 91 .15 236.59 18.60% The Composition of Revenue Receipts of the UIT for the last four years can be summarised in the following figure: Figure 7: Composition of Revenue Receipts Miscallenous Income Composition of Revenue Receipts 100% 21.00 739.88 Income from Regularisation of Agricultural land Interest Rental Income 20% Urban Assessment 11.20 28.64 1143.58 40% 8.37 60% 37.34% 82.78 66.48 47.36 Urban Assessment 21.36 3.19% -17.56 Income from Regularisation of Agricultural land 0.43 585.01 109.10 1.41 21.The operating Ratio (Total Expenditure/Total Receipts) is close to 1.77 Total 335.82 CAGR -16.25 130.54 82.64 64.12 40.93 Miscallenous Income 70.46 16.02 80% 0.95 6.16 166.45 22. Revenue Receipts-UIT The Revenue Receipt of the UIT mostly consists of Urban Assessment.11 143.

83 lakhs.73 130.00 80.27 70.09 The Composition of Revenue Expenditure of the UIT for last four years can be summarised in the following figure: Figure 8: Composition of Revenue Expenditure Composition of Revenue Expenditure 100. The details of the Revenue Expenditure of the UIT for last four years are stated below: Table 13 : Revenue Expenditure UIT. contributing around 45% in F.00 40.91 66.41 194.74 30. The 60% of the Urban Assessment charges needs to be paid to the State Government.5 times of the total receipts for F.72 167.00 62.23 49.78 185.78 2.51 1.32 1. which is about 1.Composition of Urban Assessment in the total revenue receipts of the UIT is increasing.94 33.15 Total 160.12 3.10 Establishment Expenses A perusal of the Composition of Revenue Expenditure will reveal the following More than two-third of the expenses amount to Establishment Expenses No expenditure being incurred by UIT on Operation and Maintenance of the assets.00 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 65. 92 .42 0.Y 2004-05.22 117.Revenue Expenditure (Rs in Lakh) Particulars 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 Establishment Expenses 105.82 31.00 0.00 60.81 Office Expenses 48.27 0.48 Office Expenses Survey Expenses 65. Administrative Expenses and Operation and Maintenance Expenses.Y 2003-04 Their has been a sharp decline in the Income from Hire Purchase and Rental Income of about 16-17% Revenue Expenditure The Revenue Expenditure of the UIT mainly consists of Establishment Expenses. the liability of the UIT at the end of F.56 61.27 3.00 121.Y 2003-04 amounts to Rs 260.00 20.13 Survey Expenses 6.22 29.

Loans and Grants.05 Development works in regularised Agricultural land Deposits and Security The key findings from an analysis of Capital Receipts are as follows Composition of Sale of Land is increasing in total Capital Receipts.28 Development works in regularised Agricultural land 353.77 Income from Stores 7.93 Total 2621.21 33.28 64.60 The Composition of Capital Receipts of UIT for last four years can be summarised in the following Figure: Figure 2 : Composition of Capital Receipts Advances Composition of Capital Receipts 100.00 60. The Details of the Capital Receipts of the UIT for the last four years are stated below: Table 14: Capital Receipts Capital Receipts (Rs in Lakhs) Particulars 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 Sale of Land 615.16 Advances 732.Y 2004-05.50 45.24 746.15 Grants 5.95 5.00 84.82 9.42 39.86 55.00 80.00 0.Capital Receipts.54 Income from Stores 52.84 191.95 8.25 Grants 74.46 40.47 160.89 1008.00 40.53 18.65 27.89 153.83 651.00 6.34 773.82 23.15 8.92 105.00 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 Sale of Land 30.49 43.01 0.35 25.44 Deposits and Security 793.11 578. the sale of land constitutes around 43 % of total receipts.95 1874.84 135.17 815. 93 .49 44.00 20.77 1751.78 65. In F.UIT Capital Receipts of the UIT broadly consists of Receipts from sale of Land.54 2.

00 258.99 594.76 Expenditure on UIT building other Building 11.00 77.66 58.15 Payment to Municipal Council 38.00 Income Advance Adjustment including Employee 184.07 67. due to which UIT is not able to do proper Capital Planning.62 The key findings from analysis of Capital Expenditure are as follows The Capital Expenditure of the UIT is not uniform and the total capital expenditure is on a decreasing side.91 162.00 36.00 96.The Grants constitutes a very small portion of the total Capital receipts of about 9% . Capital Expenditure Capital Expenditure of the UIT mainly consists of Expenditure on Scheme and NonScheme Areas The Details of the Capital Expenditure of the UIT for the last four years are stated below: Table 15: Capital Expenditure UIT-Capital Expenditure (Rs in Lakh) Particulars 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 Expenditure on Schemes and non1512.93 Development Works 26.53 69.36 loan and advances Total 2639.88 94.01 Settlements Purchase of Land 48. 94 .18 Repayment of Deposit 576.00 179.00 0.90 62. The UIT is not able to make full utilization of the grants received.00 39.27 72.90 6.76 1733.52 58.09 48.58 1176.34 104.69 and kiosks Store Expenses 93.00 75.81 Repayment of Loan 115.48 1151.36 26.00 99.40 205.35 62.09 Schemes Expenditure on Slums and Imformal 30. the capital receipts of the UIT are irregular .00 661.50 181.58 187..81 1955.09 52.44 25.32 2596.64 0.40 Government share in Regularisation 0.79 271.

Y 2001-02. F.11. computed on the basis of actual figures for the F. F. 95 .Y 2002-03 .Y 2004-05 Wherever the growth is inconsistent. the items of income have been assumed to grow at a rate of ten percent per annum and the items of expenditure have been assumed to grow at a rate of 5 percent per annum.2 Financial Operating Plan Financial Projections The various underlying assumptions for preparation of these projections are The various items of income and expenditure have been projected on the basis of CAGR (Compounded Annual Growth Rate).Y 2003-04 and F.2.

94 0.25 501.39 0.43 397.99 0.00 222.10 446.65 272.68 213.79 184.66 388.00 0.48 0.72 285.96 24.22 352.51 203.00 2014-15 1150.23 2006-07 536.00 0.40 175.57 14.99 629.05 259.65 0.40 2008-09 649.87 704.21 786.39 704.02 439.Table 16 : Projections.00 2015-16 1265.00 0.41 6.48 979.50 235.92 561.47 193.28 8.09 496.00 2013-14 1046.17 878.76 2009-10 714.56 0.08 0.00 0.84 878.84 0.UIT Financials Particulars Revenue Receipts-(A) Revenue Expenditure-(B) Revenue Surplus/(Deficit)=(A)-(B) Less: Principal Repayment of Loan Interest Payment of Loan Repayment of Outstanding Amount to State government of Urban Assessment Operating Surplus 2005-06 644.78 979.00 0.08 786.91 223.95 246.62 1.20 2010-11 785.00 2011-12 864.77 222.68 111.46 213.11 629.04 7.00 2012-13 950.44 468.39 2007-08 590.84 3.36 561.94 (All figures are in Rs Lakhs) 96 .21 4.00 0.

71 0.55 Colonies Two STPs (50+ 8) MLD 9.23 0.67 2.29 2.Y 2010.29 2.67 2.00 Area Sewerage Network in Newly Developed 2.52 1.Y 2012.F.71 3.90 15.69 Sewers in Anasagar Zone Laying of Secondary Sewers in City 2.00 Zone Civil and Electro-Mechanical works of 0.71 0.71 0.F.85 7.50 1.Y 2007.49 0.11.Y 2009.49 1.90 7.F.50 0.72 1.42 Km of Drains 0.49 0.90 1.53 Aforestation and Soil conservation measures Desiltation of Anasagar lake Equipment for Deweeding Construction of community toilets complexes Public Awareness and Training Lab for Water quality monitoring & biological research Creation of Lake conservation Authority 0.49 0.72 1.20 SPS in Anasagar Zone Laying of Secondary Sewers in Dargah 2.15 0.29 2.50 0.31 0.30 Name of the Sector Drainage Waste Water Lake Rejuvenation .88 Km of 7.72 1.80 Drains Construction of New drains in New 3.3 Capital Investment Plan Projects Investments Required (Rs in Crores) F.15 0.F.31 0.29 2.Y 2011.91 3.04 Lining and Restructuring of 18.23 0.71 0.91 0.23 0.50 0.85 15.00 9.60 8.91 3.49 0.49 3.Y 2008.68 3.00 18.91 3.00 1.00 Vishramsthali’s Design & Supervision Consultancy Cost 0.23 0.91 3.23 0.F.00 4.10 0.61 Dargah Area Construction of toilets at 0.00 2.43 Areas Construction of Public toilets near 0.00 Laying of Secondary and Tertiary 7.90 0.F.10 0.52 0.67 8.72 1.Total 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 Desilting of 8.23 0.72 1.35 1.91 19.29 11.Y 2006.35 6.68 3.

00 2.00 2.00 25.00 Projects Land Use. Spatial Development and Housing Roads and Transport 35.00 25.50 20.00 4.Y 2008.75 10.65 0.F.00 2.00 4.00 4.30 0.Y 2006.75 1.50 10.65 2.00 5.27 Solid Waste Management Equipment for solid waste management Solid waste composting plant Laboratory for solid waste treatment plant Awareness Decentralising wholesale commercial activities Large scale housing development EWS Housing Traffic Improvement of Hathi Bhata Area Traffic Improvement of Railway Station Area Improvement of road geometry for Pushkar road.00 20.F.00 20.Name of the Sector Investments Required (Rs in Crores) F.Y 2011. Construction of ROB/RUB 2.00 25.00 98 .00 0.F.00 25.14 2.14 1.F.00 25.00 4.00 20.Y 2010.30 0.F.00 15.00 20.Y 2007.00 2.00 5.00 100.00 70.00 5.00 2.00 10. Traffic improvement of Dargah Area Decongestion of Railway Station Area Road widening and improvement of Taragarh road Widening and strengthening of internal roads Shifting of Pvt.00 25.30 5.00 20.Y 2009.00 0.00 150.00 2.00 30.Total 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 1.00 4.F.00 1.Y 2012.00 35.00 20.00 5. Bus terminal from Daulat bagh to HBU Ext.00 20.

00 10.Total 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 0.33 1.33 0.Name of the Sector Projects Tourism and Conservation Pre-paid counters at bus stands and railway station Establishment of tourist information centers Promotion of Ajmer as a tourist destination Development works in and around Dargah Sharif Construction of New Vishram sthali A Promenade around Anasagar near ACR Conservation of Heritage monuments Development of Arts and Crafts village Rope way from Dargah to Taragarh Sound and light show at Tara garh fort Investments Required (Rs in Crores) F.00 3.Y 2006.00 5.44 68.F.F.Y 2007.50 2.63 99.00 3.Y 2008.00 1.00 116.Y 2009.19 141.F.F.68 65.00 5.00 8.00 2.F.Y 2011.00 Total (All Sectors) 99 .Y 2010.33 1.05 0.41 99.00 2.63 113.00 2.25 10.00 3.Y 2012.00 2.50 2.00 703.25 1.F.05 0.00 8.00 10.50 20.99 10.

4237 6.75 57.464 9.575 5.46 36.64 563.787 24 75.1936 Total 100 . Spatial Development and Housing Roads and Transport Tourism and Conservation 175.385 23.341 0.341 0.296 192 Institutional Strengthening Water Supply Waste Water Drainage Lake Rejuvenation Solid Waste Management Land Use.728 6.3992 17.3992 140.968 29.705 70.41 7.6 45.683 0.87 240 AMC and UIT State JNNURM Rs Contribution Government in Crores) (Rs in Crores) (Rs in Crores) 0.83 94.237 62.3896 49.6385 2.246 3.6385 2.246 3.Table 17: Capital Investment Plan-Ajmer Name of the Sector Total Investment Required (Rs in Crores) 6.683 5.992 17.705 70.4237 6.108 18.787 24 9.05 703.575 5.

SECTION II PUSHKAR .

The town is approached by road only. The most sacred being the Brahma Temple. It is located at latitude 260 27’ North and longitude 740 37’East. The same road road links Pushkar to Merta (70km) and Nagaur (150km). Pushkar lies on the eastern fringe of the Thar desert. via Ajmer. Occasionally rainfall is received during January and February. During the months of April to September strong winds prevail resulting in the formation of sand dunes.2 Regional setting Pushkar is situated 12km north west of Ajmer. The height of the hills range between 650m to 856m. PUSHKAR 1. at an elevation of 530m above mean sea level. This holy town is situated around the sacred Pushkar Lake/ Sarovar in the valley formed between two parallel hills of Aravali mountain ranges running south-west to north-east. The prevailing wing direction is southwest to north-east.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 1 1. while in winter the maximum mean temperature is 25 – 10 0C. 102 . The hottest months are May and June with maximum temperature of around 45 0C.3 Climate The climate of the town is semi-arid with dry and hot summer and cool winter. The monsoon season is relatively short from July to August with average rainfall ranging from 400 to 600mm. The nearest rail head is Ajmer. 1.1 CITY PROFILE Introduction Pushkar is one of the major pilgrimage centres in India with over 500 odd temples in and around the city. The town is linked to other pilgrim centres such as Mathura and Ujjain. State Highway 18 connects Pushkar to Ajmer.

In 1760 Shiva Ghat was renovated by Govind Rao the Maratha governor of Ajmer. such acts also enhanced their status. This suggests that travellers came here explicitly on pilgrimage. A number of religious buildings were commissioned during this time. The discovery pof punched coins as well as Greek and Kushan coins push back the existence of Pushkar to the 4th century B. Maharaja Man Singh of Amber had the Raj Ghat and Man temple constructed at Pushkar. The British organised it into a regular cattle fair. The inscriptions found at Sanchi attest to its existence in late 2nd century BC. There was no new construction or renovation. In the 12th century under the Chauhan rule there took place a renaissance in Pushkar. and forgotten till the beginning of 9th Century AD. With the beginning of Mughal rule in India Pushkar’s fortunes were eclipsed. Post Independence the royal families gave up much of their holdings in Pushkar. According to Padam Purana. The name ‘Pushkar’ is derived from the word “Pushp” meaning flower and “Kar” meaning hand. The pilgrimage tax was revoked. However it is amongst the oldest pilgrimage centres in India. In 1956 the Maharaja of Jaipur handed over the Jaipur Ghat as well as the Man Palace to the government. Bundi. Under the British rule too patronage at Pushkar continued. After the Yagna was performed by Brahma. 103 .C. This was later converted into the Tourist Bunglow. the lake was created by the falling of a lotus from Lord Brahma’s hand. Rich businessmen who settled in Ajmer donated generously towards construction of religious buildings.4 Mythology associated with Pushkar As per Hindu mythology. 1. Pushkar was razed to the ground. Taxes on the sales were used to develop other facilities. The Chauhan kings extended their patronage to this holy place. Lord Brahma was in search of a suitable place for a vedic yagna (sacrifice). Pushkar received special attention from courts of Amber. During the invasions of Huns. What makes the discovery of these coins is that Pushkar is nowhere near a trade route. A dip in the holy Sarovar is believed to absolve man of all his sins. Religious processions were banned and pilgrim tax was imposed.5 History of Pushkar The origins of Pushkar are unknown. One of them was Pushkar and Brahma decided to perform his yagna there.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 1. While contemplating. The Marathas also sponsored a number of structures at Pushkar. So did its neighbour Ajmer under the patronage of Akbar who became a staunch believer of Mouinuddin Chisti’s Dargah. For Rajput leaders visits to Pushkar and subsequent donations were not only religiously motivated. Apart from a few silver coins of the Gupta period there is not much information of that era. while Rana Pratap had the Varah temple renovated. With the formation of the Rajput coalition under the leadership of Mewar Pushkar once again flourished. In 1757 Anaji Scindia had the Koteshwar Mahadev temple constructed. Pushkar became a holy place. Over the years the annual commemoration of Brahma’s Yagna on Kartik Purnima developed from a solely religious event to an informal market place where people bought and sold various agricultural products and cattle. The Kot Tirth Ghat constructed by Daulat Rao Scindia. a lotus fell from his hand on the earth and water spurted from three places. Bikaner and Jaisalmer.

which is greater than 25% of the resident population. During cattle fair tourist traffic is very high around 16000 persons/day. at the rate of 2% annual growth).5 17.6.1 Demographic characteristics Population Growth The present population of Ajmer is estimated at around 16000 (in 2005. making Pushkar an important destination. as there isn’t any major economic activity to boost migration. Pushkar Lake and its surrounding areas which area the hub of activity also account for the highest population density (923pph). 104 . the city has a high floating population (avg. Table 1. 1.6 22. The average town density is very low 45ppH.6 17.8 28. 4400persons/day).7 Population Growth 25000 20000 Population 15000 10000 5000 0 1951 1961 1971 1981 1991 2001 2011 2021 Year Source: Census of India .km divided into administrative 15 wards.6 1. Over the last decade there has been an increase in tourist population. Decadal Growth 769 638 2027 2138 3283 2600 3086 Decadal Growth Rate 13. This population growth of the town is largely due to natural growth.36 sq.5 27.0 9.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 1. Unlike other towns population of Pushkar in the last five decades has grown very slowly from 5934 in 1951 to 14789 in 2001.6.2001 Issues Apart the resident population.2 Density Pushkar is a small town of 3.1: Population Growth of Ajmer Year 1951 1961 1971 1981 1991 2001 Projected 2011 2021 Population (lakh) 5934 6703 7341 9368 11506 14789 17389 20475 Avg.

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar

Wardwise Denity (Persons/Ha)
1000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

1.6.3

Literacy Pushkar has a fairly high literacy rate of 80.6% against the State average of 63.6%. The
town has fairly good education facilities. There are 7 primary schools, 1 middle school, 2 senior secondary schools (1 each for boys and girls) and 1 college for Girls. Boys commute to Ajmer for pursuing higher education.

1.7 1.7.1

Economic Development Economic Base
The working population of Pushkar comprises 31.4% of the total population of the city, of which 90% population constitutes main workers whereas the rest 10% fall under marginal workers category.

1.7.2

Occupational Pattern
Tourism is the main economic driver of the town, which promotes other key sectors such as trade and commerce, transportation and household industries. Like any other pilgrimage town, even in Pushkar has around 300 odd temples majority, of Brahmins are engaged in religion based economic source, which is their traditional occupation. However due to increase in foreign tourists many young Brahmins have set up their own businesses. The trade and commerce is related to temple needs and caters to pilgrims and tourists. There are no wholesale activities in town. There are 95 hotels and rest houses and 24 restaurants /cafeteria. The in Pushkar provide livelihood to a large section of the population. The cattle fair is the main economic activity in the region. Most of the local people make 80% of the annual income during the Pushkar Fair. Garment manufacture is the only significant Industrial activity which employs around 5000 persons, most of these workers come nearby villages. The household industries include – traditional handicrafts and production of rose by-products eg. Gulkand, rose oil, rose water etc.

Denity (Persons/Ha)

105

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar

Occupational Distribution
Primary sector 10% Services 40% Household industry 11% Construction 8% Trade and Business 24% Transport, storage & communication 7%

Source: Pushkar Master Plan 2001-2003

106

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar

The Vision for the City8 is:

““Pushkar aspires to be a centre of religious and cultural tourism based on the historic temples and rural cultural events like the Pushkar Fair by retaining the historical character and conserving the built and natural heritage.”

8

As discussed in the Stakeholder Workshop held in Pushkar on 21 February, 2006.

107

parks etc.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 2 2.4% and 1% respectively of the total developed area.2 30 1177 100 Land Use -1991 Waterbodies 9% Gardens/ Nurseries 4% Open spaces 12% Residential 15% Commercial 5% Govt.3 15 1.2 16 6. For centuries the town has evolved around the lake without any planned intervention.37 sq. This indicates that there is scarcity of land for recreational open spaces. There is no area under industrial use in Pushkar.3 220 19. This is evident from the road network and lack of open spaces in the town.6 600 52.4 56 22.1 2.8 32 2.5 2.5 1.1.2 8. Of the total developed area the largest land is under public-semi public use (45%) signifying the religious character of the town. nallahs.km) of which developed area accounts for 330 acres (1.km) while the remaining is under sand dunes. this rule is not followed strictly. Table 2. along the main corridor from Rangji temple to Brahma temple is a key feature.5 3. which have been further reduced by encroachments by shopkeepers and vendors.36sq. 1% Transport 17% Recreation 3% Public/Semi Public 34% Source: Pushkar Master Plan 2001-2003 • • • • • • • Area under recreational and governmental use is 3. Area under transport is (22%) followed by residential (20%). water bodies and agriculture. The internal road network of the town consists of narrow winding lanes15-20’ wide. The commercial land use is attributed to large number of hotels in the town. Although vehicular traffic is prohibited on the internal roads. Prominent occurrence of mixed land uses. Public/Semi Public Recreation Transport Open spaces Gardens/ Nurseries Water bodies Total Urban Area Land Use 1991 Area (Acres) % 50 20.7 40 13 30 330 100 Land Use 2011 Area (Acres) % 273 23. (63 hotels in a 330 Acres) 108 .1 LAND USE AND SPATIAL GROWTH Land Use Existing Situation As per the existing land use plan the total developed area is municipal area is 720 acres (0. Similarly there is inadequacy of government office buildings.0 114 46.1: Land Use 1991 and 2011 Landuse Residential Commercial Govt.8 7 0.

LAND USE MAP – PUSHKAR .1991 .

Most of the ghats are used only during Kartik Purnima. banning all vehicular traffic in the heritage zone during the day time. The large number of hotels in and around the ghats further burden the existing limited urban services and destroy the traditional morphology of the town. 2.clearly shows lack of effective development controls. and there is a trend of these public areas being converted into private spaces. With the large influx of tourists a lot of restaurants have come up in the old buildings.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 2.3 Major initiatives / Projects Pedestrianisation of the heritage precinct Provision of parking spaces along the periphery of the heritage precinct – near Brahma Temple. This reflects absolute lack of urban design element.3 Development Objectives To retain the pedestrian scale of the town around the heritage precinct. while the rest of the year they lie unused without any maintenance. Unused ghats to be converted into public / cultural institutions. The new developments in the town.2 Strategies To designate the core area as a heritage precinct and to exercise development controls Incompatible land uses such as hotels on ghats and roof top restaurants to be banned as they are incongruous with the urban character of the heritage zone.1. A defined parikrama path is proposed to be designated with adequate street furniture. 2. Maximum transformation is seen on the main spine of the town from Brahma Temple to Ranji Temple. thus destroying the townscape. Many dharamshalas are being in discriminately converted into hotels. There is a large scale neglect of built heritage because of over use or under use. The town is to be declared as a pedestrian town. No concentrated growth in the form of housing is proposed as there is no housing deficiency. by conservation of built heritage and introduction of appropriate urban design guidelines. As a result the monuments are altered indiscriminately disregarding their historical value.1. The new construction is in sharp contrast to the traditional character. 110 . Deficiency is only in terms of formal open spaces which are proposed in the peripheral area where land is available. Temple trusts undertake repair and rehabilitation of the religious monuments such as temples and ghats without much emphasis on the conservation aspect. The percentage of public area is decreasing with the increase in commercialization.2 Issues There are also large building complexes along the Ghats which were built by princely state. Now after the abolition of privy purses most of them are left unused. Mela Ground. 2.

2.5 Project Summary Pedestrianisation of the heritage precinct o The Parikrama path around the lake. 1 2 3 Projects Pedestrianisation of the heritage precinct Provision of parking spaces Conservation of the abandoned Ghats Total Estimated Cost (Rs. Cr) 2. 2. No. No. 1 2 3 Projects Implementation Period Year Year Year 1 2 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 Pedestrianisation of the heritage precinct Provision of parking spaces Conservation of the abandoned Ghats 111 .City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Conservation of ancient temples and Ghats Conservation of the heritage precinct Setting up a Heritage Conservation Cell in Pushkar Municipal Board for implementing development controls. o Removal of encroachments on the streets o Provision of adequate street furniture and street lighting o Beautify the open spaces along the Parikrama path by landscaping Provision of parking spaces along the periphery of the heritage precinct – near Brahma Temple. which connects all the 52 ghats to be repaired and paved with stone to give it look of an ancient town.7 Sr. Conservation of the abandoned Ghats and historical buildings Sr. Projects would do not have negative impact of the environment.5 2 4.4 Basis of Prioritisation Projects which enhance the image of this historic town. Mela Ground.2 0. Short term project which can improve city level facilities Projects which do not require land acquisition.

182 ML and the capacity of OHSR is around 0.1 3. Water demand for various zones has been tabulated for year 2034 in following Table.1.1.809 9 Source :PHED 112 . currently which is also not in practice. Water Demand for Various Zones S. The distribution system of the town is not an organized one and is distributing some portion directly and some portion from existing OHSR and GLSR. The tube wells are situated at Rawat Dharamshala. The water is being pumped from CWR by 2 pumps of capacity 40 HP and 50 HP to the existing GLSR and OHSR. which requires only chlorination. Moreover 2 nos of tube wells are directly connected to distribution system. 3. Water Supply Zone Zone no-1 Zone no-2 Zone no-3 Demand (MLD) for 2034 2. Presently the rate of supply is 62 lpcd for domestic purpose and 40 lpcd for floating population.2 Water Treatment Water supply is solely dependent on ground water.1. six are partially pumping water into the Pushkar Lake and partially supplying to the city.5 % of the total population of the town. 2. The present supply for Pushkar town is 1. Remaining seven are dedicated for water supply in the city. design and demand assessment.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 3 3.1 WATER SUPPLY Existing Situation Source Currently a total thirteen tube-wells are meeting the demand of Pushkar9. which are having yield of approximately 9000 lph. which now create hydraulic imbalance in the distribution network resulting in abundance of water in some parts of the town and scarcity in the other areas. The Pushkar town has distribution network . tube well no 2 near Mela ground and tube well no 3 near hospital. The rising main diameter 150 mm AC pipe is feeding the GLSR and OHSR both simultaneously. Distribution lines have been laid without proper planning.655 1.400 litres at pump house.136 0.which has been developed over the past few decades and is still under stage of development. The capacity of GLSR is 0.54 ML. The coverage under water supply system is 92. These administrative zones do not reflect the physical distribution zoning of existing overhead service reservoirs and are interlinked. Out of these thirteen. 3. which is feeding CWR of capacity 1. No 1.053 MLD.3 Distribution system The existing water distribution of Pushkar town is divided into 3 zones.82. 3.

Establishing Customer Connection Meters To increase revenue it is proposed to establish customer connections meters.5 % to 95%. • Improvements in water distribution systems by establishing DMAs. The aim is to reduce the NRW up to 20-25%. For this construction of new reservoir dedicated for Pushkar fair area is proposed.16 ML 0.65 ML 0. For this a leak detection study is proposed.1. 3.4 Water supply for Pushkar Mela Presently water supply for Pushkar Mela is done through tankers and public stand posts.3 Strategy The following strategies are proposed to improve the Water Supply situation in town • Supply of water from Bisalpur dam / surface water source • Discouraging ground water extraction in order to raise the rapidly falling ground water table. 3. Although there is no information on NRW in Pushkar. CWR for Zone-1 & 3 Construction of following service reservoirs are proposed Particulars OHSR for Zone 3 CWR for proposed OHSR for Zone-3 CWR for existing OHSR in Zone1 Capacity 0. The objective is to supply water at least for five to six hours in a day. Water supply in Pushkar is solely dependent upon ground water. It is targeted to provide water supply at a rate of 40 lpcd during Pushkar Mela. • Reducing leakages and increasing customer connections. The outcomes of the study will help to carry out rehabilitation program of the water supply network based on the outcome of the study. our experiences in other cities in India show that about 30-40 % NRW is expected.4 ML Electro-Mechanical Works Pumping machineries to fill the proposed OHSR from the proposed GLSR Energy Efficiency Study To optimize the efficiency of the electro-mechanical machinery it is being proposed to carry out the energy efficiency study.2 Developmental objective It is proposed to increase the population coverage from 92. 3.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 3. 113 .4 Major initiatives/ Projects Construction of OHSR. It is targeted to supply water at the rate of 100 lpcd. The main development objective is to supply water from a surface water source. With the help of District Metering Areas it is planned to provide water at the tail end of the system with adequate pressure.

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Bulk Meters (3nos) For metering of water and to reduce the unaccounted for flow water ten bulk meters are proposed to install at remaining reservoirs that are not covered under RUIDP. Leak Detection Study and Rehabilitation Program for Water Supply System To reduce the non-revenue water and improve service delivery it is proposed to carry out leak detection study and rehabilitate the water supply system as per the findings.25 0.37 1.35 4. Approximately 4 DMAs are estimated to be prepared for Ajmer city.5 10. Project Name Construction of OHSR. 3.93 0. Establishing DMAs (4 DMAs) To solve the problem of uneven distribution and metering it is proposed to prepare district metering areas. CWR for Zone-1 & 3 Rising main and extension of Distribution Network for water supply from Bisalpur Electro-Mechanical Works Energy Efficiency Study Establishing Customer Connection Meters Establishing DMAs (4 DMAs) Leak Detection Study and Rehabilitation Program for Water Supply System Extension of Water Supply to New Colony Areas Bulk Meters (3nos) Construction of CWR for Pushkar Mela (4ML) Total Estimated Cost (Rs) Cr 1.20 0.6 Project summary The Projects as listed in the table below have been prioritised based on the above parameters.6 0. It is proposed to cover the future projected population. 3. Extension of Water Supply to New Colony Areas Pushkar is developing on Ajmer Pushkar road.098 0.80 0.5 Basis of Prioritization The projects are prioritised on the following basis Cost of the Project Projects resolving present drawbacks of the system.40 114 . Project profiles are provided in the Annex.29 0.

Government of Rajasthan. 115 . CWR for Zone-1 & 3 Rising main and extension of Distribution Network for water supply from Bisalpur Electro-Mechanical Works Energy Efficiency Study Establishing Customer Connection Meters Establishing DMAs (4 DMAs) Leak Detection Study and Rehabilitation Program for Water Supply System Extension of Water Supply to New Colony Areas Bulk Meters (3nos) Construction of CWR for Pushkar Mela (4ML) 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Institutional mechanism These project will be implemented by the PHED.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Phasing & implementation The following table outlines the proposed phasing of the projects identified above. Name of the Project Construction of OHSR.

3 Strategy The following strategies shall help to improve the Sewerage and Drainage system in town • Separation of sewer and drainage system in the city. The wastewater is pumped through two pumping stations i. 4. The treated wastewater is used for irrigation purpose. The system is facilitating the area adjacent to the lake. • Increase in house connections and strengthening sewer collection system.The total number of sewerage connections in the town are 868. The total length of laid trunk mains runs for a length of 5 Km. 4.2 MLD.1 % of the total population. Desilting of Open Sewers The sewers are chocked and causes flooding during rainy season. 4. • Treatment of sewage before disposal.e. one in each zone to the oxidation pond of capacity 0. the garbage chokes the sewerage system. The sewerage system is divided into two zones as Badi Basti and Choti Basti The present sewerage coverage in the city is 27. It has been estimated that total wastewater generation of the town is 1. The sewer system is passing through narrow streets hence cleaning/desilting of these sewers pose a problem.7 MLD for treatment.7 MLD is proposed to treat 100 % wastewater as well as to cater the future demand. 0. 116 . hence desilting of open sewers are proposed.1 SEWERAGE AND SANITATION Existing Situation The sewerage system in the town was laid in the year 1986-87. Public toilet for Pushkar fair To maintain proper sanitation condition during Pushkar mela. It is discussed in section on Drainage system that sewer lines and storm water drains are interconnected causing flooding during rainy season Due to the interconnections of drains and sewers.7 MLD Sewage treatment plant (STP) Present capacity of treatment is not sufficient.2 Developmental objective The main objective is to increase the sewerage network coverage and to improve the collection and treatment efficiency of the system.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 4 4. Hence a STP of 0. construction of public toilets is proposed.4 Major initiatives/ projects Laying of Sewer Network in IDSMT Colony and Parashar Colony and Uncovered area These areas are newly settled areas which are not covered under sewerage system. However desilting should be a regular practice.

Project Name STP 0.89 Phasing & implementation Name of the Project STP 0. 4. Project profiles are provided in the Annex.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Sewerage Network in New Areas It is proposed to cover the newly developed areas for projected population for future.7 MLD Laying of Sewer Network in IDSMT Colony and Parashar Colony and Uncovered area Desilting of Open Sewers Sewerage Network in New Area Public toilet for Pushkar fair 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Institutional mechanism for implementation These project will be implemented by the PHED. Government of Rajasthan 117 . 4.7 MLD Laying of Sewer Network in IDSMT Colony and Parashar Colony and Uncovered area Desilting of Open Sewers Sewerage Network in New Areas Public toilet for Pushkar fair Total Estimated Cost (Rs) Cr 0.50 1.93 0.5 Basis of Prioritization Projects are prioritized on the basis of need and low cost.6 Project summary The Projects as listed in the table below have been prioritised based on the above parameters.05 2.00 4.40 0.

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar

5
5.1

Drainage System
Existing Situation
The topography of the town is like a saucer. The average rainfall varies from 38 to 51 cm in the town. The Pushkar town is divided into two drainage zones namely Badi Basti and Choti Basti. The drainage zones are similar as it is for sewerage system. Open surface drains are observed in the town which give a filthy sight in the city. There is one pumping station in each zone to pump the wastewater from sewers and open drains collectively to the oxidation pond of 0.7 MLD capacity for treatment. The treated water is used for irrigation purpose near Savitri temple. It has been observed that maintenance of the drains is neglected phenomenon. Municipal solid waste is found in open drains and thus choking the drains. Regular cleaning of the drains is not in practice. The storm water drains and sewers are found interconnected. During rainy season it is observed that the sewers get chocked due to siltation or garbage into it and resulting into floods. Three places are identified as major problematic areas where flooding take place even when there is low rainfall. The flooding areas are given below: Varha Ghat from where storm water along with sewage enters into Pushkar lake Near Brhama’s temple Ajmer Bus stand near Parikrama Marg

5.2

Developmental objective
It is being targeted to channelize and line the three main feeders of Pushkar Lake. Water level in Pushkar Lake is going down very rapidly, hence increase of surface runoff has been targeted.

5.3

Strategy
Strengthening and desilting of storm water drains in order to reduce flooding rainy season.

5.4

Major initiatives/ projects
Channelization, training and lining of Kharkheri Feeder,Savitri and Kharkheri To increase the surface runoff in Pushkar Lake Channellization of the three main feeders has been proposed. Construction of New drains in New Colonies Construction of new drains has been proposed for the projected future population.

5.5

Basis of Prioritization
The works are prioritized on the basis of need of the project and low cost.

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City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar

5.6

Project summary
Project Name Channelization and lining of Savitri and Kharkheri Feeder Construction of New drains in New Colonies Total Estimated Cost (Rs) Cr 1.44 5.19 6.63

Phasing & implementation
Name of the Project Channelization and lining of Savitri and Kharkheri Feeder Construction of New drains in New Colonies 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Institutional mechanism for implementation The works will be implemented by Pushkar Municipal Board, Government of Rajasthan.

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City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar

6
6.1

LAKE REJUVENATION
Existing Situation
Pushkar lake is located in heart of Pushkar town, 13 Km north-west from Ajmer city. The lake has religious, holy, cultural importance. There are 52 Ghat around the lake This town is surrounded by hills on three sides. The surroundings hills have rare vegetation and with the passage of time green cover is decreasing. Every year almost 10 lacks visitors come to Pushkar for holi dip in the lake and attend “animal Fair” during the month Kartik. There are three lakes in this region known as “Theerth Raj”: Jyastha Pushkar – which is known as Pushkar lake Madhyan Pushkar Kanishka Pushkar The catchment area of Pushkar Lake is 1124 hectare and lake area is 12 hectare. The approximately 8.3 meter. The carrying capacity of water is 79287 cubic meter. depth is

Water quality is deteriorating gradually due to flowing of sewer and waste water and solid waste in monsoon season. People offering flower and bone’s-ash is also a cause of water quality deterioration. Silt laden rain water flows from cachment area to lake, causing siltation. Deterioration of water quality and siltation in lake are another burning issue. Due to the steep slope of the hills the surface run-off carries boulders and silt from hills to the lake. Thus gradually the capacity of the lake is reducing. It gives a stinking smell and poor ambience to the visitors. Forest department has worked for soil conservation measures in the catchment area in 1992-95. This include plantation, construction of some check dam, sand dune stabilisation though mainly in forest area. The drop in water table is a grieve issue in this area. It has been observed that the water table in this area has fall from 10.5 m Below Ground level (BGL) in 1971 to 23.81 m BGL by year 2004,i.e a total 13.31 m fall in round water table in a period of 33 years. Ground water depletion trend for the year 1999 to 2003 is shown in the Figure 7.1. It can be seen from the graph that fluctuation in ground water table during pre-monsoon and post-monsoon range between -0.71 to + 0.55 m. This simply shows that there is scanty rainfall in the area or very low ground water table lift after monsoon. In the last few years rainfall is scanty and shows scattered pattern in this area. The soil of the area is sandy in nature hence the water retention ability of the area is less. Thus it results in lowering of water level of lake. As per a study by Central Ground Water Board (CGWB) under National Lake Conservation Programme there is a place near Nandi Village on Nand – Bhagwanpura – Kishanpura Road, where heavy subsurface flow is investigated towards adjacent water shed. This could be a major reason for high fall of ground water table in the town also

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6 Catchment % Silt and Sand Area (Km2) Contribution to the lake 7.9 2.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Fluctuation in GWT during pre-m onsoon and post-m onsoon 1 0. This is ultimately resulting fall in water level in the lake.1.6 7. There are three main feeders of the lake.5 0 -0.35 60 3. The rapid fall in the ground water table is resulting into reverse movement of lake water to the areas having deep water table.3 Major strategies for addressing above problems: The following strategies shall help carry out Lake Rejuvenation Plan Conservation and preservation of natural environment in and around the Pushkar Conservation of Pushkar Sarovar and renovation of Ghat Preventive measures to avoid further siltation of the Sarovar 121 . catchment area and percent silt contribution by each feeder is given in the Table 7.00 11. Table: 7. 6.5 Fluctuation 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Year The other reason of lowering the water table depth in Pushkar is indiscriminate capture of upstream water by farmers through small check dams for irrigation purpose. Seeing the rapid fall in ground water table and subsequent effect on Lake water level.5 21.No 1 2 3 Feeder’s Name Kharkheri Feeder Savitri Feeder Pushkar Feeder Total Length (Km) 6. CGWB has declared the town as dark zone for ground water extraction.1. It shows quality of water is deteriorating gradually.2 Developmental Objective The Development objectives for lake rejuvenation are as fallow Lake water quality improvement Increasing water level in the lake and in and around the Pushkar 6. Length. Feeder’s of Pushkar Lake S.5 -1 -1. To increase water table it is suggested to channelize and line the feeders so as to increase the water level in the lake.2.80 15 25 A Physico-chemical analysis of water quality was conducted in year 1985 and 1992 which is given in Table 7.

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar

6.4

Major Initiative / Project
The main problem of Pushkar Sarovar is its acute siltation during the rainy season. The rain water falling on the hill slopes run down and heads towards the lake in the form of three main streams – the Gomukh, Nag Pahar and Savitri feeders. The movement of water erodes the soil and carries it into the Sarovar. This is mainly because of the denudation of hills and community lands in the catchment area and improper agronomic practices followed by the people. This problem is further aggravated by the shifting of sand from active sand dunes. The huge amount of sand and silt from the surrounding hills and sandy areas is brought every year with the rain water and deposited into the lake. The deposition can be seen most predominantly near the foot bridge which forms the southern edge of the main part of the water body, where the bottom of the lake has risen above the water over the years. Also, the sewer connections of houses located between ghat road and the lake are not served by the sewer system and their entire sludge flows into the lake. If this process is allowed to continue, the Sarovar will gradually diminish in size and depth and ultimately it may be lost once for all. In order to check the siltation of Pushkar Sarovar a multi pronged strategy has to be adopted. The following long-term as well as short-term measures need to be taken up in the catchment area. Reforestation of Barren Hills Soil Moisture Conservation Measures Checking of Soil Erosion Construction of Check Dams Controlling Fish Proliferation Grass in the Sarovar Desilting of the Sarovar Water Treatment Plant Laboratory Public awareness

6.4.1

Reforestation of Barren Hills:
There are about 1600 hectares of barren and denuded hills in forest blocks of Nag Pahar, Nand, Narwar and Kanas Makrawli which need to be replanted with vegetation. These barren forest areas needs to be provided with stone wall fence with suitable tree species like Acasia senegal, Holophlia integrifolia, Prosopis julifolia, etc. Intensive sowings of suitable grass species like Cenchrus cilioris should also be done in the area so that, apart from soil conservation, the local people’s fodder needs can be met with.

6.4.2

Soil Moisture Conservation Measures:
In Nag Pahar forest block, an area of about 400 hectares has sufficient root stock. Cultural operations along with supplemental planting of appropriate species, intensive soil and moisture conservation measures like contour dykes, box trenches, small check dams and closure from grazing should be the main activities. As a result of these activities the velocity of water coming from these hills during rainy season can be checked which will also reduce run off.

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City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar

6.4.3

Stabilisation of Active Sand Dunes:
There are about 300 hectares of barren sand dunes around Savitri Pahar in the immediate vicinity of Pushkar Sarovar. These dunes act as a reservoir of sand. During the rainy season when water gushes with high velocity in Gori nala and from Khar-Kheri side, these dunes are eroded and sand from them flows along with water and ultimately gets deposited in the Sarovar. In order to check it needs stabilization. These sand dunes are partly under the control of government and partly under private occupation. The private persons use them only during the Pushkar cattle fair when they allow camping and charge the fees from them. In view of the damage done by these sand dunes to the holy Sarovar, this area may be acquired and planted up with vegetation. As a special case the government may consider taking up stabilization of these privately owned sand dunes from their funds. Suitable species of plants may be selected from the list of plants given in Annexure – 7.1, depending upon their characteristics and local needs.

6.4.4

Checking of Soil Erosion:
Nearly half of the Pushkar catchment area (1,000 hectares) is owned by the Forest Department, which has planted trees and shrubs in this area from time to time. These efforts need to be intensified and the local varieties of trees, and grass, which are easier to grow and become part of the ecological cycles of this area, should be preferred. The other parts of the catchment area include revenue lands and agricultural fields. Government lands may be transferred to the Forest Department for heavy plantation purposes. Farmers may be encouraged to cultivate commercial tree plantation.

6.4.5

Lining of Main Feeders:
The approximate length of feeder leading to the Pushkar Sarovar is about 20 km. Due to the sandy nature of the topography, water while flowing in the streams, cuts easily into their banks and bed, and carries the soil towards the Sarovar. The quantity of the soil is considerable and adds substantially to the siltation of the lake. To prevent this problem, lining of all the main feeders is essential. The gomukh feeder, with 2438 meter length contributes to the maximum discharge of 615 cusecs, has already been lined by the Irrigation Department. Silt clearance, repairing of pot-holing and rising of side walls is to be done. The Nag Pahar feeder is about 7010 meter in length, out of which about 2560.32 meter is hilly terrain and the remaining 4450 meter has to be lined. The Savitri feeder, which is about 2591 meter long, also needs to be lined. These three feeders join the main feeder and enter the lake.

6.4.6

Construction of Check Dams:
Check dams may be constructed at appropriate locations to check the velocity of the flowing water, thereby checking soil erosion also. This will make water available for irrigation purposes. Irrigation Department may take up this scheme and check dams be designed at appropriate locations.

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City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar

6.4.7

Silt Clearance from the Check Dams and Feeders:
The silt collected at the check dams over the years reduces the effectiveness and, therefore, regular removal of the accumulated material to far off locations, which will not return into the streams, is required. The silt is to be cleared from the feeders also; particular care should be taken before the rainy season. A phased programme for continuous updation of the programe with necessary budgetary provision should be implemented by the irrigation department

6.4.8

Ban on Cultivation in Feeder Beds:
Large parts of the feeders beds are being cultivated, this should be stopped forthwith to prevent the consequent increase in siltation of the lake. Tilling of the feeder beds loosens the soil and makes it more prone to transportation by the rain water.

6.4.9

Improvement of Water Level in the Sarovar:
At the full tank level of 8.53 metre, the lake spreads from Ghat to Ghat, appears larger than reality and inspires lakhs of pilgrims every year to worship. During the last twenty years, it has attained this level only three times in 1975-76, 1978-79 and 1982-83 and has completely dried up once in 1973 – 74. During the last ten years the maximum level has come down gradually to 4.6 metre. This low level not only disappoints the pilgrims but also affects the water quality. Urgent measures are to be taken to improve the water level in the Sarovar.

6.4.10 Controlling Fish Proliferation Grass in the Sarovar:
Fish population in the Sarovar has been increasing and if the water depletes and temperature increases, the possibility of sudden and large scale deaths of the fish can not be ruled out, such a mishap will also pollute the sacred water. Reducing the population of fish in the lake is the only preventive measure that can be taken. The popular religious sentimental feelings must be respected which does not allow fishing or killing of the fish. The fishes should be transported alive to other water bodies. The fish should be caught alive, placed in water tanks and transported to Ana Sagar Lake or other lakes, which should be selected carefully so that these fish flourish in them. To avoid the overgrowth of water grass and microscopic algae, some grass eating fish may be released into the lake to improve the situation.

6.4.11 Desilting of the Sarovar:
Along with the above measures for the prevention of further siltation of the Sarovar, there is a need to desilt the lake also. The desilted sand should not be disposed into the catchment area as it will be carried again into the lake in the rainy season. It should be transported to the northern side of the town and disposed on the sand dunes on the way to Budha pushkar. This can be done before the monsoon season when the water level in the lake is lowest especially in the months of April – June.

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On the above basis . 6.12 Water Treatment Plant: A water treatment plant is proposed for treatment of water in lake 6. the projects can be prioritised as follows. 3.9 Desiltation of Lake 0.36 Water treatment plant 2. Nand Narwar 0.13 Laboratory: A good quality laboratory is proposed to monitor the lake water quality 6. 1.14 Public awareness: Public awareness is necessary for prevention of deterioration of lake and encouragement of beautification of lake.4.4.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar The various measures.9 &Kanas Makrawali Soil conservation measures 0. would substantially improve the environs of Pushkar and Saraswati valley thus keeping an ecological balance of the Pushkar and its surrounding area.5 Laboratory 0. This would reduce the possibility of siltation of Pushkar Sarovar.5 Basis of Prioritisation The projects have been prioritised on the following basis Checking of all point of source of pollution and then removing the pollution from water quality Long term strategy to check the pollution and beautification. Establishment of laboratory for water quality monitoring 6. Establishment of water treatment plant 6. Public awareness campaign 7. as proposed above.75 Public awareness & Training 0. Prevention of sewage and waste water discharge into the lake Cleaning of the lake by biological and mechanical method Construction and maintenance of public toilet Plantation of suitable species. 6. 2.4. check dam and channalisation of stream for diversion of inflow in catchment area 5.75 Total Capital Cost (Rs) Cr 6.6 Project Summary Project Name Aforestation of Nag Pahar.16 125 . and would also avoid the danger floods in the town. 4.

2 Physico-chemical characteristics of Pushkar Lake Water August 1985 Sr.63 7. 1 2 3 Parameters pH Biological Oxygen Demand(BOD) mg/L Total Dissolved Solid(TDS) mg/L Jaipur Ghat 7.9 36 237 126 .98 237 Saptrishi Ghat 7. No.71 20 237 Brahma Ghat 7.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Phasing and Implementation (by year) – Name of Project Aforestation for CAT 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Soil conservation 25% 25% 25% 25% Desiltation of Lake Water treatment plant Laboratory Public awareness Institutional Mechanism for Implementation o o o o O Preventive pollution measure for the Sarover Disilting of Sarover . construction of check dam: Tree Plantation Aquatic life in Sarover Establishment of laboratory : Public Health Engineering Department Irrigation Department : Forest Department : Fisheries Department : Ajmer University Table: 7.57 8 243 Gau Ghat 7.

43 Saptrishi Ghat 80 60 50 3. mg/L Potassium. mg/L Sodium.38 1.8 0.27 0.mg/L Cadmium.07 0.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Sr. No.2 0.mg/L Sodium.8 0. mg/L Conductivity Jaipur Ghat 7.07 50 8 0.019 0.25 127 .02 38 8.25 0.25 168 28.9 0.4 Saptrishi Ghat 7.mg/L Conductivity Jaipur Ghat 80 60 45 3.8 104 20 6 0.57 0.mg/L Potassium.48 Physico-chemical characteristics of Pushkar lake water (February 1991) Sr. 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Parameters Total Hardness (as Ca CO3) Total Alkalinity Chlorides(mg/L) Sulphate(as SO4) mg/L Fluoride.44 0.2 4. No.2 0. 1 2 Parameters pH Biological Oxygen Demand(BOD) mg/L Total Dissolved Solid(TDS) mg/L Total Hardness (as Ca CO3) Total Alkalinity Chlorides(mg/L) Sulphate (as SO4) mg/L Fluoride.85 Gau Ghat 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 182 32 140 16 6 0. mg/L Phosphates. mg/L Cadmium.0 294 36.4 0.2 1. mg/L Phosphates.2 3.32 1.5 Brahma Ghat 80 60 40 2.4 3.02 38 8 0.4 Gau Ghat 80 60 45 3.8 120 24 5 0.18 40 8 0.7 Brahma Ghat 7.

Apart from wastes generated from these areas. bio-medical waste. 7. shop and establishments are thrown on the road side) and open drains.5 times. It is reported that the total quantity of bio-medical waste generated in Pushkar is approximately 0. Prior to 1998. Subzi Mandi contributes 2. 7. During the site visit collection in some ward was not proper. stipulates special consideration for disposal of bio-medical wastes under which wastes are categorized under 10 categories with different treatment and disposal options.1. There are 81 hotels and restaurants in the city which are expected to generate approximately 3. The wastes from houses.1. Health care establishment is supposed to have a full fledged bio-medical waste disposal system individually or a common bio-medical waste disposal system in the city.0 TPD of Solid Waste.0 TPD respectively at a rate of 360 gm/capita/day considering an annual increase in MSW generation by 1.0 MTD. Domestic and building solid waste generates 12. The MSW generated in the city mainly consists of domestic refuses (including slum area). which are dried along the side of the road itself.80 metric ton per day (MTD) respectively. wastes are also collected from drains in the form of wet silts. vegetable fruit market. wastes from commercial areas.0-6.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 7 7.1 Quantity and Quality of Municipal Solid Waste The study conducted by Pushkar Municipal Board estimated that at present Pushkar produces approximately 5. Sweepers (cleaners) sweep the wastes to a certain point making heaps of wastes along the road side.0 and 10. bio-medical wastes generated from medical establishments were considered as municipal wastes and underwent disposal in municipal waste dumping ground along with other municipal wastes. with no scientific collection.6 MTD. The primary collection system of MSW in the city still remains primitive. The present scenario of bio-medical waste management and disposal system existing in Pshkar is disposal at municipal waste dumping ground is not recommended under Bio-Medical Waste (Management and Handling) Rule 1998. The MSWM system of the city is primitive.5 MT of MSW. wastes from hotels and restaurants and industrial solid wastes.2 Collection and disposal system The city of Pushkar has been divided into ward for managing municipal solid waste. transportation and disposal system. It can be assumed that the estimated quantity of MWS generation in the city in 2014 and 2021 will be 7. 128 .8 and 0.1 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT Existing Situation The Municipal Solid Waste Management (MSWM) of Pushkar is no different from any other small Indian town. CPCB. Collection in each ward is privatized. Bio-Medical Waste (Management and Handling) Rule 1998. These wastes then pile up to form huge heaps of solid wastes along the road side.5-0.

unsatisfactory and inefficient. highly putriciable wastes. • No complaints can be lodged against the working of the staffs for not cleaning regularly and not attending the wastes. • Waste transportation system in not synchronized with primary collection and storage timings. • MSW are neither stored nor segregated at source. which is not a legal and scientific practice. responsibility and performance monitoring for MSW management. • Even though a legal provision of removal of construction wastes exists in the city. most of the time. open spaces drains or water bodies indiscriminately. There are six tractor trailer (open) and one loader. brooms and other cleaning devices decreases the collection efficiency • There is a lack of civic awareness. Transportation of the waste of about 70% to the depots has been outsourced to private parties and remaining 30 percent is catered by municipality. • There are inadequate numbers of wheel barrows. hygiene. • Number and condition of wheel barrows. necessity of segregation and proper storage of wastes among the citizens • Strength and distribution of sweepers in not adequate. • In slum areas and low income group residential areas. rather thrown at some low lying areas. other wastes that find its way to the MSW dumping ground are the bio-medical infectious wastes.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar These wastes from depots are collected and transported to the waste dumping site. 7. leading to the storage of huge piles of MSW around the city and especially at the storage areas.The condition of existing assets is also very poor. The location of the waste dumping site is road side due to lack of proper site. 7. • There is a lack of institutional accountability. Apart from the MSW. mostly unattended. • Cleanups are not done at every place regularly. the same is not being implemented. community bins . They are littered on the streets.3 Assessment of collection facility The Assessment of collection facilities revels that • The collection system in the city is primitive. • Collection and storage points are open lands or broken bins. hazardous industrial wastes.1. wastes are not at all carried to the dumping yard.1. • There is no control over activities by private contractors which accounts for over 70 percent of the city cleanup activity.4 Assessment of transportation facility The Assessment of collection facilities revels that • Transportation of MSW to the dump site in the city is not done on regular basis • Due to lack of vigilance. developing unhygienic condition in the surrounding. MSW collection and transportation system is found neglected. tractor trolley. footpaths. 129 . • Double handling practice of wastes by the sweepers and collectors reduces the productive output to a significant level.

this dumping ground facilitates dumping of bio-medical wastes and industrial hazardous wastes. syringes and other usable wastes in the form of bio-medical wastes are again brought back in the market by the rag pickers and local agencies which are again illegal as well as dangerous.5 Assessment of MSW disposal facility The Assessment of collection facilities revels that • Presently there is no waste disposal site. working schedule. • Apart from MSW.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 7. Unattended wastes encourage the rag pickers to collect the discarded plastic bottles and other recyclable wastes which are brought to the market again. 7. • Restricting entry of bio-medical and industrial hazardous wastes into the municipal waste disposal facility and developing separate bio-medical and hazardous waste disposal facilities in the city.6 Health hazards • • • • • Indiscriminate littering of waste everywhere in the city leads to growth of unhygienic condition in the city. These are dangerous for further utilization in health perspective. • The dumping site is not fenced and hence there is continuous encroachment of slums and rag pickers around the site.1. • The dumping site at Kharkedi village has been declared disputed. • Many times it is observed that the private contractors do not at all dump wastes at specified location. rather prefer to dump the wastes at available low lying areas near the entrance of the dumping ground. which are not legally recommended. • No compaction is done on the dumped wastes which are recommended in Municipal Solid Waste (M&H) Rule 2000. technical and institutional development of all the works carried out to destine the wastes from cradle to grave. The needles. 130 . • Institutional and scientific management.1. 7.2 Development objective The following development objectives have been identified for Municipal Solid Waste Management • Cleaning of all the city area on regular basis • Coverage of managing MSW in 100 percent area to cater 100 percent population. Water contamination due to MSW leads to various water borne diseases to the consumers. planning and application of schemes to not only augment existing system but to meet the necessary demand for future growth of the city area and population. leading the obstruction of other vehicles to utilize the unused spaces at the interior of the dumping ground. • Synchronizing the management. The degrading wastes may lead to growth of various diseases and insects like flies and mosquitoes.

Involvement of private sector for better transportation.6 Project Summary The various projects for solid waste management include best collection. treatment and disposal system by. transportation and treatment of MSW facilities 7.86 crore. Project Name Equipment for solid waste management Solid waste composting plant Laboratory Total Capital Cost (Rs) Cr 0.16 0.2 0. The total capital cost of the project is 0.5 Basis of prioritization for improvement of MSW The following basis has been adopted for the improvement of Municipal Solid Waste System.86 Phasing & Implementation 200607 200708 200809 200910 201011 Name of the Project Equipment Composting plant Laboratory Awareness Programme 131 . 7.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 7. Involving private sector participation in collection. transportation. disposal and monitoring facility.5 0. • Decentralized composting plants for treatment of MSW • A incineration plant is proposed for incineration of bio-medical waste • A good quality laboratory is also proposed to monitor all chemical and biological activity.4 Major initiatives/ projects The following projects have been identified for Improving the Solid Waste Management in the town • Provision of adequate equipment like wheel barrow.3 Strategy The following strategies are identified on the basis of above development objectives • • Improving the MSW collection. dumper placer container. transportation and disposal. • • Projects for which master plans has already been prepared. dumper placer machine and volume of storage device for collection. This will reduce the time consumption for making another study. 7.

132 .City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Institutional mechanism for Implementation Pushkar Municipal Board will be responsible for management MSW in Pushkar. However it is recommended that operation and maintenance of the facilities shall be given to the private party while regulation and monitoring their quality should be under the control of Municipal Board.

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 8 8. was installed by Adishankaracharya in 718A. Pushkar is a pilgrimage centre of national importance.D. 8. The unique setting of sand dunes in the back drop of hills is a major attraction with the foreign tourists whose numbers have been steadily increasing in the last few years.1 Key tourist sights Temples There are as many as 80 temples open for public besides hundreds of small temples situated in the private houses throughout the town. Its key features are the red spire and the image of a hans (the goose considered sacred to Lord Brahma). TO BUDHA PUSHKAR MELA GROUND WARAH TEMPLE ATMATESHWAR TEMPLE BRAHMA TEMPLE MAN MAHAL RANGJI TEMPLE TO AJMER SAVITRI TEMPLE Brahma Temple The most famous temple in Pushkar.1.This temple built with marble is decorated with silver coins and there is a silver turtle on the floor of the temple.1 TOURISM Existing Situation Far from being an ordinary tourist town. It is also the venue of internationally known cattle fair which is being patronized by Government of Rajasthan on the occasion of Kartik Purnima. The marble statue of Lord Brahma sitting in Padmasan in Lotus with Gayatri. 133 . is the only temple dedicated to Lord Brahma (the creator of the universe according to Hindu mythology) in the entire country.

It was constructed in 1901 by Seth Puranmal of Hyderabad. Purohit house. Kapileshwar Temple. Teoram Temple. Here the priests are Dravidian Brahmin and south Indian festivals and rites are followed. was constructed between 1920-1925 by a Maheshwari seth at the cost of Rs. which are the oldest ghats. Although the lake is perennial. The temples of Brahma and Warah are considered equally important. except at its southern edge where rain water from its catchment area flows in through a series of arches below a 110m long foot bridge.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Varah Temple The Varah temple houses an image of lord Vishnu in the incarnation of wild boar. It has a high rising 'Gopuram' typical of southern India. Chhatries and small cubicles (changing rooms). Savitri Temple The temple of savitri is built on the south-west of the lake on Savitri Pahar by the Purohit Ajit Singh of Marwar. Its architectural style is south Indian and here too southern rites and rituals of ramanuja Viashnava sect are performed by south Indian priests. Lake and the Ghats The most important part of the town is the Sarovar or the holy lake. New Rangji Temple This temple is also known as Baikunth Mandir.8 lakh. Others Raghunath Temple. The Sarovar is encircled by Ghats. Gau Ghat. Jain Temple etc.km. Among the important ones are Brahma Ghat. It is a stagnant water body formed by the collection of rain water from the catchment area in a natural depression and is replenished mainly by the monsoons in the month of July-August. due to its south Indian style of architecture. which completes the girdle around the lake and facilitates the pilgrims’ Parikrama around it. This ancient temple built by King Anaji Chauhan in the 12th century was demolished by Aurangzeb but reconstructed by Jai Singh II and the present image was installed in 1729. In addition to the temples Pushkar has many Ashrams imparting meditation and religious teachings as well as temporary abode to people desirous of salvation and peace. Old Rangji Temple The gracious temple is very conspicuous. Lakshminarayan Mandir.79 million cubic meter and its depth varies from 8 to 10m. Some o f the ghats are believed to be hundreds of years old but the structures are maximum 400 years old. this 12th century temple is dedicated to Lord Shiva. Apteshwar Temple Another important temple of the town. 52 in number. dharamshalas. 134 . The total area under the Ghats is 2Ha. Behariji Temple. temples. The important elements of the Ghats are bathing steps. Mythologically a very important temple and is believed that Lord Vishnu came to earth in the incarnation of Warah (wild boar) to kill the demon Hirnayaksh and liberate the land from his atrocities. The lake covers an area of 22Ha with a capacity of 0. The lake is surrounded by Aravali hill ranges forming a catchment area of 22sq. its depth varies considerably between rainy season and summer season. Varah Ghat.

Maximum number of tourists are attracted by Udaipur. View point – Savitri temple: This point on the Savitri hill offers a magnificent view of the town. Jaipur and Pushkar attract the maximum number of tourists both domestic and foreign. Rajasthan continues to be one of the most favourite tourism destinations for tourists witnessing an unprecedented growth of more than 50% in domestic and foreign tourist influx. tourism has emerged as an important segment of the economy with a potential to earn foreign exchange and generate large employment opportunities.3 lakh foreign tourists and 187 lakh domestic tourists during 2005. It was built by Jahangir in 1670 AD to celebrate his victory over Maharaja Amar Singh of Mewar.3% to India’s GDP. Udaipur.6 %.1: Tourist arrivals in Pushkar Vs Rajasthan 2005 Domestic Foreign 1523600 63312 2004 Domestic Foreign 1065703 43980 Pushkar 135 . like the world over. This place is supposed to be abode of Saint Markandeya. witnessing a 17% rise in domestic tourists and 16% increase in foreign tourists as against 2004 figures. The Savitri temple is also an important place of pilgrimage. Here the colour of water changes with the colour of sky. the surrounding hills and the sand dunes.1. Jahangir’s palace – This monument is located south of the lake along the Parikrama path. Pap Mochini Temple: This temple is located on the Dungar Pahar. 8. Markandeya cave: It is an ancient cave situated in the Nag Pahar just above the origin of Saraswati river.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Other places of tourist interest Sunset Point – Located at the Jaipur Ghat this spot is a major tourist attraction during sunset as it presents a beautiful view of the skyline of the town and ghats in the western part of the lake.2 Tourist arrivals In India. It had a record arrival of more than 11. A fair is held here in the month of September. 2 km from Budha Pushkar. Mount Abu. northern side of the town. Augastya Muni is believed to have meditated here. Out of the total tourists in Rajasthan. Augustya Muni Cave: It is a cave on Nag hills. It plays a vital role in the country’s economy with a contribution of 5. followed by Jaipur. Pushkar and Jaisalmer. Table 3. It is a protected monument. In 2005 Pushkar attracted 8% of the total domestic tourists coming to Rajasthan while the share of foreign tourists was 5.

– January 2006 Tourist Arrivals . of Domestic tourists attending the fair has increased from almost 3 times.Pushkar 1800000 1600000 1400000 1200000 1000000 800000 600000 400000 200000 0 2001 2002 2003 Domestic Foreign 2004 2005 70000 60000 50000 40000 30000 20000 10000 0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Foreign tourist arrivals .1.Domestic 14000 12000 10000 8000 6000 4000 2000 0 Monthwise Tourist Arrivals . 2005 recorded a 45 % increase in domestic tourist and 44% rise in foreign tourist arrivals.2: Tourist Arrivals in Pushkar from 2001-2005 Tourists Domestic Foreign Total 2001 865000 46182 911182 2002 1161859 28413 1190272 2003 937850 31190 969040 2004 1065703 43980 1109683 2005 1548600 63312 1611912 Source: Rajasthan Tourism Department. which coincides with the cattle fair.3 500000 400000 300000 200000 100000 0 Pushkar Fair Monthwise Tourist Arrivals . – January 2006 Over the last five years there has been a steady increase in the domestic arrivals in the city.60 1131164 6. Foreign tourists have been growing steadily since 2002. On an average 4000 tourists visited Pushkar daily (2005) No.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar % of state share Rajasthan 8. Maximum tourists visit during Kartik Purnima.65 16033896 4.Foreign A Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun 2005 Jul Aug Sep Oct 2004 Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun 2005 Jul Aug Sep 2004 Oct Nov Dec 136 . while foreign tourist doubled in the year 2004-05. Table 3.11 18787298 5. except for 2003 when there was a drop in domestic tourist.Pushkar 8.53 971772 Source: Rajasthan Tourism Department.

Inadequate facilities for the participants of the cattle fair – over crowded mela ground and poor sanitation facilities. Type of Accommodation Hotels & Dharamshalas No. Degraded natural resources – the barren hills lead to high soil erosion causing siltation in the Pushkar Lake. Accommodation The available accommodation is far short of supply. provision of water and fodder for animals at affordable rates. of Units 95 No. of beds 2934 8. The Mela is jointly organized by RTDC. lack of public conveniences etc. Budha Pushkar.3 Development Objectives To project Pushkar as a centre for religious.4 Strategies To identify circuits and offer a range of options to tourist: • Religious tourism 137 . At the tourist village the accommodation for low spending group is approx. 8. Medical facilities including inoculation of the cattle are also provided by the Department of Veterinary hospital. Some tourists have to stay back in Ajmer because of lack of accommodation in Pushkar. Illumination and beautification is done by municipality at various points in the town. Deer Park. Around 4 lakh people and about 40000 animals gather here during the fair. detailed guide books and maps. During the festival month hotels rooms also fall short. 3000 this forces the villagers to sleep in the open in cold November nights. Animal Husbandry Department. Sudhabai. Panchkund. Lack of focus on “Adventure or Eco Tourism” circuit The total number of beds available in dharamshalas is only 1600. poor solid waste management. Inadequate Information – tourist information booth. Villagers from all over Rajasthan come to sell their animals and handicraft goods at the mela. of Rooms 1298 No. Baijnath and shivling Nand which have potential for tourism are not marketed well. thus forcing the tourist to stay in Ajmer and commute to Pushkar. which is highly inadequate for lakhs of pilgrims visiting during the festival. Agastya Muni cave. cultural and eco tourism and accordingly up grade the tourism infrastructure to meet the enhanced demand.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar lively cattle fair is held in Pushkar annually during the month of November. Municipality. Animal Husbandry department organizes cattle exhibitions. presence of RTDC personnel Other places like Jahangir’s Palace. Temporary tented accommodation is created by RTDC at the tourist village to accommodate around 1700 tourists. which coincides with Kartik purnima celebrations.2 • • • • • • • • Issues Poor Infrastructure –narrow congested alleys. 8.

5 0. Investments in tourism could be either through public.5 2. 24 koss and 84 koss parikramas) Development of arts and crafts village Development of a new camping site Development of Mela Ground Construction of Heritage hotels. private sector or a combination of the two.6 Basis of Prioritisation Short term project which can improve city level facilities and accelerate tourist inflows Projects capitalising on the uniqueness of the city eg. budget hotels and dharmashalas. No. 1 2 3 4 Projects Establishment of tourist information centres Improvement of the approach roads to various religious and archaeological sites Development of Mela Ground Development a new camping site Estimated Cost (Rs.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar • Cultural tourism and Arts & Crafts • Ecotourism/Adventure tourism on surrounding hills and sand dunes Improving city level infrastructure to provide a pleasant experience to the tourists To provide all categories of accommodation. to the tourist who come for the cattle fair 8. namely resorts. the built and natural heritage. Investments more suited for private sector include: Accommodation Facilities Entertainment and Leisure Facilities Tourist Vehicles and Buses Internet Facilities Sectors that require public sector intervention are: Information Dissemination Arts and Crafts Villages and Museums Adventure and Ecotourism Facilities Civic infrastructure and Beautification Heritage conservation of important monuments Tourism Training Parks and Gardens 8. budget hotels and Dharamshalas Development of Pushkar helipad Sr.25 2 138 . information and telecommunication.7 Project Summary Establishment of tourist information centres Improvement of the approach roads to various religious and archeological sites Development of tourist circuits (7 koss.5 Major initiatives / Projects Tourism development requires a wide array of projects ranging from hotels and accommodation facilities to transportation. 8. Cr) 0.

No. budget hotels and dharamshalas Development of Pushkar helipad Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 139 .5 7. budget hotels and dharamshalas Development of Pushkar helipad Total 1 1 0.75 Project schedule Implementation Period Sr. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Projects Establishment of tourist information centres Improvement of the approach roads to various religious and archaeological sites Development of Mela Ground Development a new camping site Development of tourist circuits Development of arts and crafts village Construction of Heritage hotels.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 5 6 7 8 Development of tourist circuits Development of arts and crafts village Construction of Heritage hotels.

Among the urban poor. primarily growing rose. where 325 families live. the primary occupation of the households is farming which includes cultivation of rose. The total number of BPL households in Pushkar as per the 2003 BPL census is 1011. lacking in basic amenities. In Sansi Basti the primary occupation of households is scavenging. In the Santoshi Mata Colony. about 50% of the families are involved in casual labour which includes work in the services (including tourist related). In Pushkar. Urban poverty and urban disparities in access to basic services are issues that cannot be overlooked as the town promotes itself further to attract both domestic and foreign tourists. which being market driven. For example in Keshav Nagar. which is supplied to the neighbouring city of Ajmer. indicating that the urban poverty in Pushkar is not confined just within the slums. and processed further to make several products such as gulab jal. but they at present constitutes the most of urban poor in the town. business and trade. provides stable source of income. almost all households including 140 . garbage collection and selling. used within the temple town of Pushkar. the gap between demand and supply of essential services and infrastructure is widening. 9.1 Existing Situation The socio economic profile of Pushkar indicates that one-third of the population lives below poverty line (BPL). which is their inherited occupation. The remaining 25% of the families are involved in nonfarm activities. but sprawls beyond them. along with the significance of its cultural diversity has acted as an impetus in the influx of people in search of work and fill the gap. one-third of the urban poor families live in slums and settlements which are all located on the periphery of the town. and working as cobbler. In all there are seven slums in Pushkar. 25% of the urban poor families are engaged in agriculture. services such as tourism and stitching ethnic clothes for tourist and others work as farm labourers. The occupation of the families varies across the slums. The growth of Pushkar as temple town and tourist destination.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 9 BASIC URBAN SERVICES FOR POOR The positive aspects of cities and towns as engines of economic growth often act as attraction for people living in neighbouring villages and other areas to fulfil their aspirations for better living. The challenge in Pushkar is to find appropriate solutions to the gap in access to services and infrastructure. With increasing population pressure and increase in tourism. Table: Below Poverty Line Occupation Classification Category of workers Agricultural Labour Other Labour Agriculture Non-farm activities Craftsmen Others Total Families 42 570 251 76 4 68 1011 In the temple town of Pushkar. a large part of the urban poor are forced to live under unhygienic conditions in slums.

However. As a result they defecate in open. where there are pucca drains but they are open. The exception being Ambedkar colony. Subsequently the slum has grown around these households. there is no proper drainage. Besides these there are access to electricity for street lighting and access to health care. Access to sanitation and toilet is another basic concern among slum dwellers and urban poor in Pushkar. families do not have any land tenure. In some of the slums such as Sansi Basti. and about five families have registered land and their houses were constructed in early 1980s under a central government scheme. For example. One of the many manifestations of urban poverty is access to basic infrastructure and amenities: drinking water. sewage and solid waste disposal. In Santoshi Mata colony. Sansi basti emerged on a donated land. especially in areas surrounding the Mela ground. The absence of toilet facility in this basti has far greater implications for women. In the remaining slums and other urban poor. in other slums such as Sansi basti. sanitation. In Sansi basti. often 141 . roads and community infrastructure. households which are on upper tract do not have regular access to water supply. Drinking water supplies in Pushkar for urban poor is sufficient. where about 10% of the families have secured land tenure. There are exceptions in Ambedkar colony and Nayak colony. most of the drains at the foothills are blocked as they are full with sand and in Harijan basti both the sewer lines and drainage are mixed.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar migrant population (which constitutes the other part of urban poor) work as casual labour in the town. there are no public toilets and only few households have individual toilet facility. collection of garbage is not regular resulting in heaps of garbage lying around. education and social security safety nets. Table: Slums in Pushkar Slum Name Harijan Basti Sansi Basti Ambedkar Colony Santoshi Mata Colony Slum behind High school Behind Ramdham Nayak Colony Total slum Households No. in the same locality. However. land tenure security is one of the key concerns. however. of Households 44 26 57 87 77 20 14 325 Among the urban poor in Pushkar and especially those living in slums. households which are at the base and closer to the road have adequate access to water supply and they have individual storage tank. In all these slums. In the Santoshi Mata Colony. there are settlements such as Sansi Basti where there is no proper facility. drainage. Similarly drainage facility in the slums is not adequate. families have tapped into the distribution line and use a small pipe to collect water.

whereas in others improvement in service availability is required. The municipality collects. However. the other major issues pertain to lack of adequate health infrastructure. however.2 Issues The living conditions in some of the slums need drastic improvements. however there is daily supply. Public toilets are also limited to few areas. In addition to basic services.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar at the very entrance of the basti and creating unpleasant sight and environment. except for the Sansi basti. the main constraint is either non availability of authorised taps or inadequate number of taps. as the current mechanisms are not adequate. urban poor in Pushkar do not have sufficient access to health care facility and social security. they do not get medicines. and inadequate social security safety nets. drinking water supply and construction of proper drainage facility. However. but families to do not have access to them. In addition to basic infrastructure. open defecation is common practice.4 Major initiatives / Projects A government programme to provide basic services to the slums. These needs to be supported through community 142 . families expressed that earlier the widowers had access to family pension scheme. where ever the drains have been constructed they are open and not covered. in Sansi basti. 9. However. most of the households pilfer power and within their individual households they have electric lighting. and in some areas there is no proper drainage. Most of the slums get supply in the early morning hours for an hour. To the extent feasible community involvement may be secured in maintaining the facilities particularly community toilets. solid waste management. women in Sansi basti said that their pressing demands are better access to health care and access to toilets. For example. 9. While the families have access to a health centre. from a gender neutrality perspective. Granting security of land tenure to slums (individually or preferable to groups) will be a major intervention that would enable slum dwellers to access housing finance and improve their shelters over a period of time. limited knowledge regarding government schemes. Few households have constructed toilets.3 Development Objectives To promote an integrated urban poverty renewal project to improve the living condition and quality of life of urban poor. Approach road to most of the slums are metalled. Awareness regarding social security programmes are present. Similarly they had limited access to subsidised food grains under PDS. in spite of a government programme. The drinking water supplies in the slums are not adequate and even the hours of supply poses difficulty. Across the slums. 9. Garbage disposal is another major issue for the urban poor. Even the number of street light points is not adequate and often there is one of two in each area. but that stopped recently. which is designed to provide them medicines at affordable prices and some free of cost. however the streets are not paved. but there is no fixed schedule.

5.5 9. 9.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar infrastructure which provides them access to facilities and information regarding government schemes and their rights.1 Project Summary Integrated urban poverty renewal project 143 .

2 Nominated Members by GoR. Figure: Organisational Structure of Pushkar Municipal Board 10.1 INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENT Organisation Structure The governance structure of the Pushkar Municipal Board consists of both the elected members as well as the administrative staff. responsibilities and functions.1 Analysis of Current Situation Chairman in Council (15 Councillors.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 10 10. Functional Committees Although the Municipal Board has constituted 7 Functional Committees. 2005. The term for both the Chairman and Deputy Chairman is five years. proposes the constitution of three functional committees for Municipal Boards.(Nil) Clerical Staff Administration Committee Finance Committee Building Construction Committee Cleanliness and Health Committee Laws and Byelaws Committee Festivals and Fair Committee City Development Elected Members The Elected Members of the PMB comprises of the Chairman and councillors representing each of the 15 wards. MLA of local constituency Executive officer Sections/Department/Cells • Revenue Inspector Asst Revenue Inspector Office Assistant Chairman Vice-Chairman General Administrati on Revenue Engineerin g Section Public Health and • • • Functional Committees- • • • • • • • Ward Committees . there is no clear delegation of roles.1. This structure is depicted in the figure below. The Rajasthan Municipalities Bill. The Deputy Chairman assists the Chairman in his duties and is elected from among the councillors. Ward Committees 144 .

decentralisation of functions and active citizen participation. with no ward wise or zonal level budgetary planning. Accounting is still on single entry cash basis and budgeting is done on the basis of past trends. no Ward Committees have been constituted by the Municipal Council.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar The Municipal Council has a total 15 Wards. • The accounting and budgeting procedures at PMB need to be upgraded. construction. heads the Administrative wing. • Land Records are not updated on a regular basis. Institutional Responsibility Matrix The construction. 145 . • A significant proportion of the total municipal staff strength consists of cleaning staff. operation and maintenance of all Infrastructure Assets are handled by a large number of organisations. till date. • Computer usage is limited and most of the municipal processes are still manual. Effective co-ordination among and delegation of authorities and responsibilities with a proper calendar of activities is critical for asset creation and maintenance. The Executive Officer and Revenue Inspector are among the only officers with significant technical and functional expertise. • The Administration of the Council is largely centralised. but. Database and Information Management Some key points to note are as follows: • The Database and Information Management System in the Municipal Board is relatively poor with no centralised information management systems in place. often leading to administrative inconvenience as well as inconvenience to the citizens. Formation of Ward Committees is essential for Ward level or decentralised planning. operation and maintenance of assets. clerical staff and other non-technical staff. at both the local level as well as the state level. The following table highlights the responsibilities of various institutions involved in planning and design. The Building Plan Sanction Records are incomplete and therefore it is difficult to monitor whether the construction of assets is in accordance with the sanctioned plan. who is also the executive head of the Board. This has led to the Concentration of powers and functions at a single location. Administrative Wing Some key points to note are: • The Executive Officer.

• Implement GIS and MIS – this will lead to an improvement in day to day municipal management.1. PMB RTO Private operators PMB PMB. Private Owners PHED PWD. beautification of road intersections Air .PMB PWD. Private Owners PHED PWD.Irrigation Department PMB PMB.PMB RTO Private operators PMB.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Table18: Institution Responsibility Matrix Institutional Responsibility Urban Infrastructure Land Use/Master Plan Building Byelaws Water Supply Sewerage Roads/Bridges/flyovers/RoB/Multilevel Parking Traffic Control and Management System City Public Transportation Drains Solid Waste Disposal Street Lighting Parks. Many a times there is no proper co-ordination. PWD PMB RSPCB PMB PMB PMB PMB ASI Construction PMB PMB PHED. PMB PMB PHED.2 Development Objectives The following long term development objectives have been identified for the Pushkar Municipal Board in order to transform it into an efficient and productive organisation. leading to duplication of efforts and neglect of certain critical areas of service delivery. Playgrounds. • Upgrade municipal infrastructure and facilities – this will lead to enhanced productivity of municipal staff. • Develop interactive channels of communication with citizens – this will lead to an improvement in citizen interaction and service delivery. geared to shoulder the responsibility of future governance and service delivery demands. PWD PMB RSPCB PMB PMB PMB PMB ASI Operation and Maintenance PMB PMB PHED. PMB PHED. 146 . • Implement double entry accrual accounting – this will lead to an improvement in overall municipal management and governance. PMB RTO Private operators PMB PMB. PWD PMB RSPCB PMB PMB PMB PMB ASI The above table clearly shows that multiple agencies are involved for execution of capital works and operation and maintenance of assets. • Ensure all Municipal Administrative Staff are fully computer literate – this will lead to an improvement in the efficiency and overall productivity of staff. 10. water and noise pollution control Slum Development Urban Poverty Programmes Housing for EWS Public Convienance Heritage Building Conservation Planning and Design Town and Country Planning Board. and clear cut demarcation of responsibilities.

the list of prioritised projects.4 Major Initiatives and Projects This section outlines the parameters which form the basis of prioritisation of projects identified to implement the above strategies. Decentralisation of functions Decentralisation of municipal functions. 10. It will also ensure a citizen-friendly environment in the municipal office.1.1. Therefore. and improved budgeting methods. decision making. 10.5 Basis of Prioritisation of Projects Projects in Institutional Development have been prioritised based on the following parameters: • Time to completion • Initial capital cost • Clearly identified linkage with Development Objectives and Strategies • Clearly identified source and availability of funding 147 . citizen interface and planning will greatly enhance the operational capabilities of PMB. Leverage developments in Information Technology PMB will need to adopt IT applications wherever these applications assist them to improve service delivery.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 10. particularly in service delivery. PMB will need to emphasize on developing core skills of municipal staff in order to ensure that these skills are relevant to the ever changing operational environment. they need to initiate a process of transition by adopting various organisation management principles such as improved accounting techniques. Another important facet is to introduce a performance culture among all municipal staff and provide adequate incentives for inducing improved staff performance levels.1. Focus on developing the skills of municipal staff on a regular basis Human resources are the key to efficient service delivery in any organisation.3 Strategies for Development Transition to modern organisation management principles Municipalities need to gear themselves for meeting future challenges in service delivery. municipal management and to create a transparent and accountable basis of governance. monitoring and evaluation of projects (including social audit). Providing a conducive working environment for municipal staff The municipal facilities should be upgraded and well maintained in order to ensure that the municipal staff has a good working environment.

9.12 Phasing and Implementation The following table outlines the proposed phasing of the projects identified above. Project profiles are provided in the Annex.10 0. Use of local Chartered Accountancy firms in implementing Double Entry Accrual based Accounting Local Chartered Accountancy firms can be brought on board for providing field level support to PMB staff in preparation of opening balance sheet. Name of Project Year 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 Implementation of Double Entry Accrual based Accounting Training and Institutional Strengthening Implementation of Geographical Imformation System E-Governance System for Municipal Services Citizen Communication and Participation Programme Modernising Office Infrastructure Year 2 Implementation Period Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 Institutional Mechanism for Implementation of Projects A number of institutional mechanisms. based on a partnering policy.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 10. Sl No. 10 11 12 Name of the Project Implementation of Double Entry Accrual based Accounting Training and Institutional Strengthening Implementation of Geographical Information System E-Governance System for Municipal Services Communication and Citizen Participation Programme Modernising Office Infrastructure Total Cost (Rs in Crores) 0.10 1.50 0. Table : Project List by Priority S.07 0.08 0. can be adopted for implementing the projects listed above.27 0.1. 148 . This will ensure that the implementation is carried out efficiently and will enable PMB to meet the objectives it has laid down in area of Institutional Development. training of PMB staff and handholding support following implementation. 8.No 7.6 Project Summary The Projects as listed in the table below have been prioritised based on the above parameters. The sequence of the projects reflects the priority.

149 .City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Leveraging the Role of the State level Steering Committee on Accounting Reforms The State Level Steering Committee on Accounting Reforms can be leveraged in obtaining technical guidance on implementation of accounting reforms as well as adapting the National Municipal Accounting Manual to suit local needs. Leveraging the Presence of Training Institutes in Ajmer and Jaipur Ajmer and Jaipur have a large number of educational and vocational training institutes which can partner with PMB in developing focussed training programmes for PMB staff.

2. Table: Levy of Taxes by the Pushkar Municipal Board 150 . The Rajasthan Municipal Bill.1 Financial Operating Plan Analysis of Current Situation Levy of Taxes The Rajasthan Municipalities Act. 2005 also provides for the levy of obligatory and discretionary taxes by the ULB.2 10. The following table shows the comparison of various taxes permitted under the Act and Various taxes being imposed currently by the Pushkar Municipal Board.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar 10. 1959 provides for the levy of obligatory and other taxes by the ULBs.

Tax on Congregations No 5. Scavenging Tax No 13. Tax on Animals used for riding . Tolls on roads. or built from the funds of the Municipality [2] Discretionary Taxes 1.A Municipality 3. Octroi on Goods or Animals brought within the Municipal Limits 3. Fire Tax No 8. House Tax 2. No Obligatory Taxes 1. No driving. Tax on deficit in parking spaces in No any non-residential building 9. Toll on Vehicles and other No Conveyances and on animals entering the Municipality 12.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar S.No Taxes as per Act Taxes Levied by Pushkar Municipal Board No Abolished by the State Government. Surcharge on Electricity No Consumption within the Municipal Area [1] 5. Tax on boats moored within the N. Sanitary Tax No 151 . draught or burden when kept within the Municipality 11. bridges and ferries No owned by. Tax on Vehicles and other Passenger tax charged from the conveyances plying for hire or vehicles kept within the Municipality 2. Local Bodies receiving Compensation in Lieu of Octroi. Tax on Pilgrimages and Tourists Yes 6. Tax on Advertisement other than Yes Advertisements published in the news papers 7. Tax on Dogs kept within the No Municipality 10. Lighting Tax No 4. Tax on Professions and Vocations 4.

for the last three years are as follows Table 19 : Summarised Financial Statements of Pushkar Municipal Board Particulars F.33 93. Figure: Overview of Municipal Finances Municipal Finance Receipts Payments Revenue Receipts Capital Receipts Revenue Expenditure Capital Expenditure • • • • Tax Revenue Assigned Revenues and Compensations Revenue Grant.82 97. 2005.65 29.48 45.75 (3.33 76. The account keeping of municipal finances of the Pushkar Municipal Board is currently based on single entry cash basis.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar The above table clearly shows that PMB is not charging and recovering all the taxes.29 Capital Receipts 37.Y 2004-05 (Rs In Lakhs) (Rs In Lakhs) (Rs In Lakhs) Revenue Receipts 89. contribution and subsidies Non Tax Revenue • • • • Specific Purpose Grants Loans Deposits Received Other Liabilities • • • • • Establishment Administrative Operation and Maintenance Interest Others •Rental Income •Fees and User Charges • • • • • • • • Fixed Assets CWIP Investments Stock Loans.85 30.Y 2002-03 F. permitted under the Rajasthan Municipalities Act.97 Revenue Surplus/(Deficit) 12.81 Less: Revenue Expenditure 76. The municipal finances of Board can be broadly summarised in the following figure.Y 2003-04 F. advances Other Assets Specific Purpose Grants The summarised financials of the Pushkar Municipal Board.46 89. 1959 and The Rajasthan Municipal Bill.04 Capital Expenditure 39.71 92.84 A perusal of the above summarised financial statements will reveal the following: • The Revenue Deficit of the PMB is increasing • Low Capital Expenditure indicates that the PMB is not able to utilise the grants received for capital purposes fully 152 .13 18.49) (3.48) 10.75) Capital Surplus/(Deficit) (1.

50 CAGR Revenue Receipts Tax Revenue Assigned Revenues and Compensation Rental Income .01 -4.31 2.Municipal Properties Fees and User Charges Sale and Hire Charges Revenue Grants.31 1.20 -42.09 9.33 23.Y 2004-05 (Rs In Lakhs) (Rs In Lakhs) (Rs In Lakhs) 89.62% 7.55 0.02 -2.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Revenue Receipts The composition of Revenue Receipts of the Municipal Board for the last three years can be summarised in the following figure.93 8.93 25.01 4.13% 27. which is not a healthy sign The details of Revenue Receipts of the Board for the last three years are stated below Table 20 : Revenue Receipts Particulars F. Figure: Composition of Revenue Receipts Composition of Revenue Receipts 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 40% 38% 33% 34% 35% 34% Transfer Including Grants Non-Tax Revenue Tax Revenue 27% 27% 33% The key findings from an analysis of the composition of Revenue Receipts are as follows: • Around 65-66 % of the revenue comprises of income from own sources • The composition of non-tax income is decreasing. Contributions and Subsidies Income from Investments Interest Earned Other Income 1.03 4.43 -4.18 17.64% 4.21 1.05 0.46 23.06 0.01% 0.36% The key findings from further analysis of the details of individual heads of Revenue Receipts are as follows: 153 .02 -12.00 4.08 22.29 31.64% 19.00 4.41% 93.00 4.Y 2002-03 F.Y 2003-04 F.64% 0.12 10.06 1.14% 0.32 89.88 27.78 0.

76 24. This is against an estimated annual demand of Rs 11 Lakh. In F.Y 2004-05 was about 51 lakhs.07 12. which accounts to about 52 %of the total Revenue Receipts.00 0.90 52. leading to the increased collection of the same. The salary bill of the Board for F. Food License rates have not been revised after 1959. there is minimal collection of House Tax.14 20.72 21. 03-04 and 04-05 they accounted for 81%.97 23. 154 .00 60. Revenue Expenditure The composition of the Revenue Expenditure of the Municipal Board for the last three years can be summarised in the following diagram Diagram 3: Composition of Revenue Expenditure Composition of Revenue Expenditure 100.Y 02-03. Presently.52 20.00 80.00 62. which turns out to be negative if inflation is taken into account. • Establishment Expenditure on an average accounts to more than 80% of Income from Own Sources. The Board has outsourced the collection of Pilgrimage Tax to private contractors.33 Others 24. currently the Board has about 304 licenses in operation Hotel License rates have not been revised after 1987. currently the Board has about 96 Hotels and 299 Restaurants in operation. however currently Pilgrimage Tax is collected irrespective of the number of days of stay. 93% and 82% respectively.00 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 57.59 Operation and Maintaince Establishment (Wages and Salaries) The key findings from an analysis of the composition of Revenue Expenditure are as follows: • Establishment Expenditure of all the Departments under Board accounts for about 52 per cent of the total Revenue Expenditure. • The increase in Other Expenses is mostly on account of increase in Contingent Expenses.41%.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar • • • • • Revenue Receipts of the Board are increasing at CAGR of 1.00 40.

00 1.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar The Revenue Expenditure of the Boars for Last three Years is summarised below Table 21: Revenue Expenditure Particulars Revenue Expenditure Establishment Expenses Administrative Expenses Operations and Maintenance Interest and Finance Charges Program Expenses Revenue Grants.00 0.46 23.00 F.22% The key findings from an analysis of the Revenue Expenditure is as that the CAGR for the Revenue Expenditure of the Municipality for the Last three years is around 8%.Y 03-04 Financial Year F.10 5.00 Rs (in Lakhs) 40.96 53.76% 3.97% 0.64 10.00 30.05 2.83 3.96 19.Y 2003-04 F.00 0.19 95.00 5.15% 47.72 6.95 12.74 50.00 10.82 97. Contributions and Subsidies Miscellaneous Expenses F.74 9.87% 18.84 6. The Composition of Capital Receipts of the Board is illustrated in the following diagram.00 0.Y 02-03 F.00 20.53 1.00 0.87 7.04 8.71 92. The trends in Revenue Expenditure can be depicted in the following diagram Trends in Revenue Expenditure 60.Y 2004-05 CAGR (Rs In Lakhs) (Rs In Lakhs) (Rs In Lakhs) 76.00 0.Y 04-05 Miscellaneous Expenses Operations and Maintenance Program Expenses Establishment Expenses Administrative Expenses Capital Receipts The Board funds its capital works mostly by way of Grants from the Central and State Government.Y 2002-03 F.00 50.72% 0. 155 .

00 3.47 Others Sale of Land 66.29 0.00 0.33 1. Contributions for Specific purposes Secured Loans Unsecured Loans Deposits Received Deposit Works Other Liabilities F. There is increase in the proportion of proceeds from Sale of Land in the Capital Receipts.24 14.00 0.70% 58.33 76. Table 22: Capital Receipts of Pushkar Municipal Board Particulars Capital Receipts Grants. rather than on actual capital planning.65 CAGR 26. The Board develops and implements capital works on the basis of the availability of funds.00 0.Y 2003-04 F. Other Receipts primarily constitutes of contractors deposits.00 0.82% 17.59% 59.29 6.00 80.83 13.00 0.87 0.00 20.13 8.00 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 82.46% Capital Expenditure The following figure depicts the composition of Capital Expenditure of the Pushkar Municipal Board for the last three years.81 31.30 16.Y 2004-05 (Rs In Lakhs) (Rs In Lakhs) (Rs In Lakhs) 37.00 0. which can not be used for capital expenditure purposes. The Capital Receipts of the Board is dependent to a large extent on the availability of funds under various Government sponsored schemes.Y 2002-03 F.00 0.12 4.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Diagram 4 : Composition of Capital Receipts Composition of Capital Receipts 100.29 12.21 50. and within the guidelines of the specific scheme under which the funds are received.00 60.00 40.20 23.23 Grants The above composition clearly shows the sole dependence on Grants for Capital Works.00 3.85 8.65 29. Figure: Composition of Capital Expenditure 156 .87 79.63 17. The break-up of Capital Receipts of the PMB for the last three years are stated in the following table.00 0.

00 80. Revenue Expenditure and Revenue surplus/ (Deficit) for the next 10 years The various underlying assumptions for preparation of these projections are • • The various items of income and expenditure have been projected on the basis of CAGR (Compounded Annual Growth Rate).00 13. the items of income and expenditure have been assumed to grow at a rate of 5% 157 .51 38.Y 2004-04.14 2002-03 9.00 40.04 lakhs.00 0. Most of this expenditure by the Board is on Construction of Roads .31 Development Repayment of Deposits. loans Fixed Assets 2004-05 The above diagram shows the increasing spending in the creation of Fixed Assets by the PMB.Y 2003-04 and F.71 lakhs in F.00 60.64 12. Out of total receipt of about Rs 51 lakhs.Y 2004-05 Wherever the growth is inconsistent .18 74. the expenditure on roads was around Rs 13.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Composition of Capital Expenditure 100.72 2003-04 34. The figure also highlights the under utilisation of Grants. the ULB undertook development works amounting to around Rs 18 Lakhs only. Contributions for Specific purposes (for Development Works). Financial Improvement Plan A Financial Improvement Plan is a Multi Year Financial operating plan prepared by projecting financials on a “Business As Usual” basis (using a simple CAGR) and then superimposing the financial implications of specific financial improvement initiatives.54 13. computed on the basis of actual figures for the F. Financial Projections (Business as Usual) The following table summarises the Projected Revenue Income.22 76.00 20.74 27.of a total Expenditure on Fixed Assets of Rs 15.Y 2002-03. F.

96 157.(A) Revenue Expenditure-(B) Revenue Surplus/(Deficit)=(A)-(B) 158 .96 134.01 135.93 111.16 25.Y 2007.Y 2011.52 189.Y 2010.14 23.F.74 117.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar (Figures are in Rs Lakhs) Particulars Pro-rata on Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected the basis of 10 months F.56 23.F.01 25.F.37 140.F.F.F.F.14 142.94 199.07 1 Revenue Receipts.F.Y 201407 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 128.29 123.73 182.53 32.87 35.10 21.56 163.28 154.Y 2013.06 106.Y 2009.Y 2006.Y 2005-06 F.01 32.59 148.94 164.05 149.38 170.72 129.62 27.Y 2008.41 27.Y 2012.

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Proposed Financial Initiatives The following financial initiatives have been proposed to assist the PMB augment its existing revenue base.Y 09-10. and is expected to reach 85% by F. It is assumed that reassessment would lead to yearly increase of demand by 10%. 80% for F. The yearly demand from House Tax is expected to be about Rs 11 Lakh per Annum. The Rajasthan Municipalities Bill. Compensation in lieu of Octroi ULBs were charging Octroi on the goods coming into the Municipal limits from outside. With the abolition of Octroi w. at the rate of Rs 1 per passenger.Y 2011-12 (65% for F. which is charged for entry into the Pushkar. on the passengers coming to Pushkar from outside 51 Kms.Y 08-09. 70% for F. Improvements in Collection of Pilgrimage Tax Pilgrimage Tax is currently being collected from two sources: • RSRTC (Rajasthan State Roadways Transport Corporation).Y 06-07 is expected to be about 60%. • Vehicles and passengers coming to Pushkar by road.Y 2001-02. The next reassessment has been assumed to be in F. Collection Efficiency for the Current demand for F. Pushkar Municipal Board is looking at the following options: • Revision of Agreement with RSRTC to increase the tax on passengers. The Second State Finance Commission has requested the State Government to restore the annual increase in octroi grant to 10%. The Assessed Properties are expected to grow annually at 2%. Collection Efficiency for the Arrear Demand is expected to be at 50% of collection efficiency for the current Demand till F.Y 11-12. 75% for F. could lead to increase in collection from Pilgrimage Tax by at least 20%. to make good the loss of Octroi income of ULBs. after which it is assumed to increase at 5%.f 1st August 1998.Y 11-12). To improve the collections from Pilgrimage tax. 159 . the State Government is providing grant in aid each month based on the actual octroi income for the year 1997-98.Y 10-11 and 85% for F. The rate of Rs 1 per passenger is as per an agreement dated 1990. The financial impact of these initiatives has also been discussed below: Improving Collections from House Tax PMB is currently conducting a house-to-house survey for the determining House Tax on the basis of Unit Area Method. The annual increase of 10% has been reduced to 5% from F.e.Y 09-10.Y 07-08. irrespective of their duration of stay. with an increase of 10% every year. • Levy of Pilgrimage Tax on the basis of duration of stay It is assumed that the exercise of the above options. 2005 provides for a revision of the assessment list once in three Years.

Increase in Income from License Fees PMB has not revised the food license rates after 1959 and the hotel license rates have not been revised after 1987. Increase in Rental Income PMB is charging Rental Income to 7 tenants.Soda and others Bakery Sweet Shop Rs 24 Rs 24 Rs 12 Rs 12 Rs 24 Rs 24 PMB is planning to revise the license rates. It is assumed that suitable revision of the rent from these properties would lead to an increase in income of at least 30-40% and an inbuilt clause for annual revision of the rental income would lead to a 5% year to year increase in Rental Income. The Rental Income has not been revised for the last 5-10 years and fixation of rent is due for one of the properties (Roadways Booking Office). It has been assumed that the revision of the license rates would increase the income by a factor of 5. The following table gives a comparative list of the License rates for the PMB and the license rates for AMC as revised in 1998.Y 2006-07 for Compensation in Lieu of Octroi has been prepared. Table : Comparative License rates for AMC and PMB Category of the Hotel Current Rate as per Pushkar Bye Laws 1987 Rs 100 Rs 200 Rs 500 Current Rate as per Ajmer Municipal Council Bye Laws 1998 Rs 500 Rs 1000 Rs 1500 Rs 2000 Rs 2500 Rs 3000 Rs 5000 Rs 150 Rs 500 Rs 50 Rs 100 Rs 500 Rs 250 (Without Power) Rs 1000 (With Power) Rs 100 (With Vanspati Ghee) Rs 500 Hotels with Less than 5 Rooms Hotels with 6-10 Rooms Hotels with 11-20 Rooms One Star Hotels Two Star Hotels Three Star Hotels Four Star Hotels Five Star Hotels Restaurants (Non AC) Restaurants (AC) Tea Stalls Ice. Hike in Fees for Grant of Permit 160 .City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar The Projections from F. assuming an increase of 10% every year.

the Income from Fees for Grant of Permit.50 lakhs on the basis of 1991 census. Regularisation/Conversion of Agricultural Land Currently. It is assumed that levy of this charge would lead to an annual income of Rs 3 lakh. Conservancy Tax on Hotels and Dharamshalas The PMB has prepared byelaws to levy conservancy charges on all hotels and dharamshalas at the minimum rate of Rs 200 and maximum rate of Rs 500 on the occasion of every party. It is assumed that from 2006-07. has been taken as five times of income in F.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar PMB is currently charging Building Plan Sanction fees only from the Plans which are coming for approval to ULB. It is expected that this exercise would increase the Advertisement Income to Rs 1 Lakh from the current Rs 15000 in F. The recent judgments by State Level Committee on Land Use transfer has proposed to levy the development charge on the basis of “actual development” which could lead to substantial increase in the revenue of the Municipal Board.Y 2008-09 (refer table 6). PMB authorities are of the view that only 10-20% of the total buildings being constructed come for the approval. 161 . this grant would be available to the PMB on the basis of 2001 census. the ULB will be able to ascertain all the buildings being constructed in the city. the general grant would be available to the ULBs on the basis of 2011 census. the Development Tax is charged by the Municipality @ Rs 15 per sq feet on the conversion/regularisation of agricultural land. It is assumed that levying of user fees on tent on the basis of number of days.Y 2008-09. General Grant The general grant being received by PMB is Rs 37. would increase the income by about 20%. From 2012-13. income is expected to grow at 5% annually.Y 200607.Y 2008-09. From F. With the introduction of GIS. With the Implementation of GIS in F. the fees should be linked to the number of days for which tents are put up. with a year to year growth of about 5%. wedding and other functions. Increase in Income from Advertisement Fees PMB has recently conducted a survey for all the advertisement sites within municipal limits and will be levying advertisement fees at the rate of Rs 10 Sq feet. Income from Fairs PMB is currently charging Rs 500 per tent during the annual Fair as a fixed charge. and it is expected that this will lead to an increase of Fees from Grant by a factor of 5.

28 225.Y 2007.41 149.F.56 77.13 189. the Revenue Surplus will stand at Rs 267.F.69 275.32 lakhs with the implementation of the suggested financial strategies against the Base Case figure of Rs 35.Y 2009.F.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Projected Financial Statements On the basis of above Financial Initiatives.F.Y 2011.Y 2014.98 440.65 159.Y 2010.11 267.87 173.Y 2013.F.94 112.(A) Revenue Expenditure-(B) Revenue Surplus/(Deficit)=(A)-(B) F.10 247.Y 2006.32 (All Figures are in Rs Lakhs) A comparative with the Base Case Scenario shows that by 2015-16.07 132.67 346.30 389.Y 2008.07 lakhs.F.53 157.14 123.16 135.Y 2012.62 142.05 308.06 92. the Revenue Income.F.F. 162 .01 164.01 129. Revenue Expenditure and Revenue Surplus/Deficit for the next 10 years have been projected as follows Table 23: Projected Financial Statements Particulars Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Revenue Receipts.F.Y 201507 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 162.41 56.12 51.71 200.97 173.44 111.07 222.56 117.

City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar .

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01 0.15 4.30 0.03 0. CWR for Zone-1 0.18 0.15 2.Total 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 Implementation of Double Entry Accrual 0.16 0.03 0.08 0.Capital Investment Plan Table 24: Capital Investment Plan for F.88 Meters Establishing DMAs (4 DMAs) 2.69 1.F.16 0.25 0.69 0.14 0.50 Institutional Strengthening Water Supply 0.F.93 Distribution Network for water supply from Bisalpur Electro-Mechanical Works 0.03 0.18 0.Y 2012.F.50 Information System E-Governance System for Municipal 0.20 Establishing Customer Connection 0.01 0.16 0.64 1.60 Program for Water Supply System Extension of Water Supply to New Colony Areas Bulk Meters (3nos) Construction of CWR for Pushkar Mela (4ML) 0.07 Implementation of Geographical 0.18 0.Y 2006.01 0.80 0.25 0.10 0.03 0.Y 2009.29 Leak Detection Study and Rehabilitation 0.25 0.25 0.64 0.16 0.25 .25 0.10 Participation Programme Modernising Office Infrastructure 0.Y 2010.64 0.10 Energy Efficiency Study 0.08 based Accounting Training and Institutional Strengthening 0.Y 2006-07 Sector Projects Investments Required (Rs in Crores) F.14 0.Y 2007.03 0.18 0.Y 2008.F.03 0.10 0.27 Services Communication and Citizen 0.10 Construction of OHSR.16 0.37 &3 Rising main and extension of 0.01 0.F.10 0.F.18 0.Y 2011.01 0.30 0.

11 0.25 0.F.47 2.16 0.11 0.50 2.04 0.11 0.Y 2011.23 0.90 0.16 0.F.Total 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 0.7 MLD Laying of Sewer Network in IDSMT Colony and Parashar Colony and Uncovered area Desilting of Open Sewers Sewerage Network in New Areas Public toilet for Pushkar fair Channelization.04 0.F.18 1.04 0.05 1.10 0.75 0.40 0.47 1.04 0.11 1.20 2.10 1.18 1.75 0.F.93 0.11 0.23 1.04 0.23 1.11 1.10 0.23 0.50 0.10 0. training and lining of Kharkheri Feeder. Nand Narwar Lake Rejuvenation &Kanas Makrawali Soil conservation measures Desiltation of Lake Water treatment plant Laboratory Public awareness & Training Solid Waste Management Equipment for solid waste management Solid waste composting plant Laboratory for solid waste treatment plant Pedestrianisation of the heritage precinct Provision of parking spaces Conservation of the abandoned Ghats 1.67 0.18 0.Y 2009.75 0.50 1.25 0.50 0.Y 2012.00 1.10 0.18 0.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Sector Projects Waste Water Drainage STP 0.10 0.00 0.03 0.18 0.25 0.11 0.50 0.18 0.90 0.40 0.72 0.Y 2008.18 5.36 2.10 0. Savitri and Kharkheri Investments Required (Rs in Crores) F.44 Construction of New drains in New Colonies Aforestation of Nag Pahar.19 0.67 .03 0.F.72 0.20 Land Use and Conservation 1.67 0.20 0.50 0.Y 2010.50 0.25 0.Y 2006.Y 2007.F.

F.00 0.76 Total (For all Sectors) 13.F.F.00 0.11 .City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Sector Projects Tourism Establishment of tourist information centers Improvement of the approach roads to various religious and archeological sites Development of Mela Ground Development a new camping site Development of tourist circuits Development of arts and crafts village Construction of Heritage hotels.25 1.00 1.25 0.Y 2009.25 0.40 6.Y 2008.00 1.00 1.Total 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 0.Y 2011.F.25 2.25 2.27 14.93 0.47 0.50 4.00 1.50 1.00 0.F.Y 2012.F. budget hotels and dharamshalas Development of Pushkar helipad Investments Required (Rs in Crores) F.50 0.33 2.Y 2007.Y 2006.50 41.Y 2010.

0913 0.4104 Total .7304 3.5 41.65 4.913 4.1763 0.2 33.688 3.086 0.763 0.663 0.76 6.112 1.488 0.88 6.12 10. Spatial Development and Housing Tourism and Conservation Total Investment Required (Rs in Crores) 1.896 8.City Development Plan for Ajmer & Pushkar Table 25: Capital Investment Plan-Pushkar Name of the Sector Institutional Strengthening Water Supply Waste Water Drainage Lake Rejuvenation Solid Waste Management Land Use.65 4.904 5.928 0.47 JNNURM (Rs in Crores) 0.1763 5.112 1.663 0.7 PMB (Rs in Crores) 0.47 State Government (Rs in Crores) 0.488 0.0913 0.616 0.086 0.616 0.63 6.16 0.304 4.86 4.

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