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Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM

Final Report

TABLE OF CONTENTS

LIST OF TABLES
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1 INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................1
1.1 Background ...................................................................................................... 1
1.2 JNNURM ............................................................................................................ 1
1.3 The City Development Plan ............................................................................. 2
1.3.1 Features of CDP.................................................................................. 3
1.3.2 Steps Involved ..................................................................................... 3
1.3.3 Study Area Rationale........................................................................... 6
1.3.4 Approach to Preparation of Jamshedpur CDP .................................... 7

2 PROJECT AREA PROFILE ..........................................................................11


2.1 The State of Jharkhand.................................................................................. 11
2.2 The City of Jamshedpur................................................................................. 12
2.2.1 Location ............................................................................................. 12
2.2.2 Regional Linkages ............................................................................. 13
2.2.3 Climate and Rainfall .......................................................................... 14
2.2.4 Flora and Fauna ................................................................................ 14
2.2.5 Brief History of the City...................................................................... 14
2.2.6 Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration.................................................... 16
2.2.7 Global Recognition ............................................................................ 18

3 VISION FOR THE CITY.................................................................................19


3.1 Formulation of the Vision .............................................................................. 19
3.2 Factors Considered in Vision Development ................................................ 19
3.3 SWOT analysis ............................................................................................... 20
3.4 Vision for Jamshedpur................................................................................... 22
3.5 Mission to Achieve the Stated Vision........................................................... 23

4 SOCIO ECONOMIC AND SPATIAL GROWTH ............................................24


4.1 Demographic Growth ..................................................................................... 24
4.1.1 Past Trends ....................................................................................... 24
4.1.2 Density............................................................................................... 25
4.1.3 Household Size ................................................................................. 26
4.1.4 Literacy Rates and SC/ST Share ...................................................... 27
4.1.5 Occupational Pattern ......................................................................... 28
4.1.6 Population Projections....................................................................... 29
4.1.7 Floating Population............................................................................ 30

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4.2 Regional Importance ...................................................................................... 31


4.3 Existing Landuse of JUA ............................................................................... 32
4.3.1 Jamshedpur Notified Area ................................................................. 32
4.3.2 Adityapur Notified Area...................................................................... 35
4.3.3 Mango Notified Area.......................................................................... 37
4.3.4 Jugsalai Municipality.......................................................................... 38
4.3.5 Other Areas of the JUA ..................................................................... 40
4.3.6 Combined Landuse ........................................................................... 40
4.3.7 Future Spatial Growth Directions....................................................... 41
4.4 Economic Growth........................................................................................... 42
4.4.1 Agro Based Industries ....................................................................... 42
4.4.2 Industries and Minerals ..................................................................... 43
4.5 Essential Actions ........................................................................................... 43
4.6 Investment Plan .............................................................................................. 44

5 URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE ........................................................................45


5.1 General ............................................................................................................ 45
5.2 Water Supply .................................................................................................. 46
5.2.1 Water Sources Available ................................................................... 46
5.2.2 Quality of Water................................................................................. 47
5.2.3 Current level of Service ..................................................................... 48
5.2.4 Future Demand Estimates................................................................. 50
5.2.5 Development Proposals .................................................................... 51
5.2.6 Investment Plan................................................................................. 54
5.3 Sewerage System ........................................................................................... 55
5.3.1 Existing Treatment Plants and Coverage .......................................... 55
5.3.2 Future Demand Estimates................................................................. 57
5.3.3 Development Proposals .................................................................... 57
5.3.4 Investment Plan................................................................................. 59
5.4 Storm Water Drainage.................................................................................... 60
5.4.1 General Drainage System ................................................................. 60
5.4.2 Development Proposals .................................................................... 61
5.4.3 Investment Plan................................................................................. 62
5.5 Solid Waste Management System ................................................................ 63
5.5.1 Current Status ................................................................................... 63
5.5.2 Future Demand Estimate................................................................... 63
5.5.3 Development Proposals .................................................................... 66
5.5.4 Investment Plan................................................................................. 70
5.6 Traffic and Transportation............................................................................. 71
5.6.1 Regional Connectivity........................................................................ 71
5.6.2 Transportation within JUA ................................................................. 71
5.6.3 Vehicle Population in Jamshedpur .................................................... 72
5.6.4 Travel Characteristics........................................................................ 73
5.6.5 Accidents in Jamshedpur .................................................................. 74
5.6.6 Road Network.................................................................................... 74
5.6.7 Road Condition.................................................................................. 75

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5.6.8 Traffic Management and Circulation.................................................. 76


5.6.9 Development Proposals .................................................................... 78
5.6.10 Investment Plan................................................................................. 84
5.7 Investment Plan for Urban Infrastructure .................................................... 85

6 URBAN POOR AND SLUMS ........................................................................86


6.1 Existing Situation ........................................................................................... 86
6.2 Poverty In Jamshedpur.................................................................................. 86
6.3 Slums In Jua ................................................................................................... 86
6.4 General Characteristics Of Slums ................................................................ 89
6.5 Development Proposals................................................................................. 89
6.6 Investment Plan .............................................................................................. 90

7 URBAN ENVIRONMENT, TOURISM AND HERITAGE................................91


7.1 Existing Situation ........................................................................................... 91
7.2 Development Proposals................................................................................. 92
7.3 Investment Plan .............................................................................................. 93

8 URBAN AMENITIES .....................................................................................94


8.1 Existing Situation ........................................................................................... 94
8.1.1 Educational Facilities......................................................................... 94
8.1.2 Recreational Facilities ....................................................................... 95
8.1.3 Sports Facilities ................................................................................. 95
8.2 Development Proposals................................................................................. 97
8.3 Investment Plan .............................................................................................. 98

9 PROJECTS EXTERNAL TO JNNURM .........................................................99


9.1 The Goal .......................................................................................................... 99
9.2 Expenditure................................................................................................... 100

10 URBAN GOVERNANCE AND REFORMS..................................................101


10.1 Existing Situation ......................................................................................... 101
10.2 Financial Profile............................................................................................ 105
10.3 Reforms Required ........................................................................................ 108
10.4.1 Mandatory Reforms ......................................................................... 108
10.4.2 Optional Reforms............................................................................. 108
10.4.3 Investment Plan............................................................................... 109

11 CAPITAL INVESTMENT PLAN ..................................................................110

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11.1 General .......................................................................................................... 110


11.2 Principles Of Phasing .................................................................................. 110
11.3 Institutionalizing Cip Process ..................................................................... 111
11.4 Summary Of Expenditure ............................................................................ 112

12 URBAN LOCAL BODY FINANCE ..............................................................114


12.1 Framework For Analysis.............................................................................. 114
12.2 ULB Finance Assessment – Analysis Framework .................................... 114
12.2.1 Revenue Income possibilities .......................................................... 115
12.2.2 Revenue Expenditures .................................................................... 116
12.3 Financial Operating Plan ............................................................................. 116
12.4 Capital Investment Plan And Project Phasing........................................... 122

Annexure

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LIST OF TABLES

Table 1 – Area Statement of Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration


Table 2 – Mitigation Measures for negating weaknesses
Table 3 – Past Trends in Population – All Notified Areas
Table 4 – Comparison of Growth Rates
Table 5 – Population – Jurisdictional Distribution (2001)
Table 6 – Population Density of JUA (2001)
Table 7 – Household Size – JUA 2001
Table 8 – Literacy rates and Share of SC/STs
Table 9 – Share of Main and Marginal Workers – JUA 2001
Table 10 – Share of Main and Marginal Workers – JUA 2001
Table 11 – Population Projection for JUA
Table 12 – Floating Population Forecast
Table 13 – Land Use Distribution of Jamshedpur Notified Area
Table 14 – Land Use Distribution of Adityapur Notified Area
Table 15 – Land Use Distribution of Mango Notified Area
Table 16 – Land Use Distribution of Jugsalai Municipality
Table 17 – Land Use Distribution of Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration
Table 18 – Investment Plan
Table 19 – Current Level of Services in JUA - Water Supply by Piped
Connections
Table 20 – Current Level of Services in JUA- Water Supply by Ground
Water Extraction
Table 21 – Projected Demand for Water Supply - JUA
Table 22 – Estimated Un-met Demand for Water Supply – JUA 2006
Table 23 – Capacity and Coverage of the Proposed Water Treatment Plants
Table 24 – Investment Plan – Water Supply
Table 25 – Sewage Generation Estimated for JUA
Table 26 – Capacity and Coverage of the Proposed S T Ps – JUA 2031
Table 27 – Investment Plan – Sewage System
Table 28 – Investment Plan – Storm Water
Table 29 – Future Solid Waste Generation Estimate (Sitting Population)
Table 30 – Future Solid Waste Generation Estimate (Total Population)
Table 30 – Capacity and Coverage of the Proposed Solid Waste System
Table 32 – Investment Plan – Solid Waste management

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Table 33 – Vehicle Registration Figures - Jamshedpur


Table 34 – Accident Statistics - Jamshedpur
Table 35 – Road Lengths - JUA
Table 36 – Summary of Junction Improvement Proposals
Table 37 – Investment Plan – Traffic & Transport
Table 38 – Capital Investment on Urban Infrastructure
Table 39 – Population in Slums
Table 40 – Investment Plan – Basic Services to Urban Poor
Table 41 – Investment Plan – Environment etc.
Table 42 – Investment Plan - Amenities
Table 43 – Summary of Expenditure for Regional Development
Table 44 – Municipal Revenue Income
Table 45 – Municipal Revenue Expenditure
Table 46 – Municipal Capital Receipts
Table 47 – Municipal Capital Expenditure
Table 48 – Investment Plan – Urban Governance and Reforms
Table 49 – Total Expenditure Proposed
Table 50 – Year wise Expenditure Proposed
Table 51 – Municipal Capital Receipts

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

THE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN UNDER JNNURM


The Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission is an ambitious programme of the
Government of India to bring about improvements in the existing urban service levels and urban
infrastructure in a financially sustainable manner. The primary objective of the programme is to
create economically productive, efficient, equitable and responsive cities. The projects that qualify
under this scheme include sub-sectors of water supply, sewerage and sanitation, drainage, solid
waste management, traffic and transportation facilities and housing infrastructure. Further, special
projects including urban transit systems, urban expressways, sea-links and other sectors of
similar nature would also be covered under this scheme. In order to access funds through the
mission, the state government and the
cities seeking assistance require to
sign up to a set of reforms covering
various areas of urban management
and good governance.

The formulation of the City


Development Plan (CDP) for
Jamshedpur has been initiated by the
Government of Jharkhand under the
Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban
Renewal Mission (JNNURM).

The goals of the City Development


Plan includes a collective city vision
and action plan aimed at improving
urban governance and management,
increasing investment to expand
employment and services, and
systematic and sustained reductions
in urban poverty.

THE OBJECTIVES

• Identify infrastructure projects to be implemented under this scheme along with the
proposed implementation mechanism.
• Guide the city in the direction of economic development with the aim of creating more
employment opportunities.
• Develop a consensus building process to establish the city’s priority, strategies and
actions.
• Assist local authorities in outlining their financing and investment strategies.
• Build local capacity for more effective urban management.
• Focus on urban reforms to be implemented to improve the health of ailing urban local
bodies.

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THE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF JAMSHEDPUR


In Jharkhand, the three cities of Ranchi (Capital City), Dhanbad (Resource Centre) and
Jamshedpur (Industrial / Employment Centre) has been identified as the eligible cities, which can
seek assistance under JNNURM, for their future development.

JAMSHEDPUR CITY
Jamshedpur is one of the
oldest and the largest
existing Company town in
the world. It was the
benchmark development
for post independent
Indian industrial cities
such as Bhilai, Rourkela
and Durgapur, which were Late Jamshedji Nusserwanji Tata TISCO
established in completely
rural areas. A city founded
by the late Jamshedji
Nusserwanji Tata, Jamshedpur then known as Sakchi was home to the first private Iron and Steel
Company of India.

The Jamshedpur Block was established in the 1952 and constitutes of rural & urban areas having
one Municipality and two Notified Area Committees namely Jugsalai Municipality, Jamshedpur
Notified Area Committee and Mango Notified Area Committee. Tata Nagar was the sole urban
node for many decades till villages within its vicinity transformed into urban agglomerations.

The Jamshedpur City Development Plan has been conceived for an area of 149.225 Sq. Kms,
which has a present (2006) population of approximately 12Lakhs. The area covered under
Jamshedpur CDP includes three Notified Area Committees (Jamshedpur Notified Area, Adityapur
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Notified Area, Mango Notified Area), one Municipality (Jugsalai Municipality) and eight other
fringe towns / urban outgrowths (which includes the areas of Parsudih, Kitadih, Gadra,
Ghorabandha, Chotagovindpur, Sarjamdahh, Bagbera and Haldubani). All these areas together
form the Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration, for which the CDP has to be formulated. The City
Development Plan for Jamshedpur deals with in a comprehensive, cohesive and concise manner,
all the important elements of governance in the form of themes: Urban Growth Management /
Development Planning, Urban Infrastructure Management, Urban Poor and Slums, Urban
Environment, Social Development, Urban Governance and Management and Urban Finance and
Management apart from Demographic Trends, Economy Pattern, etc with a long term strategic
vision.

An effort has also been made to institutionalize the formation of the Jamshedpur Municipal
Corporation, which will in turn bring in a corporate vision to the development of the city as well as
bring about a change that the citizens of Jamshedpur will contribute to, and ultimately benefit
from.

THE CDP PLANNING PROCESS


The CDP is prepared through a participatory process, wherein the various stakeholders and the
citizens and the concerned authorities play a major role in the formation of the vision for the future
development of the city. The planning process therefore has been a consultative one, with
stakeholders representing a varied spectrum of qualification taking part in the discussions and
dialogue leading to the formulation of a vision and development objectives, identification of priority
sectors and projects.

CDP is prepared as a multi-stage exercise, with the following steps:

Step – 1:
In-depth analysis of the existing situation, covering the demographic profile, economic profile,
urban governance, urban infrastructure, and environmental aspects:

Step – 2:
Development of a perspective and a vision of the city:

Step – 3:
Formulating a strategy for bridging the gap between existing condition of the city and the vision for
the future of the city:

Step – 4:
Preparing a City Investment Plan (CIP) and a financing strategy:

STEP 1- CITY ASSESSMENT

As a part of the preparation of the City Development Plan, an assessment of Jamshedpur city has
been carried out to understand the city’s present status, the direction in which it has been moving,
and its strengths and weaknesses. The assessment covers the city’s basic infrastructure (physical
and environment) and finally, the financial status of the municipal corporation.

The detail study was carried out covering all the aspect of city planning, which are as follows:

• Land Use and Spatial Growth


• Urban Governance
• Urban infrastructure
o Water supply
o Sewerage and Sanitation
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o Solid Waste Management


o Storm water Drainage
o Traffic and Transportation
• Urban Poor and Slums
• Urban Environment
• Amenities and Recreational Facilities
• Development strategies
• CIP – Financial assessment and financial projection
• Reforms capacity building

The analysis covers the current status in each sector, emerging issues in the sector, likely future
demand, development objectives and strategies for improvement and identified projects to meet
these objectives. Some of the core issues which emerged during interaction with stakeholders
include provision of adequate and quality water supply to all the residents of JUA, improvement in
solid waste management and augmenting the sewerage systems, improving the institutional,
financial and technical capacity of the existing urban local bodies and also the proposed Municipal
Corporation and improvement in the traffic and transportation system as well as the urban
environment.

1. LANDUSE AND SPATIAL GROWTH

OBSERVATIONS

About 35% of the land is dedicated for the purpose of industrial use, which is the major land use,
followed by the residential use of approximately 20%.

The land use table indicates that about 18% of area is allocated for transportation facilities, and
13.5% is undeveloped area

KEY ISSUES

• The urban centres like Mango Notified Area, Adityapur Notified Area and Jugsalai Municipality
have developed in a haphazard manner resulting in unplanned urban growth.
• Poor local connectivity between the existing Notified Areas / Municipal Area and the new
growth centres added to the urban agglomeration.

2. URBAN GOVERNANCE

OBSERVATIONS

Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration consists of multiple authorities, which are as follows:

• Jamshedpur Notified Area Committee (JNAC)


• Adityapur Notified Area Committee (ANAC)
• Mango Notified Area Committee (MNAC)
• Jugsalai Municipality
• Village Panchayats of Bagbera, Gadhra, Ghorabandha, Parsudih, Kitadih, Sarjamdah,
Haldubani and Chotagovindpur
• Adityapur Industrial Development Authority (AIADA)
• Private Development Organisations like Jamshedpur Utility and Service Company (JUSCO)
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The issue of making Jamshedpur into a Municipal Corporation dates


back to 1986 when a public interest litigation was filed in the Supreme
Court urging the court to provide residents of Jamshedpur the
fundamental right to elect a local government and get civic facilities on
a par with everyone staying in the steel city.

EXISTING SCENARIO OF MULTIPLE AUTHORITIES OF


JAMSHEDPUR URBAN AGGLOMERATION

D. C

Asst. Dy C.

Jamshedpur City Adityapur City Mango Jugsalai Other Areas

JNAC JUSCO ANAC AIADA MNAC Jugsalai Village


Municipality Panchayat

Special Special Special Special


Officer Officer Officer Officer

KEY ISSUES

• Absence of one unified development and governing authority.


• Influence of the other two major players namely JUSCO, AIADA.

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3. URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE

KEY ISSUES

I. Water Supply
• The coverage area of water supply distribution in all areas of JUA is below 50%
(average).
• Uneven distribution of water supply with JUSCO area getting the best of services.
• Overall water supply coverage area (by piped connections) is approximately 25% of the
total area of JUA.
• The other areas included in JUA other than JNAC, ANAC, MNAC and JMC areas, do not
have any provision of direct water supply and is presently been supplied by bore wells,
tube wells, natural water bodies, tankers, etc.
• The dependence on groundwater is increasing alarmingly and has to be curtailed by
providing proper water supply.

II. Sewerage System and Sanitation


• About one-third of the total sewage generated is treated while the rest remains untreated
and is disposed off into the Subarnarekha and Kharkai Rivers. Thus the river water gets
polluted leading to environmental degradation.

III. Storm Water Drainage


• There is no provision of storm water drainage system in the whole JUA except in some of
the areas of Jamshedpur Notified Area, which is controlled by JUSCO.
• Absence of a storm water drainage network in congested areas like Jugsalai, Mango, etc,
is the primary reason for the inefficiency in the drainage system.

IV. Solid Waste Management


• Absence of adequate facility for collection of waste, which ultimately lands up on the
streets, lanes or backside of houses. There is no system of door-to-door collection of
waste nor is there any facility of community bins.
• No segregation of waste (hazardous, bio-medical, etc.) is done.
• There is no provision for treatment of the waste nor is there any proper waste disposal
site in JUA except for areas maintained by JUSCO. Moreover, the waste disposal site of
JUSCO are unsuitably located, being very close to the rivers, and also do not have any
treatment and recycling mechanism in place.

V. Traffic and Transportation


• Absence of functional hierarchy of road network resulting in inter-mixing of local and
regional traffic
• Narrow roads in the central and core areas of the city with restricted capacity adds to the
congestion problems
• Inadequate manned level crossing leading to travel delays and lack of road safety
• Poor road surface quality and absence of appropriate safety and visibility enhancement
parameters like sign boards for both traffic and street markings, channel islands, and
other street furniture (except the area controlled by JUSCO)

4. URBAN POOR AND SLUMS

KEY ISSUES
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• The Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration has an average of 12.4% slum population.


• The largest slum population amongst the study area exists in Adityapur. The slum
population percentage is around 33.54%.

STEP 2- DEVELOPMENT OF PERSPECTIVE AND VISION FOR JUA

FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED FOR VISION


During the individual discussions and during the workshops the stakeholders discussed and
debated the various issues1 and have articulated that the Vision for Jamshedpur should take the
following aspects into considerations while formulating the Vision.

• An environment friendly city with excellent infrastructure and sustainable development.


• Development of a Slum free and pollution free city.
• Multi sector economic approach to ensure sustainability in case of adverse economic
environment.
• Sustainable use of resources for better future.
• Promote it as a Tourist hub.
• Planned residential layouts with provision of social and physical infrastructure.
• Best Public transport and better connectivity.

The Vision for the City of Jamshedpur is formulated by the stakeholders by consensus approach
and through continued consultation with the community in an integrated and cohesive manner
considering the strengths, current issues, concerns, problems and the future focus areas to
achieve the desired results.

IMPORTANCE OF JAMSHEDPUR

• Unique Economy
• Availability of local work force
• Rich Culture and a very strong image and morale
• Good Climatic condition
• Availability of basic civic Infrastructure
• Availability of resources in the region within a very short reach
• Availability of Job opportunities
• Prime Education Centre
• A Tourist transit hub

Formulation of a Vision for a Sustainable Development Plan


‘An economically vibrant city of diverse opportunities with a rich culture in
which all the citizens enjoy safe and livable environment with good
connectivity and equitable distribution of social infrastructure and facilities’

1
For the workshop details refer to Annexure 7.2
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STEP 3 - DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES

The existing situation analysis on the state of governance and infrastructure under the sub
mission for urban governance and urban infrastructure respectively and urban poor and slums
has provided broader perspective towards formulating the sectoral goals and actions based on
the vision perceived for the city development. The gap between the existing condition and the
conceived sectoral goals has been identified which was the basis for project identification under
the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission.

The sectoral deficiencies are to be rectified phase wise for the period of 7 years from 2006-07 to
2013-2014. To achieve the said vision development strategies with action plan and total
expenditure of each activity have been formulated.

DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES

• URBAN GOVERNANCE
To constitute a single unified administrative body – Jamshedpur Municipal Corporation and
the total expenditure would be around 230 Crores

• URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE

1. WATER SUPPLY
To provide for safe, equitable, reliable, adequate water supply as well as reduce transmission
and distribution losses. The total cost for 100% water supply to the total population would be
around Rs.622.03 Crores.

2. SEWERAGE SYSTEM AND SANITATION


Treatment of 100 per cent of sewage generated and universal access to clean, affordable
sanitation facilities at public places. The total cost required for such development strategies
would be around Rs.307.27 Crores.

3. STORM WATER DRAINAGE


Provision for storm water drainage system for the entire planning area of JUA. The total
expenditure for such development is envisaged to be around Rs.161.24 Crores.

4. SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT


Creation of a Separate Solid Waste Management cell in JMC, with expertise in Engineering
Human Resources/Personnel Management, Communication, Health Include ‘Recycling’ in
SWM and facilitate and regulate the sector accordingly and decentralized Solid Waste
Disposal and treatment. Enhance Citizen Participation by involvement in source segregation
and outsource the communication campaign to NGOs/ Environmental Organizations. The
total expenditure required is Rs.100 Crores.

5. TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION


Promote public transport by developing dedicated bus lane system; focus on cycle tracks and
footpaths and to explore private participation options and to implement computerized
signalling for better traffic management. The total cost estimated is around Rs.878.25 Crores.

THE TOTAL EXPENDITURE ON DEVELOPMENT OF URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE IS


RS.2068.79 CRORES.

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No Activities Cost (Rs. Cr.) 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013
1 Urban Infrastructure
2 Water Supply 622.03 39.01 125.17 176.78 111.96 92.29 79.29 1.04
3 Sewerage System 307.27 13.98 259.59 103.77 56.68 38.36 34.91 0.00

4 Storm Water Drainage System 161.24 12.87 56.77 31.47 26.40 16.21 11.97 7.03
Solid Waste Management
5 System 100.00 10.00 25.25 25.25 20.00 6.50 6.50 6.50
6 Traffic & Transportation 878.25 8.00 89.75 324.35 288.93 159.93 4.15 3.15
TOTAL 2,068.79 83.86 556.53 661.62 503.97 313.29 136.82 17.72

INVESTMENTS IN URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE

WATER SUPPLY

31% SEWERAGE
40%
SOLID WASTE
MANAGEMENT
STORM WATER
DRAINAGE
TRAFFIC &
17% TRANSPORTATION
7% 5%

• URBAN POOR AND SLUMS


Rehabilitation of existing slum dwellers and to improve the accessibility of education and
health facilities for urban poor. The total expenditure required would be around Rs.141.50
Crores.

• URBAN ENVIRONMENT & HERITAGE


On the basis of analysis, the action plan is formulated for all water bodies in the city to check
the pollution levels and measures towards the maintenance and revitalization of the city.
Identification of historical and archaeologically significant precincts and conduct a detailed
survey of the existing condition of these structures would help to make Jamshedpur a historic
urban centre. The expenditure required would be around Rs.30 Crores.

• AMENITIES AND SOCIAL FACILITIES


To decentralize and provide for amenities and recreational facilities for all Plans for enhanced
development for self-sustainable neighbourhood/ cluster in different parts of the city. The
expenditure for such activities is around Rs.106.75 Crores

• PROJECTS EXTERNAL TO JNNURM - REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT & LINKAGES


To develop an integrated decentralized urban form. Proposals such as regional airport and
express corridors connecting Jamshedpur-Dhanbad and Jamshedpur –Ranchi are made for
overall development of Jharkhand State. The expenditure for such regional development is
nearly Rs.1000.50 Crores.

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PROJECT IDENTIFICATION AND COST ESTIMATION

Cost (Rs. Crores)


No. Activities
1 Socio Economic Growth 102.27
2 Urban Infrastructure 2,068.79
Water Supply 622.03
Sewerage 307.27
Drainage 161.24
Solid Waste 100.00
Traffic & Transportation 878.25
3 Facilities to Urban Poor 141.50
4 Environment Protection & Heritage 30.00
5 Amenities & Recreational facilities 106.75
6 Urban Reforms 230.00
TOTAL 2,679.31
7 Projects External to JNNURM 1,000.50
GRAND TOTAL 3,679.81

Urban Reforms

Regional Linkages

Amenities & Recreational facilities

Environment Protection & Heritage

Facilities to Urban Poor

Urban Infrastructure

Unified Administration Setup


500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500
-

STEP 4- PREPARATION OF CITY INVESTMENT PLAN (CIP) AND FINANCIAL STRATEGY

The Capital Investment Plan is the multi-year scheduling of identified and prioritised investments.
The scheduling or phasing of the plan is based on studies of the fiscal resources availability (for
new investments and O & M), technical capacity for construction and O & M and the choice of
specific improvements to be constructed for a period of six years into the future.

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The preparation of City Development Plan (CDP) is the pre-requisite to


obtain funding under JNNURM.
The need for the CIP is on account of:

• Assessment of city growth and infrastructure needs (will be carried out once in every 5 years)
• Detailed feasibility/ engineering studies carried out of new projects.
• Scheduling of investments on ongoing projects due to cost and/ or time overruns.
• Assigning priorities within the constraints of available financial resources

JNNURM FRAMEWORK:

The proposed new municipal corporation that will be including whole of Jamshedpur
agglomeration will have population bases exceeding 1 million. In that case the funding pattern
would be:
• Central Government Grant 50%
• State Government Grant 20%
• ULB funds 30%

On 50% (Central Grant)-20% (State Grant)-30% (ULB) pattern; fund requirements would be
as shown below:

Rs. Crores
Total Fund Requirement 2679.31
Grant (Central) 50% 1339.66
Grant (State) 20% 535.86
To be raised by ULB 30% 803.79

INVESTMENT SUSTENANCE

Investment Sustenance of JNNURM plan for Jamshedpur is by following sources of finance:


Rs. Crores
JNNURM Grant 1,186.41
Scheme Specific Grant
(Against net revenue income) 474.56
Regular Capital Income 140.00
PPP and Cash Recovery 376.34
External Loans 195.50
Total 2,372.81

CITY INVESTMENT PLAN-PHASING 2006-2013 (RS CRORES)

No Activities Cost (Rs. Cr.) 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013
1 Socio Economic Growth 102.27 51.73 48.29 2.25 - - - -
2 Urban Infrastructure 2,068.79 83.86 556.53 661.62 503.97 313.29 136.82 17.72
3 Facilities to Urban Poor 141.50 12.00 24.00 34.50 34.50 34.50 2.00 -
Environment Protection &
4 Heritage 30.00 - - - - - - -
Amenities & Recreational
5 Facilities 106.75 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 26.75 - -
6 Urban Reforms 230.00 23.00 202.50 4.50 - - - -
TOTAL 2,679.31 190.59 851.32 722.87 558.47 374.54 138.82 17.72
Projects External to
7 JNNURM 1,000.50 200.10 200.10 200.10 100.05 100.05 100.05 100.05
GRAND TOTAL 3,679.81 390.69 1,051.42 922.97 658.52 474.59 238.87 117.77

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PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP (PPP) - OTHER SUPPORT MECHANISMS:

The corporation may explore the possibility of private sector participation in development of the
projects, especially as an interim relief to its own contribution. This will ease-out the burden on
revenue recovery with desired growth of 20% per annum.

• Development of Riverbanks:
As mentioned earlier, the riverbanks of the Subarnarekha and Kharkai Rivers are to be
developed into active and passive recreation spaces for the citizens of Jamshedpur. This
could be conceived as a standalone viable project with appropriate mix of real estate,
commercial usage and public recreation infrastructure. If packaged properly, the project can
be developed totally through public private partnership (PPP). Similar effort is being explored
in Ahmedabad for development of Sabarmati Riverfront.

• Development of Ring Road:


Ring road is costing around Rs. 325 Crores. It can be packaged in two or three lengths to
make a standalone BOT project. Alternatively, a complete project could be undertaken by way
of shadow tolling i.e. proposed corporation will collect toll at all the entry points of the city
towards recovery of ring road project. Cost of flyovers in Mumbai (55 No’s) is being recovered
by way of toll at the entry points of the city.

• Other projects:
Other projects, which can be conveniently packaged (water supply, solid waste management,
new river bridges etc.) to make it a commercially viable standalone development, should be
done through PPP/ BOT as far as possible. These support mechanisms will not only ensure
success of the projects without any problem of funds but also will set precedence for funding
future infrastructure projects.

Though one of the main aims of JNNURM is to finance the infrastructure investments identified as
part of CDP, the larger objective of the mission is to initiate much-needed reforms in ULBs.

URBAN REFORMS

The main thrust of the strategy of urban renewal is to ensure improvement in urban governance
so that Urban Local Bodies (ULBs) and parastatal agencies become financially sound with
enhanced credit rating and ability to access market capital for undertaking new programme and
expansion of services. In this improved environment, public-private participation model for
providing various services would also become feasible. To achieve this objective, State
Governments, ULBs and parasitical agencies are required to accept implementation of an agenda
of reforms. The proposed reforms broadly fall into the two categories:

• Mandatory reforms
• Optional reforms

The guidelines issued by the Government of India stipulate these reforms in considerable
detail.

All the mandatory and optional reforms are to be implemented by the State/ULB/Parastatal bodies
within the mission period. However, for schemes relating to water supply and sanitation, following
State level mandatory reforms may be treated as optional.

• Repeal of Urban Land Ceiling and Regulation Act


• Amendment of Rent Control Act

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THE WAY FORWARD

The JNNURM scheme marks an important milestone in the development of urban infrastructure
and the reform agenda of the Government of India. It provides an opportunity for municipal
corporations to fill the increasing gap between existing and desired service delivery, even as the
pressure on urban infrastructure mounts. It is indeed a stepping-stone for proposed municipal
corporations like Jamshedpur Municipal Corporation to achieve improvements in service delivery,
governance and financial sustainability and to develop greater Jamshedpur into a self-sustainable
industrial town.

FOCUS AREAS

Administration
• To ensure planned development
• Equitable distribution of infrastructure
• Management of the city

Improvement of Work Participation Ratio


• Attract industries with employment opportunities
• Develop support Infrastructure

Encourage Public Private Partnership


• In all development projects

ESSENTIAL ACTIONS

In order to materialize the vision statement, the following actions will have to be undertaken:

Formulation of a Unified Administration Agency


• To ensure Planned development
• Equitable distribution of infrastructure
• Management of the city
• JNNURM requires an elected body to undertake the management of the city hence it is
suggested that a Municipal Corporation be set up for the city.

Improvement of Work Participation Ratio


• Attract industries with employment opportunities
• Develop support Infrastructure

Encourage Public Private partnership in all development projects

Implement Community Participation Law


• Encourage direct participation of public in municipal functions, budgeting

Renewal and Redevelopment of Inner City areas


• Improvement / removal of slums, develop infrastructure, redevelopment where required

Promote active participation of NGO in the development activities.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

1 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................... 1
1.1 Background ...................................................................................................... 1
1.2 JNNURM............................................................................................................ 1
1.3 The City Development Plan............................................................................. 2
1.3.1 Features of CDP..................................................................................... 3
1.3.2 Steps Involved ........................................................................................ 3
1.3.3 Study Area Rationale.............................................................................. 6
1.3.4 Approach to Preparation of Jamshedpur CDP ....................................... 7

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1 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background

According to the 2001 census, the urban population of India was 27.8% (285.35
million) of the total population and it is estimated to cross by over 40% by 2021. Cities
and towns contribute to almost 50 – 55% of the GDP and by playing a growing role in
the global markets, cities in India are going to be the engines of economic growth, the
centre-points of innovation and hubs of many socio-economic activities. It is clear that
the cities and towns will play a vital role in India’s socio-economic transformation.

In spite of this, the current state of affairs in most of our urban areas is far from
satisfactory on all parameters of urban governance. Unplanned growth, large
population residing in slums, over stressed and unreliable civic infrastructure have
become the hallmark of many of the agencies handling urban governance. Addressing
these problems at the right time will have a significant economic consequence.

Notwithstanding the 74th Constitutional Amendment Act, 1992 on Municipalities,


Municipal governments and other institutions responsible for service provision are
facing acute shortage of capacity and resources due to their inability to effectively use
their revenue raising powers, in particular, relating to property tax and user charges.

The Government of India has launched the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal
Mission (JNNURM) in the Financial Year 2005-06 which will be in place for next seven
years aiming to create economically productive, efficient, equitable and responsive
cities, which will make the current state of affairs of our cities compatible with the
country’s socio-economic objectives as well as India’s growing role in the World
economy.

1.2 JNNURM

The JNNURM assumes that in order to make our cities work and meaningfully
contribute to India’s economic growth and poverty education objectives, it is essential
to create incentives and support for urban reforms both at the state and the city level.
This can be achieved by developing appropriate enabling frameworks, enhancing the
creditworthiness of municipal governments and integrating the urban poor with service
delivery systems.

The Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission focuses on:

• Improving and augmenting the economic and social infrastructure of cities.


• Ensuring basic services to the urban poor including security of tenure.
• Initiating wide-ranging urban sector reforms whose primary aim is to eliminate
legal, institutional and financial constraints that have impeded investment in
urban infrastructure and services.

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• Strengthening municipal governments and their functioning in accordance with


the provisions of the constitution (seventy-fourth) amendment act, 1992. It
provides for public disclosure of local spending decisions together with
earmarking of budgetary locations for basic services to the poor.

With provision of incentives and support for urban reforms at city and state level, the
National Urban Renewal Mission (NURM) wants to make our cities work and
meaningfully contribute to India’s economic growth and poverty reduction objectives
by:

• Developing appropriate enabling frameworks


• Enhancing the creditworthiness of municipal governments
• Integrating the urban poor with the service delivery systems

Designed for involving the private sector in service delivery and management system
and in implementing the reform agenda, JNNURM seeks participation of business,
industry, civic groups and communities in local decision-making.

The Government of India will grant assistance to the applicant Urban Local Bodies
(ULBs) through JNNURM only if the cities undertake certain reforms. This will not only
improve the infrastructure but also bring about long-term sustenance of the ULBs.
Accordingly for JNNURM assistance to be granted, the Government of India requires
eligible cities to:

• Formulate a medium-term City Development Plan (CDP) to align with the


citizens’ interests and priorities.
• Prepare project proposals in accordance with CDP.
• Draw up a timeline for implementing the urban sector reforms.

1.3 The City Development Plan

Under JNNURM, three cities of Jharkand are eligible for obtaining Central Grants.
They are Ranchi, Dhanbad and Jamshedpur. Understanding the importance of
bringing on the urban reforms, the Government of Jharkhand has undertaken the
preparation of the City Development Plans for all the cities by appointing reputed and
experienced consultants. This report is prepared at the culmination of the exercise for
the City of Jamshedpur.

The City Development Plan (CDP) is both a perspective and a vision for the future
development of a city. It showcases the current stage of development, guides the
directions of change, identifies the thrust areas as well as proposes alternative routes,
strategies, and interventions for bringing about the change. It also provides cities the
opportunity to achieve convergence of opinion and ideas across various infrastructure,
service delivery and institutional reforms agenda.

The CDP is an essential element of the State Government’s overall application for
funds under the JNNURM framework. With various urban stakeholder groups providing
inputs, the CDP is prepared through a participatory process, establishing a “vision” for

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the future development of the city, defining a set of objectives and goals which the city
aims to achieve and identifying thrust areas in various sectors which need to be
addressed on a priority basis in order to achieve the objectives and the vision. This will
form the basis on which projects will be identified and put forward in a City Investment
Plan. Thus, the City Development Plan differs from a traditional Master Plan which
focuses on development trends based on land use and related controls.

The process of the preparation of the City Development Plan for Jamshedpur was
started in December 2005. A series of discussions and consultations individually and in
groups were held with the stakeholders of the study area.

1.3.1 Features of CDP

The features of the CDPS that are to be prepared under the guidelines of JNNURM
are:

• Prepared for a 5-10 year horizon, such plans are based on past trends, existing
strengths and limitations.
• The plans seek to integrate infrastructure requirements and environmental
concerns together with land-use patterns and regulation of the same
• The plans derive the vision, objectives and targets from socio-economic and
basic civic needs as articulated by their citizens, their representatives and other
stakeholders from civil society
• CDP establishes a logical and consistent framework for evaluation of
investment decisions.
• It is anchored on the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission
(JNNURM) goal of creating economically productive, efficient, equitable and
responsive cities.
• As a step to achieving this goal, the CDP focuses on the development of
economic and social infrastructure, strategies that deal specifically with issues
affecting the urban poor, strengthening of municipal governments, their
financial accounting, budgeting systems and procedures, creation of structures
for bringing in accountability and transparency, and elimination of legal and
other bottlenecks that have stifled the land and housing markets.
• It provides a basis for cities to undertake urban sector reforms that help direct
investment into city-based infrastructure.

State Governments and ULBs should see CDPs as initiative to usher in a new era
of urban local self governance rather than as a mandatory requirement to access
large investible funds from GOI.

1.3.2 Steps Involved

CDP is prepared as a multi-stage exercise, with the following steps:

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Step – 1: In-depth analysis of the existing situation, covering the demographic


profile, economic profile, urban governance, urban infrastructure, and
environmental aspects:

This stage reviews and analyses the current status of the city with regard to the state of its
development, systems, procedures, and its institutional and financial context. It identifies
the strengths and weaknesses in the city’s development and provides an understanding of
what impedes service delivery and management within the existing set-up and what
contributes to better service provision. This stage offers an opportunity to bring out the
unique features of the city that distinguishes it from other cities.

Step – 2: Development of a perspective and a vision of the city:

Using the results of the first stage of analyses combined with consultations with key
administrative authorities and stakeholders and the civil society, this stage is meant to
develop a vision for the future development of the city. It is a collective vision of the future
direction expressed in terms of expectations and specific goals.

Step – 3: Formulating a strategy for bridging the gap between existing condition
of the city and the vision for the future of the city:

It is in this stage that strategies and interventions are identified for attaining the vision and
future development perspectives. This stage is used to first identify the options and
strategies and second, to evaluate the strategies from the perspective of their contribution
to the goals and objectives of JNNURM. The chosen strategies are translated into
programmes and projects in this stage. This is the phase where the city needs to decide
which programmes would contribute most to the vision and medium–term perspectives. It
is at this stage where the criteria are selected, with appropriate consultative processes, for
prioritizing the strategies, programmes and projects.

Step – 4: Preparing a City Investment Plan (CIP) and a financing strategy:

The last phase of the CDP preparation process involve assessment of detailed project
costs and determination of funding sources. Types and sources of financing were
identified for priority projects and reforms; the sources included internal resources, state
and central government, local financial institutions, donors, and public-private
partnerships.

An investment plan and a financing strategy are an integral part of the CDP. It is an
aggregate investment plan indicating, for example, the cost involved in providing 24x7
water supply from the present level of 10x7 supply. It is not the cost estimate of a project
for increasing the capacity of a water treatment plant from 1,00,000 MLD to 1,50,000 MLD.

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FORMULATION OF THE CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Parameters
The City Assessment
• Demography
• Economic base
Strengths, Weaknesses • Spatial Growth,
Opportunities, and Threats Land Use & Urban
Existing Situation Analysis Environment
• Urban
Infrastructure
o Water supply
o Sewage
o Solid Waste
Management
o Storm Water
Future Perspective and Drainage
o Traffic and
Multi – Vision Transportation
Stakeholder • Urban Poor and
Consultation Slums
Direction of change and
Expectations • Urban
Governance,
Administration &
Financial Profile

Sectors /
Components
Strategies of
• Development Plan
Development / Master Plan
Options and strategies • Urban
Infrastructure
o Water supply
Link with reform agenda o Sewage
o Solid Waste
Management
Criteria for prioritization o Storm Water
Drainage
o Traffic and
Transportation
• Urban
Environment
• Slum
Improvement &
Upgradation
City Investment Plan &
Financial Alternatives • Urban
Governance &
ULB Finance

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1.3.3 Study Area Rationale

The study area considered is the area defined by the Jamshedpur Urban
Agglomeration (JUA). JUA consists of Jamshedpur Notified Area, Mango Notified Area,
Adityapur Notified Area, Jugsalai Municipal Council, and the adjacent census towns
(which are part of the Jamshedpur Revenue Block) of Ghorabandha, Chotagovindpur,
Gadhra, Sarjamdah, Haldubani, Kitadih, Bagbera and Parsudih.

MAP OF JAMSHEDPUR URBAN AGGLOMERATION

Though the Notified Areas of Jamshedpur and Adityapur are physically separated by
the Kharkai River, they are functionally linked to each other in terms of their industrial
nature. While Jamshedpur Notified Area is dominated by large scale manufacturing
industries, the Adityapur Notified Area is dominated by small scale manufacturing
industries. Thus there is a very strong synergy between the two industrial areas of
Jamshedpur Notified Area and Adityapur Notified Area, with the industries in
Jamshedpur Notified Area supplying the raw materials like steel, cables etc. to the
industries in Adityapur Notified Area. Also, in certain cases, like TELCO, the industries
in Adityapur Notified Area act as suppliers to the industries in Jamshedpur Notified
Area, where the final assembly of the machinery takes place. This mutual
interdependency between Jamshedpur Notified Area and Adityapur Notified Area has
redeemed the inclusion of both in the JUA, even though Adityapur Notified Area forms
a part of the Saraikella-Kharswan district and Jamshedpur Notified Area forms a part of
the East Singhbhum district.

Jamshedpur Notified Area is connected by National Highway 33 to the cities of Ranchi


and Kolkata. However Jamshedpur Notified Area and NH-33 are separated by the
Subarnarekha River and the Mango Notified Area, and one has to pass through the

Introduction 6
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Mango Notified Area in order to reach Jamshedpur Notified Area from NH-33.
Moreover, Mango Notified Area is a potential area for rapid urban development being
located along NH-33. These aspects have resulted in the addition of the Mango
Notified Area to JUA.

The Municipal Area of Jugsalai is the most congested area lying adjacent to the
Jamshedpur Notified Area. Jugsalai Municipal Area has reached its saturation level in
terms of urban growth and outgrown the municipal services provision capacity. The
Jugsalai Municipal Area is also responsible for the overall environmental degradation
of the region. Thus, the development of the Jamshedpur Notified Area and thereby
JUA will not be possible without the upgradation of the Jugsalai Municipal Area.
Moreover, large parts of the working population of Jamshedpur Notified Area as well as
Adityapur Notified Area are residents of Jugsalai Municipal Area. These aspects have
brought Jugsalai Municipal Area within the boundary of JUA.

The census towns of Ghorabandha, Chotagovindpur, Gadhra, Sarjamdah, Haldubani,


Kitadih, Bagbera, and Parsudih, which are a part of the Jamshedpur Revenue Block,
form the southern and eastern boundaries of the Jamshedpur Notified Area, and over a
period of time due to the dynamics of the adjacent industrial areas of Jamshedpur
Notified Area and Adityapur Notified Area, have transformed into urban outgrowths
from agricultural villages. It is important to control the growth and development of these
peripheral urban outgrowths in order to have a structured development of JUA. Thus,
the above-mentioned towns have been included within the boundary of JUA.

The total urban agglomeration, including the three Notified Areas, one Municipality and
eight urban outgrowths/ towns, as a single urban entity covers an area of 149.225 Sq
Kms with a total population of 10,82,412 (2001 census).

As per the JNNURM classification of cities Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration (JUA)


falls under category B, the criteria for which is that the city should have a population
range of 1–4 million. The funding pattern to be followed for accessing JNNURM funds
by the category B cities and thereby JUA is as follows:

Funding Pattern of JNNURM applicable to Jamshedpur


Central Municipal body
State government
City government / ULB funding
funding (%)
funding (%) (%)
City of population 1-
4 million
50 20 30
(Jamshedpur Urban
Agglomeration)

1.3.4 Approach to Preparation of Jamshedpur CDP

In order to achieve the objectives specified under the four phases defined in the city
development plan framework of JNNURM, the following approach has been adopted
for formulating the Jamshedpur CDP.

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Phase 1 – INITIAL FINDINGS & JNNURM OBJECTIVES

• Data collected1 from the Notified Areas, Municipal Council, and other agencies
to have a preliminary understanding of the city.

• Rapid city assessment carried out through primary site visits and by study of
secondary information from sources like existing surveys, research &
development studies done on the city, books relating to the city, etc.

• Identified the stakeholders2 from diverse backgrounds like NGOs, Chambers of


Commerce, educationalists, citizens groups etc.

• Identified the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) of


JUA.

• Conducted the first workshop3

WORKSHOP No. 1
Participants: Officials of Notified Areas
Date: 10.06.06.
Conducted the first workshop for the officials from the Notified areas of
Jamshedpur, Adityapur, Mango, Municipal Council of Jugsalai and the other towns
to formulate their vision and focus areas by presenting to them the objective of
JNNURM and the initial findings of the SWOT analysis and the city assessment
done.

Phase 2 – DEFINE VISION AND MISSION STATEMENTS

• Conducted interviews4 with each of the identified stakeholders to brief them


about the CDP process, and understand -

o Their views on the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats


(SWOT) of JUA,

o Their Vision on the future of JUA, and

o To identify the areas of concern to be addressed.

• Conducted Workshop no.25 for the stakeholders and public of JUA

1
It should be noted that due to the absence of a unified administrative authority, there is a dearth of information relating
the existing condition of the different areas of JUA. Moreover, the data available is inconsistent in nature. There are no
formal surveys available regarding the existing situation of any of the areas.
2
For the list of the identified stakeholders refer to Annexure-1
3
For proceedings of the workshop, refer to Annexure-2
4
For issues, concerns, visions and strategies identified by the stakeholders, refer to Annexure-3
5
For proceedings, refer Annexure - 2

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WORKSHOP No. 2
Participants: Citizens and stakeholders of JUA
Date: 11.07.06
A second workshop was conducted in which the findings of the individual
stakeholder interactions and the facts and figures on the various sectors were
presented to all the stakeholders and the citizens of JUA.

Focus sectors were identified and sub groups were formed accordingly, comprising
of the concerned government officials, other stakeholders and the citizens of JUA.

The objective of each of the groups was to formulate the vision for the city, vision
for the sector under consideration of each group and detail out the strategies to
achieve the vision. The aim of this workshop was also to reach a consensus on the
strategies and actions for each of the focus sectors.

Phase 3 –TO DETERMINE PRIORITY ACTIONS

Conducted the third workshop6 involving the concerned officials of all the areas of JUA
and the identified stakeholders in order to agree upon the priority actions7 required for
each of the focus sectors.
The priority actions were further detailed out in terms of –

• The required resources

• The responsibilities of the stakeholders and their involvement in the overall


process, and thereby identifying the action stakeholders8

• The identification of the potential challenges, suggestions to overcome these


challenges and the practical implications of the actions to be taken for
overcoming these challenges

• Identification of priority projects and reforms as per the priority actions

• The preliminary funding requirements and responsibilities required for


projectisation and implementation of the priority actions

• The additional requirements and pre-requisites for successfully accomplishing


the priority actions.

WORKSHOP No. 3
Participants: Officials and stakeholders of JUA
Date:02.08.06
A third workshop was conducted in which the priority of the schemes were
determined.

6
For proceedings of the workshop conducted, refer to Annexure-2
7
Priority actions are those, which gets translated in the form the development proposals, projects and reforms to bring
about a holistic development of the city as per the JNNURM framework.

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Phase 4 – FEASIBILITY ASSESSMENTS AND INVESTMENT SCHEDULING

Consultations with the action stakeholders

Consultations were held with each of the identified action stakeholders in order
to determine feasibility, cost, and their willingness and ability to contribute to the
priority projects that have been identified.

Project costing and determination of the funding sources

Identified the types and sources of financing the priority projects and reforms
from internal resources, state and central governments, local financial
institutions, donors, and through public-private partnerships for each of the
priority actions.

Scheduling of priority actions and developing a City Investment Plan

Proposed an implementation plan for all the prioritized projects/actions in a


logical sequence based on the availability of resources.

Prepare a capital investment plan for the identified projects.

Prepare a Financial Operating Plan to outline the preliminary budget, financing


assumptions and responsibilities for implementation and financing.

The final workshop9 was conducted involving government officials and all other
relevant stakeholders wherein the entire City Development Plan, organized under the
heads of Vision, Mission Statements and City Investment Plan was presented. The
implementation issues related to the City Investment Plan were discussed and at the
end of the workshop, the stakeholders endorsed the CDP.

A summary of the CDP was prepared for publication for wider dissemination to the
participating stakeholders.

WORKSHOP No. 4
Participants: Officials and stakeholders of JUA
Date: 08.08.06.
A fourth and final workshop was conducted in which all the findings, the vision,
mission statements and priorities identified in the earlier workshops were
presented.

Submission of the finalized City Development Plan report after incorporating the
feedback from the fourth workshop.

8
Action Stakeholders are the stakeholders who will be primarily responsible for implementation of the development
activities.
9
For proceedings of the workshop conducted, refer to Annexure-2

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

2 PROJECT AREA PROFILE...................................................................................... 11

2.1 The State of Jharkhand............................................................................... 11


2.2 The City of Jamshedpur.............................................................................. 12
2.2.1 Location ............................................................................................. 12
2.2.2 Regional Linkages ............................................................................. 13
2.2.3 Climate and Rainfall .......................................................................... 14
2.2.4 Flora and Fauna ................................................................................ 14
2.2.5 Brief History of the City...................................................................... 14
2.2.6 Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration .................................................... 16
2.2.7 Global Recognition ............................................................................ 18

Project Area Profile ii


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2 PROJECT AREA PROFILE

2.1 The State of Jharkhand

The new State of Jharkhand, formerly a


part of Bihar state, was formed on
November 15, 2000 with Ranchi as its
capital. Jharkhand is the 28th state of the
Indian Union. Having an area of 79,714
Sq. km, the new state has the potential
JHARKHAND
to be developed as the most financially
viable entity in the whole country owing
to its vast mineral resources and sound
industrial infrastructure. Bihar, Madhya
Pradesh, Orissa and West Bengal
border the new state to its north, west,
south and east respectively. The State
has a population of about 26909428 as
per the 2001 Census.

The state comprises of 18 districts,


namely Ranchi, Gumla, Lohardagga,
East Singhbhum, West Singhbhum,
Hazaribagh, Giridih, Koderma, Chatra,
Dhanbad, Bokaro, Palamau, Garhwa,
Dumka, Deoghar, Godda, Pakur,
Sahebganj, Simdega, Latehar,
Saraikella-Kharswan and Jamtara
districts.

The city of Jamshedpur, known as the


Steel City, is part of the East (Purba)
Singhbhum District of the newly formed
state of Jharkhand. Jamshedpur is the
headquarters of the East Singhbhum District which was formed by isolating 9 blocks
from greater Singhbhum on 16th January 1990. From the industrial growth and mining /
quarrying point of view, the district has a leading position in Jharkhand. Jamshedpur
city has an area of 56.32 Sq. Kms, bounded on the north by Subarnarekha River, on
the west by Kharkai River, on the South by the South Eastern Railway line between
Calcutta and Mumbai and on the east by the different villages of the Jamshedpur Block

In the urban areas, industries and mines account for the employment opportunity
whereas in rural areas agriculture is the main occupation. However, being a part of the
Chotanagpur plateau, the soil is full of grovels and red laterite containing sand and
silica, which is not suitable for agriculture. The lowland is comparatively fertile and
paddy is the main crop of this area. Approximately 49.32% people are engaged in

Project Area Profile 11


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agriculture and agriculture related works and 24.50% people are engaged in the
industrial sector.

Tribal population is found almost throughout the state. The main tribes are Santhal
Munda, Bhumiz, Kharia, and Sabar who still have maintained a very sound culture.
They are socially, educationally and economically backward, as they have been
neglected in development activities. According to the population composition, the main
languages spoken are Hindi, Santhali, Mundali, Oran, Bengali and Oriya.

Jharkhand has a highly industrialized set-up with the presence of various


manufacturing industries in large and medium scale sectors. To facilitate the industrial
set-ups it is well connected by rail & road to large urban nodes outside the state.
Forests cover more than 29% land. On an average, 25% of its land remains under
agriculture.

Jharkhand’s population is 2,69,09,428 according to the provisional data of Census


2001. In 1991 census, population of this area was 2,18,43,911. Its population growth
rate in one decade has been 23.19%. The population density in the state is 338.
Although Jharkhand is endowed with vast and rich natural resources, 80 % of its
population resides in 32,620 villages. They depend primarily on agriculture and allied
activities for their livelihood.

Possessing 40 % of the country’s mineral wealth, Jharkhand has only about 20% of
population engaged in industrial sector and that too within the urban enclaves.
Substantial number of people (nearly 80% of population), essentially the indigenous
population is largely dependant on agriculture & allied services. This has resulted in
acute income disparity structure between indigenous & non-indigenous people. On
attaining statehood, Jharkhand has initiated a vigorous path towards rapid
industrialization with focus on equitable development.

The installed capacity of power in Jharkhand is 2,590 MW. This includes 420 MW
(Tenughat Thermal Power Station), 840 MW (Patratu Thermal Power Station), 130 MW
(Sikkidri Hydel) and 1,200 MW (DVC, Thermal / Hydel). The prospect of capacity
addition in both the thermal and Hydel sectors of various power stations is estimated to
be 4,736 MW. This includes 686 MW Hydel generations.

2.2 The City of Jamshedpur1

2.2.1 Location

The city of Jamshedpur is situated at 86.12° E longitude and 22.47° N latitude, on the
banks of the rivers Subarnarekha and Kharkai. The city is at an altitude of 159 meters
above mean sea level. In the city region, there are locations that are about 933 meters
above mean sea level (e.g: Dalma).

1
The word “city” in the context of this section refers to the current JNAC area and not the JUA.

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2.2.2 Regional Linkages

The city of Jamshedpur is connected to Calcutta (251 Kms) and Ranchi (137 Kms) by
NH-33. Jamshedpur is connected to Dhanbad (146 Kms) by State highway. Patna, the
state capital of Bihar, lies at a distance of 503 Kms on the south-eastern railway line.

The Tatanagar Railway station, which is part of the South-Eastern Railway zone of the
Indian Railways, connects the city of Jamshedpur to the rest of the country.

There is no formal airport facility present in Jamshedpur City. However, an airstrip and
a helipad exist, which is owned by TISCO and is exclusively used by the Tata
Companies. TISCO, however, has recently signed MOU with Air Deccan for allowing
the usage of their private airstrip by Air Deccan and the project is on the anvil.

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Tatanagar Railway Station National Highway 33

In a meeting of special officers of various committees, the absence of Air connectivity


was discussed & it was proposed that a Domestic & Cargo terminal would be
constructed at Chakuliya where two airstrips and a helipad exist un-utilized. The State
Government has already taken up a feasibility study of the above.

2.2.3 Climate and Rainfall

The Climate of the city is temperate, typical with three distinct seasons - summer,
monsoon and winter. The average annual rainfall is 1200 mm to 1400 mm (1216.8 mm
in 2001-2002). This area comes under the path of southwest monsoon so sometimes it
receives heavy rain during July to September. During the summer, the maximum
temperature goes upto 40° C - 45° C whereas in winter it has recorded a minimum of
6° C.

2.2.4 Flora and Fauna

In this area deciduous type of forest is found in which Sal, Gamhar, Mahua, Palash,
Bamboo, shrubs and grass are the main vegetation. The Gymnosperm, Gnetum
scandens is found in the valleys, while the stem less palm, Phoenix acaulis, is
abundant on the plateau region. Especially in the area south of Tatanagar, Cassytha
filliformis, the green thread like parasite, several species of loranthus and several
epiphytic orchids are found. The white barked gouty-stemmed trees of Sterculia urens
and Boswellia serrata are very conspicuous against the background of the black rocks.
Due to industrialization and large scale of mining quarrying deforestation has taken
place. The Dalma wild life sanctuary for elephants, which has a very significant position
in the wildlife tourism sector of the nation, is located near the city.

2.2.5 Brief History of the City

Jamshedpur is one of the oldest and is considered as the largest existing industrial
town in India. It was the benchmark development for post independent Indian industrial
cities such as Bhilai, Rourkela and Durgapur, which were established in completely
rural areas. A city founded by the late Jamshedji Nusserwanji Tata, probably to support
the first private Iron and Steel Company he set up there. In those days, the area was
known as Sakchi.

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The districts within 150 Kms radius of Jamshedpur are rich in minerals, including iron
ore, coal, manganese and lime. Sonari is situated at the confluence of two rivers
Subarnarekha and Kharkai ensuring a perennial source of water supply to the
township, whereas the Kalimati Railway Station on the main railway line located
adjacent to Sakchi provides good connectivity to the township. The city was named
Jamshedpur in 1919 by Lord Chelmsford, in honour of its founder.

Messrs Julin Kennedy Sahlin of Pittsburgh, U.S.A, prepared the first layout of the town
of Jamshedpur. It was designed more or less on American lines with roads at right
angles. In 1920, Mr. Frederick Charles Temple, who was then the Sanitary Engineer to
the Government of Bihar and himself a Town Planner, was engagedTISCOas the Chief Town
Engineer. In 1936 Major P.C Stokes, who was connected with Quetta Reconstruction
after earthquake, was invited by the Company to advice on town planning and
development. In 1943, Dr. Keonigsberger was invited to advice on the planning of the
town. He prepared a master plan, which was accepted by the Tata Steel Company.

Tata Steel’s town division, now under Jamshedpur Utility & Services Co (JUSCO), a
100 per cent subsidiary of the steel major, provides municipal and civic facilities to the
city. The track record of urban management by JUSCO is a commentable one.

While the area under TISCO have developed in a planned manner based on all the
above expert inputs, the outside areas have continued to grow at fast pace one would
expect to see near a major industrial centre. This growth was generally organic in
nature as the state or the region did not have a proper plan or development control
rules. This has resulted in the present urban agglomeration, which is the area under
the current study. Also, as a result, the disparity of the level of infrastructure and
services show a large disparity, which is not good for overall growth of the city.

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2.2.6 Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration

The present city of Jamshedpur is spread over the villages of Sakchi, Susnigaria,
Jugsalai and Beldih that lay in the Dhalbhum Pargana of the East Singhbhum district.
When Jamshedpur started growing rapidly into a populous industrial town, the state
government constituted the Jamshedpur Committee to control the envisaged
haphazard growth of the town. This Committee was called upon to examine the various
problems and to submit recommendations relating to the future administration of the
town.

JAMSHEDPUR URBAN AGGLOMERATION

The Jamshedpur Block was established in the 1952 and comprises of rural & urban
areas having one Municipality and two Notified Area Committees namely Jugsalai
Municipality, Jamshedpur Notified Area Committee and Mango Notified Area
Committee. Tatanagar was the sole urban node for many decades till villages within its
vicinity transformed into urban agglomerations.

The Jamshedpur Notified Area, Adityapur Notified Area, Mango Notified Area, Jugsalai
Municipality and the towns of Parsudih, Ghorabandha, Chotagovindpur, Gadhra,
Sarjamdah, Haldubani, Kitadih, and Bagbera, which are a part of the Jamshedpur
Block, are proposed to become a part of the Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration and be
administered by a unified municipal administrative body. The total area covered by the
proposed JUA is 149.225 Sq. km.

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Table No. 1
Area Statement of Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration

Sr. No Town Name Area (Sq Km)


1 Jamshedpur Notified Area 56.32
2 Adityapur Notified Area 49.00
3 Mango Notified Area 18.03
4 Jugsalai Municipality 01.29
5 Parsudih (Kalimati) 03.59
6 Ghorabandha 03.23
7 Chotagovindpur 02.63
8 Gadhra 04.79
9 Sarjamdah 02.53
10 Haldubani 03.83
11 Kitadih 01.75
12 Bagbera 02.24
Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration (JUA) 149.22
Source: Data received from JNAC, MNA, ANAC, JMC & CENSUS

AREA STATEMENT

1%
2%
3%
2%
3%
Jamshedpur Notified Area
2%
2% Adityapur Notified Area
2% Mango Notified Area
1% Jugsalai Municipality
37% Parsudih (Kalimati)
12% Ghorabandha
Chotagovindpur
Gadhra
Sarjamdah
33% Haldubani
Kitadih
Bagbera

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2.2.7 Global Recognition

Jamshedpur area has received many accolades for its urban management being
handled by the TATA group companies. Jamshedpur has been chosen to be one of the
six cities to participate in the UN Global Compact Cities pilot programme. The other
five cities are Melbourne (Australia), Porto Alegre (Brazil), Tianjin (PRC), Nairobi
(Kenya) and San Francisco (USA). Jamshedpur would represent South Asia. Also, the
World Bank has recently commented on the water supply system managed by the
TATAs.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

3 VISION FOR THE CITY ............................................................................................ 19


3.1 Formulation of the Vision.............................................................................. 19
3.2 Factors Considered in Vision Development................................................ 19
3.3 SWOT analysis ............................................................................................... 20
3.4 Vision for Jamshedpur .................................................................................. 22
3.5 Mission to Achieve the Stated Vision .......................................................... 23

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3 VISION FOR THE CITY

3.1 Formulation of the Vision

The Vision for the City of Jamshedpur is formulated by the stakeholders that included
citizens, public representatives, focus groups including industries and other sectors
and officials of the agencies involved as stakeholders.

A consensus approach was followed to generate the vision. This was achieved through
continued consultation with the community in an integrated and cohesive manner
considering the strengths, current issues, concerns, problems and the future focus
areas to achieve the desired results. The stakeholders were asked to articulate why
Jamshedpur is important for them. Various opinions were put forth by the stakeholders.
The strong characteristics defining the identity of the city as expressed by the
stakeholders are listed below.

WHY JAMSHEDPUR IS IMPORTANT

• Unique Economy
• Availability of local work force
• Rich Culture and a very strong image and morale
• Good Climatic condition
• Availability of basic civic Infrastructure
• Availability of resources in the region within a very short reach
• Availability of Job opportunities
• Prime Education Centre
• Good connectivity with other major Centres
• A Tourist transit hub

3.2 Factors Considered in Vision Development

During the individual discussions and during the workshops the stakeholders
discussed and debated the various issues1 and have articulated that the Vision for
Jamshedpur should take the following aspects into considerations while formulating the
Vision.

• An environment friendly city with excellent infrastructure and sustainable


development.
• Development of a Slum free and pollution free city.
• Equitable distribution of urban infrastructure and amenities

1
For the workshop details refer to Annexure B

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• Multi sector economic approach to ensure sustainability in case of adverse


economic environment
• Sustainable use of resources for better future
• Promote it as a Tourist hub.
• Planned residential layouts with provision of social and physical infrastructure
• Efficient Public transport and better connectivity.

During the individual discussions and during the workshops the stakeholders
discussed and debated the various issues and have articulated that the Vision for
Jamshedpur should take the following aspects into considerations while formulating the
Vision.

As Service Provider2 As Facilitator3


• Improve Road network and develop • Provision of Public transport,
Infrastructure required for public BRTS/MRTS.
transport. • Industrial growth, Trade and
• Provision of Core Municipal Services. commerce.
• Conserve City Environment by • Health services, Higher
developing gardens, conserving and education Cultural activities.
protecting water bodies etc. • Sports and games.
• Health and Education facilities target • Recreation and entertainment.
population being urban poor. • Construction of dwelling units
• Construction of dwelling units including including infrastructure facilities
Infrastructure facilities for slums located under SRA schemes.
in critical and dangerous locations. • Clean, green and pollution free
• Clean, green and pollution free environment.
environment. • Community participation.
• Places of Healthy Entertainment and
Recreation.
• Fire Service.
• Efficient Urban and Development
Planning.
• Good and Modern urban governance.

3.3 SWOT analysis

Based on the primary site surveys done as well as the workshops and interactions
conducted with the stakeholders over the period of time, a SWOT analysis of the JUA
was done, which forms the rationale for the formulation of the vision for the
development of JUA.

2
A service provider is an entity that provides services to other entities
3
A facilitator is someone who skillfully helps a group of people understand their common objectives and plan to achieve
them without personally taking any side of the argument. The facilitator will try to assist the group in achieving a
consensus on any disagreements that preexist or emerge in the meeting so that it has a strong basis for future action.

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SWOT Analysis is a strategic planning tool used to evaluate the Strengths,


Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats involved in a project or in a business venture
or in any other situation requiring a decision. The aim of any SWOT analysis should be
to isolate the key 'issues' that will be important to the future of the project or the
organization. The strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats as emerged out of
the exercise are as below:

Strengths

• City is already an established industrial centre


• City has a strong economic base
• Resources including raw material is available in the city and the region
• A work force, which is enthusiastic to take up the challenges is available
• Good rail link to port and hinterland facilitating easy movement of heavy goods
• Good road link to port and the state capital, Ranchi
• Availability of water in abundance (two perennial rivers flow through the city)
• Not known for natural calamities
• Good commitment shown by Tata Steel in urban management and the resultant
global recognition

Weaknesses

• Absence of documentation of civic services


• Absence of masterplan / development plan and development control rules and
regulations resulting in un-authorised / un-planned growth
• Disparity in municipal services between areas controlled by JUSCO and State
Government Agencies
• Limited staff available in the various Notified Area Committees
• Multiplicity of agencies
• Nearly absent tax structure, restricting the resources for urban management
agencies
• Requirement of large number of reforms for ensuring growth
• Environmental degradation by way of air and water pollution

Opportunities

• Availability of land for development


• Potential for revenue growth in tax and user charges
• Could form part of a “Golden Triangle” combined with Ranchi and Dhanbad

Threats

• Increasing need to serve higher growth of population


• Influence of large number of players like JNAC, JMC, JUSCO, AIADA etc.

It is clear that the city has lots of opportunities to grow into a city with an extremely
strong economic base. However there are certain weaknesses and threats that need to
be addressed. The likely measures of mitigating the negative points are listed below:

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Table No. 2
Mitigation Measures for negating weaknesses

Weakness / Threat Likely Mitigation Measures


Absence of documentation of civic Conduct surveys (physical as well as
services satellite imageries) and develop a GIS
based system
Absence of masterplan / development Develop a masterplan and formulate
plan and development control rules and development control rules and regulations
regulations resulting in un-authorised / un-
planned growth
Disparity in municipal services between Invest in development of infrastructure to
areas controlled by JUSCO and State make up the gap and bring the urban
Government Agencies management under an unified agency
Limited staff available in the various Recruit, train and deploy adequate staff in
Notified Area Committees various sectors
Multiplicity of agencies Formulate a unified agency for urban
management
Nearly absent tax structure, restricting the Implement reforms in tax structure and
resources for urban management develop accounting systems in line with
agencies the practices in other bodies.
Requirement of large number of reforms Formulate a unified agency for urban
for ensuring growth management
Environmental degradation by way of air Provide treatment plants for all effluents,
and water pollution clean up the waste dumping and improve
the riverfront areas.
Increasing need to serve higher growth of Develop masterplan, identify requirement
population for meeting the growing demands and
mobilize financial resources to meet the
investment requirement. This again may
be possible only, if a unified agency is set
up for management of civic facilities.
Influence of large number of players like Having dialogues to arrive at a consensus
JNAC, JMC, JUSCO, AIADA etc. and approach
probable conflicts in the formation of a
unified agency

3.4 Vision for Jamshedpur

Based on the above SWOT analysis and the various development perspectives,
characteristics defining the importance of Jamshedpur, citizens’ desires and potentials
of the city, the Vision Statements articulated by various stakeholders can be
summarized as a comprehensive statement encompassing all the stakeholders in
reflecting their expectations of the city.

‘‘An economically vibrant city of diverse opportunities with a rich culture in


which all the citizens enjoy safe and livable environment with good
connectivity and equitable distribution of physical as well as social
infrastructure and facilities’

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3.5 Mission to Achieve the Stated Vision

In order to achieve the vision stated above, the following steps will have to be taken:

• Formation of unified agency for urban management


• Develop a masterplan and development control regulations
• Evaluate future requirements of infrastructure
• Provision for urban poor
• Identify projects for development and assess investment requirements.
• Assess financial mobilization opportunities to invest for the future requirements
• Continued management of the infrastructure and maintenance of level of
service
• Implementation of reforms to meet the vision statement

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

4 SOCIO ECONOMIC AND SPATIAL GROWTH ....................................................... 24

4.1 Demographic Growth..................................................................................... 24


4.1.1 Past Trends .......................................................................................... 24
4.1.2 Density.................................................................................................. 25
4.1.3 Household Size .................................................................................... 26
4.1.4 Literacy Rates and SC/ST Share ......................................................... 27
4.1.5 Occupational Pattern ............................................................................ 28
4.1.6 Population Projections.......................................................................... 29
4.1.7 Floating Population............................................................................... 30
4.2 Regional Importance...................................................................................... 31
4.3 Existing Land use of JUA.............................................................................. 32
4.3.1 Jamshedpur Notified Area .................................................................... 32
4.3.2 Adityapur Notified Area......................................................................... 35
4.3.3 Mango Notified Area............................................................................. 37
4.3.4 Jugsalai Municipality............................................................................. 38
4.3.5 Other Areas of the JUA ........................................................................ 40
4.3.6 Combined Landuse .............................................................................. 40
4.3.7 Future Spatial Growth Directions.......................................................... 41
4.4 Economic Growth .......................................................................................... 42
4.4.1 Agro Based Industries .......................................................................... 42
4.4.2 Industries and Minerals ........................................................................ 43
4.5 Essential Actions ........................................................................................... 43
4.6 Investment Plan.............................................................................................. 44

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4 SOCIO ECONOMIC AND SPATIAL GROWTH

4.1 Demographic Growth

4.1.1 Past Trends

The JNAC area has seen significant growth in population in the last decade as can be
seen from the table below:

Table No. 3
Past Trends in Population – All Notified Areas

Year Population (lakhs) Average decadal growth rate (%)

1981 611,885 NA
1991 689,256 12.64%
2001 940,206 36.40%
Source: Census of India, 2001

The above growth rates are higher than that of the general trends observed in the
country as a whole or even within the State of Jharkhand.

Table No. 4
Comparison of Growth Rates

Total Population Decadal Growth 1991 - 2001


India 1,027,015,247 21.34%
Jharkhand 26,909,428 23.19%
Jamshedpur 940,206 36.40%
Source: Census of India, 2001

The population of total JUA as per the census 2001 (Provisional Data) is close to 11
Lakhs (10,82,412). The growth in the population is testifying the vibrancy in the
economic growth of the city. The population growth in the case of this industrial city
must have been mainly due to the significant role played by immigration over the
years.

The break-up of the population under different jurisdictions of notified areas and towns
are presented below:

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Table No. 5
Population – Jurisdictional Distribution (2001)

Sr. No. Name of Town Population (2001)


1 Jamshedpur Notified Area 608,768
2 Adityapur Notified Area 119,233
3 Mango Notified Area 166,091
4 Jugsalai Municipality 46,114
5 Parsudih 18197
6 Ghorabandha 14,724
7 Chotagovindpur 24,781
8 Gadhra 15,767
9 Sarjamdah 18,385
10 Haldubani 19,029
11 Kitadih 14,020
12 Bagbera 16,493
JUA (Total) 1,082,412
Source: Census of India, 2001

4.1.2 Density

As per the observations made of the 2001 population, Jamshedpur is experiencing a


rapid growth of 36.4%, mostly towards the southwestern side. The dynamic process of
population growth is beyond the control of the authorities. It generally is a function of
land prices and ease of accessibility to work place and availability of basic services.

The spatial distribution has been examined on the base of densities of the different
areas included in the JUA.

The observations are:

• The density is high in Jugsalai Municipality, which is 357 persons per Hectare,
and lowest in Adityapur Notified Area, which is 26 persons per Ha. Jamshedpur
Notified Area, it is 108 persons per Hectare.

• Mango Notified Area has a density of 92 persons per Ha. which shows the
growing potential of the residential sector in the area.

Table No. 6
Population Density of JUA (2001)

Area Density Density


Sr. No Area Name Population
(Sq Km) (P/Sq Km) (P/Ha.)
1 Jamshedpur Notified Area 56.32 608,768 10,809 108
2 Adityapur Notified Area 49.00 119,233 2,433 24
3 Mango Notified Area 18.03 166,091 9,211 92
4 Jugsalai Municipality 1.29 46,114 35,747 357

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Area Density Density


Sr. No Area Name Population
(Sq Km) (P/Sq Km) (P/Ha.)
5 Parsudih 3.59 18197 5,074 51
6 Ghorabandha 3.23 14,724 4,555 46
7 Chotagovindpur 2.63 24,781 9,433 95
8 Gadhra 4.79 15,767 3,291 33
9 Sarjamdah 2.53 18,385 7,278 73
10 Haldubani 3.83 19,029 4,973 50
11 Kitadih 1.75 14,020 7,997 80
12 Bagbera 2.24 16,493 7,349 74
9,013 90
JUA 149.23 1,082,412
(average) (average)
Source: As per data received from JNAC, MNA, ANAC, JMC

DENSITY (Persons/Sq Km)

Bagbera

Kitadih

Haldubani

Sarjamdah

Gadhra

Chotagovindpur
Area

Ghorabandha

Parsudih

Jugsalai Municipality

Mango Notified Area

Adityapur Notified Area

Jamshedpur Notified Area

0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 40,000

Persons/Sq km

4.1.3 Household Size

As per the Census, the household size of the sub-areas are as given in the table
below:

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Table No. 7
Household Size – JUA 2001

Total Total Household


Area
population Households size
Jamshedpur Notified Area 608,768 113,357 5.37
Adityapur Notified Area 119,233 22,497 5.30
Mango Notified Area 166,091 26,902 6.17
Jugsalai Municipality 46,114 6,800 6.78
Parsudih 18,197 3,192 5.70
Ghorabandha 14,724 2,678 5.50
Chotagovindpur 24,781 4,343 5.71
Gadhra 15,767 2,873 5.49
Sarjamdah 18,385 3,514 5.23
Haldubani 19,029 4,054 4.69
Kitadih 14,020 2,681 5.23
Bagbera 16,493 12,695 1.30
Total 1,081,602 205,586 5.26

4.1.4 Literacy Rates and SC/ST Share

As per the 2001 census, the JUA has over 72.88% literacy rate. Among the population,
females have a higher literacy rate than males.

Table No. 8
Literacy rates and Share of SC/STs

Total Total % of total SC / ST Share


Area
population Literates Literates %
Jamshedpur Notified Area 608,768 455,296 74.79% 12.35%
Adityapur Notified Area 119,233 78216 65.59% 13.50%
Mango Notified Area 166,091 113,010 68.04% 8.34%
Jugsalai Municipality 46,114 32,881 71.30% 3.86%
Parsudih 18197 10636 58.45% 48.28%
Ghorabandha 14,724 10,670 72.47% 6.10%
Chotagovindpur 24,781 18,524 74.75% 9.68%
Gadhra 15,767 10,147 64.36% 30.01%
Sarjamdah 18,385 10,889 59.23% 57.03%
Haldubani 19,029 13,797 72.51% 38.94%
Kitadih 14,020 8817 62.89% 36.68%
Bagbera 16,493 25413 64.90% 34.30%
Total 1,081,602 788,296 72.88% -

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LITERACY RATE (2001)

Bagbera

Kitadih

Haldubani

Sarjamdah

Gadhra
Percentage

Chotagovindpur

Ghorabandha

Parsudih

Jugsalai Municipality

Mango Notified Area

Adityapur Notified Area

Jamshedpur Notified Area

0.00% 10.00% 20.00% 30.00% 40.00% 50.00% 60.00% 70.00% 80.00%


Area

4.1.5 Occupational Pattern

A study of the occupational pattern of the different areas of JUA, as per the census of
India (2001), indicates that a large part of the total population is engaged in industrial
activities. A major part of the population is absorbed in the industries of Jamshedpur
Notified Area and Adityapur Notified Area. A considerable percentage of the population
of JUA is also engaged in industrial activities in the other industrial areas of the
region. A large portion of the population is also engaged in agricultural activities.

Table No. 9
Share of Main and Marginal Workers – JUA 2001

Total Main Marginal Other


Sr no Area Population
workers workers (%) workers (%) workers
1 Jamshedpur (NA) 608,768 155,080 24.00 3.00 96.90
2 Adityapur (NA) 119,233 33,524 24.90 3.20 92.40
3 Mango (NA) 166,091 41,061 21.00 3.70 94.70
4 Jugsalai (M) 46,114 12,646 25.50 1.90 96.60
5 Bagbera 16,493 17,751 22.00 4.50 96.70
6 Haldubani 19,029 5,874 26.00 3.50 94.80
7 Sarjamdah 18,385 4,972 20.30 6.80 97.40
8 Gadhra 15,767 4,023 19.30 6.20 90.30
9 Chotagovindpur 24,781 5,921 21.40 2.40 95.10
10 Ghorabandha 14,724 3,733 23.50 1.80 97.70
Source: Census of India, 2001

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Table No.10
Share of Main and Marginal Workers – JUA 2001

Total Household Agricultural


Sr no Area Population Cultivators (%)
workers industry (%) labourers (%)
1 Jamshedpur (NA) 608,768 155,080 2.50 0.30 1.00
2 Adityapur (NA) 119,233 33,524 2.50 3.20 3.80
3 Mango (NA) 166,091 41,061 3.50 0.70 1.00
Jugsalai
4 Municipality 46,114 12,646 3.20 0.10 0.10
5 Bagbera 16,493 17,751 1.60 0.90 0.80
6 Haldubani 19,029 5,874 1.60 2.90 0.70
7 Sarjamdah 18,385 4,972 1.10 0.50 1.00
8 Gadhra 15,767 4,023 3.40 2.70 3.60
9 Chotagovindpur 24,781 5,921 2.20 1.40 1.30
10 Ghorabandha 14,724 3,733 0.80 1.00 0.50
Source: Census of India, 2001

The proportion of agricultural workers is lowest in Jamshedpur Notified Area (0.3%)


and highest in Adityapur Notified Area (5.05%).

Based on the above review, the following issues have emerged with regard to the
demographic characteristics of JUA:

• The worker population is likely to increase the demand for housing particularly
in the EWS/LIG section. If planning is not done for this section of population
then the development of slums will take place
• The growth in population is also likely to stress the traffic and transportation
system of the city and will also have an impact on other services.

4.1.6 Population Projections

It is seen that the population growth rate of the city (36.40% decadal) for the last
decade is much higher than the national (21.34% decadal) or state (23.19% decadal)
average for the same period. The industrial base of the city and the resultant migration
of people into the city in search of job opportunities have attributed to this high growth
rates.

Table No.11
Population Projection for JUA

Sr. Population Population Population Population Population


Name of Town
No. (2001)# (2006) (2011) (2021) (2031)
Jamshedpur
1 6,08,768 7,19,564 8,30,360 11,32,611 15,44,881
Notified Area
Adityapur
2 1,19,233 1,40,933 1,62,634 2,21,833 3,02,580
Notified Area

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Sr. Population Population Population Population Population


Name of Town
No. (2001)# (2006) (2011) (2021) (2031)
Mango Notified
3 1,66,091 1,96,320 2,26,548 3,09,011 4,21,492
Area
Jugsalai
4 46,114 54,507 62,899 85,795 1,17,024
Municipality
5 Parsudih 18197 21,509 24,821 33,855 46,179
6 Ghorabandha 14,724 17,408 20,084 27,394 37,365
7 Chotagovindpur 24,781 29,291 33,801 46,105 62,887
8 Gadhra 15,767 18,637 21,506 29,334 40,012
9 Sarjamdah 18,385 21,731 25,077 34,205 46,656
10 Haldubani 19,029 22,492 25,956 35,403 48,290
11 Kitadih 14,020 16,572 19,123 26,084 35,579
12 Bagbera 16,493 19,495 22,496 30,685 41,855
JUA (Total) 10,82,412 12,78,459 14,75,306 20,12,317 27,44,800
#Source: Data received from JNAC, MNA, ANAC, JMC & CENSUS

The detailed population projection from 2006 to 2014 has been studied. The projected
population forms the base for the formulation of the CDP, both in terms of development
of and the estimation for the physical infrastructure and the social amenities.

The average growth rate of 36.40% is taken into consideration for projecting the
population for the future years (2006 – 2031). The following graph shows the steady
incremental growth in the population upto about 17 lakhs during the period of this CDP.

18
16
Population in Lakhs

14
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

4.1.7 Floating Population

JUA being primarily industrial in nature will attract large number of floating population,
coming to the city for the work, business and other purposes. For the planning
purposes, almost 33% of the total population of JUA is considered as floating
population. Provisions of additional facilities for floating population should be made so
as to avoid any future deficiency in the supply of the civic infrastructure.

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Table No. 12
Floating Population Forecast

Census Year Total Population Floating Population#


2006 1,278,459 421,891
2007 1,318,811 435,208
2008 1,358,211 448,209
2009 1,397,610 461,211
2010 1,437,010 474,213
2011 1,475,306 487,215
2012 1,515,810 500,217
2013 1,555,210 513,219
2014 1,594,609 526,221
2021 2,012,317 664,065
2031 2,744,800 905,784
#Considering 33% of total population to be floating population (JUA being
predominantly industrial area)

4.2 Regional Importance

Jamshedpur is one of the key nodes of a “Golden Triangle” of Jamshedpur – Ranchi –


Dhanbad.

DHANBAD –
RESOURCE
RANCHI –
ADMINISTRATIVE &

JAMSHEDPUR –
INDUSTRIAL

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The above is possible if the transportation and communication link between these
nodes are strengthened.

4.3 Existing Land use of JUA

Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration consists of Jamshedpur Notified Area, Adityapur


Notified Area, Mango Notified Area, Jugsalai Municipality and parts of Jamshedpur
Block, which include the areas of Bagbera, Kitadih, Chotagovindpur, Parsudih,
Ghorabandha, Haldubani, Sarjamdah and Gadhra. The total area of Jamshedpur
Urban Agglomeration is about 149.225 Sq km.

JAMSHEDPUR URBAN AGGLOMERATION

4.3.1 Jamshedpur Notified Area

The Jamshedpur Notified Area covering an area of 56.22 Sq. Kms (5622 Ha) is
administered by the Jamshedpur Notified Area Committee, which was formed in 1924.
Major part of the JNA is covered by the Tata Iron and Steel Company (TISCO), TELCO
and the Tata Nagar Township. The part of the Jamshedpur town, which is maintained
by TISCO, is the most developed part of the town, with provision of adequate facilities,
well tree-lined avenues, landscaped gardens and parks, adequate social amenities,
etc.

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However, a large part of the JNAC, which is not in the purview of JUSCO, faces
shortage of basic infrastructure. Whereas parts of the JNAC are well developed, there
are other parts like Bastis, which have developed into unauthorized settlements.

LAND USE DISTRIBUTION OF JNAC AREA


2%
2%
18% RESIDENTIAL
15%

COMMERCIAL

2% INDUSTRIAL / WARE
HOUSING
9% SOCIAL FACILITIES /
AMENITIES
OPEN SPACES
2%
CIRCULATION / RDS.
/RLY. / PARKINGS
NALA / RIVER /
POWER CORRIDOR
UNDEVELOPED

50%

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Table No. 13
Land Use Distribution of Jamshedpur Notified Area

Land use Area (in Ha)


Residential 1,011.96
Commercial 112.44
Industrial / Ware Housing 2,867.22
Social Facilities / Amenities 112.44
Open Spaces 505.98
Circulation / Roads /Railway /Parking 843.30
Nala / River / Power Corridor 84.33
Undeveloped 84.33
Gross Area In Ha 5,622.00
Source: Primary site reconnaissance

Tatanagar Township Tatanagar Township

Tatanagar roads Tatanagar roads

Tatanagar Township Housing Development in JNAC

The predominating land use of the JNAC is industrial, whereas the residential use is
covered mainly by the townships of TISCO and TELCO and unplanned Bastis (86).
The commercial development in the JNA does not follow an organised zoning pattern,
and is also inadequate as per the requirement of the residing population. A large part
of the JNA, excluding Tatanagar, falls under unauthorised development and
unregistered land. The land use classification has been done on the basis of primary
site visits.

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4.3.2 Adityapur Notified Area

The Adityapur Notified Area, covering an area of 49 Sq. Km is the industrial centre
belonging to the Saraikella - Kharswan district. Located 8 kilometres away from
Jamshedpur, it forms the heart of the Chhotanagpur Industrial Belt. The Adityapur
Industrial Area controlled by AIADA includes industrial, residential, commercial and
institutional zones. The rest of the area is controlled by the Adityapur Notified Area
Committee and the civic amenities provided by them are not adequate. A number of
public and private sector units are part of the Adityapur Industrial Area. The rest of the
area excluding the Adityapur Industrial Area is predominantly residential comprising
mostly of the Residential Colonies developed by State Housing Board.

The Adityapur Notified Area Committee provides the civic infrastructure in the colonies,
which however is not adequate. These residential areas are densely populated. The
remaining area of the Adityapur Notified Area is covered by villages, which have over
the period of time developed into fringe area towns and are very sparsely populated.
As per observations made on the urban built form of the area, it can be said that the
predominant development in the Adityapur Notified Area is scattered and unevenly
distributed, with some of the areas being very congested especially along the
movement corridors, while the fringe areas have very sparse and cluster type of
development. Overall there is a major scarcity in the civic amenities in the Adityapur
Notified Area, with no provision of civic infrastructure in the fringe area settlements.

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Table No. 14
Land Use Distribution of Adityapur Notified Area

Land use Area (in ha)


Residential 1,960.00
Commercial 49.00
Industrial / Ware Housing 1,715.00
Social Facilities / Amenities 24.50
Open Spaces 49.00
Circulation / Roads /Railway / Parking 588.00
Nala / River / Power Corridor 73.50
Undeveloped 441.00
Gross Area In Ha 4,900.00
Source: Primary site reconnaissance

LAND USE DISTRIBUTION OF ANAC


9%
2%

12%
RESIDENTIAL

39% COMMERCIAL
1% INDUSTRIAL / WARE
1% HOUSING
SOCIAL FACILITIES /
AMINITIES
OPEN SPACES

CIRCULATION / RDS.
/RLY. / PARKINGS
NALA / RIVER /
POWER CORRIDOR
UNDEVELOPED

35% 1%

Adityapur Master Plan was


prepared and approved by
the Bihar government before
the formation of the state of
Jharkhand. However, the
master plan was never
executed due to various
factors. In the master plan
provisions were made for
better connectivity between Adityapur and Jamshedpur, as well as the overall
development of the area, with proper zoning for residential, industrial, commercial,
institutional, recreational, transportation etc. Since the master plan was never

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implemented, the land use classification of the Adityapur Notified Area has been done
according to UDPFI guidelines supported by primary site visits.

4.3.3 Mango Notified Area

Mango covering an area of 18.03 Sq. Km is the part of Jamshedpur Urban


Agglomeration, which is directly connected to the NH 33 and also connects
Jamshedpur city to the NH 33 via the Mango Bridge across the Subarnarekha River. It
is the area close to the Dimna Lake and is a very rapidly developing high-class
residential zone. Though services are strained in this area, due to the strategic location
and other perspectives, this area has a high potential for development.

Table No. 15
Land Use Distribution of Mango Notified Area

Land use Area (in ha)


Residential 864.00
Commercial 36.00
Industrial / Ware Housing 216.00
Social Facilities / Amenities 18.00
Open Spaces 54.00
Circulation – Roads, Railway, Parking 162.00
Nala / River / Power Corridor 126.00
Undeveloped Area 324.00
Gross Area 1,800.00
Source: Primary site reconnaissance

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LAND USE DISTRIBUTION OF MANGO NOTIFIED


AREA

18%

RESIDENTIAL

COMMERCIAL

INDUSTRIAL / WARE
7% HOUSING
48% SOCIAL FACILITIES /
AMENITIES
OPEN SPACES

9% CIRCULATION / RDS.
/RLY. / PARKINGS
NALA / RIVER /
3% POWER CORRIDOR
UNDEVELOPED
1%
12%
2%

4.3.4 Jugsalai Municipality

Jugsalai covering an area of 1.29 Sq. Kms is the smallest of all the wards in the
Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration but it is the area having the highest density of all the
areas.

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Jugsalai though has a municipality has insufficient provision of water supply, no proper
sewage system, no solid waste dumping ground and even the road and transportation
structure has been strained to the extreme limit.

This area is predominantly residential, with a high percentage of unauthorized


development in the area. Some small-scale industrial development is also there in this
area. This area is highly congested, and many parts of the area impose critical
environmental and health issues.

Table No. 16
Land Use Distribution of Jugsalai Municipality

LAND USE AREA (in Ha)


Residential 78.69 LAND USE DISTRIBUTION OF
JUGSALAI MUNICIPALITYRESIDENTIAL
Commercial 3.87
Industrial / Ware Housing 15.48 7%
3% COMMERCIAL
Social Facilities / Amenities 2.58
12% INDUSTRIAL / WARE
Open Spaces 0.26 HOUSING
0% SOCIAL FACILITIES /
Circulation – Roads, Railway, 2% AMENITIES
Parking 15.22 OPEN SPACES
Nala / River / Power Corridor 9.03 12% 61%
CIRCULATION / RDS.
Undeveloped Area 3.87 /RLY. / PARKINGS
3% NALA / RIVER /
Gross Area 129.00 POWER CORRIDOR
UNDEVELOPED
Source: Primary site reconnaissance

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4.3.5 Other Areas of the JUA

The other areas of the JUA are Bagbera, Kitadih, Parsudih, Ghorabandha, Kalimati,
Sarjamdahh, Chhotagovindpur, Gadhra and Haludbani. These areas form the fringe
areas to the southern and eastern part of the present Jamshedpur city (Jamshedpur
Notified Area). Though the administrations of these areas are under the jurisdiction of
Panchayats, they have over the period of time developed into fringe towns (urban out
growths). These areas are in transition state with character changing from rural to
urban areas.

Due to the lack of regulatory framework for development, the town has grown in a
hapazard and irregular manner with no land use classification / segregation, thus
adversely affecting the urban as well as the ecological environment of the region.

4.3.6 Combined Landuse

The combined land use distribution is done on the basis of primary site reconnaissance
only, in the absence of any existing land use survey.

Table No. 17
Land Use Distribution of Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration

Sr. No Land use Area (sq km) % of total area


1 Industrial 52.23 35.0
2 Residential 29.85 20.0
3 Transport 26.86 18.0
Water Bodies, Nala,
20.14 13.5
4 Undeveloped Area
5 Recreational 11.93 8.0
6 Commercial 4.47 3.0
7 Public Utilities 3.75 2.5
Total 149.23 100.0
Source: Primary site reconnaissance

Observations:

• About 35% of the land is dedicated for the purpose of industrial use, which is
the major land use, followed by the residential use of approximately 20%.
• The land use table indicates that about 18% of area is allocated for
transportation facilities, and 13.5% is undeveloped area.
indicates that the major land use is the industrial sector, which wisely gives name of
Industrial Town to JUA.

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Land Use Percentage

2.5% Industrial
3.0%
8.0% Residential
35.0%
Transpo rt

13.5% Water Bodies, Nala,


Undeveloped Area
Recreational

Commercial

18.0% Public Utilities


20.0%

Land Use Analysis for JUA

4.3.7 Future Spatial Growth Directions

A detailed reconnaissance and evaluation of satellite photographs indicates that there


are some constraints for the expansion of the city on the north and south.

HILLS / FOREST

POTENTIAL
POTENTIAL TOURISM
TOURISM &&
RECREATIONAL
RECREATIONAL
GROWTH
GROWTH CENTRES
CENTRES

MANGO
POTENTIAL INDUSTRIAL
GROWTH CENTRES

ADITYAPUR JAMSHEDPUR

HILLS / TRIBAL AREAS OUTGROWTH POTENTIAL


POTENTIAL
TOWNS RESIDENTIAL
RESIDENTIAL
GROWTH
GROWTH
CENTRES
CENTRES

On the north side, steep hill range with forests are present and no development on that
side is possible. On the southern side, there are largely tribal areas that would also
restrict the development. So the only expansions possible are towards the east and
west. Looking at the current developments, it is possible that the eastward direction
would be predominantly residential and westward direction would be predominantly

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industrial in nature. If the same pattern occurs, the gap between the residential and
work places may increase. In order to overcome this, new road links will have to be
planned.

4.4 Economic Growth

In today's economy, information is the lifeline of any business. Industries can thrive in
today's hyper-competitive market only by continuously improving and re-inventing.
They have to learn to re-skill their services to meet the demands of the customers.
Speed, flexibility and transparency of communication are the deciding factors in the
success of any organization. Industries are moving towards a new, more complex
bottom line in which profit, environmental concern and social responsibility will have to
be balanced. The initial development of Jamshedpur city was largely as that of an
industrial town. A great iron and steel-producing centre, it is sometimes called the
“Pittsburgh of India.”
Other manufactures include automobiles, agricultural equipment, and locomotive parts
and nearby districts of Jamshedpur has extensive coal and iron ore deposits as natural
resources.

4.4.1 Agro Based Industries

The promotion of Agro based industries is among the priorities of the State
Government. This sector, besides providing employment opportunities to vast section
of the society, has immense export potential which needs to be exploited to earn
valuable foreign exchange for the country. The State has assured supply of fruits &
vegetables grown by applying scientific techniques, investment in post harvest
technology and good transport infrastructure. To give thrust to this sector, the

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government aims to provide several benefits. Investment potential in cattle feed, jute,
hemp, sisal and other fabrics, tea cultivation, processing and packaging, paper,
floriculture, horticulture.

4.4.2 Industries and Minerals

Tata Iron and Steel Company (TISCO) in Jamshedpur is the largest steel works in the
private sector in the country. Other important industries are Tata Engineering and
Locomotive Company, Timken, Tata Agrico, Sriram Bearing, Usha Martin, Indian Tube
Company, etc. The state of Jharkhand is abundantly rich in minerals-copper, coal, iron,
manganese, mica, chromites, bauxite, etc., and has the potential of becoming one of
the most prosperous states of India.

MAJOR INDUSTRIES OF JAMSHEDPUR


1. Tata Iron & Steel Company (TISCO) - Sakchi, Jamshedpur -product (Iron)
2. Tata Engineering Locomotive Company (TELCO) - Telco, Jamshedpur - product (Motor)
3. The Tinplate Company India Ltd. (TINPLATE) - Golmuri, Jamshedpur - product (Tina)
4. Tata Robins Frazer (TRF) – Burma Mines, Jamshedpur, product - (machinery parts,
mechanical works)
5. Telcon Works, Jamshedpur – product (Machinery)
6. Timken India, Sidhgora, Jamshedpur -Product (Bearing)
7. Indian Cable (INCAB) - Golmuri, Jamshedpur - Product (Cable)
8. I.S.W.P. – product (wire production)
9. Lafarge Cement - Govindpur, Jamshedpur - Product (Cement)
10. Tata Electric Power, Govindpur, Jamshedpur -Product (Power)
11. Tata Pigment - Bistupur, Jamshedpur - product – (paints & chemicals)
12. Tata Rayerson - Sidhgora, Jamshedpur, product – (mechanical works)
13. Uranium Corporation India Limited (UCIL) - Jadugora, Jamshedpur - Product (Uranium)
14. Hindustan Copper Limited (HCL) –Ghatshila / Mosabani, Jamshedpur - Product (Copper)
15. Rakha Copper Project - Rakhamines, Mosabani, Jamshedpur - Product (Copper)
16. Turamdih Gold Mine - Mosabani, Jamshedpur - Product (Gold)
17. Paper Mill - Dhalbhumgarh, Jamshedpur - Product (Paper)
18. Tube Company (Tata Steel) – Burma Mines, Jamshedpur - Product (Tube)
19. Tata Agrico

4.5 Essential Actions

In order to materialize the vision statement, the following actions will have to be
undertaken:

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• Formulation of a Unified Administration Agency


o To ensure Planned development
o Equitable distribution of infrastructure
o Management of the city
o JNNURM requires an elected body to undertake the management of the city
Hence it is suggested that a Municipal Corporation be set up for the city.

• Improvement of Work Participation Ratio


o Attract industries with employment opportunities
o Develop support Infrastructure

• Encourage Public Private partnership in all development projects

• Implement Community Participation Law


o Encourage direct participation of public in municipal functions, budgeting

• Renewal and Redevelopment of Inner City areas


o Improvement / removal of slums, develop infrastructure, redevelopment
where required

• Promote active participation of NGO in the development activities

4.6 Investment Plan

In order to achieve the socio-economic growth, the city will have to form a Unified
Administrative and management body, undertake urban renewal schemes, prepare
masterplan and identify developmental projects. The cost of undertaking such actions
are estimated and presented in the table below:

Table No. 18
Investment Plan
Cost (Rs.
No Activities Description Cr.) 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Establishment of Unified electoral
A body 15.00 1.50 11.25 2.25 - - - -
B Inner City Renewal 40.00 20.00 20.00 - - - - -
C Master Plan Development

(total station including existing


Landuse of the JUA Area)
1,50,000RS Per Sq Km
1 Physical Surveys (150000*149.225) 2.23 0.22 2.01 - - - - -
Rs 2000 Per Sq Km
2 Satellite Imagery 0.5m resolution (2000*149.225) 0.04 0.01 0.03 - - - - -
DPR for all components
Rs 250000/ per Sq km
(Components such as Water Consolidated DPR (including
supply, Land use , Sewerage ,Solid all the activities)
3 Waste Management etc) =250000*149.225 45.00 30.00 15.00 - - - - -
Sub Total C 47.27 30.23 17.04
TOTAL (A+B+C) 102.27 51.73 48.29 2.25

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

5 URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE ............................................................................. 45


5.1 General ...................................................................................................... 45
5.2 Water Supply ............................................................................................ 46
5.2.1 Water Sources Available .......................................................................... 46
5.2.2 Quality of Water........................................................................................ 47
5.2.3 Current level of Service ............................................................................ 48
5.2.4 Future Demand Estimates........................................................................ 50
5.2.5 Development Proposals ........................................................................... 51
5.2.6 Investment Plan........................................................................................ 55
5.3 Sewerage System ..................................................................................... 55
5.3.1 Existing Treatment Plants and Coverage ................................................. 55
5.3.2 Future Demand Estimates........................................................................ 57
5.3.3 Development Proposals ........................................................................... 57
5.3.4 Investment Plan........................................................................................ 59
5.4 Storm Water Drainage.............................................................................. 60
5.4.1 General Drainage System ........................................................................ 60
5.4.2 Development Proposals ........................................................................... 61
5.4.3 Investment Plan........................................................................................ 62
5.5 Solid Waste Management System .......................................................... 63
5.5.1 Current Status .......................................................................................... 63
5.5.2 Future Demand Estimate.......................................................................... 63
5.5.3 Development Proposals ........................................................................... 66
5.5.4 Investment Plan........................................................................................ 70
5.6 Traffic and Transportation....................................................................... 71
5.6.1 Regional Connectivity............................................................................... 71
5.6.2 Transportation within JUA ........................................................................ 71
5.6.3 Vehicle Population in Jamshedpur ........................................................... 72
5.6.4 Travel Characteristics............................................................................... 73
5.6.5 Accidents in Jamshedpur ......................................................................... 74
5.6.6 Road Network........................................................................................... 74
5.6.7 Road Condition......................................................................................... 75
5.6.8 Traffic Management and Circulation......................................................... 76
5.6.9 On – Going Projects ................................................................................. 78
5.6.10 Development Proposals ....................................................................... 78
5.6.11 Investment Plan.................................................................................... 84
5.7 Investment Plan for Urban Infrastructure .............................................. 85

Urban Infrastructure v
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Final Report

5 URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE

5.1 General

There is a glaring difference in the level of infrastructure provision within different areas
of the city. The infrastructure within the area controlled by JUSCO in Jamshedpur city1
is properly laid out and adequate in terms of the requirement of the Tata Steel
Company Township2. JUSCO has managed to develop and maintain the urban
services to very good quality.

However, the other areas of the Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration do not have
adequate provision of civic infrastructure, nor is there any detailed survey,
documentation or records available for the existing infrastructure. The primary reason
for the absence of such documentation as well as the inadequacy in provision of
services can be attributed to the absence of a unified municipality in the area.

A review of the existing infrastructure reflects the unequal distribution of services in


JUA, which needs attention on a priority basis. The infrastructure needs to be
upgraded to such a level so as to be able to project the city of Jamshedpur as a
‘Millennium City’ and to reach the Specified Global Standard.

This section reviews the existing situation and issues related to the urban
infrastructure, which includes:

• Water supply
• Sewerage System
• Storm Water Drainage
• Solid Waste Management System
• Traffic and Transportation

The study of the existing urban infrastructure is done in two steps:

Step 1:

Review of the existing condition of the infrastructure is done in the form of an area wise
analysis, in order to understand the following:
• Current level of service
• Current service requirement as per the present population (2006)
• Unmet demand

Step 2:

Proposals are made for whole area of JUA, considering the following aspects:

• The future requirement for (2006-2031) as per the projected population of 2031
• Meeting the demand-supply gap in service provision.

1
Jamshedpur City refers to only the area covered by Jamshedpur Notified Area and not to the entire Jamshedpur
Urban Agglomeration.
2
Company Townships refer to the townships of TISCO, TELCO, and other industrial establishments.

Urban Infrastructure 45
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5.2 Water Supply

The main sources of water supply to JUA are the Subarnarekha River, Kharkai River,
Sitarampur Dam and the Dimna Lake. The current water supply is managed by JUSCO
(within their areas, mainly in JNAC) and PHED on areas outside JNAC. However, the
supply is far below the requirements. Use of hand pumps, deep bore wells, tankers,
etc. to meet the demand are very common. The newly added areas are currently being
catered to through tanker supply or by the deep bore wells. Even after all that, in terms
of service levels, the per capita supply is far below the desired norms. The growing
dependence on the groundwater is alarming. It is high time, piped water supply is
taken up to curb the problems of extraction of ground water.

5.2.1 Water Sources Available

Subarnarekha River:
The Subarnarekha River is the prime
source of water supply for Jamshedpur
Notified Area and Mango Notified Area.
There is a Water Treatment Plant on the
Subarnarekha River, which supplies water
to the Mango Notified Area (1.2MGD). The
Central Irrigation department has several
projects in the pipeline to harness the
water of the Subarnarekha River and
make it usable both for household and
SUBARNAREKHA RIVER
irrigation purposes.

JUSCO PUMP HOUSE ON SUBARNAREKHA RIVER JUSCO WATER TREATMENT PLANT

Kharkai River:

The Kharkai River is a tributary of the


Subarnarekha River and acts as a divider
between Jamshedpur Notified Area and
Adityapur Notified Area. Though it is not a
prime water resource of the area, it
supplies water partly to different parts of
JUA. It acts as an alternative source of
water to the Sitarampur Dam, when there
is less rainfall. Three pumps of 125Hp
power are installed on the Kharkai River
to pump water into the Sitarampur Dam
KHARKAI RIVER when requirement arises.

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Sitarampur Dam:

The Sitarampur Dam, of a capacity of 5.6MGD, was constructed in 1963 and relies not
on any river water but on natural water source for its supply. During period of less
rainfall, the Kharkai River acts as alternate source of water for the dam. The dam
supplies water (total 5 MGD) to parts of Adityapur Notified Area, Jugsalai Municipal
Area, parts of Jamshedpur Notified Area (Shastri Nagar) and Bagbera. The domestic
supply from the Sitarampur Dam is 2.5 MGD while the industrial supply (to Gumharia
Industrial Area in Adityapur Notified Area) is 2.5 MGD. The total supply from
Sitarampur dam to Jugsalai Municipal Area, parts of Jamshedpur Notified Area (Shastri
Nagar) and Bagbera is 0.1MGD. A water treatment plant is also attached to the
Sitarampur Dam.

Dimna Lake:

The Dimna Lake located near Mango, has


made the Mango Notified Area a prime
location for high-class residential
development. The dam on the Dimna
Lake supplies water to the JUSCO area of
Jamshedpur Notified Area.
DIMNA LAKE

Dimna Reservoir - Capacity: 34000 ML (JUSCO)

This reservoir was constructed in 1944 at a distance of 8 Kms. from the city to use this
water in event of low water level in the river Subarnarekha. Water can be withdrawn
from the reservoir under gravity to Water Works and Steel Works through two nos. 36"
diameter Hume Pipe lines.3

The following table summarises the available rough capacities estimated for the
various sources:

Dimna Subarnarekha Sitarampur


Unit Reservoir River Reservoir
Agency Responsible TATA TATA / GoJ GoJ
Available Capacity ML 34,000 Perennial 25,000
Water extracted MLD 35 10 15
Transmission Type - Gravity Pumping Gravity
Transmission Loss % 25% 15% 25%

5.2.2 Quality of Water

Water quality is commonly defined by its physical, chemical, biological and aesthetic
(appearance and smell) characteristics. Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration being a

3
Source: http://www.juscoltd.com

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predominantly industrial zone, the quality of water in the area is a very critical factor in
the holistic development of the area.

JUSCO has two functional water treatment plants, which give supply to the Tatanagar
Township as well as to some parts of the Jamshedpur Notified Area, which is not under
the administrative control of JUSCO.

PHED carries out preliminary treatments including chlorination and sedimentation


before supplying the water to the public. However, the water thus supplied is not of
very high quality, since the raw water source is the river that is contaminated by the
untreated sewage and other effluents discharged into them4.

5.2.3 Current level of Service

The following tables indicate the current level of service assessed based on available
data, interviews and reconnaissance.

Table No. 19
Current Level of Services in JUA - Water Supply by Piped Connections

Total Coverage Current Current Water Supply


population Area (%Of Water Supply Supply Duration5
Area (2006) Population) (MLD) (lcpd) (Hour)
8 (planned for
JNAC 719,564 60 50.37 70
24 hrs)
ANAC 140,933 40 2.86 60 2
MNAC 196,320 40 5.47 60 1
JUGSALAI
54,507 10 1.11 60 1.5
MUNICIPALITY
OTHER JUA
AREAS 167,135 10 1.00 60 1.5
(PARSUDIH)
TOTAL 1,278,459 25 60.81 60

Table No. 20
Current Level of Services in JUA - Water Supply by Ground Water Extraction

Total Approximate
population Coverage Area Source of Water supply
Area (2006) (%of Population)
Bore wells, tubewells, Tankers
JNAC 719,564 40
during summer
Bore wells, tubewells, ponds,
ANAC 140,933 60
tankers during dry season
Bore wells, tubewells, tankers
MNAC 196,320 60
during dry season

4
For pollution level of Subarnarekha River refer to Annexure 7.4
5
The duration of water supply has been considered as the total hours of water supply in the
respective areas. The hours mentioned are usually distributed into two parts (morning and
evening) over the day.

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Total Approximate
population Coverage Area Source of Water supply
Area (2006) (%of Population)
JUGSALAI Bore wells, tubewells, tankers
54,507 90
MUNICIPALITY during dry season
OTHER JUA Bore wells, tubewells, ponds,
167,135 90
AREAS tankers during dry season
TOTAL 1,278,459 75

It can be seen that the level of service is far below the norms prescribed for the water
supply (which indicates a supply requirement of 140 to 150 LPCD for a minimum
duration of 8hours per day).

LEVEL OF SERVICE COVERAGE – 10%

LEVEL OF SERVICE COVERAGE – 60%

LEVEL OF SERVICE COVERAGE – 40%

CURRENT LEVEL OF WATER SUPPLY

A review of the water supply sources also indicates that a large part of the population
depends on ground water, thus leading to a considerable amount of ground water
extraction.

KEY ISSUES

It has been observed that the service level of water supply is well below the desired
requirement. The key issues with regards to water supply system in all the areas of
JUA are as follows:
• The coverage area of water supply distribution in all areas of JUA is below 50%
(average).
• Out of the 50% coverage area of water supply, only 55% of people get water
supply by piped connections.

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• As the water supply system is quite old, in some of the areas, the distribution
network needs rehabilitation in order to reduce the distribution losses, it is
estimated that about 45% of water is lost in distribution.
• The dependence on the ground water is alarming and needs to be curtailed by
providing piped water supply
• It is also observed that the gross per capita supply is not equitable. Proper
distribution is an issue to be addressed on a priority basis.
• It is observed that in the other towns of JUA, the water supply is limited, due to
inadequate storage and water pressure.
• Of the total Overhead & Maintenance cost of water supply, energy cost is
considerably high (about 60%).
• A large part of the population depends on ground water sources like bore wells,
tubewells, etc. The issue of ground water should be considered and stopped
over a period of time to maintain the environmental balance of the city.

5.2.4 Future Demand Estimates

Future demand estimates are carried out based on the population projection and the
supply level of 140 lpcd (as per the UDPFI norms) for the household demand and 70
lpcd for the floating population. The following table provides the estimated demand:

Table No. 21
Projected Demand for Water Supply – JUA

Sr Water Demand *(MLD) for


No Year Population Population Floating Population Total
1 2007 1,318,811 184.63 30.46 236.60
2 2008 1,358,211 190.15 31.37 243.68
3 2009 1,397,610 195.67 32.28 250.75
4 2010 1,437,010 201.18 33.19 257.81
5 2011 1,476,410 206.70 34.11 264.89
6 2012 1,515,810 212.21 35.02 271.95
7 2013 1,555,210 217.73 35.93 279.02
8 2014 1,594,609 223.25 36.84 286.09
9 2021 2,012,317 281.72 46.48 361.02
10 2031 2,744,800 384.27 63.40 492.44
* - Demand includes estimated transmission loss of 10%

It is considered that JUSCO has a capacity available for water supply of 120 MLD
(Source: JUSCO web site). Hence it is estimated that there would be a requirement of
building up facilities for collecting, treating and distributing about 372.44 MLD (492.44 -
120) for meeting the 2031 demand. For meeting the demand till 2014, water treatment
facilities for about 166 MLD is required, which has been considered for estimation of
fund requirement. The system proposed can be augmented as required for the future
(2031) demand.

In order to understand the immediate requirements (especially since the area has very
poor coverage), an analysis of unmet demand for the current year was carried out.
This was done with the assumption that the current level of water supply would be
made available to 100% of the population in those areas. The results are presented in
the table below:

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Table No. 22
Estimated Un-met Demand for Water Supply – JUA 2006

Total population Current Supply Un-met demand


(2006) (LPCD) (MLD)
Area
JNAC 719,564 70 20.15
ANAC 140,933 60 5.58
MNAC 196,320 60 7.77
JUGSALAI
54,507 60 3.24
MUNICIPALITY
OTHER JUA AREAS 167,135 60 9.93
TOTAL 1,278,459 60 48.68

5.2.5 Development Proposals

THE GOAL

To achieve 100% direct water availability and best distribution connectivity to the total
population spread over JUA. To reach a level of 140 LPCD water supply capacity in all
the parts of JUA with a supply duration of minimum 8 hours per day.

DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES

• Safe, equitable, reliable, adequate water supply for the entire area
• Reduce transmission and distribution losses
• Identify illegal water connections and discourage public stand post
• Conduct a leak detection study and reduce the UFW
• Refurbish the old distribution system

ACTION PLAN

• Phased rehabilitation of the existing water supply system by increasing its


efficiency and source augmentation to meet the current requirement
(immediate) of water supply in JUA
• Creation of new water supply sources and augmentation of existing system to
meet the future demand of water supply
• For equal distribution of water in the different parts of JUA, adequate storage
and distribution network are to be developed.
• To supply hygienic water and to maintain the quality of water in the city, water
treatment plants should be located at suitable parts of the city. The existing
treatment plants should also be rehabilitated to increase efficiency.
• All consumers should be brought under metered water supply connections,
including the slum areas.
• There should be attractive concession for advance payment against water bill
and at the same time there should be strict check and implementation on
penalty for the defaulter.

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ONGOING PROJECTS

Water & Waste Water department caters to a huge customer base of 500,000
populations in JNAC (Jamshedpur Notified Area Committee) and MNAC (Mango
Notified Area Committee) area. This includes all the industries, commercial &
Government establishments within this area. For accomplishing this, the department
has divided Jamshedpur into three virtual zones and are supplying water through the
three water towers situated in these zones.

Each zonal office is responsible for the operation of towers and maintenance of the
distribution network. Operation includes 24 hours monitoring of tower activities, running
up pumps for water supply in distribution network simultaneously interacting with water
treatment plants, attending customer complaints and resolving issues related to water
supply. They are also responsible for the supply of water through tankers in an
emergency. Ensuring quality water at customers end and daily survey of pipe leakage
or overflow to prevent water wastage are some other responsibilities of the zonal
offices.

Augmentation of the existing water supply system at Sitarampur Dam and the
construction of two new water treatment plants are also been taken up by AIADA. The
project is in the draft DPR stage which is being prepared by the appointed consultants
(IL&FS).

In order to cater to the different parts of JNAC, which are presently not receiving proper
water supply, a water supply scheme has been taken up by PHED (implementing
agency) and JNAC (financing agency). The DPR for this project called Bagunhatu-
Birsanagar Water Supply Scheme is already in progress. Some amount (Rs. 8 crores)
has been obtained by JNAC for the above work.

The above projects (which are in the initial stages) are very much required to achieve
the vision set for the city. Hence it is strongly recommended that these be included
under the JNNURM framework.

DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS

A number of proposals for rehabilitation and augmentation of existing water supply


schemes have been outlined to meet the projected future (2031) demand of water
supply of JUA. Proposals have also been given for development of new water supply
schemes as well as for the development of water treatment plants in order to maintain
the quality of water in the city. Following are the projects identified to meet the goal
defined for water supply sector:

• Development of water treatment plant in Bagunhatu on the Subarnarekha


River, near Moharda in JNAC area. This project has already been taken up by
JNAC, and the DPR is in its inception stage. The implementing agency for this
project is PHED while the financing agency is JNAC.

• Development of water treatment plant next to Jata Jhopri colony and


Baroda ghat on Kharkai River in Bagbera. It is proposed to be located
upstream of the existing water veer of the Railways. This project is to be
implemented by the PHED and funded by the Jugsalai Municipality.

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• Development of two water treatment plants near the existing Sitarampur


Dam in Adityapur. The two units are to be developed in a phased manner.
This project has been taken up by AIADA and is in the stage of preparation of
detailed project report. This is envisaged to take care of the water supply
demand of the entire area of Adityapur (both industrial and residential demand),
Shastrinagar in JNAC, Bagbera and parts of Jugsalai. The Sitarampur dam is
also proposed to be rehabilitated and undergo phased augmentation to meet
the future demand of water supply in JUA.

• Water treatment plant at Gagia barrage on Kharkai River. The Gagia


barrage development is an irrigation department project abandoned due to the
non availability of funds. This project needs to be reconsidered and utilized for
meeting a part of the future demand.

• Water Treatment Plant at Pokhari, Mango. It is proposed to develop a water


treatment plant at Pokhari in Mango. The area for the same has already been
handed over to the State by the Forest Department. This will utilise water
coming from the intake wells on Subarnarekha River.

• Water supply network for entire area

• Water metering for all consumers

PROPOSED WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM

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Table No. 23
Capacity6 and Coverage of the Proposed Water Treatment Plants – JUA 2014

Sr Location of Capacity Source of Implementing Population Approx.


no WTP of WTP water supply Agency coverage supply
(MGD) (apprx. %) coverage
areas
1. Existing WTP 37.07 Subarnarekha JUSCO Areas of
of JUSCO on River JNAC
32
Subarnarekh maintained
a River by JUSCO
2. Bagunhatu 5.58 Subarnarekha Implementation Birsanagar,
near Moharda River by ULB or Baridih,
(Itabhatta, unified body 08 Bagan area,
Moharda) Bagunhatu,
Bagunnagar
3. Baroda Ghat 7.5 Kharkai River Implementation Jugsalai,
WTP by ULB or 14 Other Areas
unified body of JUA
4. Sitarampur 4.89 Sitarampur Implementation ANAC area,
WTP Dam, Bhua & by AIADA Gamharia,
(Phase 1) Kuluptanga Shastrinagar,
28
5. Sitarampur 5.410 intake wells Implementation Jugsalai,
WTP on Kharkai by AIADA Bagbera
(Phase 2) River
6. Gagia 5.0 Kharkai River Implementation 09 Jugsalai,
Barrage WTP by ULB or Other areas
unified body of JUA
including
Kitadih,
Parsudih,
Sarjamdah,
Gadhra,
Chota-
Govindpur
7. WTP at 5.0 Subarnarekha Implementation 09 Mango
Pokhari, River by ULB or
Mango unified body

6
According to IS 1172:1993 for cities with population excess of 1lakh with flushing system, minimum norms are 150 –
200 lpcd. However, considering the Industrial status of the city of Jamshedpur and comparing the situation with other
similar cities in India, the per capita consumption has been considered as 135 lpcd.
7
Source: (total capacity = 168 MLD) http://www.juscoltd.com
8
Source: DPR of Bagunhatu – Birsanagar Water Supply Scheme, JNAC
9
Source: Draft Study Report of System Status of Water Supply for Adityapur Industrial Area
10
Source: Draft Study Report of System Status of Water Supply for Adityapur Industrial Area

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5.2.6 Investment Plan

In order to achieve the goals, the City will have to undertake the proposals listed
above. The cost of undertaking such actions are estimated and presented in the table
below:

Table No. 24
Investment Plan – Water Supply

Cost (Rs.
No Activities Description Cr.) 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

A Existing System Refurbishment


1 Replacement of Water Mains 6.25 0.63 2.50 3.13 - - - -
Replacement of distribution
2 pipes 18.00 1.80 7.20 9.00 - - - -

3 Water audit and leak detection 2.25 0.75 1.50 - - - - -


Sub Total 26.50 3.18 11.20 12.13
B System Augmentation
Water Mains & distribution
1 system 207.28 7.11 10.05 79.67 48.27 31.09 30.05 1.04
2 Industrial Water distribution 208.69 - 41.74 41.74 41.74 41.74 41.74 -
166.09 MLD @
Rs. 30 Lakhs per
3 Water Treatment Plants MLD 49.83 4.98 19.93 24.92 - - - -
Bagunhatu (5.5 MGD)
Bagbera - Baroda Ghat (7.5
MGD)
Sitarampur - as per IL&FS (4.8 +
5.4 MGD)
Gagia Barrage (5.0 MGD)
Dimna Dam (8.5 MGD)
Rs. 1 crore for 1
overhead (50
4 Overhead tanks OHTs) 50.00 - 15.00 10.00 10.00 7.50 7.50 -
6000 nos @ Rs.
5 Consumer metering system 5000/per meter 79.73 23.92 15.95 15.95 11.96 11.96 - -
Sub total 595.53 36.01 102.67 172.28 111.96 92.29 79.29 1.04
TOTAL (A+B) 622.03 39.01 125.17 176.78 111.96 92.29 79.29 1.04

5.3 Sewerage System

This is one of the least developed infrastructure in the JUA. Organised sewage system
is not available in the city, except for the areas that are under the JUSCO. Most of the
sewage is discharged into the river system, making the water polluted too much higher
levels than permissible.

5.3.1 Existing Treatment Plants and Coverage

The JUA has only two sewage treatment plants – one at Kharkai and one at Bara. Both
are under the jurisdiction and management of JUSCO and has a combined capacity of
around 60 MLD (Source: JUSCO Web site). The areas served by these STPs are the
townships of the Tata companies and parts of the JNAC area.

The other areas of JNAC, MNAC, JMC, ANAC and the other areas of JUA do not have
any facility for treatment for sewage. The sewage of these areas are disposed into

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soak pits and septic tanks, finally being disposed off into the Subarnarekha and
Kharkai Rivers via the drains (which act as common drains for both storm water and
sewage).

The overall level of service11 of the sewerage system in JUA is very poor, which is one
of the major causes for river and ground water pollution. The areas maintained by
JUSCO is provided with the relatively good quality of service with a sewerage system
and treatment mechanism in place. However this is not adequate and is termed as
moderate due to its limited coverage when compared to the total area. Comparatively
the other parts of JUA can be categorised to have poor and very poor level of sewage
disposal services.

KEY ISSUES

• Almost 60% of the total sewage generated remains untreated and is disposed
off into the Subarnarekha and Kharkai Rivers. Thus the river water gets
polluted leading to environmental degradation.
• JUSCO have its own sewage treatment plants. Except these, no other
treatment plants exist in any other part of the city.

LEVEL
LEVEL OF
OF SERVICE
SERVICE OF
OF EXISTING
EXISTING SEWERAGE
SEWERAGE SYSTEM
SYSTEM

DIMNA
LAKE

SU
BA
RN
AR
EK
HA
R IV
ER

STP STP

SITARAMPUR
RESERVOIR
KHARKAI RIVER

VERY POOR LEVEL OF SERVICES


POOR LEVEL OF SERVICES
MODERATE LEVEL OF SERVICES (MORE THAN 60% AREA UNDER

11
Level of service in context to sewerage system can be considered as moderate level of service for areas having
underground sewere lines in some parts of the area, poor level of service being those areas where the open storm
water drains serve as sewage disposal drains too, and very poor level of service being areas which have no sewage
disposal system at all.

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5.3.2 Future Demand Estimates

The current level of sewage generation is not available with the Notified Area
Committees as there is hardly any treatment carried out. In the absence of any details,
sewage generation is estimated at 80% of the water supply demand (excluding the
transmission loss estimated in the water supply). The estimated volume of sewage
including floating population is as in the table below:

Table No. 25
Sewage Generation Estimated for JUA

Total Sewage including


Year Total Population Sewage generated (MLD) 10% infiltration (MLD)
2007 1,318,811 172.08 189.28
2008 1,358,211 177.22 194.94
2009 1,397,610 182.36 200.59
2010 1,437,010 187.50 206.25
2011 1,476,410 192.64 211.90
2012 1,515,810 197.78 217.55
2013 1,555,210 202.92 223.21
2014 1,594,609 208.07 228.87
2021 2,012,317 262.56 288.81
2031 2,744,800 358.14 393.95

The available capacity for sewage treatment is about 60 MLD only; covering
approximate 15% of the total area of JUA. It is estimated that the demand for sewage
collection, treatment and disposal will have to be planned for a capacity of 333.95
MLD. For meeting the demand till 2014, sewage treatment facilities for about 169 MLD
is required, which has been considered for estimation of fund requirement. The system
proposed can be augmented as required for the future (2031) demand.

5.3.3 Development Proposals

THE GOAL

To achieve 100% coverage of areas with underground sewers and achieve 100%
treatment of the wastewater.

DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES

• Treat 100 per cent of sewage generated


• Provision of clean, affordable sanitation facilities at public places, especially for
the large number of floating population, considering the industrial city nature of
Jamshedpur.

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ACTION PLAN

• Extension, augmentation and rehabilitation of existing systems in an efficient


manner
• An inventory of locations of spills, leaks and mixing areas of storm water
• Mapping and creation of GIS based database.
• Regularization drive to be taken up as also an awareness campaign on getting
a sewerage connection.

DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS

Based on the general slope and physical barriers, the entire area of JUA has been
divided into four zones, excluding the JUSCO area. Sewage Treatment Plants (STPs)
have been proposed for each of these zones. The following diagram shows the
proposed zones and their respective STPs.

STP STP
(Ex.) (Ex.)

The proposed STPs are as follows:

• Near Sampra in Adityapur, near the confluence of Kharkai and Subarnarekha


Rivers. The treated sewage can be disposed into the Kharkai River. This
treatment plant is proposed to be serving Adityapur (Zone – 1).
• Near Bhilalpahari serving Mango area (Zone –2), the treated sewage can be
discharged in Subarnarekha River.
• At Domuhani, in Sonari, which is proposed to be serving JNAC area (Zone –
3), the treated sewage will be discharged in the Subarnarekha River. The
treated water can also be used for landscaping purposes in the public parks
and gardens along the Marine Drive.
• Near Shivghat in Jugsalai, where the Tezab Nala meets the Kharkai river.
This is proposed to be serving Jugsalai and the other areas of Jamshedpur
block, which are being included in the JUA boundary (Zone – 4). The

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treated sewage will be discharge in the Kharkai River. The treated water can
also be used for landscaping purposes for developing public parks and gardens
along the Kharkai River in Jugsalai and Bagbera.

Table No. 26
Capacity and Coverage of the Proposed Sewage Treatment Plants – JUA 2031

Sr Location of Capacity Population Capacity Areas Served Disposal


no STP of STP coverage of STP Areas
(MLD) (apprx. %) (MLD)
2014
1. Existing STP Parts of JNAC Subarnarekha
of JUSCO on serviced and River
Subarnarekha 60 15 60
maintained by
River JUSCO
2. Sampra STP 105 56 Adityapur Kharkai River
27
in Adityapur
3. Bhilalpahari 98 51 Mango Subarnarekha
25
STP in Mango River
4. STP at 71 18 42 JNAC Subarnarekha
Domuhani in River
Sonari
5. Shivghat STP 60 15 20 Jugsalai and the Kharkai River
in Jugsalai other areas of
JUA (Bagbera,
Kitadih,
Parsudih,
Sarjamdah,
Gadhra,
Chotagovindpur)

5.3.4 Investment Plan

In order to achieve the goals listed, the City will have to undertake the proposals
identified above. The cost of undertaking such actions are estimated and presented in
the table below:
Table No. 27
Investment Plan – Sewerage System
Cost
No Activities Description (Rs. Cr.) 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
A System Augmentation
1 Laying of Sewers 222.07 5.46 227.13 81.66 48.16 29.84 29.84 -
169 MLD (2014)
@ Rs. 30 Lakhs
2 Sewage Treatment Plants per MLD 50.70 5.07 15.21 15.21 5.07 5.07 5.07 -
Bhilalpahari (51 MLD)
Domunahi (42 MLD)
Sampra (56 MLD)
Shivghat (20 MLD)
Rs 50,000 per
Pumping Station
3 Intermediate Pumping Stations (2 stations) 1.00 0.10 0.50 0.20 0.10 0.10 - -
Mango
Shastrinagar
4 Miscellaneous Works 33.50 3.35 16.75 6.70 3.35 3.35 - -
Public Toilets
Road Overlays
TOTAL 307.27 13.98 259.59 103.77 56.68 38.36 34.91

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5.4 Storm Water Drainage

5.4.1 General Drainage System

The major rivers flowing through the JUA are the Subarnarekha River and the Kharkai
River. Generally, storm water gets discharged into these rivers. Some of the major
nalahs that are contributing to the drainage system include:

• Tezab Nalah
• Khadgeshwar Dham Nalah
• Gareeb nawas colony Nalah
• Kapali Nalah
• Diaguta Nalah
• Paras Nagar Nalah
• Dimna Nalah
• Baradwara Nalah
• Baridi Nalah
• Lakshmi Nagar Nalah
• Shastri Nagar Nalah etc.

General Flow Directions


Existing Natural Drainage System in JUA

Generally, these nalahs facilitate easy drainage of water from the area. However,
during monsoons, there is backflow from the river system into the nalahs, which create
flooding on the adjacent areas.

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Roadside drains are absent from most of the parts of the JUA, except in the JUSCO
area and some portions of the Jugsalai, Mango and Adityapur areas. The extent of the
coverage by road side drains are not available. Based on the preliminary
reconnaissance, it is estimated that about 40km of roads have some provision of
drains. Almost 75% of the above are in kutcha form.

Tezab Nalah in Jugsalai Municipal Area, which carries


wastewater from TISCO and finally flows into the Kharkai River
Open drainage system in Jugsalai Municipal Area near Shivghat in Jugsalai.

KEY ISSUES

The key issues with regard to storm water drainage system in Jamshedpur Urban
Agglomeration are:

• There is no provision of storm water drainage system in the whole JUA except
in some of the areas of Jamshedpur Notified Area, which is controlled by
JUSCO.
• Absence of storm water drainage network in congested areas like Jugsalai,
Mango etc, is a problem during rains
• The industrial waste of TISCO gets discharged into the stream, which is termed
as Tezab Nalah. This Nalah passes through Jugsalai and merges into the
Kharkai River, which is a major environmental hazard, both to the river as well
as Jugsalai area.
• Significant silting and obstructions in the primary and secondary drains, hamper
natural flow.
• During monsoon season, some of the nalahs have backflow from the river
system creating floods

5.4.2 Development Proposals

The investments on new formations shall be based on the formation of new roads. The
components are up-gradation of existing drains and development of new drains.

THE GOAL

Provision of efficient storm water drainage system for the city using the natural
drainage system.

DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES

• Provide adequate storm water drainage

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ACTION PLAN

In order to drain rainwater and to protect road surface from deterioration, it is advisable
to have drains at least on one side of roads having width less than 9 meters. Drains
should be provided on both sides of roads having more than 11 meters width.

However the city need to undertake a comprehensive storm water drainage master
plan study before implementing any drainage system, which would need to capitalize
on the natural drainage features- drains and water bodies, while identifying drain
improvement and augmentation requirements based on rainfall pattern and intensity
and local flooding characteristics

Rainwater harvesting mechanisms should be undertaken at the neighbourhood level


with the upgradation and rehabilitation of existing local water bodies (like ponds, lakes,
etc). Such action plans result in the development of sustainable public spaces (parks,
gardens, etc.) and helps in recharging the ground water table, which is especially
required in an arid area (having low ground water table) like Jamshedpur. These
measures should be addressed in the development control regulations leading to
urban upgradation.

5.4.3 Investment Plan

In order to achieve the goals listed, the City will have to undertake the proposals
identified above. The cost of undertaking such actions are estimated and presented in
the table below:

Table No. 28
Investment Plan – Storm Water
No Activities Cost (Rs. Cr.) 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Existing System
A Refurbishment
1 Desilting of drains, nallahs 4.00 1.00 3.00 - - - - -
Culverts improvement,
2 provision of slabs 6.00 1.00 5.00 - - - - -
Conversion of drains to
3 Pucca form 71.02 8.10 38.61 24.31 - - - -
Sub Total 81.02 10.10 46.61 24.31
B System Augmentation
1 Cost of equipments 10.00 1.00 6.00 3.00 - - - -
Major drainage network
2 development 22.50 - - - 10.13 5.63 4.50 2.25
3 Minor road side drains 26.90 - - - 12.11 6.73 5.38 2.69
4 Manholes and traps 6.25 0.31 1.25 1.25 1.25 0.94 0.63 0.63
Miscellaneous works
(Drainage Master plan
preparation, Rainwater
5 harvesting systems) 14.57 1.46 2.91 2.91 2.91 2.91 1.46 1.46
Sub total 80.22 2.77 10.16 7.16 26.40 16.21 11.97 7.03
TOTAL (A+B) 161.24 12.87 56.77 31.47 26.40 16.21 11.97 7.03

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5.5 Solid Waste Management System

5.5.1 Current Status

Waste is an unwanted material left over from


manufacturing process; refuse from places
of human and animal habitation. The primary
sources of solid waste generation in JUA are
industries, households, markets, commercial
establishments, hotels, restaurants, and
hospitals. Data regarding the total quantity of
waste generated per day is not available for
all the areas of the JUA.

Currently there is no strategic plan for safe


disposal of municipal solid waste and no Open Garbage Dumping ground in Jugsalai
infrastructure for collection; storage, Municipal Area
segregation, transportation, processing and
disposal of the waste exist. In the part of the
JNAC area controlled by JUSCO, the
collection and transportation of the waste is
conducted in an organized manner through a
team of its own conservancy workers and a
fleet of vehicles and dumper-placers.

As per the Central Pollution Control Board’s


(CPCB) record12 of the status of landfill sites
in the different cities in the country, Open Garbage Dumping ground in residential area
Jamshedpur has a total area of 4.10Ha of in Jugsalai Municipal Area
area under landfill site, which is distributed
between two sites.

5.5.2 Future Demand Estimate

There is no survey existing regarding the estimation of waste generated13 in JUA. It is


assessed that about 60% of the waste is generated is mainly from industries and
remaining is from households (domestic waste), followed by hotels, restaurants and
other commercial establishments, which together account for over 40% of the waste
generated.

Source Category % Composition


Industries 60
Domestic (Households) 25
Commercial 10
Market Areas 5

Management of industrial solid waste (ISW)14 is not the responsibility of the local
bodies. Industries generating solid waste have to manage such waste by themselves
and are required to seek authorization from respective State Pollution Control Boards

12
Source: http://www.cpcb.nic.in
13
Bio-medical and Hazardous Waste is not included in the solid waste taken into consideration.
14
For details on Industrial Solid Waste Management refer to Manual on Municipal Solid Waste Management,
CPHEEO, Ministry of Urban Development, Govt. of India.

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(SPCBs) under relevant rules. However, through joint efforts of SPCBs, local bodies
and the industries, a mechanism could be evolved for better management.

The total amount of waste generated by the current population of 2006 is estimated15
to be 319.61 MT16 per day (considering the current total population of 12.78 lakhs for
2006).

Table No. 29
Future Solid Waste Generation Estimate (Current Population)

Sr. Census Total Sitting Solid Waste (MT) – as per Solid Waste (MT) – as per
No. Year Population UDPFI Guidelines CPHEEO Guidelines17
1. 2006 1,278,459 319.61 268.47
2. 2007 1,318,811 329.70 276.95
3. 2008 1,358,211 339.55 285.22
4. 2009 1,397,610 349.40 293.50
5. 2010 1,437,010 359.25 301.77
6. 2011 1,475,306 369.10 309.81
7. 2012 1,515,810 378.95 318.32
8. 2013 1,555,210 388.80 326.60
9. 2014 1,594,609 398.65 334.87
10. 2021 2,012,317 503.08 422.58
11. 2031 2,744,800 686.20 576.41

Table No. 30
Future Solid Waste Generation Estimate (Total Population)

Total Solid Waste Total Waste Total Waste


Floating (MT) – as generated generated
Population per both considering both considering
Sr Census
CPHEEO sitting and both sitting and
No Year
and UDPFI floating floating
Guidelines18 population (MT) - population (MT)
UDPFI - CPHEEO
1. 2006 421,891 29.53 349.14 298.00
2. 2007 435,208 30.46 360.16 307.41
3. 2008 448,209 31.37 370.92 316.59
4. 2009 461,211 32.28 381.68 325.78
5. 2010 474,213 33.19 392.44 334.96
6. 2011 487,215 34.11 403.21 343.92
7. 2012 500,217 35.02 413.97 353.34
8. 2013 513,219 35.93 424.73 362.53
9. 2014 526,221 36.84 435.49 371.71
10. 2021 664,065 46.48 549.56 469.06
11. 2031 905,784 63.40 749.60 639.81

15
For analysis purpose, the standards mentioned in UDPFI guidelines (waste generated @ 0.25kg/per person/ per day)
have been taken into consideration.
16
This does not include the industrial waste generated (60%). This can thus be considered to constitute the remaining
40% of the waste generated from other sources except industrial.
17
CPHEEO means Central Public Health and Environment Engineering Organization, as per which the waste
generated, is 0.21-kg/per person/ per day for cities of population ranging between 0.1 – 0.5 million.
18
For analysis purpose, the standards mentioned in UDPFI guidelines and CPHEEO guidelines (waste generated for
floating population @ 0.07 kg/per person/ per day) have been taken into consideration.

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For city assessment, the higher quantity of waste generated from the above has been
considered. Thus, the amount of waste estimated to be generated in 2031 is
approximately 686.20 MT per day. Considering the waste to be generated by the
floating population (33% of total population) also, the total volume that needs to be
considered for planning the facilities of solid waste management is approximately 750
MT per day.

As per CPCB records, the existing solid waste disposal facilities in Jamshedpur
constitute of a total landfill area of 4.1 Hectares (41,000 sq.m or 10.25 Acres). These
facilities presently cater to the population residing in the JUSCO maintained area and
also to parts of JNAC. The population thus facilitated can be considered to be
approximately 45% of the total sitting population (2006) of JUA and approximately 55%
of the total floating population (2006), due to the presence of most of the large-scale
industries in the areas serviced by these facilities.

Thus, total population serviced = 807,350 (apprx.)


= 63 % (apprx.) of total population of JUA (2006)

Considering a height of 30m for the existing landfill site, its holding capacity19 is
approximately 962,604 cu.m.

Total waste generated (2006) for entire JUA = 349.14 MT per day

The total required capacity of the landfill site to cater to the current waste generated is
approximately 168,603 cu.m.

Considering a maximum height of 20m for the landfill site, the total area of landfill site
required is 8430.15 sq. m (2 .08 Acres) approximately. If the height of the landfill site is
considered to be a maximum of 30m, then the total area of landfill site required is 8093
sq.m (1.9 Acres) approximately.

Evaluation of the available and required services shows that approximately 8 Acres
(existing 10.25 Acres site – required 2 Acres site) of landfill site, of height 30m, is
available within the existing facilities to serve a part of the future requirement.

Thus, the future solid waste management facilities should be planned for a solid waste
quantity of approximately 400 MT per day (gap between 2031 estimation and current
volume of 2006).

KEY ISSUES

• In absence of adequate facility for collection of waste, it ultimately lands up on


the streets, lanes or backside of houses. There is no system of door-to-door
collection of waste nor is there any facility of community bins.
• Unpaved and open garbage dumping sites.
• No waste segregation done.
• There is no scientific technique for waste disposal in any part of JUA.
• No identification of hazardous waste and no proper disposal procedure for such
waste exist presently.

19
Based on CPHEEO guidelines, for details refer to Annexure H

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• Uneven distribution of services. Even though the present facilities have the
capacity to cater to the current population, poor management leads to
inefficient disbursement of the services.

5.5.3 Development Proposals

The requirements at the disposal site are planned for the horizon year 2031 while the
other components of primary and secondary collection are planned for the immediate
requirements and demands. Future acquisition of dumper placer bins and dual loaded
dumper placers are proposed.

THE GOAL

Comprehensive and sustainable solid waste management system with modern and
scientific methods of collection, transportation and disposal of solid and bio medical
waste.

DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES

• Create a Separate SWM cell, with expertise in Engineering, Human Resources


/ Personnel Management, Communication & Health Management
• Include ‘Recycling’ in SWM and facilitate and regulate the sector accordingly.
• Decentralized Solid Waste Disposal and treatment.
• Enhance Citizen Participation by involvement in source segregation and
outsource the communication campaign to NGOs / Environmental
Organizations.
• Formalize the integration of waste pickers in primary door step collection

Practices of SWM

The SWM process may be classified under the following stages:

• Waste storage and segregation


• Primary and secondary collection
• Waste processing and disposal
• Reuse and recycling

ACTION PLAN

• Integration of solid waste collection by covering all areas by door to door


Collection
• Develop wholesale scrap market at appropriate locations and explore
opportunities for providing facilities in at the neighborhood level for waste
segregation.
• Promote civic education
• Local Mahila Mandals / Ladies social workers are to be involved for social
awareness for segregation at source and educating house wives for importance
of collection from door to door and related public health
• Development of decentralized treatment plants at neighbourhood level.

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• Strategize the planning of the land fill disposal sites for a long term period
(minimum 15 – 20 years)

PROPOSALS

The major issue in terms of solid waste management in the present context of
Jamshedpur is the absence of any proper solid waste dumping ground, not even for
the large amount of industrial waste generated everyday. For developing an efficient
solid waste management system the entire JUA area has been divided into three
zones with local dedicated solid waste dumping grounds and treatment plants. While
locating these sites the following broad issues have been kept into consideration:

• The site should not be near any water body (minimum distance of 5 Km radius
to be maintained between disposal ground and water body)
• Disposal Site should be away from human settlement (minimum distance of 3
Km radius to be maintained between disposal ground and settlement)
• No airstrip (airport) should be located within 5 Km radius of the disposal site
• The site should be barren unfertile land, unsuitable for agriculture
• The site should be so located that the waste carriage vehicle (dumper) does not
have to pass through dense human settlement areas, but the local dhalaos
(neighbourhood garbage bins) are easily accessible by the dumpers.

Following are the sites identified for the proposed solid waste disposal grounds and
treatment plants:

• A stretch of approximately 30 Acres of land near Roopamdih and Murudih


villages in Adityapur has been identified, which will be catering to the entire
area of Adityapur (Zone – 1). This site is unsuitable for agriculture, having very
low water table, being located at an elevation and is partly rocky in nature. The
site being in very close proximity to the AIADA industrial area, ancillary
industries (like fertilizer plants, etc) related to the solid waste treatment plants
can also be located nearby.

• A site of approximately 20 Acres has been identified near Palashbani south of


NH-33 for catering to the Mango Area (Zone – 2).

• For catering to the entire JNAC area and the other areas of Jamshedpur
block, which are being included in the JUA boundary (Zone – 3), a large
site of approximately 150 Acres has been identified in Khairbani, which lies at
the extreme eastern part of JUA. This site can also cater to the surrounding
industrial areas in Gadhra, Jamshedpur, etc. separate treatment plants should
be developed for different types of waste, and recycling industrials should also
be located in the vicinity. This site is located in close proximity to the
southeastern railway line going towards Calcutta, making this a potential site for
location of recycling and treated waste related industries in the area.

The sites for solid waste disposal have been selected on the basis of the site selection
criteria as defined by the CPCB guidelines.

Landfills should be designed and constructed as a secured facility to contain the waste
material and any leachate generated during the process. To meet these requirements,
the base, slope, liner system etc. of the landfill should be designed and constructed as
per the guidelines of MoEF/ CPCB (Guidelines for Setting up of Operating Facility-
Hazardous Waste Management, HAZWAMS/11/98-99 and Criteria for Hazardous

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Waste Landfills, HAZWAMS/17/2000-01), and the conditions stipulated by SPCB/PCC


in the authorization to operate TSDF while granting consent to establish. Prior to the
placement of waste, an engineered capping over the surface should be placed after
completion of work daily so as to minimize the infiltration of rainfall.

The base liner and capping should be a composite system comprising compacted clay
layer and synthetic membrane as may be approved by the SPCB/PCC. A leachate
collection drainage system should be provided at the base of the landfill, immediately
above the liner to ensure that the head of leachate will not exceed 300 mm during any
season of the year.

A landfill design life comprises of an ‘active’ period and a ‘closure’ period. The ‘active’
period typically range from 10 to 25 years depending on the availability of land area.
the ‘closure and post-closure’ period for which a landfill should be monitored and
maintained should be 25 years after the ‘active period’ is completed.

However, it is recommended that a further detailed study be undertaken to finalise the


locations of landfill sites, which may vary depending upon the land ownership pattern
at identified sites.

Waste Volume and Landfill Capacity

The volume of waste to be placed in a landfill should be computed for the ‘active’
period of the landfill taking into account the current generation of water per annum and
the anticipated increase in rate of waste generation on the basis of past records or
population growth rate.

The required landfill capacity is significantly greater than the waste volume it
accommodates. The actual capacity of the landfill depends upon the volume occupied
by the liner system and the cover material (daily, intermediate and final cover) as well
as the compacted density of the waste. In addition, the amount of settlement a waste
will undergo due to overburden stress and due to bio-degradation should also be taken
into account.

The methodology for computing the landfill capacity, landfill area and landfill height is
as per the Manual for Solid Waste Management by CPHEEO and has been provided in
Annexure H.

The total landfill area should be approximately 15% more than the area required for
land filling to accommodate all infrastructure and support facilities as well as allow the
formation of a green belt around the landfill. There is no standard method for
classifying landfills by their capacity. Landfill heights are reported to vary from less than
5m to well above 30m.

The following objectives have to be considered in the design of an engineered


landfill:

• Minimization of the possibility of contamination of surface and/or groundwater.


• Control over gaseous emissions if any.
• Prevention and control of any other possible adverse impact(s) on the environment
• Utilization of excavated soil as cover material.
• Harvest of upstream rainwater flowing into the landfill.

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POKHARI

• Preferred use of clay with plasticity index between 10-30, which is well graded
having at least 30% passing through 75 micron. Clay fraction should be kept at
greater than 15% or more whereas gravel fraction should be < 50% of clay lining.
• Clay having clod size less than 50 mm should be compacted to optimum moisture
content using a sheep foot roller.

Placement of wastes into a landfill should be done judiciously as it may cause


impact(s) throughout the active life of the waste in the landfill. Therefore, waste
disposal into the landfill should be restricted as per the concentration limits/criteria20 for
acceptance of hazardous waste in landfill, besides the restrictions for waste placement
into landfill stipulated by the SPCB/PCC.

Placing bulk, containerized, or non-containerized liquid hazardous wastes containing


free liquids (whether or not adsorbents have been added) in any landfill should be
prohibited by SPCB/PCC.

Table No. 31
Capacity21 and Coverage of the Proposed Solid Waste System – JUA 2031

Sr Location of Area of Holding Areas Served Useable


no Solid Waste solid waste Capacity22 of till year
Management disposal / Site (cu.m) –
Site landfill site maximum
(Acres) height = 30m
1. Existing 10 950,165 Parts of JNAC
2010
Disposal serviced and

20
For detailed criteria refer to Annexure G
21
For detailed calculations of capacity and size of landfill sites, refer to Annexure H
22
For details, refer to Annexure H

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Sr Location of Area of Holding Areas Served Useable


no Solid Waste solid waste Capacity22 of till year
Management disposal / Site (cu.m) –
Site landfill site maximum
(Acres) height = 30m
Grounds of maintained by
JUSCO JUSCO
2. Roopamdih 30 2,850,496 Adityapur
2013
in Adityapur
3. Pokhari in 20 1,900,330 Mango
2013
Mango
4. Khairbani 40 3,800,661 JNAC, Jugsalai
and the other
areas of JUA
(Bagbera, Kitadih,
2013
Parsudih,
Sarjamdah,
Gadhra,
Chotagovindpur)

It is recommended that a detailed study be carried out for the final selection and area
of the site. Also, it is necessary to identify a long-term landfill site.

5.5.4 Investment Plan

In order to achieve the goals listed, the City will have to undertake the proposals
identified above. The cost of undertaking such actions are estimated and presented in
the table below:

Table No. 32
Investment Plan – Solid Waste management
No Activities Cost (Rs. Cr.) 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
A System Augmentation
Dumping Site - Landfill
management &
1 development 45.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50
Equipments (such as plant
dumper, excavator,
2 compactor, etc.) 35.00 3.50 12.25 12.25 7.00 - - -
Miscellaneous Works
including treatment plants,
3 offices, store, etc. 20.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00
TOTAL 100.00 10.00 25.25 25.25 20.00 6.50 6.50 6.50

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5.6 Traffic and Transportation

5.6.1 Regional Connectivity

Jamshedpur is strategically located in the regional context, being 137 Kms from
Ranchi, which is the administrative and business centre of the state of Jharkhand and
146 Kms from Dhanbad, which is the coal capital and one of the resource centres of
Jharkhand. Jamshedpur is also connected to Kolkata and Ranchi via the NH 33. Being
so located, Jamshedpur has a strong potential to be developed into the manufacturing
and industrial centre within the region, bringing in the opportunity of increased export
trade.

NATIONAL HIGHWAY 33 – CONNECTING NATIONAL HIGHWAY 33 – CONNECTING


RANCHI TO KOLKATA VIA JAMSHEDPUR RANCHI TO KOLKATA VIA JAMSHEDPUR

The key issue is the improvement of the regional connectivity between the three cities
of Jamshedpur, Ranchi and Dhanbad, as well as development of quality linkages
between the other cities of the state of Jharkhand. This will not only bring about
development to the city of Jamshedpur, but also to the over state of Jharkhand.

5.6.2 Transportation within JUA

In JUA, organizations like Municipal Councils, NHAI, PWD, State Highways, Indian
Railways, Interstate bus operators, private bus operators, etc are involved in planning
and operation of the traffic and transportation systems.

Internal Road in Jugsalai Municipal Area


Access Road to Jugsalai Municipal Area

The focus is on establishing the current status of transportation system and traffic
management in Jamshedpur. Inputs have been drawn from the Comprehensive Traffic
and Transportation Study for Jamshedpur city prepared by JUSCO in May 2005.
Reconnaissance surveys of the city were also taken up in consultations with concerned
authorities.

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The elements reviewed and assessed include:

• The road network


• Public transport/ mass transit
• Traffic management and circulation
• Inter-city bus transport & Intermediate public transport
• Parking
• Pedestrian facilities

Road leading from JNAC to Jugsalai Road leading to Jugsalai from JNAC

The road infrastructure has not expanded in line with increase in number of vehicles in
the city. In comparison to the increase in the population in the last five years, which
was 25%, the vehicle population has increased by 118% and the road network by 50%
to match it. With the projections indicating Jamshedpur’s population of about 20 Lakhs
by 2021 and 27 Lakhs by 2031, the road and transportation infrastructure has to not
only meet the existing demand but also cater to the demand that will be generated by
the increasing population. The total absence of Public Transport system has resulted
into the high growth of personal vehicles resulting into numerous bottlenecks in the
existing infrastructure.

Mode % of Total Vehicle


Kms
Two-wheelers 55
Car / Jeeps 30
Public Transportation/ Buses 15
- Buses 6
- 3-Wheelers 8
- Taxi/ Cabs 1
Total 100

5.6.3 Vehicle Population in Jamshedpur

There are more than 1.45 Lac, vehicle registered in Jamshedpur in the period of 2000-
06. The table given below indicates the growth trend in number of registered vehicles
in Jamshedpur. As per CAGR the growth rate of registered vehicles is around 14%.
Jamshedpur possibly has the highest vehicle ownership pattern with more than 400
vehicles per 1000 in comparison with its peer group cities of Dhanbad, Ranchi etc.
Major share and maximum growth is observed in the 4-wheelers at 21.94% CAGR and
2-wheelers at 15.8% CAGR during the past 5 years. This increase in 2-wheelers and

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4-wheelers indicates a growing dependence on privately owned transport in


Jamshedpur. The vehicular modal split indicates 75% of the total vehicles to be 2-
wheelers, followed by 4-wheelers at 13%, 3-wheelers at 6% and the rest constitutes
HMV/LMV of the total registered vehicles in the city.

Table No. 33
Vehicle Registration Figures – Jamshedpur

Total Number of Registered Annual Growth Rate


Sr. No Year
Vehicles (Cumulative) %
1 2000-01 15,315 -
2 2001-02 17,899 16.80
3 2002-03 22,619 26.40
4 2003-04 26,799 18.50
5 2004-05 29,684 10.77
6 2005-06 33,503 12.87
Source: District Transport Office (DTO), Jamshedpur.

5.6.4 Travel Characteristics

Mode of Travel

In the absence of public transportation system, the preferred mode of transport is two-
wheelers. Bicycles, Auto rickshaws, private bus service cater to transportation facility
on ad-hoc basis. Although the modal split between pedestrian, bicycle and bus was not
available, it was observed that due to a lack of public transport system, the residents of
Jamshedpur have been forced to seek their personal motorized transport. In this
motorized form the predominant mode of transport are the two wheelers and four
wheelers. While it was observed that a high percentage of the commuters especially in
non-JUSCO areas such as Mango, Jugsalai, Adityapur etc did not have footpath for
pedestrian traffic. This has resulted in pedestrians utilizing the existing roadway thus
causing flow of traffic to be disrupted and additionally contributing to human fatalities
by virtue of road accidents.

Traffic Mix

It was observed that over 50% of the population commutes by two wheelers and three
wheelers. The bicycles contribute heavily to the slow moving traffic due to absence of
dedicated lanes. Then the truck traffic destined to the industries gets mixed up with the
urban traffic creating a lot of problems. This indicates the mixing up of various modes
of travel on the major roads of the city adding further to the woes of congestion. This
problem is further enhanced by the absence of footpaths, which brings all the
pedestrians on the roads to add to further congestion and confusion.

Inter City Bus Transport

There is only one major inter-city bus terminal in the city located at Mango. It was
observed that passengers have an average waiting time of 45 minutes, which is
indicating the inadequacy with respect to the inter-city operations.

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Intermediate Public Transport (IPT)

The present bus system in the city is operated by private transporters offering poor
level of service to the commuters. This leads to majority of them switching over to other
modes of transport like auto rickshaws and 6-seaters. These are the only bridges
between public and private transport systems.

Some of the salient observations are:


• Maximum trips are made for work
• Maximum number of trips have trip length between 3-6 Km
• Majority of the IPT users are satisfied with travel cost, comfort and frequency of
IPT mode
• Average travel distance by IPT is 10 Km
• The predominant mode of IPT is the Auto rickshaw and mini buses. There are
very few organized auto rickshaw stands. As a result, these vehicles can be
seen parked in a haphazard manner almost everywhere on main commercial
roads.

5.6.5 Accidents in Jamshedpur

Based on the data available with DTO Jamshedpur, of the total number of accidents
recorded in the year 2005, 35.70% were fatal and 71.93% were non-fatal. The number
of accidents on the roads of Jamshedpur and the resulting casualties has been on the
rise during the last decade. It was observed that two wheelers and Heavy Motor
Vehicles account for maximum fatal and serious accidents followed by Light Motor
Vehicles and three wheelers. This clearly indicates the lack of traffic safety norms.

Table No. 34
Accident Statistics – Jamshedpur

Year Number of Number of Total Number of Injured


Fatal non-fatal accidents persons
accidents accidents dead
1996 128 328 456 135 428
1997 107 350 457 125 431
1998 129 368 497 132 605
1999 122 307 429 131 443
2000 95 333 428 109 364
2001 134 328 462 141 350
2002 146 303 449 155 436
2003 143 300 443 152 404
2004 146 269 415 160 361
2005 165 297 462 173 467
Source: District Transport Office (DTO), Jamshedpur.

5.6.6 Road Network

The two rivers Subarnarekha and Kharkai run through the city of Jamshedpur. The
planning of roads and their network is primarily based on this geographical set-up. In
the areas controlled by JUSCO, which was designed as part of the steel township in

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the early 1900, the flow of traffic is very smooth. This is a result of good transportation
planning which is reflected in the wide roads, boulevards and a lot of pavement space
for pedestrian movement. The other parts of the city, which mushroomed on its own
has no transportation planning and the road network is in total disarray. This led to
Jamshedpur being choked at both the entry points (Mango as well as Adityapur). The
total length of roads in the city is approximate by 328km, which includes 63km of
National Highways and State Highways.

Table No. 35
Road Lengths – JUA

Sr. No Road Type Length in Kms


1 National Highway 8.00
2 State Highway 55.00
3 City Arterial Road 113.65
4 Other Roads 151.35
Total Road Length 328.00
* This does not include the Kutcha roads in the newly added villages.
Developed based on inputs from agencies and site reconnaissance

The road network in the city is primarily radial and rectilinear / circumferential. The road
networks in the JUSCO area and the connecting road from Adityapur to Bistupur are
wide and have space for capacity increase. The problem lies in the connectivity over
both the rivers, which are now serviced by single bridges on each of the two rivers.

The core areas other than the JUSCO areas are severely congested and different
modes of transportation from pedestrian to heavy vehicles are in constant competition
for the limited road space. Congestion in traffic has further been aggravated in areas
such as Jugsalai and Mango by unauthorized and unplanned development with major
encroachment on the limited existing roadway. This has been further compounded by
the dumping of waste materials on the side of roads and the rivers by the
manufacturing companies.

Jamshedpur is the location of major steel manufacturing units and its ancillaries. All
these are being serviced by just one National Highway (NH- 33), which has two entry
points one is at Dimna Square, and the other at Pardih junction. Both of these access
roads to Jamshedpur converge at Mango and go through the same bridge, over river
Subarnarekha that adds to existing traffic of Mango to Jamshedpur.

The road network is further constrained by the railway line that runs along the central
ridge of the city. The area lying towards the east of the railway line is Jugsalai, which
has no entry points except the narrow railway under-bridge. The free flow of traffic in
the North & South are also disrupted by the manned railway crossings. Further the
geographical division of the city into three segments and the old city being at the centre
of these three segments led to a number of missing links for poor connectivity between
them. The inter city traffic also has to go through the traffic congestion in absence of
by- pass roads.

5.6.7 Road Condition

The length of roads maintained by notified area committees alone is about 265 km and
has an average width of less than 6 m (except JUSCO area). The road widths in the
central areas of the city are much lesser with high density traffic and concentration of

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residential population, commercial and institutional activities on both sides. This leaves
little scope for widening and strengthening of these roads to ease the congestion.
Further 2-wheelers and 3-wheelers have become preferred modes of transport in the
narrow alleys of the city, as the road widths do not allow bus transport to be feasible.
Such main roads in the core areas are Jugsalai road, Mango road, Jugsalai to Station
road etc.

Unauthorized hawkers further encroach upon the right of way of these roads.
Consequently, most of the roads in the city witness a continuous conflict between
various modes.

On a general note, the pavement condition of the radial arterial roads is good, which
however is not the same with respect to the other roads in the city. One of the prime
reasons for the poor condition of the roads in the city is non-availability and lack of
maintenance of proper drainage network along the roads to retain the quality of riding
surface during monsoon. Area Commities, to tide over this situation have started
concretising of important stretches of roads in the city. Though capital intensive, more
roads will need to be upgraded to concrete roads as the maintenance cost would be
low.

5.6.8 Traffic Management and Circulation

Supplemented to this situation, is the inadequate road network and congestion on the
roads leading to time delays at intersections. As part of its traffic management
initiatives, RTO and JUSCO have installed traffic signals at main squares in the city.
However, it has not been possible to control the traffic.

Intersections

The major intersections carrying high volumes of traffic and are the most critical with
respect to the overall transportation network of the city are:

• Dimna Chowk
• Pardih Chowk
• Timken Chowk
• Mango Chowk
• Jubilee park Stadium Junction
• Bistupur Chowk
• Sher-e-Punjab Chowk
• Bistupur (TISCO)
• Jugsalai Chowk
• Jugsalai RUB chowk
• Burma Mine
• Kalimata Chowk
• Golmuri Chowk
• Sakchi Chowk
• Tula Dongri
• Agrico
• Bus stand Chowk, Mango

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Parking

Organized street parking facilities are provided only in select locations in the city,
primarily due to lack of space. Parking lots are provided by JNAC (Jamshedpur
Notified Area Comity) at 3 locations in the city for 4-wheelers and 2-wheelers. These
parking lots have facilities with capacity about 200 (2-wheelers) and 50 (4-wheelers).
Lack of organized street parking facility has to be addressed immediately. Narrow
roads, inadequate organized parking, pedestrian traffic constitute the major reasons for
traffic congestion.

Street Lighting

The Jamshedpur Notified Area is serviced by JUSCO, providing the Tatanagar area
with adequate provision of streetlights. The other wards of the Jamshedpur Urban
Agglomeration do not have proper street lighting system. The electricity department
and the Local Body are the responsible agencies for installation, replacement, repairs,
operation and maintenance of the streetlights in the city.

Pollution

Do not have AAQMS to measure the pollutions level. The JNAC is depending on
TISCO for the data.
Slag from the steel manufacturing industries are dumped in different parts of the city in
an insensitive manner, which gives a bad impact on environmental health & safety
system and also on the future investment opportunities in the city. These slag need to
be recycled and used in many construction activities like pedestrians, paving, for river
side development, road works, etc but only after being treated adequately.

KEY ISSUES

At the overall city level, the level of provision of streetlights is not appropriate. The
authority needs to review the following issues related to the operation and
maintenance for improving the service further:

• Improve the coverage at ward level particularly in newly added areas


• Carrying out a detailed assessment of spacing and energy audit to assess the
power consumption and implement efficient automatic switching operations as
energy cost will be very high for this level of service and also need to explore
solar lighting.
• Absence of functional hierarchy of road network resulting in inter-mixing of local
and regional traffic
• Narrow roads in the central and core areas of the city with restricted capacity
adds to the congestion problems
• Inadequate manned level crossing leading to travel delays and lack of road
safety
• Poor road surface quality and absence of appropriate safety and visibility
enhancement parameters like sign boards for both traffic and street markings,
channel islands, and other street furniture (except the area controlled by
JUSCO)
• It was observed that only 20% of the roads have footpaths and most of the
existing ones are encroached upon by informal activities and street hawkers
• Absence of access control measures and other such traffic management
measures on the arterial roads

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• Absence of public transport system


• Inadequate number of parking lots.
• Lack of civic sense towards traffic and poor traffic behaviour is widespread
• Lack of coordination among agencies involved in planning of traffic and
transportation
• Absence of intelligent traffic signal system
• No monitoring of traffic
• Absence of ring road and separate connectivity to industries.

5.6.9 On – Going Projects

The growth plan for roads is a priority project for PEC (Planning, Engineering &
Construction) division of JUSCO. Under this scheme the total road infrastructure of the
town is to be upgraded with widening of major roads, strengthening of road surface,
improvement of junction geometry, beautification of road flanks, etc. The activity has
been phased on a need-based prioritization. The first phase is already complete and
the second phase is on the anvil.

On going widening of roads by JUSCO –PHASE 2

• Slag Road (Slag Gate to Bhuiyadih)


• H.S.M. Gate to Tube Island
• Tube Island to Golmuri
• Golmuri to NML Agrico
• NML to Bhuiyadih Bridge
• Bhuiyadih Bridge to Mango Bridge Bara Road to NML Plates-Tata Ryerson
• Dindli Road and Anil Sur Path
• Pipeline Road, Sakchi
• Outer Circle Road, South Park, Bistupur
• Subarnarekha Link Road
• E & F Road, Bistupur
• Outer Peripheral Road along river Kharkai
• Approach Road to ROB, Burmamines
• Gwala Basti near ISWP
• Beldih Lake road
• Walkers Track in K S Link Road

5.6.10 Development Proposals

The strategies for traffic and transportation in the city are in accordance with the
conclusions drawn in the present infrastructure analysis carried out earlier in the report
and as per the suggestions of the citizens, elected representatives and the other
stakeholders involved in the entire City Development. The strategies aim at covering
the entire area and population of the city with an effective road network by 2011, as
well as improving the surface condition of the roads by 2021.

Up-gradation is proposed for the existing kuccha roads and other such roads in the
jurisdiction and proposal for widening and strengthening of identified road stretches in
the town. A Comprehensive Traffic and Transportation Study with Traffic Management
System is suggested to be undertaken for Jamshedpur City.

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THE GOAL

Total connectivity with main emphasis laid down to mass transportation and ample
parking space

DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES

• Promote public transport by developing dedicated bus lane system, focus on


cycle tracks and footpaths
• Explore private participation options
• Discourage private vehicle usage by imposing parking fees and declare busy
areas/old city bazaars as vehicle free zones
• Segregation of modes of transportation
• Implement computerized signalling for better traffic management

ACTION PLAN

• Intelligent Traffic management system


• Dedicated bus lane, which eventually gets upgraded to Rapid Bus Transit
System
• Revaluation of am-pm peak based on factory shift timings
• Footpath for pedestrians

• Development of under bypasses, flyovers and bridges
• Development of ring road to connect the areas
• Development of new road links

PROPOSALS

REGIONAL CONNECTIVITY

As per the Industrial Policy of the State of Jharkhand, the State Government intends to
set up an SEZ along Jamshedpur - Ranchi National Highway corridor in the area lying
within a distance of 5 Kms on both sides. The State intends this development to act as
a catalyst, enabler and enhancer to promote maximum activities through private
participation. The high quality-supporting infrastructure development at the SEZ would
greatly enhance the investment and economic development of the region. With such
development envisaged by the State government, the position of Jamshedpur in the
regional context becomes very important.

AIADA has a proposal of setting up a SEZ (area 90Acres) in Ramchandrapur in


Adityapur, approximately 2 Kms from the Kandra chowk on the Kandra-Gamharia
Road.

INTER-CITY TRANSPORTATION

The maintenance and development of the road network, traffic management, public
transportation, management of truck operations, etc is to be maintained by the
respective Notified Area Committees.

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MISSING LINK DEVELOPMENT

While the construction of the main entry point to NH-33 has led to decongestion of
several internal roads of the city from regional traffic, there still are several missing
links in the inner and outer ring roads.

• River Bridge: - Parallel to Kharkai bridge (Entry point of Adityapur), At Hurlung


and Barabaki on Subarnarekha, Near Bagbera, Near Kadma, At Dumuhani
near Sonari to reduce the traffic conjunction at Mango and Adityapur entry point
and develop the vacant areas in planned way and which will beneficial for
relocation etc

• Ring road: - Required to connect all areas Mango-Jugsalai-Adityapur-


Chotagovindpur etc into loop to divert the traffic and reduce fatalities.

• Traffic Signals: - Near Mango Stand, Near Mango Bridge Square, Sakchi
Square, Between Sakchi Square and Kinan Stadium, Golmuri Square, Two
signals at Gopal Maidan, at Diagonal Square Pardih Square, Dimna Square
etc.

RING ROAD

The development of the Ring Road is the most important aspect required to increase
the connectivity amongst the different areas of the JUA as well as to reduce the traffic
congestion of the existing areas of Adityapur, Jugsalai, Mango, Jamshedpur Notified
Area and other parts of the Jamshedpur block included in JUA. The proposed
alignment of the ring road has been shown in the following diagram. An initial survey of
the areas through which the proposed Ring Road is expected to pass, provides us with
two alternative routes for the proposed Ring Road.

Option – 1:

The proposed alignment of the Ring Road is envisaged to start from NH-33 at Pipla at
the eastern end of the JUA boundary, passing through Hurlung, Barabaki, Dhanchatari,
Chotagovindpur, Rugraidih, Padamdih, Sundernagar, Haldubani, Karandih, Parsudih,
Kuluptanga, Gamharia, Kandra, Palgam (approx. 12km from Kandra), meeting the NH-
33 at Chowka (16km from Kandra). The distance between Chowka and Pipla along the
NH-33 is approximately 54 Kms.

The Dimna chowk on the NH-33, which is presently the main entry to Jamshedpur, is
at a distance of 6 Kms from the Pipla crossing of the Ring Road on NH-33. This route
includes a ghat section (hilly terrain) of approximately 4Kms (starting at a distance of
approximately 7Kms from Kandra), which is a challenging part of the Ring Road due to
the expected movement of multi axle vehicles on this road.

Two new bridges, which are the bridges on the Subarnarekha River at Hurlung-
Barabaki, and that on the Kharkai River at Kuluptanga, form a part of this route. The
Ring Road crosses the railway line at two places. One crossing is at Chotagovindpur in
the east, which is presently a level crossing and need to be developed into a RUB
(Railway under Bridge) crossing. The other crossing is at Adityapur, which is an
existing RUB crossing and needs to be upgraded as per the development of the Ring
Road. The proposed Ring Road follows the existing Kandra-Gamharia Road for a
distance of almost 22 Kms, starting from almost 750m to the west of Adityapur
Polytechnic Institute, till the junction where it turns to the north going towards Kandra.

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The overall length of the Ring Road (inclusive of the length of the NH-33 from Chowka
to Pipla crossings) is approximately 113 Kms, which can be finalized only after a
detailed survey of the proposed alignment route.

Option – 2:

The second alternative for the proposed Ring Road alignment is same as that
mentioned in option – 1 from Pipla to Kandra. The route changes from Kandra, which
crosses the river Subarnarekha at Chandil, and meets the NH-33 at Chandil chowk.
The advantages of this route via Chandil are as follows:

• The route includes a very small portion of ghat section (hilly terrain), which is
less steep than the one involved in the Kandra – Chowka route.
• The total length of the Ring Road reduces by almost 25 Kms.
• There is an existing newly constructed bridge (two-lane) over the Subarnarekha
River at Chandil, which can be upgraded as per the requirement of the
proposed Ring Road.

The total length of the Ring Road (inclusive of the length of the NH-33 from Chandil to
Pipla crossings) is approximately 88 Kms, which can be finalized only after a detailed
survey of the proposed alignment route.

Option 1 Option 2

NH-33 & PROPOSED RING ROAD


OTHER NEW ROADS
RIVER
RIVER BRIDGE

ELEVATED ROAD
TRANSPORT HUB

PROPOSED ROAD FROM NH33 TO ADITYAPUR

A four-lane road is proposed from NH33 to Adityapur through Sonari to meet the
industrial infrastructure needs of the city. The proposed road is planned to take a new
alignment starting from NH33 after the Kali-temple Ghat section (near to the city inn
restaurant). It will then move round the hill section towards Domuhani where the two
rivers Subarnarekha and Kharkai merge near Sonari. The alignment has a total of 5.5
km of four-lane dual carriageway with a 25m long four-laned culvert at the stat point.
This road is joined to Sonari, with the existing slag road by the proposed four-lane

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bridge of around 300m and nd


proceeds towards Adityapur
through another new four-laned
bridge of 200m. Another 1.5 km
of new alignment of is needed,
before it junctions with Bistupur-
Adityapur road near the
Adityapur industrial area. The
total stretch is of 11.5 km length
with 4.5 km of existing road.

ROAD
ROAD BYPASS TO
DECONGEST JUGSALAI

The area within Jugsalai is very


congested. As a measure for
decongesting the given location,
a new bypass is proposed,
connecting to the main ring road
on one side, passing over the
railway line at another ROB
location and finally meeting near
the Jugsalai roundabout on the
other side.

RAILWAY UNDERPASS IN JUGSALAI

Jugsalai is connected to Jamshedpur Notified Area at two points; one is a RUB and the
other a railway level crossing. The road having the RUB, along the railway corridor
should be considered for widening and subsequent development of a railway
underpass. Also it is proposed to divert the movement of HMV from this road to the
proposed bypass.

FOUR LANING OF BRIDGES

The existing bridges at Mango (across Subarnarekha River) and Adityapur entry
(across Kharkai River) are very congested and would need immediate capacity
augmentation. It is proposed to develop new bridges parallel to the existing bridges.

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FLYOVER ON NH 33

It is proposed that the urban section of NH33 is elevated to flyover the Dimna and
Pardih Chowks. This bridge will facilitate through traffic to move up, leaving the road
space below for local movements.

TRANSPORT HUB

It is proposed to develop two truck terminals (one near Kandra Chowk and one near
Pipla where the bypass will take off from the NH 33. These will have a capacity to
handle about 1,000 trucks.

TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT

This shall include modification of junctions, provision of signals, provision of good road
signage and markings, organisation of parking and enforcement of traffic rules.

JUNCTION IMPROVEMENT PROPOSALS

The control measures at various major junctions of the city are assessed. Most of the
junctions exceed its design capacity and is to be renovated. The following table
presents the existing and the proposed mechanisms.

Table no 36
Summary of Junction Improvement Proposals

Sr.
No Name Of Junction Proposed Mechanism
1 TIMKEN Chowk Roundabout with signalisation
2 Mango Chowk Signalization
3 Jubilee park Stadium Junction Signalization
4 Bistupur Chowk Signalisation
5 Adityapur Chowk Signalisation
Bistupur (next to the entrance of TISCO Redesign of Roundabout and
6 factory) signalization
7 Jugsalai Chowk Redesign of Roundabout
8 Jugsalai RUB Chowk Redesign of Roundabout
9 Burma Mine Signalized Intersection
10 Kalimatha Chowk Signalization
Redesign of Roundabout with
11 Golmuri Chowk Channelisation
12 Sakchi Chowk Traffic Calming Measures
13 Agrico Chowk Re design
14 Dimna Chowk Slip line and Channelisation

BUS BASED TRANSIT SYSTEM

In order to facilitate easy movement of work force to and from their residence and in
order to reduce their dependence on the private transport, it is proposed that a bus
based transit system be introduced for intra city travel.

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5.6.11 Investment Plan

The investment requirement for carrying out the works listed are as below:

Table No. 37
Investment Plan – Traffic & Transport
No. Activities Cost 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013
A Road W ideninng
Pardhi to Mango - 3.5km
Sonari to South West Kadma - 4.5km
South West Kadma to Bistupur
Sections of Kalimati Road
Sub Total 39.00 5.00 22.00 12.00
B New Roads
NH 33 to Adityapur through Sonari
Jugsalai Riverfront road
Sub Total 83.75 18.125 65.625
C Other Roads
Ring Road 105.00 25.00 60.00 20.00
Jugsalai Bypass including ROB 17.50 10 7.5
Railway Underpass expansion 20.00 10 10
Mango and Adityapur Bridge Widening 50.00 25 25
NH 33 elevated bridge between Pardhi and 310.00 125 125 60
Sub Total 502.50 - - 195.00 227.50 80.00 - -
D Transport Hub Development
Truck terminal 2.00 2
Bus Terminals 4.00 2 2
Sub Total 6.00 - - 4.00 2.00 - - -
E New River Bridges
Near Hurlung and Barbaki 25.00 2.50 12.50 7.50 2.50
Near Domukhani near Sonari 25.00 2.50 12.50 7.50 2.50
Near West Kadma 25.00 2.50 12.50 7.50 2.50
Near Adityapur 25.00 2.50 12.50 7.50 2.50
Sub Total 100.00 - 10.00 50.00 30.00 10.00 - -
F Traffic Improvement
Construction of Pathways, footpaths 1.00 0.20 0.15 0.15 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.20
Parking Lots 10.00 5.00 5.00
Street Lighting, street furniture 3.00 0.30 0.60 0.45 0.45 0.45 0.30 0.45
Junction Improvements 8.00 2.00 4.00 2.00
Traffic Management 25.00 2.50 5.00 3.75 3.75 3.75 3.75 2.50
Sub Total 47.00 3.00 7.75 13.35 11.30 4.30 4.15 3.15
H Bus Transit System
Procurement of buses and creation of bus 100.00 50.00 50.00
Sub Total 100.00 - 50.00 50.00 - - - -
TOTAL (A to H) 878.25 8.00 89.75 324.35 288.93 159.93 4.15 3.15

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5.7 Investment Plan for Urban Infrastructure

The total outlay required for revamping and developing the urban infrastructure for the
city is as follows:

Table No. 38
Capital Investment on Urban Infrastructure

Activities Cost (Rs. Cr.) 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013
Urban Infrastructure
Water Supply 625.53 39.01 125.17 176.78 111.96 92.29 79.29 1.04
Sewerage System 307.27 13.98 259.59 103.77 56.68 38.36 34.91 -
Storm Water Drainage
System 161.24 12.87 56.77 31.47 26.40 16.21 11.97 7.03
Solid Waste Management
System 100.00 10.00 25.25 25.25 20.00 6.50 6.50 6.50
Traffic & Transportation 878.25 8.00 89.75 324.35 288.93 159.93 4.15 3.15
TOTAL 2,072.29 83.86 556.53 661.62 503.97 313.29 136.82 17.72

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5.7 Investment Plan for Urban Infrastructure

The total outlay required for revamping and developing the urban infrastructure for the
city is as follows:

Table No. 38
Capital Investment on Urban Infrastructure

No Activities Cost (Rs. Cr.) 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013
1 Urban Infrastructure
2 Water Supply 622.03 39.01 125.17 176.78 111.96 92.29 79.29 1.04
3 Sewerage System 307.27 13.98 259.59 103.77 56.68 38.36 34.91 0.00

4 Storm Water Drainage System 161.24 12.87 56.77 31.47 26.40 16.21 11.97 7.03
Solid Waste Management
5 System 100.00 10.00 25.25 25.25 20.00 6.50 6.50 6.50
6 Traffic & Transportation 878.25 8.00 89.75 324.35 288.93 159.93 4.15 3.15
TOTAL 2,068.79 83.86 556.53 661.62 503.97 313.29 136.82 17.72

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

6 URBAN POOR AND SLUMS................................................................................................86


6.1 EXISTING SITUATION .........................................................................................................86
6.2 POVERTY IN JAMSHEDPUR .................................................................................................86
6.3 SLUMS IN JUA ...................................................................................................................86
6.4 GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SLUMS ...........................................................................89
6.5 DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS ...............................................................................................89
6.6 INVESTMENT PLAN ............................................................................................................90

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6 URBAN POOR AND SLUMS

6.1 Existing Situation

This section deals with the access of slums and urban poor1 in Jamshedpur to basic
services, drawing from secondary information and interactions with stakeholders. It also
reviews past and present programs for service delivery to urban poor in the city. The aim
is to identify key issues in service delivery to the poor in Jamshedpur and arrive at key
issues and suggest strategies that would enable to address the issues and fulfil its
mandate of providing basic services to the poor in the city.

The city of Jamshedpur has experienced a steady growth in the population in the last 3
decades. The city’s population grew at an average growth rate of 36.40% per cent to 11
Lakhs (as per the 2001 census). Along with which the housing needs of the city too grew,
which the formal housing market could not satisfy. Several immigrated households who
could not avail of the formal housing market satisfied their need by occupying vacant land
and this led to a simultaneous increase in the slum population. The concentration of
employment opportunities in Jamshedpur urban area attracts several migrant labourers to
the city. Such migrants due to their low level of income are unable to afford the pucca
houses and end up in occupying vacant government/private land.

6.2 Poverty in Jamshedpur

As such no recent studies are available about the extent of poverty levels in Jamshedpur
and other wards, but the discussion with stakeholders reveal that the poverty levels are
very low and that the only concern is security of land tenure, quality of housing and access
to basic infrastructure. It could be true that absolute poverty as per the general definition
may not exist in some areas, except a small section of people who lack even housing and
other amenities can be categorized as urban poor. But if other parameters of urban
poverty like housing, access to better sanitation facilities and capability to function in the
society are considered, and then almost all slum dwellers can be categorized as urban
poor.

6.3 Slums in JUA

The following shows the slum population in all the wards of the study area.

1
Definition of urban poor in India: People who live on less than RS 559 per month (in Urban areas).

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Table No. 39
Population in Slums

Sr. Total Area Total Slum Slum


Ward Name
No. (Sq Km) Population Population Population %
1 Adityapur Notified Area 49.00 1,19,233 40,000 33.54
2 Jamshedpur Notified Area 56.32 6,08,768 60,876 10.00
3 Mango 18.03 1,66,091 13,428 8.08
4 Jugsalai 1.29 46,114 8,250 17.89
5 Chotagovindpur 2.63 24,781 421 1.70
6 Kitadih 1.75 14,020 1,518 10.82
7 Bagbera 2.24 16,493 1,527 9.26
8 Sarjamdah 2.53 18,385 3,066 16.67
9 Parsudih 3.59 18,197 2,176 11.95
10 Haldubani 3.83 19,029 747 3.93
11 Ghorabandha 3.23 14,724 925 6.28
12 Gadhra 4.79 15,767 1,425 9.04

Total 149.22 10,82,412 134,359 12.41 %

Location of Slum Areas in JUA

The name of the major slum pockets in the city are given below:

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JNAC
1. Bhuiyadih
2. Nirmal Nagar Pipe Basti
3. Ramdeo Bagan Golmuri
4. Sundari Basti
5. Parbatghat
6. Bajrang Nagar
7. Gwala Basti
8. Kumharpara
9. New Baradwari
10. Dev Nagar Baradwari
11. Millat Nagar
12. Gandhi Ashram
13. Tatanagar foundry
14. Kanchan Nagar
15. Gemco Chowk
16. Birsagarh
17. Chunabhatta Burmamines
18. Bagunhatu
19. Subhash Ashram
20. Hindkustha Ashram
21. Shree Ram Ashram
22. Chaya Nagar
23. Jahira Colony
24. Kusumpur
25. Bage Basti
26. Indra Nagar
27. Ramadhin Bagan
28. Shyam Nagar
29. Ram Nagar
Total 76 Basti

Jugsalai
1. Garibnawaj Colony
2. Islam Nagar

Mango (Under Mango Adhisuchruta Kchetra Samity)


1. Pardih Indra Colony
2. Dimna Basti Jharkhand Colony
3. Kutkut Dungri Basti
4. Purana Ulidih
5. Bali Guma
6. New Ulidih Harijan Basti
7. Daigutu Bagansahi Jakur Nagar

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Adityapur
1. Ichchapur
2. Kuluptanga
3. Sampra
4. Uttamdih
5. Saldih
6. Banta Nagar
7. Bandi
8. Krishnapur
9. Tentuldanga

The observations are made depending upon the data available.

KEY ISSUES

• The Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration has approximate 12.4%slum population.


• The largest slum population amongst the study wards area exists in Adityapur. The
slum population percentage is around 33.54%.
• Jugsalai has 8250 slum population contributing some 18% of slum population.
• Mango has 8% of slum population
• Jamshedpur area has nearly 5% of slum population.
• More Slum improvement and development schemes are required like VAMBAY
near Burma mines for urban poor and physically handicapped people.

6.4 General Characteristics of Slums

The following observations are derived from discussion with officials and stakeholders.
Large numbers of slums are located along the riverbed, and other environmental sensitive
areas. In addition slums are located on lands belonging to government, defence
department and reserved lands for crucial purposes and would require to be relocated.

Employment: A majority of the working population in slums works as factory workers or


labourers in construction, daily wagers, and home-based small businesses.

6.5 Development Proposals

For Slums’ improvement, as part of JNNURM’s strategy to improve the economic


conditions in the slums and thereby avoid the existence of the very name ‘Slum’ in the city,
various development works and improvement programs are being proposed. The
components identified to be implemented under this sector include rehabilitation/ housing,
infrastructure creation and acquiring land for the purpose.

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THE GOAL

Upgradation and improvement of slum areas and provision of basic infrastructure facilities
to the urban poor.

DEVELOPMENT STRATERGIES

• Rehabilitation of existing slum dwellers, inclusive of hilltop, hill slope and river bank
slum dwellers
• Improve the accessibility of education and health facilities for urban poor
• Low rise high density projects to be promoted under SRA project
• 10% for development of any new housing stock for future migrants on
rental/ownership basis.
• Registration and Regulation of all workers in the informal sector
• Declare certain areas as hawker zones and make them vehicle free movement

ACTION PLAN

• Relocation of Slums in the city.


• Slum Rehabilitation Programme
• Awareness Campaign in Slum

6.6 Investment Plan

In order to improve the access of urban poor to the civic facilities and in order to move
towards a slum free city, the following expenditures will have to be made.

Table No. 40
Investment Plan – Basic Services to Urban Poor
No Activities Cost 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
(Rs. Cr.)
BASIC INFRASTRUCTURE TO
POOR
1 Provision of water taps 4.00 2.00 2.00 - - - - -
2 Water connection coverage 7.50 - - 2.50 2.50 2.50 - -
3 Provision of public toilets 10.00 - 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 -
4 Rehabilitation, community facilities 120.00 10.00 20.00 30.00 30.00 30.00 - -

TOTAL 141.50 12.00 24.00 34.50 34.50 34.50 2.00 -

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

7 URBAN ENVIRONMENT, TOURISM AND HERITAGE ............................................ 91


7.1 EXISTING SITUATION.............................................................................................. 91
7.2 DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS ................................................................................... 92
7.3 INVESTMENT PLAN ................................................................................................. 93

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7 URBAN ENVIRONMENT, TOURISM AND HERITAGE

7.1 Existing Situation

Jamshedpur is India's first planned industrial town and a very cosmopolitan city. Whilst
JUSCO is maintaining the area under their control, the areas outside are not really taken
care of due to want of funds by the Notified Area Committees.

The city has many well planned recreational spots. The main ones among those are:

Jubilee Park: A park developed by Tata Steel to commemorate its Golden Jubilee. This is
spread over 200 acres and has flower beds, illuminated fountains etc.

Dalma Wildlife Sanctuary: This is mainly an elephant sanctuary. One can also see other
wild life including barking deer, sloth bears, porcupines, leopards, tigers, etc.. The steep
slopes of Dalma Hills are also a trekker's delight.

Tata Steel Zoological Park: Located only a few kilometres away from the Tata Steel Plant
is the Zoo, which houses a variety of animals and birds. The Safari Park in the zoo
enables visitors to take a drive through a wooded area where animals roam free and
uncaged. A visit to the Nature Education Centre, boat rides in the Jubilee Lake or walks in
the Nature Trail are the unique outlets to relax. The co-existence of wild life in close
proximity to the Steel Plant is an evidence of the excellent balance of industry with nature.

KEY ISSUES

• The air pollution and water pollution are the biggest challenges faced by the city
administration.

• The untreated wastes from the industries as well as a large part of other wastes of the
city are disposed off into the rivers

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• The industrial wastewater from the industries of Tatanagar, is discharged directly into
the Kharkai River without prior treatment. This waste water is discharged via two
nalahs, namely the Garam Nalah passing through JNAC area, and the Tezab Nalah
passing through Jugsalai, leading to very high level of river pollution. In order to avoid
river pollution this wastewater needs to be treated before it gets discharged in the
river.

7.2 Development Proposals

The overall development of the city is directly related to the city environmental conditions.
The city of Jamshedpur and its surroundings have a number of natural water bodies, rivers
(Subarnarekha & Kharkai) as well as a number of large green open spaces, which
presently are in a state of negligence and used as garbage dumping grounds. These open
spaces in and around the city needs to be developed as public recreational spaces, both
to provide the citizens with recreational spaces as well as to upgrade the environmental
condition of the city.

THE GOAL

To enhance for clean and environment friendly Jamshedpur city

DEVELOPMENT STRATERGIES

Preparation of existing detail inventory of the level of air & water pollution of the city at
various locations.

ACTION PLAN

On the basis of analysis, the action plan to be formulated for all the water bodies in the city
to check the pollution levels and measures towards the maintenance and revitalization
should be carried out.

PROPOSALS

Riverfront Development

The riverbanks of the Subarnarekha and Kharkai Rivers are to be developed into active
and passive recreation spaces for the citizens of Jamshedpur, which will enrich the city’s
(lung) open space qualitatively and quantitatively. The riverfront should be developed into
a landscaped promenade, balanced with hard and soft landscaping, so as to enable the
spaces to serve a dual purpose of being a space for leisure as well as a space for public
gatherings and cultural programmes. Certain areas need to be rehabilitated to make
riverfront open to public, for which some area should be identified and rehabilitation
scheme needs to be implemented. Rehabilitation of the slum settlements along the
Subarnarekha River to suitable locations of the city is very necessary for the subsequent

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development of the riverfront. Development of the Subarnarekha riverfront into a public


promenade will subsequently lead to the environmental upgradation of the city as well as
improvement of the cityscape.

The Kharkai riverfront around Jugsalai also should be developed into a public open space,
which will not only provide the over congested area of Jugsalai as public open space, but
will also result in environmental Upgradation of the Kharkai River. The junction of the
‘Tezab Nala’ with the Kharkai River, which presently has turned into a dumping ground,
needs special attention during the development process.

There are possibilities of developing water sports centres along the river. Likely locations
are near Tata filtering plant and Domuhani (Sonari). This could be combined with the
promenade development.

Provision of Sluice Gates

While developing the promenade, the nallahs joining the rivers will also be provided with
one-way sluice gates to prevent river water getting into the Nalah.

Tourism Development

In order to develop tourism potential of the city, a ropeway could be constructed from
Dimna Lake to Dalma Pahar (Hills) (approx. 2km).

7.3 Investment Plan

The investment plan for undertaking the above works are as follows:

Table No. 41
Investment Plan – Environment etc.

No Activities Cost 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013


(Rs. Cr.)
Environment & Heritage
1 River front protection,
embankment
2 Sluice gates on nallahs
3 Provision of ghats, development of
water sports centre
4 Ropeway between Dimna Lake
and Dalma Pahar

TOTAL 30.00 - - 10.00 10.00 10.00 - -

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

8 URBAN AMENITIES .............................................................................................................94


8.1 EXISTING SITUATION .........................................................................................................94
8.1.1 Educational Facilities ...............................................................................................94
8.1.2 Recreational Facilities ..............................................................................................95
8.1.3 Sports Facilities.........................................................................................................95
8.1.4 Health Facilities ........................................................................................................96
8.2 DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS ...............................................................................................97
8.3 INVESTMENT PLAN ............................................................................................................98

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8 URBAN AMENITIES

8.1 Existing Situation

8.1.1 Educational Facilities

Jamshedpur has very high level of literacy and is comparable with the highest in the
country. The Steel City has as many as 183 schools and 13 colleges. Of these, 25 schools
and one inter-college are managed by JUSCO Education Department; they cater to over
thirty thousand children. The major institutes are:

XLRI: The prestigious Institute for Business Management and Labour Studies
conducts two-year post-graduate courses in Business Management and PM&IR. It
also has a three-year post-graduate Evening Programme in Business
Management, tailor-made for professionals working in Jamshedpur.

National Institute of Technology: The NIT offers graduate and post-graduate


degree courses in engineering. Noted for metallurgy and civil engineering, it also
conducts part-time courses for those employed in local industries.

Shavak Nanavati Technical Institute: The over 75-year old institute, though
initially set up to cater to the requirements of Tata Steel, is now open to
professionals from other industries.

National Metallurgical Laboratory: Set up in 1946, the National Metallurgical


Laboratory (NML) marked the beginning of metallurgical research in India. Since its
inception, NML has been making significant contributions to the development of the
metallurgical industry (ferrous, non-ferrous and alloys, and materials and
engineering components) in the country. NML aims at excellence in research on
properties of materials and the application of its results for the benefit of industry
and society.

R D Tata Technical Education Centre: The centre aims to improve the quality of
technical education and to cater to the requirements of industries in the region.

MGM Medical College & Hospital: Undergraduate MBBS and post-graduate


diploma and degree courses in selected subjects are conducted here. The college
is also associated with the Tata Main Hospital.

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8.1.2 Recreational Facilities

Tagore Society: The society's five branches across the city and the Rabindra
Bhawan under it trains students up to Standard VII in fine arts, music, dance and
crafts.

Nritya Kala Kendra: The Kendra is open to students interested in learning vocal
and instrumental music. It is affiliated to the Prayag Sangeet Samiti, Allahabad and
Bhatkhande Sangeet Vidyapith, Lucknow.

Tata Auditorium: The Tata Auditorium at XLRI has witnessed numerous artists,
academicians and litterateurs of national and international fame and hosted
prestigious seminars and conferences of international stature.

Tribal Culture Centre: The TCC showcases the ethos of our indigenous peoples. It
also imparts vocational training and organizes tribal festivals and cultural
programmes to preserve and rejuvenate dwindling cultures.

Laser & Musical Fountain Show: A unique combination of dazzling lights and
fountains, the show is the first of its kind in India. Inspired by the musical fountains
and laser installation at Sentosa Island, Singapore, the show has been set up by
JUSCO. A glimpse of the colourful beams of light and the musical fountain with a
varied combination of 96 water jets leaves a mesmerizing effect on the minds of
visitors.

Jubilee Amusement Park: The park has redefined entertainment in the Steel City.
A special gift to the children of Jamshedpur, the amusement park provides
entertainment that is available in far away metros only. The green hillocks and the
water body provide a wonderful ambience for an outing where games like whirling
in the wind, dashing cars, rolling till the moon, derby riding, caterpillar ride and a
75-meter slide can be enjoyed.

8.1.3 Sports Facilities

Sports are 'a way of life' at Tata Steel and Jamshedpur's reputation as the sports
capital of Jharkhand is a consequence of this philosophy. Under the close
supervision of skilled coaches, training is imparted to sports persons to excel at
national and international level competitions.

Keenan Stadium: This cricket stadium has been acknowledged by many visiting
cricket teams as one of the finest in the country.

Sumant Moolgaonkar Stadium: This 10,000-seating capacity stadium in Tata


Motors colony has hosted many national and state athletic meets.

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JRD Tata Sports Complex: This sports complex has an international standard
football ground and an eight-lane monosynthetic track. The Tata Chess Centre,
ladies fitness gymnasium and the Tata Archery Academy are also based here.
Facilities for handball, tennis, volleyball, hockey, basketball, boxing, table tennis
and a modern gymnasium are available at the complex. The sports hostel at the
complex can comfortably accommodate over 500 persons.

Tata Steel Adventure Foundation: An umbrella organization, it manages adventure


activities for Tata Steel employees, their families and residents of Jamshedpur.
The foundation arranges wide variety of adventure sports, such as rock climbing,
river rafting, parasailing, etc.

Water sports: Dimna lake has facilities for thrilling water sports. There is choice
between speedboats, rowboats, paddleboats, and water scooters. Fitness freaks
can get their highs by rowing sleek Canadian Canoes and Kayaks.

Horse Riding: Horse riding is a royal sport and a must for everyone to learn and
enjoy. For saddle fanatics, Tata Steel Officers' Beach Club offers the elegant
exercise of horse riding at its Riding School in the heart of Jamshedpur.

Gliding & Flying Club: The Jamshedpur Gliding Club, the Jamshedpur Co-
operative Flying Club and Tatanagar Aviation offer wide scope for 'extra-terrestrial'
sporting activities, such as gliding and flying.

Recreation Clubs: Jamshedpur's numerous private clubs provide opportunities for


a variety of sporting activities, such as golf, tennis, squash, billiards, swimming
pool, etc.

Tata Football Academy: India’s first football academy has an ultra-modern


gymnasium and imparts training based on international techniques to budding
footballers.

8.1.4 Health Facilities

Government health facilities in Jamshedpur are inadequate to serve such a large


population. Disease and high infant mortality is common in the industry town.
However a number of hospitals, health care centres, and clinics are being operated
by TATA group providing the people with effective and affordable family welfare
services.

The Tata Memorial Centre is the national comprehensive cancer centre for the
prevention, treatment, education and research in Cancer and is recognised as one
of the leading cancer centres in this part of the world.

A few of the hospitals present in Jamshedpur are the ADM Hospital, Jamshedpur
Government Hospital, Guru Nanak Hospital and research Centre, Kantilal Gandhi

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Memorial Hospital, MGM College & Hospital, Meherbai Tata Memorial Hospital,
Tata Main Hospital, Telco Main Hospital, Singhbhum Homeopathy College
Hospital, Jamshedpur Eye Hospital, etc. A number of private nursing homes and
clinics also provide health services to the citizens of Jamshedpur.

KEY ISSUES

• Most of the social and recreational facilities are concentrated at one part of the
entire JUA, and are located mostly in the areas maintained by JUSCO.
• There is a very high disparity amongst the urban landscape throughout the JUA;
the JUSCO maintained areas being of the best condition.
• The facilities and their accessibility to the people of JUA is very disproportionate.

8.2 Development Proposals

THE GOAL

To decentralize and provide amenities and recreational facilities for all and enhance for
self sustain neighborhood/ cluster in different parts of the city.

DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES

• Greening of the City by developing public parks and gardens, street side
plantation, etc.
• Riverfront development including improvement of river ghats
• Up gradation of religious and heritage structures/ precincts
• Removal of encroachment along roads
• Development of shopping facilities such as shopping malls, markets, haat-bazaars,
etc. for improving the quality of life
• Social and Recreational Facilities such as Theaters, community centers, banquet
halls, sports stadium, libraries, etc.
• Public Amenities such as public toilets, drinking water kiosks, etc.
• Humanizing urban environment by introducing Street Furniture, landscaping, etc.
• Public hygiene and Health Facilities including hospitals, blood banks, nursing
homes and other related establishments
• Higher Educational Facilities such as professional institutions, high schools,
integrated educational complexes etc.

ACTION PLAN

The action plans are in accordance with the conclusions drawn from the suggestions of
the citizens, elected representatives and the other stakeholders involved in the entire City
Development Plan.

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8.3 Investment Plan

In order to meet the vision, the cost the city will have to undertake is as follows:

Table No. 42
Investment Plan - Amenities

COST
SR NO ACTIVITIES PLACE
(Crores)
Industrial Workers Jamshedpur, Adityapur,
1
Quarters Other parts of JUA 10.00
2 Convention Centre Adityapur, Mango
20.00
Jamshedpur , Adityapur,
3 Market Complex
Mango, Other parts of JUA 2.25
4 Sports Complex Adityapur
10.00
Jamshedpur, Adityapur,
5 Marriage Hall
Mango 4.00
6 Community Centre Adityapur, Mango
2.00
7 Entertainment Centre Jamshedpur, Adityapur
10.00
Jamshedpur, Adityapur,
8 Public latrine/urinals
Mango, Other parts of JUA 2.00
Jamshedpur near Domuhani,
9 Crematorium
Adityapur near Gamharia 6.00
Child Welfare
10 Centre/Orphanage Adityapur
3.00
Centre
11 Museum/Art Gallery Jamshedpur
5.00
Working Women’s
12 Jamshedpur, Adityapur
Hostels 10.00
13 Old Age Homes Jamshedpur
1.00
Jamshedpur, Adityapur,
14 Library
Mango 10.00
Jamshedpur, Adityapur,
15 Animal Kanzi House
Mango 1.50
Jamshedpur, Adityapur,
16 Commercial Complex
Mango, Other parts of JUA 10.00
TOTAL
106.75

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

9 PROJECTS EXTERNAL TO JNNURM ..............................................................................99


9.1 ONGOING PROJECTS ..........................................................................................................99
9.1.1 Special Economic Zone – Adityapur .........................................................................99
9.1.2 Housing Colony - Adityapur......................................................................................99
9.1.3 Commercial Complex ................................................................................................99
9.2 REGIONAL LINKAGES ........................................................................................................99
9.2.1 The Goal ....................................................................................................................99
9.2.2 Expenditure..............................................................................................................100

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9 PROJECTS EXTERNAL TO JNNURM


9.1 Ongoing Projects

9.1.1 Special Economic Zone – Adityapur

JUSCO along with M/s Gammon India Ltd and M/s Gammon Infrastructure Projects Ltd
has won the bid to develop an automobile and auto components Special Economic Zone
(SEZ) on build, operate & transfer (BOT) basis at Adityapur (Jamshedpur, Jharkhand)
through competitive bidding process. The developer will design, finance, build, market,
manage, administer, operate and maintain the SEZ through a Special Purpose Company
(SPC).

The SEZ would be developed on about 90 acres of land, which will be transferred on a
long-term lease for 90 years. The facilities/infrastructure required to be developed includes
site development, water supply and distribution network, fire fighting, storm water drainage
system, power distribution network, street lighting, effluent and sewerage conveyance,
common effluent treatment plant, sewage treatment plant, roads, amenities (buildings and
other infrastructure), logistics hub and green belt.

9.1.2 Housing Colony - Adityapur

Adityapur Industrial Area Development Authority (AIADA) and Infrastructure Leasing and
Finance Services (IL&FS) is setting up a state-of-the-art housing colony for entrepreneurs
in the Adityapur industrial area. Over 200 acres of land within the industrial belt has
already been identified for the project.

9.1.3 Commercial Complex

The board of directors of the Adityapur Industrial Area Development Authority (AIADA) has
approved the proposal to establish a multi-facility commercial complex within the industrial
hub. The proposed building will be named the City Centre and would comprise hotels,
shopping malls, multiplexes and other facilities. The project will come up about 5 km from
the existing Kharkai over bridge and would be spread over 20 acres. AIADA has already
acquired land for the project, and IL&FS will prepare the master plan.

9.2 Regional Linkages

9.2.1 The Goal

To develop an integrated yet decentralized urban form.

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DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES

• Infrastructure Up gradation
• Local & Regional Connectivity
• Sustainable Development

ACTION PLAN

• Formulation of regional planning board


• Feasibility study for regional airport

9.2.2 Expenditure

Table no 43
Summary of Expenditure for Regional Development

Sr. No.
COST
ACTIVITIES
(Rs. Crores)
1. Formation of Regional Planning Board 0.50
2. Freeways & High Speed corridors 750.00
3. Regional Airport - Regional Warehousing and Container 250.00
Facility
TOTAL 1,000.50

The total expenditure for regional development will be Rs. 1,000.05 Crores

The above costs are indicative of the expected share of Jamshedpur city in the regional
development

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

10 URBAN GOVERNANCE AND REFORMS ..................................................................101


10.1 EXISTING SITUATION .......................................................................................................101
10.1.1 State Administrative Profile.....................................................................................101
10.1.2 District Administrative Profile ................................................................................102
10.1.3 Current Administrative Profile of JUA....................................................................103
10.1.4 Service Providing Organizations.............................................................................104
10.2 FINANCIAL PROFILE.........................................................................................................105
10.2.1 Municipal Revenue Income and Expenditure ..........................................................105
10.2.2 Municipal Capital Account (Receipts & Expenditure)............................................106
10.3 REFORMS REQUIRED .......................................................................................................108
10.3.1 Mandatory reforms ..................................................................................................108
10.3.2 Optional Reforms.....................................................................................................108
10.3.3 Investment Plan .......................................................................................................109

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10 URBAN GOVERNANCE AND REFORMS

10.1 Existing Situation

10.1.1 State Administrative Profile

The Chief Minister is the head of the Government, assisted by the two Deputy Chief
Ministers and a team of cabinet ministers. The ministers have the responsibility of the
different departments dealing with the city administration, planning and development. Each
of the departments is headed by the Principal Secretary, under whom are the Director,
Deputy Secretary / Joint Secretary, Assistant Secretary or Under Secretary. The different
departments of the Government of Jharkhand are as follows:
1. Department of Agriculture
2. Department of Animal Husbandry
3. Board of Revenue
4. Department of Building Construction
5. Department of Cooperative
6. Department of Commercial Taxes
7. Department of Culture, Sports & Youth Affairs
8. Department of Disaster Management
9. Department of Drinking Water & Sanitation
10. Department of Energy
11. Department of Finance
12. Department of Food & Civil Supplies
13. Department of Forests & Environment
14. Department of Health, Medical Education & Family Welfare
15. Department of Home
16. Department of Housing
17. Department of Human Resources Development
18. Department of Industries
19. Department of Information & Public Relations
20. Department of Information Technology
21. Department of Institutional Finance & Program Implementation
22. Department of Labour, Employment & Training
23. Department of Law
24. Department of Mines & Geology
25. Department of Panchayati Raj
26. Department of Personal Administrative Reforms & Raj Bhasa
27. Department of Planning & Development
28. Department of Registration
29. Department of Revenue & Land Reforms
30. Department of Road Construction
31. Department of Rural Development

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32. Department of Science & Technology


33. Department of Social Welfare
34. Department of Tourism
35. Department of Transport
36. Department of Urban Development
37. Department of Water Resources
38. Department of Welfare

10.1.2 District Administrative Profile

District Name – East Singhbhum


Commissionary – Chhottanagpur (South)
District Headquarter – Jamshedpur
Number of Sub-division – 2
Total Revenue Blocks – 9
Names of Revenue Blocks
Dhalbhum (sub division) – Jamshedpur, Potka, Patamda
Ghatshilla (sub division) – Ghatshila, Dhalbhumgarh, Chakulia, Bharagora, Musabani,
Dumaria

The District Administration is controlled by the Deputy Commissioner assisted by the


Deputy Development Commissioner. The officials of the district administration in order of
their ranking and responsibility are as follows:

Deputy Commissioner
• Superintendent of Police
• Deputy Development Commissioner
Addl. District Magistrate, Law & Order
Addl. Deputy Commissioner
Sub-Divisional Magistrate (Civil), Dhalbhum
Sub-Divisional Magistrate (Civil), Ghatshila
Special Officer Rationing, Jamshedpur
MESSO Officer, Jamshedpur
Director, DRDA
Director NEP
Nazarat Deputy Collector
District Supply Officer
Dy. Collector, TATA Lease
Asst. Project Officer, DRDA (3 nos)
Executive Magistrate, SDO-Dhalbhum (3 nos)
Dy. S.P. (HQ, 2 nos)
Dy.S.P. (City)
Dy. S. P. (P.C.R)
Dy. S.P. (Ghatshila)
Dy. S.P. (L & O)
Sub-Election Officer

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D.C.L.R. Dhalbhum
D.C.L.R. Ghatshila
D.T.O. Jamshedpur
Special Officer, JNAC
Special Officer, MNAC
Special Officer, Jugsalai Municipality
Officer on Special Duty
o Deputy Collector cum Ex. Magistrate (Legal)
o Ex. Magistrate, Office of SDM Ghatshila
o District Panchayati Raj Officer
o District Welfare Officer
o District Planning Officer
o District Informatics Officer
o Treasury Officer

10.1.3 Current Administrative Profile of JUA

The proposed Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration consists of multiple authorities, which


are as follows:
• Jamshedpur Notified Area Committee (JNAC)
• Adityapur Notified Area Committee (ANAC)
• Mango Notified Area Committee (MNAC)
• Jugsalai Municipality
• Village Panchayats of Bagbera, Gadhra, Ghorabandha, Parsudih, Kitadih,
Sarjamdah, Haldubani and Chotagovindpur
• Other Development Organisations like:
o Jamshedpur Utility and Service Company (JUSCO)
o Adityapur Industrial Area Development Authority (AIADA)

Deputy Commissioner

Superintendent of Deputy Development


Police Commissioner

Jamshedpur Notified
JAMSHEDPUR Area Committee
URBAN
AGGLOMERATION Adityapur Notified
Area Committee

Mango Notified Area


Committee

Jamshedpur Utility & Adityapur Industrial Jugsalai Municipality


Services Company Area Development
(JUSCO) Authority (AIADA) Village Panchayats

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10.1.4 Service Providing Organizations

URBAN LOCAL BODIES

Jamshedpur Notified Area Committee

In 1924 in accordance with the Bihar and Orissa Municipal act, a Notified Area Committee
(NAC) was established and existed as a nominal department of the Tata Steel Company
for a long time till some aspects of its functioning was taken over by the district
administration.

The population under JNAC has long crossed the 6,00,000 mark, which is the minimum
level necessary to convert a notified area committee into a municipal corporation.
Inefficient staff strength in Jamshedpur notified area committee, makes it difficult for
provision of proper services to the citizens.

Adityapur Notified Area Committee (ANAC)

The Adityapur Notified Area Committee (ANAC) controls the Adityapur Notified Area. The
area under the control of ANAC is around 49 sq. Kms, out of which approximately 45% of
the area is leased to the Adityapur Industrial Area Development Authority.

ANAC is responsible for the provision of the necessary civic infrastructure (water supply,
sewerage system, drainage system, solid waste management, transportation
infrastructure, etc.) to the Adityapur Notified Area. However, presently ANAC is not been
able to provide adequate civic infrastructure to the area under its jurisdiction, and the level
of service is much below of what is required. Moreover, inefficient staff strength as well as
inadequate administrative infrastructure, makes it difficult for provision of proper services
to the citizens of Adityapur Notified Area.

Mango Notified Area Committee

Mango Notified Area Committee is responsible for the provision of infrastructure of the
area.

Jugsalai Municipal Council

The Municipal Council of Jugsalai is responsible for managing the infrastructure of the
densest area in the JUA.

Village Panchayats

Village Panchayats Of Bagbera, Gadhra, Ghorabandha, Parsudih, Kitadih, Sarjamdah,


Haldubani And Chotagovindpur are now included in the JUA.

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OTHER DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITIES

Jamshedpur Utility and Service Company Limited (JUSCO)

Jamshedpur Utility and Service Company Limited is a Tata Steel subsidiary, which was
incorporated in August 2003 and has formally launched its services on April 1, 2004. With
it, the entire onus of providing Civic Amenities and Allied Services was transferred to this
organization, from Tata Steel's erstwhile Town Division.

JUSCO's area of operation extends over approximately 14000 acres across Jamshedpur
Notified Area. It has the expertise and infrastructure to serve a vast and varied customer
base, including 0.70 million people as well as a world class steel plant. The Company's
services encompass Water and Waste Water Management, Power Services, Public Health
& Horticulture Services, and Planning Engineering & Construction.

Adityapur Industrial Area Development Authority (AIADA)

Adityapur Industrial Area is situated in the newly created district of Saraikella Kharswan in
the state of Jharkhand. It is located at a distance of about 8 km from Tatanagar railway
station.

The total controlled area under Adityapur Industrial Area Development Authority is about
53 square miles spread over 83 revenue villages. The controlled area includes Industrial,
Residential, Commercial and Institutional area with good and adequate civic amenities.
Adityapur Industrial Area has a well-planned road network of about 45 km with adequate
drainage system.

KEY ISSUES

• Absence of a unified development and governing authority


• Influence of large number of private bodies like JUSCO, AIADA, etc.

10.2 Financial Profile

10.2.1 Municipal Revenue Income and Expenditure

The financial profile of the urban local bodies is not structured and mostly all the ULBs
have been operating at a recurring loss over the years. The municipal tax inflow is almost
negligible, which has resulted in limited financial resource options for the institutions. The
inflow of funds is mainly through the government grants and is utilized for infrastructure
development such as roads, sewerage systems, etc. For Jamshedpur, since all the
development is almost a fresh stocktaking process, all capital incomes and expenditures
may be covered under JNNURM.

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Data with existing authorities of Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration is as follows:

Table No. 44
Municipal Revenue Income
Revenue Account Receipts

2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 - Total


Authority 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
Figures in Rs. Lakhs
Jugsalai Municipality 24.92 21.03 32.81 17.22 23.36 119.34
Jamshedpur Notified Area
28.02 30.70 168.29 24.23 30.82 282.07
Committee (JNAC)
Mango Notified Area
8.59 18.85 63.02 23.67 28.82 142.95
Committee (MNAC)
Adityapur Notified Area
13.21 9.34 11.41 1.09 28.65 63.70
Committee (ANAC)
Total 74.74 79.92 275.53 66.21 111.65
Source: Jugsalai Municipality, Jamshedpur Notified Area Committee, Adityapur Notified Area
Committee& Mango Notified Area Committee

Table No. 45
Municipal Revenue Expenditure
Revenue Account Expenditure

2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 - Total


Authority 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
Figures in Rs. Lakhs
Jugsalai Municipality 25.66 30.63 9.19 32.98 11.42 109.88
Jamshedpur Notified Area
33.51 27.03 32.11 38.91 37.86 169.44
Committee (JNAC)
Mango Notified Area
10.54 18.15 15.32 16.88 32.36 93.25
Committee (MNAC)
Adityapur Notified Area
7.61 6.39 7.67 13.31 5.43 40.41
Committee (ANAC)
Total 77.32 82.20 64.29 102.08 87.07
Source: Jugsalai Municipality, Jamshedpur Notified Area Committee, Adityapur Notified Area
Committee& Mango Notified Area Committee

10.2.2 Municipal Capital Account (Receipts & Expenditure)

Capital income of the existing ULBs of the Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration comprises of
loans, grants and subsidies from the Central and State governments. An analysis of this
account indicates that the entire capital income is in the form grants and subsidies. It also
reveals that during the review period capital income was inconsistent due to irregular flow
of scheme specific grants. Capital receipts of JUA so far included only state government
loans and grants. Capital Expenditure data for the other JUA constituents is apparently not

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available in the desired format. Moreover, all taxes need to be revised, as present taxes
are very less and inadequate, forcing the ULBs to go into more losses.

Table No. 46
Municipal Capital Receipts
Capital Receipts (Rs. Lakhs)

Authority Year State Government Financing Market Total


Loans Grants Institutions
2001 – 2002 93.48 68.71 - - 162.19
2002 – 2003 6.28 62.76 - - 69.04
Jugsalai
2003 – 2004 38.06 33.62 - - 71.68
Municipality
2004 – 2005 69.67 83.56 - - 153.23
2005 - 2006 177.41 85.63 - - 263.04
Jamshedpur 2001 – 2002 520.19 - - 520.19
Notified 2002 – 2003 300.87 - - 300.87
Area 2003 – 2004 547.52 - - 547.52
Committee 2004 – 2005 261.43 - - 261.43
(JNAC) 2005 - 2006 1,338.48 - - 1,338.48
Mango 2001 – 2002 136.84 113.74 - - 250.58
Notified 2002 – 2003 22.67 22.67 - - 45.35
Area 2003 – 2004 79.60 124.94 - 8.77 213.31
Committee 2004 – 2005 47.60 68.93 - - 116.53
(MNAC) 2005 - 2006 283.10 155.84 - - 438.94
Adityapur 2001 – 2002 194.62 - - 194.62
Notified 2002 – 2003 436.90 - - 436.90
Area 2003 – 2004 121.26 - - 121.26
Committee 2004 – 2005 217.45 - - 217.45
(ANAC) 2005 - 2006 304.43 - - 304.43
Source: Jugsalai Municipality, Jamshedpur Notified Area Committee, Adityapur Notified Area
Committee& Mango Notified Area Committee

Table No. 47
Municipal Capital Expenditure
Capital Expenditure (Rs. Lakhs)

Authority Year Works Establishment & Total


Others
2001 – 2002 145.54 42.31 187.85
2002 – 2003 60.05 30.03 90.08
Jugsalai
2003 – 2004 66.43 38.06 104.49
Municipality
2004 – 2005 129.26 41.20 170.46
2005 - 2006 258.89 27.51 286.41
2001 – 2002 136.14
Jamshedpur
2002 – 2003 102.83
Notified Area
2003 – 2004 483.97
Committee
2004 – 2005 364.18
(JNAC)
2005 - 2006 736.96

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Authority Year Works Establishment & Total


Others
2001 – 2002 128.88 5.94 134.82
Mango Notified 2002 – 2003 61.94 6.81 68.75
Area Committee 2003 – 2004 146.82 8.70 155.52
(MNAC) 2004 – 2005 125.63 11.99 137.62
2005 - 2006 194.5 10.06 204.56
2001 – 2002 103.60
Adityapur
2002 – 2003 70.00
Notified Area
2003 – 2004 387.22
Committee
2004 – 2005 152.36
(ANAC)
2005 - 2006 221.36
Source: Jugsalai Municipality, Jamshedpur Notified Area Committee, Adityapur Notified Area
Committee& Mango Notified Area Committee

10.3 Reforms Required

10.3.1 Mandatory reforms

Mandatory reforms are to be undertaken for the following sectors:

• Accounting reforms (Double entry Accounting system)


• E – Governance
• Property Title certification & registration
• Property tax reforms with GIS
• Budget for poor
• Basic services for the poor
• User charges (dominated by tax receipts)

10.3.2 Optional Reforms

There are some sectors where the reforms are optional. They are:

• Administrative reforms – ULB (Reforms regarding the Administrative


Structure of the proposed Jamshedpur Municipal Corporation has already
been taken up at the State level)
• Master Plan Formulation, Revision of bye laws, Formulation of
Development Control Regulations
• Cross subsidization for EWS/ LIG Housing
• Rain water harvesting
• Encouraging PPP

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10.3.3 Investment Plan

It is proposed that the mandatory reforms be undertaken. It is expected that the same shall
be completed in a period of maximum 3 years. This time is proposed as currently, there
are no titles or property registration records and a new agency that will be formed for
Jamshedpur will take some time to collect the details.

Accordingly, the investment plan prepared is presented below:

Table No. 48
Investment Plan – Urban Governance and Reforms

No Activities Cost 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013


(Rs. Cr.)
A Reforms
Enactment of Rent Control Law
Enactment of Public Disclosure Law
Enactment of Property Title
Certification
Computerization of Property Tax
Development Control Rules &
Regulations

Sub Total 30.00 3.00 22.50 4.50


B E-Governance
Capacity Building, Training, Software
dev.
GIS System Development
IVRS System for the Local Body
Kiosks
Document Management System

Sub Total 200.00 20.00 180.00

TOTAL (A+B) 230.00 23.00 202.50 4.50

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

11 CAPITAL INVESTMENT PLAN ...................................................................................110


11.1 GENERAL .........................................................................................................................110
11.2 PRINCIPLES OF PHASING ..................................................................................................110
11.3 INSTITUTIONALIZING CIP PROCESS ................................................................................111
11.4 SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE ...........................................................................................112

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11 CAPITAL INVESTMENT PLAN

11.1 General

The Capital Investment Plan is the multi-year scheduling of identified and prioritised
investments. The scheduling or phasing of the plan is based on studies of the fiscal
resources availability (for new investments and O & M), technical capacity for
construction and O & M and the choice of specific improvements to be constructed for
a period of six years into the future.

As a part of CIP prepared for the CDP

i. Analysed and discussed with the stakeholders, the existing applicable norms
and standards for infrastructure services,
ii. Agreed and recommended a reasonable and realistic option,
iii. Justified and provided rationale if the chosen option is not within the existing
service level standards.

In determining a long-term financial strategy, the administration should plans to raise


resources through:

• Accessing the grants available under the JNNURM Framework (as % of


identified investment in Urban Governance and infrastructure sectors - 90%
Central Govt. Grants and 10% State Govt. Grants)
• Funds devolved by the GOJ based on the recommendations of the State
Finance Commission
• Revision of the Annual Rateable Value at certain levels
• Revision of water and sewerage charges at specific intervals
• Transfer of water and sewerage tax to the respective account heads
• Maintaining the collection performance of taxes and charges at certain
minimum levels for current and for arrears.
• Octroi or similar entry tax & toll tax

Underlying the major assumptions, basic assumptions for growth in property tax
assessment, growth in other taxes and miscellaneous income, as well as changes in
the main expenditure heads have been made, including general administration,
establishment, O & M, debt servicing, etc. he phasing/ scheduling of investments have
been carried out through an iterative process and the principles of phasing have been
taken into account.

11.2 Principles of Phasing

• Priority needs, with developed areas receiving priority over future development
area

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• Inter and intra-service linkages, viz. water supply investments shall be


complemented by corresponding sewerage/ sanitation improvements.
• Size and duration of the requirements, including preparation and
implementation period.
• Project linked revenue implications, such as installing house connections where
supply and distribution capacities have been increased.

The Capital Investment Plan involved the identification of public capital facilities to
cater to the demand of the city populace by the year 2011 and 2031 according to the
short, medium and long-term infrastructure needs.

11.3 Institutionalizing CIP Process

The CIP is an important element and is significant in terms of the city’s management
process and sustainability with regard to the delivery of basic services. The CIP
presented in this section provides a framework for the annual budget cycle of the
proposed Municipal Corporation of Jamshedpur.

The need for the CIP is on account of:

• Assessment of city growth and infrastructure needs (will be carried out once in
every 5 years)
• Detailed feasibility/ engineering studies carried out of new projects.
• Scheduling of investments on ongoing projects due to cost and/ or time
overruns.
• Assigning priorities within the constraints of available financial resources

GOALS FOR CIP

• Provision of capital facilities that sustains city populace.


• Preservation of the physical integrity capital assets.
• Capital facilities to be considered community assets.
• Grass-root involvement.
• Community inputs to the setting up of public facilities.

STRATEGIES FOR CIP

• Strategic Capital Investment


• Facility Setting
• Decision Making
• Programme Funding

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11.4 Summary of Expenditure

The summary of expenditure under various heads proposed in the previous sections
are presented below:

Table 49
Total Expenditure Proposed

No. Activities Cost (Rs. Crores)

1 Socio Economic Growth 102.27


2 Urban Infrastructure 2,068.79

Water Supply 622.03


Sewerage 307.27
Drainage 161.24
Solid Waste 100.00
Traffic & Transportation 878.25
3 Facilities to Urban Poor 141.50
4 Environment Protection & Heritage 30.00
5 Amenities & Recreational facilities 106.75
6 Urban Reforms 230.00
TOTAL 2,679.31
7 Projects External to JNNURM 1,000.50
GRAND TOTAL 3,679.81

The year wise expenditure is presented in the table below:

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Table 50
Year wise Expenditure Proposed

No Activities Cost (Rs. Cr.) 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013
1 Socio Economic Growth 102.27 51.73 48.29 2.25 - - - -
2 Urban Infrastructure 2,068.79 83.86 556.53 661.62 503.97 313.29 136.82 17.72
3 Facilities to Urban Poor 141.50 12.00 24.00 34.50 34.50 34.50 2.00 -
Environment Protection &
4 Heritage 30.00 - - - - - - -
Amenities & Recreational
5 Facilities 106.75 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 26.75 - -
6 Urban Reforms 230.00 23.00 202.50 4.50 - - - -
TOTAL 2,679.31 190.59 851.32 722.87 558.47 374.54 138.82 17.72
Projects External to
7 JNNURM 1,000.50 200.10 200.10 200.10 100.05 100.05 100.05 100.05
GRAND TOTAL 3,679.81 390.69 1,051.42 922.97 658.52 474.59 238.87 117.77

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

12 URBAN LOCAL BODY FINANCE.................................................................... 114


12.1 Framework For Analysis.............................................................................. 114
12.2 ULB Finance Assessment – Analysis Framework .................................... 114
12.2.1 Revenue Income possibilities ........................................................... 115
12.2.2 Revenue Expenditures ..................................................................... 116
12.3 Financial Operating Plan ............................................................................. 116
12.3.1 Introduction....................................................................................... 116
12.3.2 Overview of Municipal Finances....................................................... 117
12.3.3 Comparison with other Municipal Corporations:............................... 119
12.3.4 Estimations for Jamshedpur ............................................................. 119
12.3.5 JNNURM Framework ....................................................................... 121
12.3.6 Investment Sustenance .................................................................... 122
12.3.7 JNNURM Grant Disbursement ......................................................... 122
12.4 CAPITAL INVESTMENT PLAN AND PROJECT PHASING......................... 123
12.4.1 Principles of Phasing ........................................................................ 123
12.4.2 Institutionalizing the CIP Process ..................................................... 123

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12 URBAN LOCAL BODY FINANCE

12.1 Framework For Analysis

The first step in analyzing the financial position of JUA (Jamshedpur Urban
Agglomeration) is to differentiate and categorize the account heads into General
Account, Water Account and Capital Account through a budget recasting exercise. For
the purpose of financial assessment, financial data pertaining to the last five years
(2000-01 to 2004-05) have to be recast into a standard format.

12.2 ULB Finance Assessment – Analysis Framework

Financial Projections for Jamshedpur Municipal Corporation (Proposed)

Stage I - Sourcing Stage II - Assessment Stage III - Analysis

Municipal Finances Recast Data:


Data as obtained
• Extra-ordinary
from ULB
account heads *Extra-ordinary account heads
• Budget comprising Cesses, Advances,
Books Deposits etc is not considered for
financial assessment and further
• DCB
Projections, as these items would
Statements
not effect the financial health of
• Taxation the ULB.
Information

Recast Data:
Debt/ Non-debt
• Revenue
Liabilities’ Data as
Account ULB
obtained from
• Capital FINANCIAL
• ULB Account ASSESSMENT/
• Other nodal CREDIT
agencies/ Liabilities: STANDING
Lending
• Debt
agencies
Liabilities
etc
• Non-debt
Liabilities

Jamshedpur consists of four accounting authorities, viz., Jugsalai Municipality,


Jamshedpur Notified area committee, Mango Notified Area committee and Adityapur

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Notified Area Committee. In addition, JUSCO, TISCO and AIADA also are agencies
that have their own accounting practices.

12.2.1 Revenue Income possibilities

The proposed new corporation may consider following heads to generate revenue
income:

• Property Tax

Consolidated property tax in the range of 6 to 8 per cent of the Annual Rateable
Value (ARV) is commonly levied by municipal corporations. This tax may be
consolidated or may be charged under different heads such as general purpose
tax, water tax, lighting tax and sanitation tax. Currently, the holding tax
collected is very low due to the absence of the title hold details and inadequate
staff at site.

• Other Taxes

o Fees on municipal services (birth & death certificates)


o User charges (water and sewerage tariffs)
o Income from special services (educational and medical)
o Dangerous and offensive (D&O) trade license fee.
o Vehicle Parking (Pay and Park)

• Assigned Revenues

This item head comprises of income from the State Government/State transfers
of municipal income collected by the state line department. The income items
include
o Surcharge on stamp duty (Transfer of immovable property)
o Entertainment tax (For cinema halls, multiplexes and theatres)
o Motor vehicle tax
o Professional Tax
o Octroi Compensation

Octroi: Most of the states have abolished Octroi. But almost all the state
governments are presently granting some amount to ULBs towards compensation
of Octroi income. It may be noted that Octroi was 60% to 70% of total revenue
income before it vanished. The governments, which are not in a position to
provide such grant, have not done away with Octroi. In our proposal we do not
propose Octroi but it may be possible that state governments may allow some
additional taxes to the corporations as alternate source of revenue.

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12.2.2 Revenue Expenditures

This includes expenses broadly on following accounts.

Expense Head % of Total Rev.


Expense
Establishment:
This head comprises expenditure on pay and allowances of elected
representatives, salary and other operational expenses related to general
35% to 50%
administration and revenue collection, pension and gratuity payouts and
provident fund contributions.

Water Supply:
Expenditure on water supply comprises salaries of all relevant staff and
operating expenditure incurred largely on electricity charges and purchase 25% to 35%
of chemicals for water treatment.

Traffic and Transportation:


This head includes the cost of new development proposals such as ring
25% to 35%
road, under pass, new mango bridge etc

Solid Waste Management:


This head covers salaries of supervisory and field staff and operation and
maintenance of a fleet of vehicles for solid waste collection and
10% to 20%
transportation. On an average, over 70 per cent of expenditure under this
head is attributed to salary expenses.

Urban poor &slums:


Rehabilitation and redevelopment of the slums will be included in this
3% to 10%
section.

Street Lighting:
Comprises primarily of expenditure on electricity charges and replacement
2% to 5%
of lighting fixtures.

Debt Servicing:
Loan repayment and interest payment if any, is under this head. 0% to 5%

12.3 Financial Operating Plan

12.3.1 Introduction

Jamshedpur consists of four accounting authorities, viz., Jugsalai Municipality,


Jamshedpur Notified area committee, Mango Notified Area committee and Adityapur
Notified Area Committee. In addition, JUSCO, TISCO and AIADA also are agencies
that have their own accounting practices. Under this project, the practices and revenue
of the external agencies are not considered.

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12.3.2 Overview of Municipal Finances

In existing setup, most of the authorities are not generating revenues as per normal standards
of other local authorities. A reason may be rooted to the historical development of the city. It
has progressed concentric to the industrial setups and their private colonization. That’s how
each area is a separate commune and with population growth, all of them have tended to
overlap and converge. Hence, now is the time to merge all of them and a new appropriately
administered Municipal Corporation should be formed. While we plan this following points may
be noteworthy:
• Existing authorities do not have proper data on land registration and property
ownership. At least a systematic effort towards this is lacking. Available data is not for
the complete geographical area (referred as Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration) under
consideration.
• There is no property tax levied in many areas.
• There is no precedence of assigned revenues (form state government) in line with other
existing Municipal corporations.
• Accounting systems are not tuned even to the routine requirements.
• Establishment will be new and hence establishment expenditure will be a new head for
expenditure.

With these reasons, past data is not at all an indicator of future collections and expenses.

Hence, entire estimation exercise is based on comparative cities in India and correlation of
factors with population and geography. Extrapolation of past data is not used for estimations.

Past data:

Revenue
Income
(Rs. Lakh) 2001 - 2002 2002 - 2003 2003 -2004 2004 -2005 2005 -2006

Jugsalai 24.92 21.03 32.81 17.22 23.36

Jamshedpur 28.02 30.70 168.29 24.23 30.82

Mango 8.59 18.85 63.02 23.67 28.82

Adityapur 13.21 9.34 11.41 1.09 28.65

Total 74.74 79.92 275.53 66.21 111.65

Revenue
Expenditure
(Rs. Lakh) 2001 - 2002 2002 - 2003 2003 -2004 2004 -2005 2005 -2006

Jugsalai 25.66 30.63 9.19 32.98 11.42

Jamshedpur 33.51 27.03 32.11 38.91 37.86

Mango 10.54 18.15 15.32 16.88 32.36

Adityapur 7.61 6.39 7.67 13.31 5.43

Total 77.32 82.20 64.29 102.08 87.07

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Table: 51
Municipal Capital Receipts
Capital Receipts (Rs. Lakhs)

Authority Year State Government Financing Market Total


Loans Grants Institutions
2001 – 2002 93.48 68.71 - - 162.19
2002 – 2003 6.28 62.76 - - 69.04
Jugsalai
2003 – 2004 38.06 33.62 - - 71.68
Municipality
2004 – 2005 69.67 83.56 - - 153.23
2005 - 2006 177.41 85.63 - - 263.04
Jamshedpur 2001 – 2002 520.19 - - 520.19
Notified 2002 – 2003 300.87 - - 300.87
Area 2003 – 2004 547.52 - - 547.52
Committee 2004 – 2005 261.43 - - 261.43
(JNAC) 2005 - 2006 1,338.48 - - 1,338.48
Mango 2001 – 2002 136.84 113.74 - - 250.58
Notified 2002 – 2003 22.67 22.67 - - 45.35
Area 2003 – 2004 79.60 124.94 - 8.77 213.31
Committee 2004 – 2005 47.60 68.93 - - 116.53
(MNAC) 2005 - 2006 283.10 155.84 - - 438.94
Adityapur 2001 – 2002 194.62 - - 194.62
Notified 2002 – 2003 436.90 - - 436.90
Area 2003 – 2004 121.26 - - 121.26
Committee 2004 – 2005 217.45 - - 217.45
(ANAC) 2005 - 2006 304.43 - - 304.43
Source: Jugsalai Municipality, Jamshedpur Notified Area Committee, Adityapur Notified Area
Committee& Mango Notified Area Committee

12.3.3 Investment Sustenance

It is very clear that the above revenue figures are very misleading as the current setup does not
collect the tax as it normally should have been. One analysis is carried out for working out the
holding tax based on the following assumptions;

Total Population 1,082,000


Population under JUSCO area 450,000
Balance population 632,000
Approximate no. of households 126,400
Approx. no. of title holders (assumed at 70%) 88,480, say 90,000
Tax receivable (average Rs.2000/per title/year) 180,000,000

It can be seen that if nominal tax is collected across the complete property holdings, the
authorities would atleast have about Rs.18 crores collection as against the total collection of
about 1 crores at the moment.

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12.3.4 Comparison with other Municipal Corporations:

Since there is no integrated authority for the city, there is no precedence for collection of
common municipal taxes and other such levies. In order to envisage the quantum of possible
income from such sources, we have compared two cities viz., Nashik and Bhopal with
Jamshedpur. These are appropriate samples as they represent two different states of India.
Their geographical area is comparable. Population of Nashik is comparable. Hence these cities
together will not have any bias in our projections. Details of comparison are presented in the
following table.

Nashik Bhopal Jamshedpur


Population 1991 2001 1991 2001 1991 2001
7,25,000 10,77,000 14,33,351 18,37,000 10,80,702
Area (Sq Km) 259 Sq. Km. 285 Sq. Km 149 sq. Km.
Water Supply 202 MLD 234 MLD 176 MLD
Solid Waste 230 MT per Day 550 MT per Day 349 MT per Day
Generated
ULB Finance Assessment (Rs. Crore)
2004-05 2004-05 2005 - 2006
Revenue Income 334 105 1.12
(Rs. Crores)
Income Heads Property Tax 18 Tax 20
Octroi 213 Non Tax 10
Assigned&Grnts103 Assigned 50
Grants 25
Revenue 154 91 0.87
Expenditure (Rs.
Crores)
Expenditure Heads Establishment 53 Establishment 33 Establishment
Water 55 O&M 27 Others
Solid Waste 37 Water 31
Others 9
Capital Receipts 4 27 23.45
(Rs. Crores)
Receipts Heads All state government Capital Loans 20 State Govt.
grants and subsidies Capital Grants 7 Loans & Grants
Capital Expenditure 81 45 14.50
(Rs. Crores)
Expenditure Heads Roads Establishment
Storm Water Drains Others
Works

The income and expenditure levels of Nashik and Bhopal provide us with some benchmark to
arrive at the numbers for Jamshedpur.

12.3.5 Estimations for Jamshedpur

Revenue Income for the proposed corporation is possible through following ways:
Property Tax
Other Taxes
– Fees on municipal services (birth & death certificates)
– User charges (water and sewerage tariffs)

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– Income from special services (educational and medical)


– Dangerous and offensive (D&O) trade license fee.
– Vehicle Parking (Pay and Park)

Assigned Revenues:
This item head comprises of income from the State Government/State transfers of
municipal income collected by the state line department. The income items include
• Surcharge on stamp duty (Transfer of immovable property)
• Entertainment tax (For cinema halls, multiplexes and theatres)
• Motor vehicle tax
• Professional Tax
• Octroi Compensation

Estimations are based on following assumptions:

General Parameters
Rate Remarks
1 Population 3% CAGR Nominal Growth Rate
2 Inflation 5% CAGR Nominal Rate
Revenue Income Assumptions (Linked to Population)
Property Tax
1 Persons per assessment 12 Average in Non-metros
2 Collection / Assessment Rs. 2,000/-per assessment. Average at 2001 rates
Initial collection assumed is
only 50%
3 Assessment rate growth 7% CAGR Slightly above inflation
Other Taxes
1 Per head Collection Rs. 100/- per annum.(2001) Nominal collection.
2 Per head Collection 5% CAGR At inflation rate
Assigned Taxes
1 Per head Collection Rs. 80/- per annum.(2001) Nominal collection.
2 Per head Collection 7% CAGR Assigned income may
grow a little faster
Revenue Expenditure Assumptions
1 Growth 10% CAGR New establishment, so
new additions each year
in period considered.
1 Establishment expenditure Rs. 130/- in 2005 By past data of non-
- Per head average metros
2 Water supply and Rs. 5 Crore in 2005 Data
sewerage maintenance
expenses.
3 Roads maintenance Rs. 2 Crores in 2005 Nominal Provision
4 Education and Public Rs. 1 Crore in 2005 No such facility as of
Health now. Hence nominal
provision.
Total Revenue Rs. 22 Crores in 2005 -
Expenditure

Based on these assumptions, projected revenue flows are as under:

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Property Tax

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013


Property Holdings 90,000 90,000 90,000 90,000 90,000 90,000 90,000 90,000
Tax rate 2,000 2,140 2,289 2,449 2,620 2,803 2,999 3,208
Collection Percentage 50% 50% 50% 60% 70% 70% 70% 70%
Tax Collection 9.00 9.63 10.30 13.22 16.51 17.66 18.89 20.21

It can be seen that the number of property holdings is not increased for the analysis. This has
been done for maintaining a conservative approach. Also, the average rate considered of 2,000
per year across the holdings is also a very conservative approach. Over and above the same,
initially, only 50% collection is assumed.

The following table indicates the total collection possible during the JNNURM period, which
would indicate the level of investments that is possible for the city.

2006- 2007- 2008- 2009- 2010- 2011- 2012-


Rs. Cr. Total 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Property Tax 95.21 9.00 9.63 10.30 13.22 16.51 17.66 18.89

Other Taxes 143.23 15.98 17.28 18.69 20.21 21.86 23.64 25.57
Assigned
Taxes 134.14 14.05 15.48 17.06 18.81 20.73 22.84 25.17
Total
Revenue
Income 372.58 39.03 42.39 46.05 52.24 59.10 64.14 69.63
Total
Revenue
Expenditure 229.58 24.2 26.62 29.28 32.21 35.43 38.97 42.87
Net Revenue
Surplus 143.00 14.83 15.77 16.77 20.03 23.67 25.17 26.76

12.3.6 JNNURM Framework

Existing city of Jamshedpur has population base of half a million or less. It qualifies for funding
pattern under JNNURM as follows:

• Central Government Grant 80%


• State Government Grant 10%
• ULB funds 10%

However, the proposed new municipal corporation that will be including whole of Jamshedpur
agglomeration will have population bases exceeding 1 million. In that case the funding pattern
would be:

• Central Government Grant 50%


• State Government Grant 20%
• ULB funds 30%

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Since this corporation would be a new body, it is difficult for it to raise funds to the tune of 30%
requirement.

The total fund requirement is Rs. 3,683.31. The fund required for projects, which are external to
the JNNURM, is Rs. 1,000.05.

Thus, the total fund required for projects included in the JNNURM is Rs. 2,679.31.

On 50% (Central Grant) - 20% (State Grant) - 30% (ULB) pattern; fund requirements would be
as shown below:
Rs. Crores
Total Fund Requirement 2679.31
Grant (Central) 50% 1339.66
Grant (State) 20% 535.86
To be raised by ULB 30% 803.79

Thus total grant (70%) amounts to Rs. 1,875.52 Crores.

12.3.7 Investment Sustenance

In order to have the above level of investment, the ULB will have to raise a total of over 800
crores. Out of this, own revenue sources account for 143 crores only. Hence, the balance would
have to be raised through other means including private partnership.

PPP and Cash Recovery

The following projects are proposed under private sector participation;

Water supply schemes – total cost Rs. 595 crores (system augmentation only)
Solid waste management – Total cost Rs. 100 crores
Ring Road development – Rs.105 crores

Capital Income

This is mainly through state government grants and subsidies. Most of these grants are used
for roads and sewerage, drain systems etc. Grants are extended by the state and central
governments. With conservative estimates in comparison with other cities, Rs.20 Cr. Per year
during JNNURM tenure totaling Rs. 140 Crores are expected.

12.3.8 JNNURM Grant Disbursement

As per JNNRM guidelines:

• The funds would be released as far as possible in four installments by the MoUD and
MoUEPA as Additional Central Assistance (100 per cent grant in respect of Central
share) to the State Government or its designated State-level agencies.
• The first installment of 25 per cent will be released upon signing of a Memorandum of
Agreement (MoA) by the State Government, ULB or parastatal agency. The balance

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amount of assistance shall be released as far as possible in three installments upon


receipt of Utilization.

12.4 CAPITAL INVESTMENT PLAN AND PROJECT PHASING

The Capital Investment Plan is the multi-year scheduling of identified and prioritised
investments. The scheduling or phasing of the plan is based on studies of the fiscal resources
availability (for new investments and O & M), technical capacity for construction and O & M and
the choice of specific improvements to be constructed for a period of six years into the future.

As a part of CIP prepared for the CDP,

(a) Analysed and discussed with the stakeholders, the existing applicable norms and
standards for infrastructure services,
(b) Agreed and recommended a reasonable and realistic option and
(c) Justified and provided rationale if the chosen option is not within the existing service
level standards.

The phasing/ scheduling of investments have been carried out through an iterative process and
the principles of phasing have been taken into account.

12.4.1 Principles of Phasing

Priority needs, with developed areas receiving priority over future development area
Inter and intra-service linkages, viz. water supply investments shall be complemented
by corresponding sewerage/ sanitation improvements.
Size and duration of the requirements, including preparation and implementation
period.
Project linked revenue implications, such as installing house connections where Supply
and distribution capacities have been increased.

The Capital Investment Plan involved the identification of public capital facilities to cater to the
demand of the city populace by the year 2011 and 2031 according to the short, medium and
long-term infrastructure needs.

12.4.2 Institutionalizing the CIP Process

The Capital Investment Plan is an important element and is significant in terms of the city’s
management process and sustainability with regard to the delivery of basic services. The CIP
presented in this section provides a framework for the annual budget cycle of the JMC for the
future 6 to 10 years period.

The need for the CIP is on account of:

Assessment of city growth and infrastructure needs (will be carried out once in every 5
years)
Detailed feasibility/ engineering studies carried out of new projects.
Scheduling of investments on ongoing projects due to cost and/ or time overruns.
Assigning priorities within the constraints of available financial resources

Goals for CIP

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Provision of capital facilities that sustains city populace.


Preservation of the physical integrity capital assets.
Capital facilities to be considered community assets.
Grass-root involvement.
Community inputs to the setting of public facilities.

Strategies for CIP

Strategic Capital Investment


Facility Setting
Decision Making
Programme Funding

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

ANNEXURE - A .................................................................................................................... I
List of Some of the Stakeholders for Jamshedpur - City Development Plan
(CDP) ........................................................................................................................... i
ANNEXURE - B ................................................................................................................. VI
Stakeholder Interactions ......................................................................................... vi
Jugsalai Municipal Authorities ........................................................................... vi
AIADA (Adityapur Industrial Area Development Authority)................................ vi
Mango notified area committee representatives............................................... vii
District planning officer, East Singbhum district ............................................... vii
Tata Nagar South Eastern Railway .................................................................. vii
Forest and Irrigation department ...................................................................... vii
State building department ................................................................................viii
JUSCO (Jamshedpur Utilities & Services Company Ltd.) ................................viii
Development Strategies – by Stakeholders ...................................................... ix
ANNEXURE - C ................................................................................................................ XX
Questionnaire for receiving information from different areas of JUA ............... xx
ANNEXURE - D .............................................................................................................XXVI
Water Quality Of Subarnarekha River ................................................................ xxvi
ANNEXURE - E ...........................................................................................................XXVIII
Hierarchy of Roads ............................................................................................ xxviii
Hierarchy of Roads .................................................................................... xxviii
ANNEXURE - F..............................................................................................................XXXI
Action Plan For Implementation ......................................................................... xxxi
ANNEXURE – G ............................................................................................................. XLII
Fingerprint Analysis Requirements for Hazardous Wastes - TSD Facilities .... xlii
Concentration Limits/Criteria for Acceptance of Hazardous Wastes for Direct
Disposal to Secured Landfill ................................................................................. xlii
Emission Standards for Common Hazardous Wastes Incinerator................... xliv
ANNEXURE – H ............................................................................................................ XLVI
Estimation of Landfill Capacity, Landfill Height, Landfill Area ......................... xlvi

Annexure 1
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
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ANNEXURE - A
List of Some of the Stakeholders for Jamshedpur - City Development
Plan (CDP)

Sr. no. Name Department / organisation


1 A.K.Roy J.N.A.C.
2 Dr. G Singh J.N.A.C.
3 N Kumar M.N.A.C.
4 G.K. Bhagat M.N.A.C.
5 Firoz Alam M.N.A.C.
6 Yogendra Prasad M.N.A.C.
7 Jitendranath Singh M.N.A.C.
8 Ganesh Shankar Citizen, Jugsalai
9 Vidhyarthi Citizen, Jugsalai
10 Bali Ram Pandey Jugsalai Municipality
11 Virendra K Pathak Jugsalai Municipality
12 Murlidhar Kedia Citizen, Jugsalai
13 Ershoji Prasad Consultancy firm, Jugsalai
14 Upendra Chatrath Citizen, Jugsalai
15 Shravan Deboka Citizen, Jugsalai
16 Ratan Joshi Citizen, Jugsalai
17 Natai Chandragup Mango
18 Sudhir K.Dubey A.N.A.C.
19 Vijay Bhargav Mango
20 A.K.Chaudhary A.N.A.C.
21 J. Tiwari A.N.A.C.
22 R.D.Singh A.N.A.C.
23 R.K.Shenoy A.N.A.C.
24 Prakash Barua J.N.A.C.
25 P. Bhatia Citizen, Jugsalai
26 S.P.Triwedi J.N.A.C.
27 S.D.Dubey Jharkand Panchayat Karmchari
28 Samant Kumar W.S.S.S. Ltd
29 Shambhu M. Citizen, Jamshedpur
30 Sunil Kumar Sharma Citizen, Jamshedpur
31 Ajay Kumar Singh Citizen, Jugsalai
32 G . Raja Jharkand N.G.O. Foundation
33 Gopal K . Rai Jharkand N.G.O. Foundation
34 Narendra Singh Citizen, Jugsalai

Annexure i
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Sr. no. Name Department / organisation


35 AnitKumar Bhattacharjee K.A.D.M.A.
36 Anjan Sarkar Consumer Welfare Committee, J.S.R
37 Priya Ranjan Citizen, Sakchi
38 Dilip Kumar B Citizen, Sakchi
39 M.V.R Rao Citizen, Sakchi
40 B.K. Prasad Citizen, Sakchi
41 S.C. Prasad Citizen, Sakchi
42 Phulchand Rai Mango
43 Prakash Bhagat J.N.A.C.
44 Rajnath Mahato J.N.A.C.
45 Krishnaram J.N.A.C.
46 Raj Kumar Mandal J.N.A.C.
48 A.K. Pramanik Citizen, JSR
49 Sanjiv Paul JUSCO ,Jamshedpur
50 K. N. Jha JUSCO ,Jamshedpur
51 R.N. Mandal Sarvoday Gram Vikas Trust
52 Mohan Swaroop Sharan J.N.A.C.

Annexure ii
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
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List of stakeholders present for first workshop on June 10, 2006

Annexure iii
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

List of Stakeholders present for Public Workshop

Annexure iv
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Final Report

Annexure v
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

ANNEXURE - B
Stakeholder Interactions

The concerns and suggestions expressed by the various stakeholders during the different
stages of the stakeholders’ meetings are as follows:

Jugsalai Municipal Authorities

• High density of development, road infrastructure not well developed which leads to
heavy traffic congestion.
• The area has open drainage system.
• Area of concern is transportation, Solid Waste management, and Sewerage and
drainage system.
• There is no land available for sewage treatment plant, or solid waste management /
dumping ground.
• Absence of underground sewage system.
• New connectivity, if proposed, to Adityapur may release further traffic congestion.
• Suggestions provided:
• Widening of the road (2 to 4 lane) along the railway corridor and building a ROB or
RUB junction at the two crossings of the railway track with road.
• Development at the Kharkai riverfront as well as the confluence of the ‘Garam Nala’
with the river.
• Regularize Development.
• Provision of social infrastructure and public open space.
• JNAC (JAMSHEDPUR NOTIFIED AREA COMMITTEE) REPRESENTATIVES
• Bistupur is the highest congested area.
• Major part is covered by TISCO, TELCO, Tata Tinplate Company and their respective
colonies.
• A large part is under unauthorized construction, both on unused leased land to the
Tata Companies and also on private land. The owners of the unauthorized
developments are paying no user charges, nor do the developments obtain any
permission from the authorities for construction.
• The Subarnarekha Riverfront has large stretch of slum pockets, which need to be
rehabilitated and subsequently the riverfront has to be revitalized.
• There is a considerable HMV movement and parking along the movement corridors
within the JNAC area. Business related to HMV movement cause congestion in the
area and roads, especially near the bus terminus.

AIADA (Adityapur Industrial Area Development Authority)

• Most of the forest area either falls within or adjacent to AIADA.

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• Adityapur Notified Area has been demarcated as the area to be developed into a
Special Economic Zone.

Mango notified area committee representatives

• There being only one connection between Jamshedpur and Mango, all the
development has taken place along this road, leading to traffic congestion.
• The Mango area is highly congested and there is very less land available for
expansion / future development.

District planning officer, East Singbhum district

• Mango Bridge is the only bridge (the only lifeline into the city) connecting the city of
Jamshedpur to the northern part, NH33, leading to Ranchi and Kolkata.
• The government, along the Hurlung & Dhanchatari village, has sanctioned a new
bypass road with a new bridge over the Subarnarekha in order to decongest Mango by
detouring the trucks away from the city. A 16crore DPR has been prepared for this
project. A copy of this DPR has been promised by the client to be given to the
consultant.
• The NH33 is also to be widened to a four lane road, over a period of 35years, and the
HMVs form Kolkata, Ghatshila, Chaibasa and Bhubaneshwar need to be restricted
entering Mango.
• The land, 5kms from NH33 to the river can be used for future development on a
priority basis.
• The trucks from TISCO, which presently pass through Mango, needs to be diverted
through a different route and moved out of the city.
• Expansion of Greater Jamshedpur should be considered towards the eastern part of
the existing city, towards Ghorabandha, Hurlung – Dhanchatari hinterland area.
• The riverfront of Subarnarekha River has to be developed by rehabilitating the existing
slum settlements along the river.

Tata Nagar South Eastern Railway

• New proposals for parking spaces, bus termini and other support facilities, has to be
considered keeping in view both the future development of the city as well as the
development of the SEZ in Adityapur.
• The challenges faced by the city needs to be looked into with an objective.

Forest and Irrigation department

• The government has sanctioned a few development proposals near Mango and
Chotagovindpur, which have to be taken into consideration.

Annexure vii
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State building department

• Low rise, sparsely laid out Government quarters are located in such parts of the city
where the land value is very high, and thereby resulting in under utilization of premium
land in the city.
• Suggestion was given by the building department that the option of carving out land for
development of multi-storied structures by demolishing old quarters should be
considered.
• Presently there is no land available for multi-storied development. Land can be made
available be demolishing old development, and thereby making proper utilization of the
land value of the prime areas, as well as releasing land in the congested parts of the
city for public open spaces.

JUSCO (Jamshedpur Utilities & Services Company Ltd.)

Specific surveys and analyses are required to quantify the exact demands and
deficiencies with respect to each category, which will help to set targets and
timelines to achieve the ‘Vision’. The possible milestones outlined for the CDP are
as follows:

• Land Use –
• Formulation of development control guidelines (including building
bye-laws) and zoning regulations
• Provisions to meet the housing demand

• Physical Infrastructure –
• 100% accessibility to potable water
• Sewage disposal with proper treatment
• Efficient solid waste management system with 100% collection
• Regulated and stabilized power supply to all parts of the city
• Provision of basic services to urban squatters and slums
• Increased regional connectivity to support the growing importance of
Jamshedpur as an economic hub
• Increased community accessibility through development of a public
transport system, parking facilities, road infrastructure, and
segregation of goods and through traffic from passenger traffic

• Social Infrastructure –
• Provisions for basic primary education for all ands quality higher
education to stall out-migration of the student population
• Provision of all levels of healthcare facilities within easy access of
the public

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• Provision of neighbourhood recreational spaces and facilities, as


also city level recreational centres

• Environment & Ecology –


• To have sustainable development ensuring that it meets the present
needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet
their needs

Development Strategies – by Stakeholders

Strategies for Urban Development and Growth

• Land use provisions and DC rules to promote diverse economic activities and create
self-sufficient suburbs that are well linked with the other parts of the city
• Reservation of hilltops and hill slopes for green zones, parks etc.
• DC rules to be modified to promote eco city principles
• Allocate land for promotion of cultural activities
• Redevelopment of inner city to preserve the cultural and heritage identity
• Prevent illegal settlements in the future
• Zoning/Reservations for EWS and LIG housing
• Protect and Conserve existing green areas in the city
• Provide adequate land for transportation corridors, transportation hubs and network
including mass transportation to provide safe, efficient and affordable mobility
• Identification of demand for different land use activities and optimisation of land
resources with respect to potential and carrying capacity, land allocation to residential,
commercial, industrial, public / semi-public, open spaces, transport and communication
• Development of zoning regulations and development control guidelines
• Land management systems to handle encroachments and latent development
potential, land pooling, land sharing, etc.
• Rejuvenation and renewal of degenerated urban areas and slums, market areas,
fringe areas, etc.
• Controlling of land speculation, especially in the growth areas like Adityapur, Mango,
etc.

Strategies for Slum Rehabilitation and Urban Poor

• Affordable housing, tenure security, integrated service provision, access to basic


infrastructure and social amenities,
• Rehabilitation of existing slum dwellers inclusive river bank slum dwellers
• Improve the accessibility of education and health facilities for urban poor
• Low rise high density projects to be promoted under Slum Rehabilitation Authority
(SRA) project
• 10% for development of any new housing stock for future migrants on rental/ownership
basis.

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• Registration and Regulation of all workers in the informal sector


• Declare certain areas as hawker zones and make them vehicle free movement

Strategies for Traffic &Transportation

• Road widening, dedicated bus lanes, cycle tracks and improve public transport system
in the short run. Explore the possibility of BRTS, MRTS in the long run.
• Promote public transport by developing dedicated bus lane system
• Segregation of green modes (cycle tracks and pedestrians) from vehicular traffic
• Explore private participation options
• Discourage private vehicle usage by imposing parking fees and declare busy areas/old
city bazaars as vehicle free zones
• Implement computerized signalling for better traffic management
• Conduct Comprehensive Traffic and Transportation Study (CTTS) to plan the public
transport facility. Comprehensive network design (trip generation, trip attraction, trip
distribution and modal split studies to be conducted) and augmentation of road
capacity as per demand, construction of new roads, flyovers, underpasses, etc.
• Development of logistic hub
• Defining dedicated corridor for movement of industrial goods, maximum segregation of
goods traffic and passenger traffic
• Incorporation of facilities for increasing the accessibility of the physically challenged
• Development of peripheral ring road to facilitate bypassing of through traffic.

Strategies for Urban Infrastructure provisions

• Adequacy, reliable and accessibility to core municipal services for all citizens
• Safe, equitable, reliable, adequate water supply
• Reduce transmission and distribution losses
• Identify illegal water connections and discourage public stand posts
• Conduct a leak detection study and reduce the UFW
• Refurbish the old distribution system
• Treat 100 per cent of sewerage generated
• Provide adequate storm water drainage
• Create a Separate Solid Waste Management cell in JMC, with expertise in
Engineering Human Resources/Personnel Management, Communication, Health
• Include ‘Recycling’ in SWM and facilitate and regulate the sector accordingly
• Decentralized Solid Waste Disposal and treatment.
• Enhance Citizen Participation by involvement in source segregation and
outsource the communication campaign to NGOs/ Environmental Organizations.
• Formalize the integration of waste pickers in primary door step collection
• Universal access to clean, affordable sanitation facilities at public places

Annexure x
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Strategies for Socio Cultural development

• Preserve cultural character and encourage tourism appropriate to the city environs
• Provision and maintenance of neighbourhood parks and playgrounds
• Development of public plazas / promenade along the riverfront
• Development of city level recreation facilities, malls, multiplexes, sporting facilities,
libraries, museums, theme parks, community halls, library, auditoriums, etc.

Strategies for Economic development

• Improving infrastructure governance, attracting PPP and creating coordination for


implementing economic policies in the urban region
• Improving infrastructure governance and attracting PPP
• Creating customer friendly governance
• Creating a coordination cell among the various implementing agencies implementing
economic policies in the urban region
• Creating consensus about development priorities
• Creating a Data base and R & D Cell for implementing strategies

Strategies for Urban Governance and Revenue improvement

• Redefining the roles of administration & citizens in order to achieve citizen


empowerment
• Encourage citizens involvement to monitor progress of works and introduce a
public/social audit for monitoring of projects
• Establish Citizen’s Charter in all departments of Municipal cooperation
• Benchmarking the service and financial indicators and implementing the score card
concept for measuring infrastructure, service delivery, and citizen satisfaction on a
regular basis
• Increasing automation to handle routine citizen requests on 24 X 7 basis
• Launch of Public-Private Partnerships to fund large infrastructure projects
• Taxation and user charges to recover full cost, index the annual/periodic increase with
inflation
• Organize & License Informal Sector
• Rationalize Property tax and Octroi
• Move towards stepped tariff or taxes for various services offered by Municipal
Corporation
• Identify measures for expenditure control
• For prudent financial management initiate the process and implement to create
specific funds for pension liability, depreciation, disaster management and
infrastructure fund.

Annexure xi
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Suggestions as received from the stakeholders

Annexure xii
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Annexure xiii
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
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Annexure xiv
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Annexure xv
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
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Annexure xvi
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Annexure xvii
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Annexure xviii
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Annexure xix
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
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ANNEXURE - C
Questionnaire for receiving information from different areas of JUA

During the initial discussion with the government officials of the concerned departments
and the special officers of the different areas of the JUA, the following questionnaire was
given to them to be filled up (for the provision of information), in addition to any other
information that could be provided by them.

Sample Questionnaire
S.No. Query Reply
URBAN GROWTH
What is the total area under current municipal
1
jurisdiction?
2 What is the current extent of urban development?
What are the new areas identified under future
3
development?
POPULATION STATUS
4 What is the Population as per 2001 census?
What is the approximate current population
5
estimation?
What is the percentage of working vis a vis non-
6
working population?
7 What is the workforce participation set-up?
What is the population composition across various
8
religious groups?
What is the population composition across various
9
age groups?
URBAN POOR & SLUMS
What is the number of urban population under
10
poverty level (without access to basic amenities)?
What is the approximate percentage of urban poor
11
as compared to the overall population – current?
What is the approximate percentage of urban poor
12
vice a vice the overall population – future trends?
What is the current employment status of the urban
13
poor?
Are there any employment opportunities and
14 schemes offered by the state government for the
betterment of the urban poor?
What are the various slums in and around the city
15
and its population?
HOUSING
16 What is the household size of the urban poor?

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Sample Questionnaire
S.No. Query Reply
17 What is the household size of regular dwelling?
What is the population living in of government
18
housing?
What is the population living in company
19
accommodation?
20 What is the population living in private housing?
ADMINISTRATIVE SETUP
21 What is the type of administrative set-up?
22 List the key functional departments?
List the strength of municipal employees?
23 Officers
Staff
Is there a development authority present /
24 constituted, if yes attaché copy of development
control regulations & building byelaws?
ADMINISTRATION FINANCIAL STATUS
Receipt & expenditure account status for the
following years?
Year 2001-2002
25 Year 2002-2003
Year 2003-2004
Year 2004-2005
Year 2005-2006
Current funding sources, avenues of the municipal
26
body?
TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION
What is the total road length in the notified area?
National Highway stretch
27 State Highway stretch
City arterial roads
Street roads
What is the average road width in the notified
area?
National highway stretch
28
State highway stretch
City arterial roads
Street roads
What is the pattern of vehicle growth pattern and
modal split?
Year 2001-2002
29
Year 2002-2003
Year 2003-2004
Year 2004-2005

Annexure xxi
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

Sample Questionnaire
S.No. Query Reply
Year 2005-2006
30 What is the road length added in the last decade?
Is public transportation system available in the city,
31
and type of transport?
Is there any proposal for implementation of a public
32
transportation system, and type of transport?
What is the number of bridges and flyovers in the
33
city?
What are the new proposals for new bridges and
34
flyovers?
35 What is the strength of traffic police in the city?
Is there any traffic management system existing or
36
proposed?
What is the type of intermediate transportation
37
system?
How much is the growth of intermediate
transportation system over the years?
Year 2001-2002
38 Year 2002-2003
Year 2003-2004
Year 2004-2005
Year 2005-2006
39 What is the modal split of outside vehicles?
What is the number of authorized parking spaces /
40
lots in the city?
41 What are the new parking proposals?
Is paid parking lots present and what is their
42
pricing structure?
What is the emission recorded over the years?
Year 2001-2002
Year 2002-2003
43
Year 2003-2004
Year 2004-2005
Year 2005-2006
List the intercity bus movement linking the city to
other areas?
44
Daily
Weekly
RAIL CONNECTIVITY
List the number of passenger trains connecting the
city/ municipal area?
45
Daily
Weekly

Annexure xxii
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Sample Questionnaire
S.No. Query Reply
List the number of freight trains connecting the city/
municipal area?
46
Daily
Weekly
What is the average annual passenger volume and
pattern over the years?
Year 2001-2002
47 Year 2002-2003
Year 2003-2004
Year 2004-2005
Year 2005-2006
What is the average fright volume and patter over
the years?
Year 2001-2002
48 Year 2002-2003
Year 2003-2004
Year 2004-2005
Year 2005-2006
AIR CONNECTIVITY
List the current air connectivity status?
Daily
49
Weekly
Cities linked
50 List the air connectivity proposals?
51 What are the sources of power supply?
What is the power supply for industries?
52 Installed capacity
Demand per capita
What is the power supply for non-industrial areas?
53 Installed capacity
Demand per capita
54 List any new power projects planned?
55 List the power cut hours?
56 List the number of streetlights?
MUNICIPAL SERVICES – SEWERAGE & SANITATION
57 What is the type of sewerage system installed?
What is the length of sewerage network?
58 Installed
Proposed
59 List the sewage disposal sites?
What is the volume of sewage generation over the
60 following years?
Year 2001-2002

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Sample Questionnaire
S.No. Query Reply
Year 2002-2003
Year 2003-2004
Year 2004-2005
Year 2005-2006
61 List the installed sewage treatment facilities?
List the sources of water supply?
62 Existing
Proposed
What is the water supply volume?
63 Installed capacity
Demand per capita
64 What is the water supply duration?
What is the population covered with piped water
65
connections?
66 Is the water supply metered?
MUNICIPAL SERVICES – SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SYSTEM
What is the volume of waste generated over the
following years?
Year 2001-2002
67 Year 2002-2003
Year 2003-2004
Year 2004-2005
Year 2005-2006
68 List the various dumping sites?
What is the split between hazardous vis a vis non
69
hazardous waste?
70 Total forest cover area in and around the city?
71 Total agricultural land in and around the city?
List the precipitation data over the following years?
Year 2001-2002
Year 2002-2003
72
Year 2003-2004
Year 2004-2005
Year 2005-2006
List the number of water bodies in and around the
73
city?
List the quality of air or pollution standards
recorded over the following years?
Year 2001-2002
74 Year 2002-2003
Year 2003-2004
Year 2004-2005
Year 2005-2006

Annexure xxiv
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Sample Questionnaire
S.No. Query Reply
INDUSTRY
List the various types of industries established to
75
date?
76 List the various proposed industries?
What are the revenue earnings of the organized
sector over the following years?
Year 2001-2002
77 Year 2002-2003
Year 2003-2004
Year 2004-2005
Year 2005-2006
TOURISM
List the tourism hotspots in and around the city/
78
municipal area?
MISCELLANEOUS
List the key NGO’s present within the city/
79
municipal area?
List the key health establishments within the city/
80
municipal area?
List the key educational establishments within the
81
city/ municipal area?
List the key institutional set-ups within the city/
82
municipal area?
List the key cultural organizations within the city/
83
municipal area?

Annexure xxv
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

ANNEXURE - D
Water Quality Of Subarnarekha River

The Subarnarekha River is an interstate river flowing through the States of Jharkhand,
Orissa and West Bengal. The 450 kilometres long Subarnarekha `the streak of gold’ for its
gold bearing sands originates from Chhotanagpur plateau, about 15 kilometres southeast
of capital city of Ranchi. It flows through plateaus and plains area of Jharkhand for about
324 kilometre, 62 kilometres in Orissa and 64 kilometres in West Bengal before meeting
Bay of Bengal. Major sources of organic and inorganic pollutants are both domestic and
industrial sectors. It is estimated that more than 0.4 million cubic metres of untreated and
partially treated wastewater are discharged daily into the Subarnarekha River. Besides,
certain quantity of uncontrolled discharge of mine waste and allied economic activities in
the basin account for both metallic and non-metallic substances.

The middle stretch of the river from Jamshedpur to Behragora has been chosen for the
present study because:
o The area is densely populated;
o Intensive industrial activities (Jamshedpur to Ghatsila);
o Major urban centres including a place of tourists’ interest (Ghatsila); and,
o River water is used for various purposes besides water supply.

Six sampling stations were identified under the study as U/S Jamshedpur, D/S
Jamshedpur, Jadugora, Ghatsila, Mosabani and Behragora. With specific location-wise
consideration the river water quality, in terms of primary criteria parameters for designated
use, at up and down streams Jamshedpur, Ghatsila and Behragora do not conform to the
desired class `C’ whereas the water quality at Jadugora and Mosabani meets the required
criteria. While considering the study stretch as a whole and the mean values of BOD
(>3mg/l) and Total Coliform Bacteria (>5000 MPN/100 ml), the stretch does not qualify the
desired class. The present status of water quality is summarized in Table 4.11. Besides
the concentration of metals in sediment and in water are presented in Table 4.12 and 4.13

Water quality status of river Subarnarekha

Critical
Present Status of
Assigned Designated Criteria Parame
River Stretch Water Quality
Class Use Parameters ter
pH DO BOD TC
Jamshedpur C Drinking pH : 6-9
8.0 8.1 3 9000 TC
U/S water DO : 4
Jamshedpur C source mg/l or 1600 TC &
7.9 7.6 5
D/S after more 0 BOD
Jadugora C conventio BOD : 3 7.9 7.6 3 2800
Ghatsila C nal mg/l or 7.6 6.9 3 9000 TC
Mosabani C treatment less 7.7 7.8 3 2200

Annexure xxvi
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
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Critical
Present Status of
Assigned Designated Criteria Parame
River Stretch Water Quality
Class Use Parameters ter
pH DO BOD TC
Behragora C and Total
disinfectio Coliform
ns (TC) : TC &
7.4 8.2 5 9000
5000 BOD
MPN/
100ml

Heavy metals content in Water ( µG/L)

Station Fe Pb Zn Mn Cu Cd As Hg Cr Co Ni
Jamshedpur U/S 24.00 NT .05 NT NT NT 0.012 NT NT NT NT
Jamshedpur D/S 28.00 NT NT NT NT NT 0.012 NT NT NT NT
Jadugora 0.15 NT NT NT NT NT 0.012 NT NT NT NT
Ghatsila 0.16 NT NT NT .06 NT 0.01 NT NT NT NT
Mosabani 0.12 NT NT NT .05 NT 0.012 NT NT NT NT
Behragora 0.09 NT NT NT NT NT 0.01 NT NT NT NT

NT = Not Traceable

Heavy metals content in Sediment (MG/KG)

Jamshedpur Jamshedpur Musha Behra


Parameters Jadugora Ghatsila
U/S D/S Bani gora
Lead (Pb) ND ND ND ND ND ND
Cadmium (Cd) ND ND ND ND ND ND
Mercury (Hg) - 1.00 0.70 0.90 3.30 1.80
Arsenic (As) 0.02 0.05 0.03 0.03 0.02 0.02
Cobalt (Co) 13.00 72.00 28.00 51.00 60.00 46.00
Zinc (Zn) 44.00 77.00 34.00 63.00 52.00 33.00
Copper (Cu) 17.00 27.00 15.00 93.00 229.00 57.00
Chromium (Cr) 48.00 72.00 28.00 51.00 60.00 46.00
Manganese (Mn) 440.00 950.00 362.00 500.00 394.00 269.00

Annexure xxvii
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

ANNEXURE - E
Hierarchy of Roads

The present road network structure of the city does not have a clear demarcation of the
hierarchy of roads, both in terms of functionality as well as in terms of road widths. For the
city to have an efficient transportation structure, it is highly recommended that a hierarchy
be maintained in classification of roads. The existing roads of the city should be improved
and widened in order to improve the transportation system of the city. A detailed traffic
survey should be carried out to assess the cost and development of the roads of the city.
The following table and figures illustrate the ideal road structure to be followed in the city.

Hierarchy of Roads

Type of Road Width of Road (ROW) Potential Location


Arterial Road 60.0 m National Highways, State Highways, Ring
Road, roads providing an integrated
network having the characteristics for
serving traffic between large population
centres, generally without stub
connections, roads linking areas, which
attract travel over long distances and
generally provide for relatively high
overall travel speeds with minimum
interference to through traffic movement.
Generally provide for at least inter-county
or interstate service and are spaced at
intervals consistent with population
density.

Sub Arterial 45.0 m City Main Roads, which collect traffic for
Road arterial type roads, make connections
within the grid of the city arterial system.

Annexure xxviii
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Type of Road Width of Road (ROW) Potential Location

Collector Road 18.0 m Roads connecting neighbourhoods to city


main roads, collect traffic from local roads
and bring it to the arteries thereby
bringing all developed areas, smaller
communities and locally important traffic
generators within a reasonable distance
of the arterial or sub arterial roads.

Neighbourhood 12.0 m Local roads primarily providing access to


Road adjoining land and short distance travel
service compared to arterials, sub
arterials and collectors.

Annexure xxix
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

Type of Road Width of Road (ROW) Potential Location


Neighbourhood 9.0 m Roads which are located within
Street communities serving residential and other
urban type settings

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ANNEXURE - F
Action Plan For Implementation

Sector/ Strategy Key Actions Authority Surveys to be


Responsible Conducted
Administrative Development
Set up of an efficient Constituting a Centralized Municipal Study to be
Municipal structure Urban Development and Council, done on the
Public participation Management Authority Administrative organizational
Right to Information Setting up of Jamshedpur Head, structure of
Dissemination Information Center – NGO various
instituting e-governance. Various active medium towns.
Developing cooperation organization
between existing urban
management authorities
like JUSCO, AIDC etc. for
integrated and
coordinated urban
development.
Economic Development
Develop collaboration Revenue Economic
and association between Department of J study to be
institutions and MC conducted.
industries of PPP
Joint Coordination and
Jamshedpur U.A. to
curriculum development,
further establish the
facilitation of R&D for
dynamic role of
industries in institutions,
Jamshedpur U.A. as the
impart training in
Industrial Node of
institutions by industry
Jharkhand.
Feasibility Study needs to
Better air connectivity
be conducted for location
and associated
of International and Cargo
infrastructure. Air cargo
Airport and PPP options
facilities to be provided
to be explored.
to cater to the export
demand from the small-
scale industries and the
developing SEZ.
Land Use
Rationalization of land A Development Plan / Town Planning Detail land use
use distribution in Master Plan to be Department of J survey to be
different areas of prepared for the entire MC conducted.
Jamshedpur U.A. combined area of the NGO Detail 7/12
Discourage development Jamshedpur Urban PPP extract to be
in critical, ecologically Agglomeration, to ensure Various collected and
sensitive areas regularized and structured organization and stored properly
Check speculative Urban development of the city. People from various
Growth Decongesting areas participation is wards.
Integrated urban through relocation of must while Detail land
development strategy unauthorized settlements, preparing the records to be

Annexure xxxi
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Sector/ Strategy Key Actions Authority Surveys to be


Responsible Conducted
Business Districts and especially in Jugsalai, and land use maps. maintained.
commercial areas to be parts of JNA like Hurlung Land use maps
strategically located in Basti. and land use
different parts of the city. Organizing the statement to be
Compatibility of Land commercial and prepared.
uses (compatibility with transportation hubs like Land use maps
transportation) interstate and local bus to be kept open
Facilitate housing for termini and truck terminals for public
student population and for the industries. viewing for
transit shelters for the Integration of the objections and
EWS/ LIG working class peripheral areas like suggestions.
(industrial labour) Parsudihi, Bagbera,
population Kitadihi, Sarjamdah,
Peri-urban development Chhotagovindpur,
needs focus and Ghorabandha and Gadra,
integrate with and provide connectivity
transportation networks and other infrastructure to
through coordinated these places.
efforts from JMC with The building regulation
regional and district town policies to be framed to
planning authorities. encourage decongestion
The economic of the different areas
development that is through:
taking place in the Commercial and
surrounding areas of Mixed Use Building
Adityapur, Mango, etc. Norms.
as well as the FSI Norms &
development in Incentives
Jamshedpur city is Parking Norms
influencing the growth Specific Regulations-
management of the city. Accommodation and
Thus there is need for Reservation
having one unified TDR (Transfer of
municipal authority Development Rights)
(Jamshedpur Municipal Critical locations with
Corporation) or respect to environmental
Coordination cell of all sensitivity need to be
planning and identified and demarcated
implementing agencies by the town-planning
within Jamshedpur department.
Urban Agglomeration. Special DCR need to be
Identify open spaces to made applicable to these
create these spaces as areas to restrict any
lungs of the city. encroachments and
unauthorised
developments.
Encourage builders /
developers to develop
hostels, working women’s
hostels under incentives.
These aspects will need
to be taken into account in
the new Development

Annexure xxxii
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Sector/ Strategy Key Actions Authority Surveys to be


Responsible Conducted
Plan to be prepared.
The potential
development areas in the
peripheral areas need to
be linked through an
efficient arterial structure
(ring road) at the
periphery of the city.
These would provide
alternatives to these areas
bypassing the core of the
city resulting in
decongesting the city
core. The arterial structure
is proposed in such a way
to take care of future
vehicular growth and
hence undertake an
exercise to widen these
roads and connect the
missing links.
Provision of adequate
land for transportation
corridors, transportation
hubs and network
including mass
transportation to provide
safe efficient and
affordable mobility. In
addition redensification of
certain areas need to be
explored so that the
infrastructure is cost
effective and open spaces
are created.
Carry out study to identify
corridors where
densification is possible
JMC/JNAC/AIADA/MNAC
needs to have a
coordination cell or JMDA
(Jamshedpur Metropolitan
Development Authority) to
be established for
planning functions alone
(land use and major
infrastructure)
Modify the DCR
accordingly
The area under the open
spaces category needs to
be increased through
identification of such

Annexure xxxiii
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Final Report

Sector/ Strategy Key Actions Authority Surveys to be


Responsible Conducted
potential areas.
Use of market friendly
mechanisms like
accommodation and
reservation to generate
more urban land and to
further generate open
space.
Urban Environment
Conserve Environmental Identification of sources Detail study of
resources and points of pollution. sound pollution
Slum Networking Greening of the City by and air
Air Quality Monitoring developing public parks pollution to be
A framework for air and gardens, street side carried out
pollution monitoring and plantation, etc.
management to be in The protection of water
place bodies, lakes and open
Solid waste disposal and spaces from further
management encroachments shall be
Riverfront development carried out in a co-
and conservation of the coordinated way. The
natural water bodies and river/ tank bunds should
reservoirs. be clearly marked and
Reduce waste notified so as to prevent
generation further encroachment.
Upgradation of religious De-silting shall be carried
structures/ precincts out to increase the water
Removal of holding capacity and to
encroachment along remove the toxic and
roads hazardous materials that
reached the river / tank
beds.
Hydraulic capacity of the
nallahs and water bodies
must be improved through
widening and deepening
and construction of
sidewalls.
Treatment and disposal of
industrial waste such as
slag and ash, as well as
treatment of discharged
water from industries.
Slum networking would
involve mapping and
integrating slum locations
and the natural drainage
paths of the town with the
parks, playgrounds etc to
form a continuous network
of green corridor. The
approach is to help build
infrastructure in an

Annexure xxxiv
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Final Report

Sector/ Strategy Key Actions Authority Surveys to be


Responsible Conducted
economical way also
targeting the
environmental
improvement of the
surroundings.
Providing public amenities
such as public toilets,
drinking water kiosks, etc.
Humanizing urban
environment by
introducing Street
Furniture, landscaping,
etc.
Public hygiene and Health
Facilities including
hospitals, blood banks,
nursing homes and other
related establishments
Coordination with JPCB
(Jharkhand Pollution
Control Board) to install
air quality monitoring
stations.
At least 10 air quality
monitoring stations to be
setup at select locations in
the city (at busy junctions
and near industrial
estates) and main
parameters such as CO
and HC shall be
monitored as per the
guidelines.
It is imperative to
establish a database on
air quality indicators and
initiate research on health
impacts of particulate
matter. The database
shall include sources,
emission concentrations
and identify non-
scheduled industrial and
commercial premises in
the city with air pollution
potential so as to develop
emission reduction
strategies.
To be made possible
through awareness
creation and eliciting
active community
involvement in source

Annexure xxxv
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Sector/ Strategy Key Actions Authority Surveys to be


Responsible Conducted
segregation practices.
Take a pro-active role in
sensitizing the
communities on waste
minimization through a
robust awareness
campaign and education
with support of NGOs and
other agencies.
Urban Poor/ Slums
Rehabilitation of slums Instituting Slum Slum Detail list of no
away from core city, yet improvement and improvement of slums, slum
maintaining the rehabilitation program authority population and
sustainable livelihood Allocate funds for slum infrastructure to
options. improvement be done
The decision making for Identify the slums and Slum
prioritization of projects announce the budgeted population
for slums shall be shifted amount. Prioritizing of maps to be
from JMC to grass roots projects and project prepared
level. JMC playing the implementations with
role of facilitator and active participation from
financer. beneficiaries
Awareness among Hold frequent meetings of
beneficiaries towards the slum dwellers along
project implementation with the officials (ward
Social audit conducted officer) wherein the
through formation of beneficiaries can give
Vigilance committees their contribution to
Make beneficiaries project development and
partners in their own also take the responsibility
development works and of implementing these
implementation. projects
The beneficiaries should
be educated on the
project, which is being
planned in their
neighborhood so that to
monitor the project better.
Form groups among the
beneficiaries and involve
them in the
implementation of the
projects. Educate them on
the importance of proper
sanitation, pucca housing
and education for
children.
Encourage beneficiary
contribution in order to
ensure responsibility and
ownership of new housing
by the dwellers.
Transportation systems and Traffic Management

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Sector/ Strategy Key Actions Authority Surveys to be


Responsible Conducted
Road widening, Gauge the willingness Traffic and Origin and
dedicated bus lanes, among the public to use transportation cell of destination
cycle tracks and improve public transportation JMC survey on the
public transport system system. major roads to
in the short run. Explore A private agency may be be carried out.
the possibility of MRTS appointed to ensure that Detail Traffic
in the long run. the public transport and
Segregation of civic and system runs efficiently Transportation
industrial traffic Hawker zones must be studied to be
movement. created and continuous proposed.
Diversion / bypassing efforts must be made by
heavy vehicle movement the JMC to avoid
away from the city. encroachments
Discourage private Re-planning of the old
vehicle usage bazaars in order to bring
Parking Provisions for about efficient utilization
trucks and local vehicles of space
Exploring possibilities of Provide for dedicated
development of an parking spaces for cars,
airport two wheelers, buses and
trucks at relevant parts of
the city.
Enforce parking charges
especially in prime areas.
Explore PPP options for
such enforcement.
PPP options must be
explored to develop cycle
tracks. The target usage
audience can be the
students and the industrial
workforce.
Exploring possibilities of
developing a ring road
network
Road widening in
congested areas and
select routes
Coordinated efforts
between various planning
authorities.
Development of Modern
Bus Depots and bus
stands at convenient
locations
Implementation of Mass
transport system
Development of Extensive
Roads and Flyover
Network to improve local
and regional connectivity
Instituting a Traffic
management and

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Sector/ Strategy Key Actions Authority Surveys to be


Responsible Conducted
administration setup
Implement computerized
signalling for better traffic
management
Municipal Finance
Increasing revenue Regularize development, Revenue Detail Financial
generation land registration and Department Assessment
In addition to revenue imposition of proper tax pertaining to
mobilization JMC need system for municipal Capital
to explore expenditure service provided. investment
reduction measures Increasing realization from plan, Detail
towards energy existing taxes (within expenditure
efficiency, fuel existing tax structure plan,
consumption and other parameters) through Expenditure
items where reduction is better identification, receipts,
possible after conducting billing, assessment, Financial
proper cost audit of all collection and Operational
major items of enforcement Plan to be
expenditure. Carrying out changes in carried out.
Controlling the growth of tax structure (principles
expenditure underlying purpose, tax
Leveraging available base, rates, slabs,
surpluses/ own exemptions, rebates, etc.)
resources Introducing new sources
of revenue like cesses
(Conservancy cess); and
o Introducing
stepped tariff
structure for
water
connections
(This would
require
complete
metering of all
connections
in the city)
Identify and assess the
sector wise expenditure to
categories specific
expenditure control
measures
Appoint an agency for
carrying out a cost audit of
all the expenditure
incurred service wise
Making all-round
improvements in the tax
administration process to
facilitate revenue
generation;
Improving the quality of
accounting, budgeting and

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Sector/ Strategy Key Actions Authority Surveys to be


Responsible Conducted
financial management
processes to facilitate
improved Management
Information Systems
(MIS) and better cost
control
Legal and policy changes
to widen the revenue base
of the Corporation
Communicating with the
public and within the
organization to build
popular support for the
reform initiatives
Outsourcing high energy
consuming maintenance
works of municipal
services to target energy
efficiency with revenue
sharing model.
Outsourcing non-
administrative and non-
technical operations of
most of the municipal
functions like
o Property Tax
database
management,
demand
notices
generation,
arrears
collection etc
o Non-core
functions in
the Vehicle/
workshop
department
Instead of trying to meet
adhoc and minor capital
works from internal
generation, available
surpluses need to be
leveraged to realize long
term funding options from
external sources to
implement major and
large scale city
development works in the
wake of raising demand
and several DPRs waiting
for implementation.
Water Supply

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Final Report

Sector/ Strategy Key Actions Authority Surveys to be


Responsible Conducted
Safe, equitable, reliable, Reduce transmission and Detail survey of the
adequate water supply distribution losses water distribution to
Develop an integrated Identify illegal water be done
water supply system connections and
Use of Suwarnarekha discourage public stand
River as potential water post
source Conduct a leak detection
Provision of water supply study and reduce the
from reservoirs to UFW
enhance capacities Conduct a study to check
Additional source the quality of water being
identification of potable supplied
water Potential and existing
polluting sources need to
be checked. Systems
refurbishments shall be
taken up.
Capacities to be sourced
from Dimma Reservoir to
be integrated with CLBC
Prepare an Asset
inventory and map the
water supply systems for
effective monitoring
Conduct an energy audit
Sewerage and sanitation
Ensure no sewerage is Decentralize the system Sewerage and
let untreated into the of operations for effective sanitation survey to
water bodies in and service delivery be conducted
outside the city. Ensure location of STPs
Universal access to in proper location such
clean, affordable that the benefits are
sanitation facilities at maximized.
public places. Provision of
Provision of Centralized comprehensive
Sewage Treatment underground drainage
Plants and sewerage system.
Improving and ensuring
access to sanitary
facilities for the urban
poor and slum dwellers.
Encourage pay & use
category Public
Conveniences with
community involvement in
maintenance of the same.
Solid Waste Management
Centralized location of a Create a Separate Solid Detail survey of
Solid Waste Dumping Waste Management cell solid waste
ground at a proper in JMC, with expertise in management to be
location in or in the Engineering Human carried out.
outskirts of the city. Resources/Personnel
Enhance Citizen Management,

Annexure xl
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

Sector/ Strategy Key Actions Authority Surveys to be


Responsible Conducted
Participation by Communication, Health
involvement in source I-E-C campaigns to be
segregation and initiated for awareness
outsource the among urban poor and
communication slum dwellers towards
campaign to NGOs/ better SWM practices
Environmental Institutionalize rag-pickers
Organizations. association and integrate
Ensure source them into the system in
segregation and door-to- primary collection
door collection activities.
Implementing collection of
solid waste and disposal
system
Social Infrastructure
Even and adequate Retain the identity of the Detail listing of
distribution of social city by ensuring urban all the existing
amenities design guidelines and social
Adequate provision of controls amenities
educational institutes. Development of shopping should be
Preserve cultural facilities such as shopping done.
character and encourage malls, markets, haat- The maps
tourism appropriate to bazaars, etc. showing all the
the city environs Social and Recreational social
Facilities such as amenities to be
Theaters, community prepared.
centers, banquet halls,
sports stadia, libraries,
etc.
Higher Educational
Facilities such as
professional institutions,
high schools, integrated
educational complexes
etc.

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Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

ANNEXURE – G
Fingerprint Analysis Requirements for Hazardous Wastes - TSD Facilities

Method of Analysis Fingerprint Analysis by the Operators of TSD Facilities


Physical Analysis Physical State of the waste (liquid/slurry/sludge/semi-
solid/solid: inorganic/organic/metallic)
Identification of different phases of the wastes (in cases of
solid wastes contained in aqueous/non-aqueous
liquids/solutions for slurries and sludge)
Colour & Textures
Whether the waste is multi-layered (yes/no)? If yes,
quantify each layer
Specific Gravity
Viscosity
USEPA, SW-846; Method Flash Point
1010 and 1020 Loss on ignition at 105˚ C
Loss on ignition at 650˚ C
USEPA, SW-846; Method Paint Filter Liquid Test (PFLT)
9095
USEPA, SW-846; Method Liquid Release Test (LRT)
9096
Chemical Analysis
USEPA, SW-846; Method pH
9040, 9041 and 9045
USEPA, SW-846; Vol. 1C Reactive Cyanide (ppm)
Part II; Test Method to
determine HCN released
from Wastes
USEPA, SW-846; Vol. 1C Reactive Sulfide (ppm)
Part II; Test Method to
determine H2S released
from Wastes

Concentration Limits/Criteria for Acceptance of Hazardous Wastes for Direct


Disposal to Secured Landfill

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Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

Leachate Quality *
Concentration
pH 4 - 12
Total Phenols < 100 mg/l
Arsenic < 1 mg/l
Lead < 2 mg/l
Cadmium < 0.2 mg/l
Chromium-VI < 0.5 mg/l
Copper < 10 mg/l
Nickel < 3 mg/l
Mercury < 0.1 mg/l
Zinc < 10 mg/l
Fluoride < 50 mg/l
Ammonia < 1,000 mg/l
Cyanide < 2 mg/l
Nitrate < 30 mg/l
Adsorbable organic bound Chlorine < 3 mg/l
Water soluble compounds except salts < 10%
Calorific value < 2500 K.Cal/kg
Strength
Transversal strength (Vane Testing) > 25 KN/m2
Unconfined Compression Test >50 KN/m2
Axial Deformation < 20 %
Degree of Mineralization or Content of Organic Materials (Original Sample)
< 20% by weight
(For non-biodegradable waste)
Annealing loss of the dry residue at < 5% by weight
550°C (For biodegradable waste)
Extractible Lipophilic contents (Oil & < 4% by weight
Grease)
* Leachate quality is based on Water Leach Test

Leachate Disposal Standards

S. Parameter Standards (mg/l)


No Inland STP CETP Marine Coastal
Surface (See note) Areas
Additional Parameters Recommended
1. Adsorbable Organic 0.50 - - 0.50
Halogens (AOX)
2. Poly Aromatic Hydrocarbons 0.059 - - 0.059
(PAH) (each)
3. Benzene 0.14 - - 0.14
4. Toluene 0.08 - - 0.08
5. Xylene (sum of o, m, p- 0.32 - - 0.32
xylene)

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Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

Note :

1. In addition to the above, General Standards for discharge of environment pollutants


Part-A: Effluents notified, vide G.S. R. 422 (E), dated 19.5.1993 and published in
the Gazette No. 174, dated 19.5.1993 under the Environment (Protection) Act,
1986, and rules made thereunder, shall also be applicable for disposal of leachate
into sewage treatment plant, common effluent treatment plant, Inland surface water
bodies or coastal areas.

2. For each CETP and its constituent units, the SPCB/PCC shall prescribe standards
as per the local needs and conditions; these can be more stringent than those
prescribed above. However, in case of clusters of units, the SPCB/PCC may
prescribe suitable limits.

3. Leachates having high COD shall be concentrated through evaporation (forced)


and fed to the incinerator of the integrated TSDF in view of its high calorific value,
and the residue ash shall be disposed off in their secured landfill.

4. The Bioassay test shall be substituted by ‘Fish Toxicity’ test, and a dilution factor of
2 (two) may be considered.

Emission Standards for Common Hazardous Wastes Incinerator

A. Flue Gas Emission Standards

Treated flue gas emissions discharge through stack to atmosphere shall always be
less than or equal to the following parameter-specific emission standards:

Parameter Emission standard


Particulates 50 mg/Nm3 Standard refers to half hourly average value
HCl 50 mg/Nm3 Standard refers to half hourly average value
SO2 200 mg/Nm3 Standard refers to half hourly average value
CO 100 mg/Nm3 Standard refers to half hourly average value
50 mg/Nm3 Standard refers to daily average value
Total Organic Carbon 20 mg/Nm3 Standard refers to half hourly average value
HF 4 mg/Nm3 Standard refers to half hourly average value
NOx (NO and NO2 400 mg/Nm3 Standard refers to half hourly average value
expressed as NO2)
Total dioxins and 0.1 ng Standard refers to 6-8 hours sampling.
furans TEQ/Nm3 Please refer guidelines for 17 concerned
congeners for toxic equivalence values to
arrive at total toxic equivalence.
Cd + Th + their 0.05 mg/Nm3 Standard refers to sampling time anywhere
compounds between 30 minutes and 8 hours.
Hg and its 0.05 mg/Nm3 Standard refers to sampling time anywhere
compounds between 30 minutes and 8 hours.

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Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

Parameter Emission standard


Sb + As + Pb + Cr + 0.05 mg/Nm3 Standard refers to sampling time anywhere
Co + Cu + Mn + Ni between 30 minutes and 8 hours.
+ V + their
compounds
Note: All values corrected to 11% oxygen on a dry basis.

B. Operating Standards:

I. All the facilities shall be designed to achieve a minimum temperature of 1100°C


in secondary combustion chamber and with a gas residence time in secondary
combustion chamber not less than 2 (two) seconds.

II. The incineration facilities after initial operation of minimum one year, as per the
guidelines and standards, can submit a proposal for relaxation in temperature
and retention time requirement if it can be demonstrated that the flue gas
standards and operation standards can be complied with at lower temperatures
and residence times. The State Pollution Control Board / Pollution Control
Committee, upon successful demonstration of compliance with flue gas
standards by the facility, can recommend the proposal made by the incineration
facility for relaxation in temperature and residence time, but in any case not less
than 950 °C and 1.5 seconds, for the consideration and approval of the Central
Board.

III. Incineration plants shall be operated (combustion chambers) with such


temperature, retention time and turbulence, so as to achieve Total Organic
Carbon (TOC) content in the slag and bottom ashes less than 3%, or their loss
on ignition is less than 5% of the dry weight of the material.

IV. Guidelines published by the Central Board from time to time for common
incineration facilities shall be referred for implementation.

V. All the project proposals submitted for establishment of the common incineration
facilities shall be examined and cleared by the Task Force constituted by the
Central Board.

Notification of compliance: The operator of the incinerator shall undertake comprehensive


performance test. Within 90 days of completion of comprehensive performance test, the
operator shall issue a notification of compliance documenting compliance or non-
compliance, as the case may be, for public information / notice.

Annexure xlv
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

ANNEXURE – H

Estimation of Landfill Capacity, Landfill Height, Landfill Area

1 Current Waste Generation per year W (tons per year)


Estimated rate of increase (or decrease) of waste
generation per year (use rate of population growth
where waste generation growth rate estimates are not
2 available) x (percent)
3 Proposed life of landfill (in years) n (years)
4 Waste generation after n years W (1+x/100)n (tons per year)
T = 1/2 [W+W(1+x/100)n]
5 Total Waste generation in n years (T) in tons (tons)
Total volume of waste in n years (Vw) (on the
6 assumption of 0.85 t/cu.m density of waste) Vw = T/0.85 (cu.m)
Total volume of daily cover in n years (Vdc) (on the
basis of 15cm soil cover on top and sided for lift
7 height of 1.5 to 2 m) Vdc = 0.1 Vw (cu.m)
Total volume required for components of liner system
and of cover system {on assumption of 1.5m thick
liner system (including leachate collection layer) and
1.0m thick cover system (including gas collection
8 layer)} Vc = kVw (cu.m)
(k = 0.25 for 10m high landfill, 0.125 for 20m high landfill and 0.08 for 30m high
landfill. This is valid for landfills where width of landfill is significantly larger than the
height)
Volume likely to become available within 10years due
9 to settlement / biodegradation of waste Vs = m Vw
(m = 0.10 for biodegradable waste; m will be less than 0.05 for incinerated / inert
waste)
10 First estimate of landfill capacity (Ci) Ci = Vw + Vd + Vc - Vs (cu.m)
Likely shape of landfill in plan and section (to be
based on topography of area, depth to ground water
table and other factors like: area type, trench type,
11 slope type, valley type, combination)
12 First estimate of landfill height and area
a Restricted area available Ar (sq.m)
Area required for infrastructure facilities 0.15 Ar
Area available for land filling 0.85 Ar
Average landfill height required (first estimate) above Hi = Ci / 0.9 Ar (m) (valid for
base level area type landfill)
b No limitation on area

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Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

Possible maximum average landfill height (first Hi (typically between 10 to 20


estimate) m, rarely above 30m)
Ai = Ci / Hi (sq.m) (valid for
Area required for landfilling separations area type landfill)
Total area required (including infrastructural facilities)
(first estimate) A = 1.15 Ai
Refinement in estimates of landfill capacities, landfill
13 height and landfill area:
After obtaining the initial estimates, the volume of daily cover as well as volume of
liner system and cover system can be revised keeping in view the shape of the landfill
as well as on the basis of whether materials of daily cover, liner system and cover
system will be excavated from within the landfill site.
Taking these revised values into account, refined estimates of landfill capacity, height
and area can be made.
It may be noted that landfill capacity values will undergo revision during operation of
the landfill when waste quantities delivered at the site vary from the generation rates
estimated prior to the start of landfill operations.

A TYPICAL EXAMPLE (PRELIMINARY DESIGN)

The example given below is applicable for preliminary design of a landfill. Detailed design
is not covered in this example. The word “tentative” is used wherever adequate
information was not available and when an adhoc estimate has been made.

BASIC DATA
Location : Delhi
Waste Generation : 1000 tonnes per day (current)
Design life : Active period = 16 years
Closure and Post Closure
Period = 25 years
Topography : Flat ground
Sub soil : Sandy SILT up to 20 m below ground
surface, underlain by bedrock
Water table : 10m below ground surface
Average Total Precipitation : 750 mm per year
Base year : 1998 prices

LANDFILL CAPACITY, LANDFILL HEIGHT, LANDFILL AREA

Current Waste Generation = 1000 tonnes per day

Estimated Waste Generation after 16 years = 1700 tonnes per day

Total Waste Generation in 16 years = 0.5 (1000 + 17000) x 365 x 16

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Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

= 7 x 10 6 tons
Total Waste Volume (assumed density 0.85 tonnes / cu.m) = (7 x 10 6 ) / 0.85
= 8.25 x 10 6 cu.m
6
Volume of Daily Cover = 0.1 x 8.25 x 10
= 0.825 x 10 6
Volume of Liner and Cover Systems = 0.125 x 8.25 x10 6
= 1.03 x 10 6 cu.m
= 0.825 x 10 6 cu.m
First Estimate of Landfill Volume = (8.25 + 0.825 + 1.03 – 0.825) x 10 6
= 9.28 x 10 6 cu.m

Likely Shape of Landfill


Rectangular in plan (length: width = 2: 1)
Primarily above ground level, partly belowground level.

Area Restrictions: Nil

Possible maximum landfill height = 20 m

Area required = (9.28 x 10 6) / 20


= 4.15 x 10 5 sq.m
= 41.5 Hectares

Approximate Plan Dimensions = 450 m x 900 m

Actual Landfill Section and Plan : Discussed in Section 17. A 2.3

LANDFILL SECTION AND PLAN

Landfill Section and Plan is evaluated on the basis of

4: 1 side slope for the above ground portion of the landfill.


2: 1 side slope for the below ground portion of the landfill.
Material balance for daily cover, liner and final cover material through excavation at site.
Extra space around the waste filling area for infrastructural facilities.

Additional 30 m land is acquired around the landfill to place infrastructure facilities. Final
size of landfill = 572 m x 1172 m.

LANDFILL PHASES

Active life of landfill = 16 years

Duration of one phase = one year

Number of phases = 16. Each phase extends from base to final cover

Annexure xlviii
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

Volume of one phase = Landfill capacity / 16

Plan area of phase = (Volume of one phase) landfill height


= 240 m x 120 m (approx)

Number of daily cells = 365

Plan area of one cell / on the basis of 2.0 m lift of each cell = (Volume of one cell) / 2.0
= 22 x 42 m (approx)

LANDFILL INFRASTRUCTURE & LAYOUT

Site Fencing : All around the landfill

Weighbridges : Two weighbridges of 50T capacity


(computerized) : (entry and exit ) with office

Administrative office : 30 m x 10 m building

Site control office : 3 m x 5 m (portable cabin)

Access road
Main Access Road : 7m wide; from main road to parking area after weigh – bridge
Arterial Road : 3.5 m wide all along the periphery

Waste Inspection and Sampling Facility: Nil; to be done at landfill area.

Equipment Workshop and Garage: 30 m x 20 m building

Vehicle Cleaning: Within the Workshop

Other Facilities:
Temporary Holding Area: Excavated portion of half phase to be used
Surface water drain: Adjacent to arterial road along periphery
Leachate collection pipe: Adjacent to arterial road along periphery
Leachate holding tank: 20 m x 10 m x 3 m
Leachate treatment facility: 40 m x 20 m (in plan) (tentative)
Gas Flaring facility: 20 m x 10 m (in plan) (tentative)
Surface water sedimentation tank: 40 x 10 x 1.5 m

LINEAR AND LEACHATE COLLECTION SYSTEM

Liner System

The liner system will comprise of the following layers below the waste:

Annexure xlix
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

0.30 m thick drainage layer comprising of Badarpur sand (coarse sand) or gravel (stone
dust with no fines)
0.2 m thick protective payer of sandy silt (Delhi silt)
1.50 mm thick HDPE geo-membrane
1.0 m thick clay layer / amended soil layer (since clay is not easily available in Delhi,
amended soil layer comprising of local soil + bentonite is to be designed)

Amended Soil Layer Design Through Laboratory Testing

Sandy silt mixed with bentonite in proportions of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 % in laboratory and


permeability determined. Minimum bentonite content determined for achieving
permeability of less than 10–9 m / sec. 5 % Bentonite + sandy silt assumed in preliminary
design.

Leachate Evaluation

Average Total Precipitation in Delhi = 750 mm / year


Only one phase is operative every year
Plan area of operating phase = 29000 sq.m
Assuming 80 % precipitation in 4 months (monsoon period), peak Leachate quantity
(thumb rule basis) = 200 cu. M. per day (To be confirmed by HELP or other software)

Leachate Collection Pipes

Diameter of HDPE pipes (perforated) = 15 cm


Spacing of pipe required (hydraulic analysis) = 22 m

Leachate Holding Tank

Size of holding 3 days of Leachate = 20 m x 10 m x 3m

COVER SYSTEM DESIGN

Cover System

The cover system will comprise of the following layer above the waste

0.45 m thick gas collection layer comprising of gravel (stone dust with no fines)
0.6 m thick barrier layer (sandy silt + 5 % bentonite)
0.3 m thick surface layer of local top soil for vegetative growth

Passive Gas Vents

Passive gas vents 1 m high (above ground surface) will be provided at a spacing of 75 m x
75 m.

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Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

SURFACE WATER DRAINAGE SYSTEM

Surface Water Runoff


Average Total Precipitation in Delhi = 750 mm / year
Peak discharge rate reaching drainage channel = 0.064 cu.m / sec
Dimensions of drainage channel
Depth = 0.6 m, Base width = 0.6 m, side slopes = 3: 1

Sedimentation Tank
To remove suspended particles of size 40 microns and above tank size required
= 40x15 x 1.5
ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEM

Ground Water Monitoring Wells


Numbers = 6 ( 1 up-gradient well ; 5 wells along the sides in down-gradient direction ; all
wells 30 m away from landfill)

Lysimeters
Numbers = 2 lysimeter under each phase. Total Nos. = 32

Gas Monitors
Two portable gas monitors for landfill gas

Samples
Stainless steel / HDPE samples (25 nos ) for
Ground water samples
Leachate samples in vertical risers / wells

Grab samplers for landfill gas (25 nos) at


Passive vents
Gas wells

Down-hole Monitors
One multi parameter down hole ground water monitoring system

Annexure li
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

Estimation of Landfill Capacity, Landfill Height, Landfill Area for Jamshedpur


Urban Agglomeration

Sr Base of Jamshedpur Case


No Description Calculation Year 2031 Year 2014 Year 2031
Current Waste Generation 349.14 (MT
1 per year W (tons per year) 127,436 127,436 per day)
Estimated rate of increase
(or decrease) of waste
generation per year (use
rate of population growth
where waste generation Population
growth rate estimates are growth rate
2 not available) x (percent) 36.4 36.4 36.4 (%)
Proposed life of landfill (in
3 years) n (years) 20 8 25 Years
n
Waste generation after n W (1+x/100) (tons
4 years per year) 63,325,633 1,526,889 MT per year
T = 1/2
Total Waste generation in n [W+W(1+x/100)n]n
5 years (T) in tons (tons) 634,530,687 6,617,300 273,750
Total volume of waste in n
years (Vw) (on the
assumption of 0.85 t/cu.m
6 density of waste) Vw = T/0.85 (cu.m) 746,506,691 7,785,059 322,059
Total volume of daily cover
in n years (Vd) (on the basis
of 15cm soil cover on top
and sided for lift height of 1.5
7 to 2 m) Vd = 0.1 Vw (cu.m) 74,650,669 778,506 32,206
Total volume required for
components of liner system
and of cover system {on
assumption of 1.5m thick
liner system (including
leachate collection layer)
and 1.0m thick cover system
(including gas collection
8 layer)} Vc = kVw (cu.m) 59,720,535 622,805 25,765
(k = 0.25 for 10m high landfill, 0.125 for 20m high landfill and 0.08 for 30m high landfill. This is valid for
landfills where width of landfill is significantly larger than the height)
Volume likely to become
available within 10years due
to settlement /
9 biodegradation of waste Vs = m Vw 74,650,669 778,506 32,206
(m = 0.10 for biodegradable waste; m will be less tha 0.05 for incinerated / inert waste)

Annexure lii
Jamshedpur City Development Plan under JNNURM
Final Report

Sr Base of Jamshedpur Case


No Description Calculation Year 2031 Year 2014 Year 2031
First estimate of landfill Ci = Vw + Vd + Vc -
10 capacity (Ci) Vs (cu.m) 806,227,226 8,407,863 347,824
Likely shape of landfill in plan and section (to be based on topography of area, depth to ground water
11 table and other factors like: area type, trench type, slope type, valley type, combination)
12 First estimate of landfill height and area
(10+20+30+
40) = 100
a Restricted area available Ar (sq.m) 404,700 404,700 404,700 Acres
Area required for
infrastructure facilities 0.15 Ar 60,705 60,705 60,705
Area available for land filling 0.85 Ar 343,995 343,995 343,995
Average landfill height Hi = Ci / 0.9 Ar (m)
required (first estimate) (valid for area type
above base level landfill) 2,214 23 0.95
b No limitation on area
Hi (typically
between 10 to 20
Possible maximum average m, rarely above Acres (till
landfill height (first estimate) 30m) 30 30 30 2031)
Ai = Ci / Hi (sq.m)
Area required for land filling (valid for area type
separations landfill) 26,874,241 280,262 11,594
Total area required
(including infrastructural
facilities) (first estimate) A = 1.15 Ai 30,905,377 322,301 13,333
Refinement in estimates of
landfill capacities, landfill
13 height and landfill area:
After obtaining the initial estimates, the volume of daily cover as well as volume of liner system and
cover system can be revised keeping in view the shape of the landfill as well as on the basis of whether
materials of daily cover, liner system and cover system will be excavated from within the landfill site.
Taking these revised values into account, refined estimates of landfill capacity, height and area can be
made.
It may be noted that landfill capacity values will undergo revision during operation of the landfill when
waste quantities delivered at the site vary from the generation rates estimated prior to the start of
landfill operations.

Annexure liii