Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students

in spring 2006

Introduction
“Net Impact goes beyond coursework and club activities. It speaks more to the orientation of our students. When you take intelligent, ambitious, team-oriented students and combine these abilities with a heightened sense of social consciousness, you are left with a future business leader capable of influencing significant and real change. Change not only within the companies that will employ them, but also within the communities where these companies operate and within the communities where our graduates reside. These are attributes we seek in our students, and our recruiting organizations seek in their employees.”
-C. Michael Stepanek, MBA Program Director, Kenan-Flagler Business School, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

About Net Impact
Net Impact’s mission is to improve the world by growing and strengthening a network of new leaders who are using the power of business to make a positive net social, environmental, and economic impact. For the past fourteen years, we have supported a grassroots movement of student chapters to educate, inspire, and equip individuals with ideas and tools for using business for social good. As of summer 2006, we have more than 125 student and professional chapters on 4 continents in 75 cities and 80 graduate schools. Our central office in San Francisco provides tools for member networking, organizes an annual conference, and manages programs to support members in combining business skills with values on their campuses, in their companies, or in their communities. Net Impact has student chapters in 100 graduate business programs. These schools include the top 30 business programs (as ranked by Wall Street Journal); 17 international business programs; and 2 public policy programs. Our student chapter leaders, usually elected by their classmates, are committed individuals who organize events and activities for their chapters while serving as a liaison to the larger Net Impact network. Student members participate in local chapter activities as well as activities with Net Impact Central, such as our annual fall conference, Issues in Depth conference calls, and online career resources. Net Impact also has a professional membership, which includes both business school graduates and other professionals working in socially responsible business and related industries. Our website is www.netimpact.org.

About the Guide
The information in Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs was compiled from two sources: a qualitative survey completed by 39 student chapter leaders, and an online survey completed by 1,191 student Net Impact members. Net Impact created the Guide for several reasons. First, we receive numerous inquiries from students who are applying to business school about what programs offer for those with social and environmental interests. Second, we hear from many of our chapter leaders that they would like a chance to share the student perspective on how their program addresses these issues. Third, we are proud of all that our chapters and schools have accomplished, and it seems like the right time to share this exciting news! Finally, we believe that the information included in the Guide will be a useful tool for business schools to compare themselves against their peers and develop more robust social impact curricula, career services, and support for student activities. The following section outlines the process and decisions that we made in putting together the Guide.

How did you decide what questions to ask on the surveys?
Based on our knowledge of our chapters and their programs, Net Impact drafted two surveys (one for chapter leaders and one for all student members). We asked our chapter leaders for input on the questions, and ten student leaders provided us with feedback and suggestions that we incorporated into the final draft.

Which schools are included in the School Profiles?
Net Impact asked each of the chapter leaders in our MBA and graduate school programs to complete a survey with information on their school curriculum, student activities, career services, and administrative support. You can find a full list of our student chapters at www.netimpact.org/chapters. We were pleased that 39 chapters completed the survey.

2 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Introduction
What schools are included in the Ratings?
Net Impact sent an online survey to 4,269 student chapter members. (One program’s students were omitted at the request of the chapter leader because the program is new.) We included schools in the ratings that received more than five responses, even if the chapter leader did not submit a profile. A total of 1,119 students answered the full survey. Note: since the survey was sent only to Net Impact members, and not to the student body as a whole, the opinions represent a sub-set of students who are committed to and interested in Net Impact issues. We asked students not to forward the survey to their classmates so we could ensure a consistency in type of respondents between schools. Specifically, the side bar sections can be defined as: Full-time MBA students: number of fulltime graduate students in the program, as provided by the chapter leader. Very active Net Impact members: estimated by the chapter leader. Somewhat active members: estimated by the chapter leader.
“The MBA degree should be about lifetime preparation in business that involves serious experience in the nonprofit sector as well as an understanding of the social context of decision making.”
-R. Glenn Hubbard Dean Columbia Business School

Who wrote the School Profiles? Were they edited? Did admissions submit any content?
Net Impact chapter leaders wrote the School Profiles, at times with input from other Net Impact students. Members of the Net Impact staff provided edits, focusing mostly on clarity, grammar, and consistency. Our goal was to keep as much of the student’s original language and writing as possible; in almost every case the profile published in the Guide is very close to the content the student submitted. Net Impact staff did insert quotes into the profile that were submitted by students in the online survey. Net Impact also sent two emails to the admissions office of every program to let them know about the new Guide, and to ask if they would like to review the Guide entry for their program. A number of admissions offices did choose to fact check their school’s entry, and we made factual edits and clarification edits based on their feedback. No alterations to the opinions and subjects of the students’ text were made based on admissions’ comments. To learn more about the process involved in creating and compiling the Guide please email chapters@netimpact.org.

Student activity level: from the all-student survey, the average of the students’ ratings of their programs on a five point scale from “much less than average activity” through “one of the most active clubs at the program.” Support of social/environmental themes: from the all-student survey. Students were asked to fill in the blank on the sentence “students/faculty/ administration at my program are ____ about social/environmental themes in curriculum” as well as a similar sentence for extracurricular events and activities. The answer choices ranged from “unfriendly” to “enthusiastic.” Answers were converted to a five point scale and are shown as a fraction out of five (e.g. 3.5/5). The chapter in three words: these words were chosen by the chapter leader. Leadership: students completing the all-student survey were asked if their program prepared Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership. Answer choices ranged from “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree.” The percentage of students who selected “agree,” “somewhat agree,” or “strongly agree” for each question is presented in graph format. Career/internship placement: from the all-student survey. The responses describing Career Services as either “helpful” or “very helpful” were combined to determine the percentage included under the first bullet. For the second bullet, students were asked to indicate if they had found an internship or job that

How should I read the side bars?
The “At a Glance” sidebars have been designed to enable the reader to quickly get a feel for the profiled program. The various sections contain information from the all-student survey, as well as the chapter leader survey. Some sections may be missing on certain chapter entries due to lack of data (either the chapter leader did not fill out the question, or fewer than five students provided answers on the survey).
3 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Introduction
“utilizes their values and their business skills.” Respondents who did not have this as their end goal were asked to skip the question. The possible responses were, “no,” “somewhat,” “yes,” and “still looking.” Four or more responses were required for this section to be included. Alumni: the all-student survey asked students to rate their alumni network from “not at all helpful” to “very helpful.” Those responding with either “helpful” or “very helpful” are included in the percentage. Prominent Alumni: chapter leaders were asked to name up to five prominent alumni. It was not always possible to include all five due to space limitations. To sum it up: The chapter leader survey asked the chapter leader to choose from four statements about what type of student their program would be best for. Net Impact created icons to go with each statement to draw a comparison between the chapter’s development and the building of a house (shown below). The statements and icons are: A special note on the “Overall” rating (page 107): this list shows how many times a school appeared in the 10 highest student ratings for each of the 20 questions. All questions were weighted equally. Someone interested in laying the foundation for social/ environmental awareness at the program. Net Impact Chapter Leader: The chapter leader(s) who completed the chapter leader survey have included their names here and sometimes their email address. Many chapters have also included a Net Impact admissions contact whom potential applicants should feel free to contact with questions about the program. Survey Respondents: This is the number of students who took the allstudent survey. Please note that even if this number is more than five, some of the sections may still not be included if fewer than five students chose to respond to a particular question.

How should I read the Ratings section?
The Ratings section is not meant to give a definitive ranking of business programs; rather, the data presents a way to compare student opinions of their schools. When reviewing the data, please keep in mind the “n” represented by each school (on page 106), as any school with over five survey respondents was included on the lists. You may want to take into account the number of survey respondents for each school when considering the rating tables.

Who funded / sponsored the Guide?
Neither Net Impact nor our student writers received funding for the Guide. Our team committed to this project to give our student leaders a chance to talk about their schools, share what was going well, and indicate where progress needs to be made. Thank you to our student chapters for providing quality and comprehensive write-ups on their program. Net Impact is especially grateful to summer volunteer intern Tiffany Liu for her compilation work, and to Membership Manager Lars Olson for managing the process from start to finish. Net Impact decided to publish the Guide for free in order to get as much exposure for the Guide, our students, and their programs as possible. If you find the Guide interesting or helpful and if you’d like to see us continue with similar projects, we encourage you to make a tax-deductible donation to Net Impact at www.netimpact.org/donate. If you know of a company or

Someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

Someone interested in refining and growing a mostly socially aware program and student body.

Someone interested in attending a school where students and faculty are on the forefront of social/environmental issues.

4 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Introduction
funder that would like to sponsor the 2007 version of the Guide, please let us know at contact@netimpact.org. Another good resource is the Idealist.org Graduate School Fairs, which take place in major cities across the United States. See www.idealist.org for more details. Numerous other sources of information about graduate schools exist from traditional guidebooks to school and student websites. You may also want to contact students directly, or look them up when attending information sessions/admit days. If no Net Impact admissions contact is indicated in the sidebar, please contact the program’s admissions office directly, as they should be able to put you in touch with Net Impact students.

What other information should I use to learn about what business schools are doing in these areas?
We encourage you to look at Beyond Grey Pinstripes, a biennial survey and ranking of business schools, which spotlights innovative full-time MBA programs and faculty that lead the way in integrating issues of social and environmental stewardship into business school curricula and research. The information in Beyond Grey Pinstripes is provided by faculty and staff and thus presents a nice complement to the student perspective. To learn more, please see www.beyondgreypinstripes.org.

Is Business School For You?
Today, MBA programs are no longer just for future bankers, consultants, and corporate executives focused only on bottom line financial results. More and more graduate business programs are recognizing the importance of training values-based leaders who understand the importance of a healthy environment, strong communities, and long-term sustainability. Many of today’s business schools have both required and elective courses that include discussion and assignments focusing on the Triple Bottom Line (financial, social, and environmental). The students at MBA programs today include former and future nonprofit leaders, social entrepreneurs, public sector leaders, and corporate employees who are committed to helping their company make a positive net impact on the environment and society. Some of the recent alumni highlighted in this Guide include a Program Manager for Corporate Citizenship at IBM; the Director of Finance for California Charter Schools Association; and an information technology specialist for the EPA. Net Impact encourages individuals with all backgrounds and interests to apply to business school. The management, strategy, and financial skills taught in an MBA or similar program will be valuable for anyone who will manage people, programs, or an organization in all sectors. While strong grades, GMAT scores, and professional achievement are required to gain admission to top programs, admissions officers are increasingly aware of the importance of ‘Net Impact’ values and priorities among their business school classes.

School Stand-Outs
A number of MBA and graduate programs stand out in the Guide. Overall, students at the Bainbridge Graduate Institute gave their program the most top-10 ratings (15 top-10 ratings for the 20 questions). Bainbridge was followed closely by Duke’s Fuqua School of Business and Simmons School of Management (both with 14 top-10 ratings), and Yale SOM and Presidio School of Management (with 13). Rounding out the top-rated schools were Kellogg, Boston College Carroll, Cornell’s Johnson School, UC Berkeley Haas, University of Michigan Ross, and UNC Kenan-Flagler. A cautionary note on the ratings: please be sure to check out the number of respondents, as they differed widely between programs. Our goal with the ratings is not to give a definitive ranking, but rather to provide an easy way to compare how students assess their individual programs. As you read through the school profiles, you will be impressed with the amount of activity that is going on today at business schools. As a preview, we are including some brief excerpts here:

5 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Introduction
At the University of Denver, Daniels, students said that “ethics and social responsibility are threaded throughout the entire program, regardless of concentration” • UNC/Kenan-Flagler Business School organized a Sustainability Career Forum in the fall to expose students to career options and a Sustainability Career Fair in the Spring • The Ross School at the University of Michigan offered electives in Green Building and Design, Social Marketing, Competitive Environmental Strategy, and others • The chapter at the University of Alberta hosted speaker events in conjunction with a number of other clubs to expose a broad student base to Net Impact issues

“We have been fortunate to work with a great group of classmates to add programs and establish a great momentum at Fuqua during the past year. Net Impact has been a great resource for our chapter development strategies, and we’re pleased to share our experiences and students’ enthusiasm through Net Impact’s Guide to Grad Schools.”
-Tim Scheu & Tom Mitchell Co– Presidents Fuqua Social Impact Club

Read on for more details!

Aggregate Responses
Our survey was emailed to a total of 4,269 students; we had a 28% response rate with 1,191 who answered the survey. This group was broken down into 708 first year students, 447 second year students, and 41 students who are in their third or fourth year. Although the majority of our respondents are in school in the United States, 46 students answered the survey from schools in Canada, 19 in Europe, 3 in Australia, and 2 in India. Overall, most students are positive about how their program is incorporating social and environmental issues to date, while signaling that there are many opportunities for growth. Most students described their fellow students, faculty, and administration as supportive or enthusiastic about social/ environmental themes in business school. Each of the groups was described as slightly more enthusiastic about the themes in extracurricular activities than in curriculum. For more detail on the breakdown, please see pages 118-120. Students also told us whether they thought their program prepares students like themselves – Net Impact members with an interest in social and environmental issues – for ethical and socially responsible leadership. 85% of students agree at least somewhat that their program prepares Net Impact members for ethically and socially responsible leadership. We also asked whether the program prepares all students, including their classmates outside the Net Impact club, for ethical and socially responsible leadership. For the general MBA/grad school population, 70% agree at least somewhat that their program prepares the class for ethical and socially responsible leadership. Detailed breakdowns are available on page 117. On the career front, most students fared fairly well. Of the 653 students whose goal was to find an internship that utilized both their values and their business skills, 68% told us they did find an appropriate internship, with an additional 9% answering “somewhat” and 16% “still looking” in April. Of the 272 second year students with the same goal for a full-time job, 53% found a position, with another 8.5% answering “somewhat” and 32% still looking as of April.

6 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Introduction
The majority of students called their fellow students, alumni networks, and career services staff helpful or very helpful, with fellow students getting the most enthusiastic response. For detailed breakdown, see page 121. In terms of student club activity, only 10% of students said their Net Impact club was less active than others at the school. 20% said their club had an average level of activity, 33% called their activity above average, and 36% consider their club one of the most active clubs at the program. We were encouraged to see a number of students mention the growing momentum for Net Impact-related issues in their program. For example, students talked about “heightening the general student body’s awareness of environmental issues and community development;” “working towards building a much stronger, complete “Social/environmental organizations sustainability program;” and “having faculty members that are in need of people who know how to make decisions that allow feel a commitment to raising awareness of corporate sothem to do the most they can with cial responsibility.”
the resources they have, and to get more resources to do it. Business school can allow a future leader to combine passion with skill, values with resources.”

While students are proud of their program and its accomplishments, they still demand more progress. When asked about opportunities for growth, we heard In our open ended questions, students were asked about about greater integration of Net Impact themes into the their program’s strengths and opportunities for growth. In curriculum, specifically in the core/mainstream courses. -Carrie Marcinkevage MBA Admissions Director terms of strengths, most answers focused on the following Other frequently mentioned themes include involving a Smeal College of Business categories, in order of frequency. broader spectrum of students in Net Impact-related activiPenn State University ties; better career services for Net Impact-type careers; more • The strength of the curriculum as a whole, especially outreach and involvement in the community; and improveCSR/Social Enterprise centers and programs ments in particular fields like social entrepreneurship. As one stu• The strength of the Net Impact club and other student activities dent says, the opportunity exists to “incorporate these themes into ‘every • Support from faculty, staff, and administration day’ lifestyle that includes both classroom and extra-curricular activities.” Another addresses the need to “educate students on the necessity for so• A specific professor or class cial and environmental involvement in all areas of business – not just those • Specific topic areas, such as entrepreneurship or sustainable enterprise companies and careers specifically geared towards these pursuits.” The • Careers and internships, especially internships with nonprofits that inopportunity to do more is significant and in demand by students at all procluded subsidies from the schools grams.

Next Steps: How You Can Get Involved
It is our hope that Business as UNusual: The Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs will serve a variety of purposes. First, for applicants who are considering graduate school, it will demonstrate the breadth of opportunities to build up your business skills while cultivating your social/environmental interests and career prospects. The Guide will also provide you with details and characteristics of different programs to help you make the graduate school choice that’s right for you. Next, for current students, faculty, and administration, we hope you can use this information to benchmark where your program is today compared to
7 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

others, and to identify specific ideas and opportunities for improvement. We think you will be amazed at the wealth of classes, variety of student activities, and dedication of career services to incorporating social and environmental issues into the business school experience. Also, if you did not see your program in the Guide this year and would like to see an entry next year, please email us at chapters@netimpact.org to let us know you are willing to help. For Net Impact members and chapter leaders, we encourage you to get involved with Net Impact programs to help work on your school’s opportunity area. For example, consider joining Net Impact’s Curriculum

Introduction
Change Initiative to improve your program’s curriculum; involving your school with Service Corps or Board Fellows to provide classmates with greater opportunities for community involvement; or becoming a part of the Campus Greening Initiative to make an environmental impact on your campus facilities. Details on all of these programs are available at www.netimpact.org/programs. In addition, Net Impact has developed a number of best practices and tips for student clubs on raising awareness, recruiting members, and hosting events. While some of these resources are on a password protected site for chapter leaders, many of these best practices are located at www.netimpact.org/bestpractices for all student leaders to use. For members of the media and individuals with a general interest in MBA education and social/environmental issues, we hope that this information provides a useful framework for looking at how students perceive graduate business education in 2006. While the sample includes a specific segment of graduate schools (mostly U.S., mostly full-time, all with some interest in social and environmental issues), we believe that the data is useful to provide basic generalizations and trends on graduate business education today. Finally, if you would like to get more involved in Net Impact, please consider joining as a member at www.netimpact.org/join. If you are involved in an organization that would be interested in establishing a relationship with Net Impact, email us at contact@netimpact.org. Thank you for your interest in Net Impact and the Guide, and please contact us with any questions, comments, or ideas. We hope that this publication is both informative and inspiring.

“Today’s business schools have the responsibility, and are seizing the opportunity, to create a new type of innovative business leader: one who is knowledgeable about traditional MBA subjects while strategic about the social and environmental issues that are increasingly affecting businesses and their survival, value, and ultimate success.”
-Kellie McElhaney Adjunct Professor and Executive Director Center for Responsible Business Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley

8 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Business as UNusual
Table of contents
Introduction About Net Impact About the Guide Is Business School for You? School Stand-Outs Aggregate Responses How You Can Get Involved Part I: School Profiles Babson College F.W. Olin Graduate School of Business Bainbridge Graduate Institute MBA in Sustainable Business Carnegie Mellon Tepper School of Business Columbia University Columbia Business School Cornell University The Johnson Graduate School of Management Duke University Fuqua School of Business George Washington University School of Business Georgetown University McDonough School of Business Harvard University Harvard Business School Harvard University Kennedy School of Government Indiana University Bloomington Kelley School of Business Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT Sloan School of Management Monterey Institute of International Studies Fisher Graduate School North Carolina State University College of Management Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management Pennsylvania State University Smeal College of Business Presidio School of Management San Francisco State University College of Business University of Alberta School of Business University of British Columbia Sauder School of Business University of California Berkeley Haas School of Business University of California Davis Graduate School of Management University of California Los Angeles Anderson School of Management University of California San Diego Rady School of Management University of Chicago Graduate School of Business University of Cincinnati College of Business
9 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

2 2 2 5 5 6 7 10 11 13 15 17 19 22 25 28 31 33 35 38 41 43 45 48 50 52 53 55 57 60 63 66 69 72 University of Colorado Boulder Leeds School of Business University of Denver Daniels College of Business University of Maryland College Park Robert H. Smith School of Business University of Michigan Ann Arbor Stephen M. Ross School of Business University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Kenan-Flagler Business School University of Pennsylvania The Wharton School Graduate Division University of San Francisco Masagung Graduate School of Management University of Southern California Marshall School of Business University of Utah David Eccles School of Business University of Washington Business School University of Wisconsin-Madison Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management Yale University School of Management Part II: Ratings and Aggregate Responses Number of Survey Responses by Program Rating Charts Aggregate Responses 74 77 79 82 85 88 91 93 95 97 100 102 104 107 108 109 119

Part I: School Profiles

10 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Babson College
F. W. Olin Graduate School of Business
“If you are strongly committed to developing new business ideas to serve the underserved, Babson is the place to come. Our focus on entrepreneurship, and our commitment to starting sustainable businesses, is unmatched by other MBA programs.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 350 Very active Net Impact members: 8-10 Somewhat active members: 20-25 Program strengths: SE Student activity level: Average Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 3.3/5 3.5/5 Faculty: Admin: 3/5 3.3/5 2.9/5 3.4/5

Curriculum
One MBA said that “Babson professors often use social and environmental themes in their teachings and the cases used in their classes.” In the words of another student, there is an “integrated curriculum that weaves social and ethical responsibility themes into all classes, allowing students to see these issues in greater clarity because they are combined with issues of accounting, organizational management, finance, etc.” Students are most enthusiastic on the electives; one student said that the strength of the school is “the appearance and increasing number of elective courses offered that relate to social/ environmental issues.” Specific electives that address social/environmental themes include Social Entrepreneurship, 21st Century Entrepreneurship: Sustainability and Competitive Advantage; and Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility. In the opinion of one Net Impact member, “both these courses are excellent.” At the same time, students differed on how well the core is addressing Net Impact themes. One student reported that “overall, ethics and discussions of sustainability are themes that run through much of the first-year MBA program”, while another suggests that “Babson’s core curriculum, the first year ‘mods,’ leave much to be desired in regard to social/environmental themes.” Students described an ethics/law stream as “a step in the right direction” with opportunity to do much more to address issues in the social/environmental business world. One student said that “while the administration has shown signs of becoming more open to Net Impact’s ideas, the first year faculty ‘owns’ the curriculum and is highly resistant to change.” The student continues that, while there are a number of faculty that are highly supportive of Net Impact, “the Babson College faculty, as a whole, is overwhelmingly ‘conservative.’ I have observed faculty members hesitate to publicly support Net Impact activities for fear of rocking the boat.” Some students said that Babson’s focus on entrepreneurship is relevant to Net Impact students: “I identified the entrepreneurship focus of Babson as being very close to the skills I would need to learn in order to lead a nonprofit organization or socially minded business. Babson teaches you tools for creating new ways of doing things and affecting change.”

The chapter in three words: Active, Energetic, Growing Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

Student Activities
One MBA described that Babson has a strong spirit of entrepreneurship that includes meeting the needs of those underserved by society. A student noted that “the greatest strength of Babson is really the passion of its students. While there is only a small group of students who explicitly pursue social/environmental issues, the student body as a whole is very optimistic and energetic, and are very receptive to new ideas that expand their sense of connection to the world.” At the same time, Net Impact at Babson is a relatively young chapter; and though small, there is room for potential and growth. One student predicted “this chapter will grow rapidly in the next few years and improve in most areas.” The student also noted that “our new leadership team has identified ‘social entrepreneurship’ as the primary focus for Babson Net Impact going forward. We feel that this is a niche where our chapter can thrive as well best transform our school.” The chapter’s biggest challenges are time for extra-curriculars with the mod system, especially during the first year, as well as finding rooms for meeting and events.
11 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

100% 90% 80
Somewhat agree

60

54%

40

Agree

20
Strongly agree

0

NI members

All

Babson College, continued
Career Services and Alumni
The Center for Career Development (CCD) at Babson went through a reorganization in early 2004 and started from scratch. Since then, students said “the new staff and find this office to be very open to our ideas and contacts.” CCD sent a representative to the 2005 Net Impact Conference, and students “expect Net Impact and the new CCD to continue to be allies and grow together.” Recent alumni who have founded socially/environmental themed companies. Jim Poss (M’92) founded Seahorse Power Company (http://www.seahorsepower.com/) and Eric Hudson (M’03) founded Recycline (http://www.recycline.com/). Both are still running their respective companies.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 38% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 86% of students found internships using both their values and skills

Reasons to Attend
By a great margin, Babson’s strongest point is its entrepreneurship department. The school has been rated the #1 school in entrepreneurship by US News for 13 years in a row (in addition to a number of other #1 entrepreneurship rankings by other publications). “My expectations have Students explained that “if you are strongly committed to developing new business ideas been met and exto serve the underserved, Babson is the place to come. Our focus on entrepreneurship, ceeded: Babson is a and our commitment to starting sustainable businesses, is unmatched by other MBA fantastic place to learn programs. Also, a very large part of our full-time student body is comprised of internahow to turn your tional students. This allows us as students to gain a truly global perspective on social dreams into reality with and sustainability issues, and it allows us to make contacts that can be used to make the appropriate knowlreal change happen around the world.” Stated another, “it is a school that celebrates edge, connections, and entrepreneurial spirit, including social entrepreneurship. It is a supportive environment for hard work.” creativity and new ideas.” Finally, a student said that “the main tenets of a Babson education - creation and change - are the main tenets of socially responsible business. This is a great place to put your vision into practice.”

Alumni: 50% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful Prominent alumni: • Jim Poss (1992): Founder, Seahorse Power Company • Eric Hudson (2003): Founder, Recycline

Net Impact Chapter Leaders: Jon Rickert jrickert1@babson.edu Joshua Polasky jpolasky1@babson.edu
Survey respondents: 14 12 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006 Olin Hall Babson Park, Wellesley, MA 02457-0310 Email: mbaadmission@babson.edu

Bainbridge Graduate Institute
MBA in Sustainable Business
“Bainbridge Graduate Institute is one of only a few MBA programs in North America that is completely focused on environmental sustainability and social responsibility. After meeting the faculty and students, and reviewing the curriculum, I knew this was the place for me. I wasn't interested in pursuing an MBA until I learned about Bainbridge. It matches my values, my interest in making the world and better place, and my belief that business has a huge role to play in building a better future.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 98 Very active Net Impact members: 10 Somewhat active members: 20 Program strengths: SE, ES, ID, NPM, CD, CSR Student activity level: Above average Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 5/5 5/5 Faculty: Admin: 5/5 4.9/5 5/5 5/5

Curriculum
Bainbridge Graduate Institute (BGI) was founded in 2002 with the intention to infuse environmentally and socially responsible business innovation into general business practice by transforming business education. BGI offers an MBA in Sustainable Business as well as several related certificate programs. Our MBA program combines monthly intensives with “The distance learning hydistance learning, allowing students to continue working while completing their MBA in brid structure of the program either two or three years. Social and environmental themes are incorporated into means that students can every course in the curriculum, which also includes all of the competencies expected continue to live and work where they are, and then of MBA graduates. One student said BGI’s greatest success is the “complete intetake one long weekend a gration of social/environmental impact themes into the MBA curriculum. This subject month to go to a beautiful is not an add-on to the coursework, and social/environmental themes are not found Pacific Northwest island only in elective classes. Every class has this emphasis built-in to the curriculum. retreat center…to bond with an amazing array of faculty Our courses are taught by a committed group of core faculty including Jill Bamburg, and students.” Lorinda Rowledge and a roster of distinguished visiting professors including Andrea Larson (Darden), John Ehrenfeld (MIT), John Adams (Saybrook Graduate School), April Atwood (University of Washington), and Héctor Sáez (University of Vermont). BGI also sponsors a monthly Sustainable Business Speaker Series that enriches the curriculum and allows the public to hear from leaders in sustainable business. Recent speakers have included: Van Jones, Executive Director of the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights; Joan Bavaria, President of Trillium Asset Management; and Christine Ervin, former President and CEO of the United States Green Building Council. The BGI student experience is further enhanced by interactions, both in and out of the classroom, with our Entrepreneurs and Executives in Residence. These have included Sarah Severn, Director of Corporate Sustainable Development at Nike; Peter Bladin, Vice President and Director of Technology Center, Grameen Foundation; and David Marsing, former Vice President of the Technology and Manufacturing Group at Intel.

The chapter in three words: Full of potential Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Somewhat agree

100%

100%

100%
Agree

Student Activities
BGI's Net Impact chapter is only about a year old, and we are still in the process of figuring out the right role for Net Impact at our school, since much of the valuable work that Net Impact does in other institutions in raising the profile of social/ environmental themes in the curriculum, on campus, and in extracurricular activities is already part of our program. We look forward to learning how we can share our experiences with other Net Impact chapters and learning about exciting things going on elsewhere that we might be able to incorporate at BGI. We are very proud of our members who represented BGI in the Leeds/Net Impact Case Competition (fourth place) and the Simon Fraser University Net Impact CESR Challenge 2006 (first place). From a campus greening perspective, we consider ourselves very fortunate to enjoy two very green campuses. Our monthly intensives are held at IslandWood, a LEED Gold Certified environmental education center complete with food waste (cont’d)
13 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

80

60
Strongly a gree

40

20

0

NI members

All

Bainbridge Graduate Institute, continued
composting, a Living Machine for wastewater processing, and photovoltaic cells that provide half of the classroom electricity. Our partnership with IslandWood is a great mission fit for us. Elementary and middle school students take part in residential learning programs there Monday-Thursday; our intensives run Thursday-Sunday. IslandWood's Executive Director is Ben Klasky, former Executive Director of Net Impact, who has also helped us feel at home there. We also hold orientation, alumni retreats, and occasional classes at Channel Rock, our secondary campus, on Cortes Island in British Columbia. This 140-acre facility operates completely independently from the electric grid, featuring a solar-powered computer lab, solar-heated showers, and meals emphasizing produce from the century-old garden.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: 69% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 78% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 67% found jobs

Career Services and Alumni
BGI's career services include one-on-one counseling, group workshops, ongoing weekly career development/design conference calls, online job postings, as well as a growing network of alumni and supporters. BGI alumni pursue careers in forprofit, nonprofit and governmental sectors, in large organizations, start-ups, and as entrepreneurs; our approach to career development is supportive of all of those paths. As a young school, our alumni base is still small, but it is very dedicated to connecting current students to opportunities. Our Entrepreneur and Executive in Residence programs have also helped raise the profile of the school and connect students and alumni to career opportunities. Alumni: 57% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful Prominent alumni: • Kevin Hagen (2005): Program Manager for Corporate Social Responsibility, REI • Erin Gately (2004): Environmental Product Steward, Hewlett-Packard Tim Crosby (2005): Farm to Cafeteria Director, Woodinville Farmers Market

Reasons to Attend
Bainbridge Graduate Institute is an ideal place for those who are deeply committed to becoming change agents as entrepreneurs or leaders in the business and nonprofit worlds. Our hybrid model offers the flexibility that adult learners need to juggle school along with work and family obligations. Our learning community is incredibly strong and supportive--in a recent survey of students and alumni, 92% of respondents listed community among the school's greatest strengths; one student wrote, “[BGI] has a strong focus on building a robust and effective learning community which will serve me well long after I graduate.” If you are looking for a place to develop solid MBA skills in a context of social and environmental sustainability, design a career that aligns your work with your values, and become part of a community of individuals on the same journey, BGI may be the place for you!


To sum it up: Bainbridge Graduate Institute is most fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school where students and faculty are on the forefront of social/ environmental issues. Net Impact Chapter Leader: Karin Borgerson karinborgerson@speakeasy.net Net Impact student admissions contact: aly.tibbetts@bgiedu.org
Survey respondents: 24

14 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

284 NE Madrona Way, Suite 124 Bainbridge Island, WA 98110 Email: info@bgiedu.org

Carnegie Mellon University
Tepper School of Business
“This program has a supportive faculty and administration who enables you to create what you want, which is feasible with a small class. You have an opportunity to really involve yourself with the community if you take the initiative. The resources are there if you have the motivation to seek out opportunity.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 161 Very active Net Impact members: 10 Somewhat active members: 35

Curriculum
The Tepper School is currently working toward a curriculum that focuses more on social and environmental impact. While currently there are a limited number of specific classes that focus on these subjects, there are a number of informal opportunities that present themselves in the form of seminars, discussions, and debates. We are currently pushing for more social/environmental courses in the curriculum, and these efforts seem to be wellreceived by both students and faculty.

Student activity level: Above average

“I knew that Tepper’s highly quantitative approach to business would empower me with skills to solve real world problems.”

Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 3.4/5 3.6/5 Faculty: Admin: 3.9/5 3.3/5 3.6/5 3.6/5

MBA Students at the Tepper School have the opportunity to take classes anywhere on the CMU campus. Departments that may be of particular interest to an MBA applicant interested in social/environmental impact include: The Center for Economic Development, Institute for the Study of Information Technology and Society, and National Consortium on Violence Research. These are all at The Heinz School of Public Policy and Management. Speaking directly the Tepper’s strengths, one student said “I knew that Tepper’s highly quantitative approach to business would empower me with skills to solve real world problems.”

The chapter in three words: Growing, Collaborative, Energetic Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

Student Activities
The Net Impact chapter at the Tepper School of Business has a mission to promote the education and understanding of business ethics and corporate social responsibility among MBA students and other interested graduate students at Carnegie Mellon University. The chapter, founded in 2004, has established a solid foundation and is poised to build momentum. We have established numerous activities to benefit our members and the larger student community including a Speaker Series, a Faculty Discussion Lunch Series, field trips, community involvement programs (including participating in Net Impact’s Service Corps), cross-campus collaborations, and conferences.

80% 71% 71%

Career Services and Alumni
The Career Opportunity Center (COC) at Tepper does a great job of working with students on their specific goals. While the center has no formal program for individuals focusing on social/environmental careers, the center does help find relevant contacts and events. The center also helps students tweak resumes and provide interview preparation for these career fields. The school does have funds to supplement nonprofit internships. Few students apply for such funds, and students are usually approved.

60

Somewhat agree

40
Agree

20
Strongly agree

0

NI members

All

15 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Carnegie Mellon University, continued
Reasons to Attend
Tepper offers a number of strong academic programs that are of particular use to people interested in having a social/ environmental impact. Two programs that are particularly strong (and relevant) here are entrepreneurship and finance. Our strong finance program is especially helpful to people interested in better allocating resources to be used in social and environmental improvement efforts. It is also helpful to those interested in pursuing microfinance. Our entrepreneurship program is very strong, and does a great deal to support individuals interested in pursuing social entrepreneurship. One thing to note, as one student put it, is that “since it’s a small program, there are many fantastic opportunities to make a significant difference during your two years here.” There is also a great deal of cross-campus collaboration between our program and other CMU social and environmental programs, such as the Solar Decathlon and joint initiatives between Tepper and Sustainable Pittsburgh.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 67% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 80% of students found internships using both their values and skills

Alumni: 67% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

To sum it up: Tepper School of Business would be most fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school to help build upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

Net Impact Chapter Leader: Nicole Smith, nicolesm@andrew.cmu.edu Adil Wali, adil@cmu.edu Net Impact student admissions contact: Nicole Smith, nicolesm@andrew.cmu.edu

Survey respondents: 8 16 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006 Tepper School of Business, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Email: mba-admissions@andrew.cmu.edu

Columbia University
Columbia Business School
“Columbia is an incredible program that combines academic rigor with a wide student support base to bring speakers, mentoring, events, and alumni to interested students. We provide support for internships and loan assistance after graduation. The number of students coming to Columbia specifically for this program grows each year! Finally, we are in NY, which means you are close to people working in every field of social enterprise - international development, nonprofit management, CSR, education, and many more .”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 1400 Very active Net Impact members: 50 Somewhat active members: 150-300 Program strengths: SE, CSR, ID Student activity level: Above average Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Faculty: Admin: Curriculum: Activities: 3.2/5 3.7/5 3.8/5 3.8/5 4/5 4.1/5

Curriculum
In general, there are quite a few courses devoted to social enterprise and students may select a formal Social Enterprise Concentration. The Columbia Business School (CBS) program has chosen to concentrate on quality over quantity, selecting a finite number of high impact courses to offer instead of a laundry list that can occupy a student's entire elective schedule without much additional value. The student body is happy with this, in part because we know that the faculty is incredibly receptive to requests when they arise. A selection of courses includes: a. Foundation Electives: Social Entrepreneurship (SE), Board & Executive Management of Nonprofits (SE), Business in Society (SE), Modern Political Economy. b. Finance: Finance & Sustainability, Project Finance c. International: The Private Sector and International Development, International Business Strategy, Private Equity and Entrepreneurship in Emerging Markets, Globalization and Markets, Transnational Business and Human Rights d. Other: Education Leadership Consulting Lab, Marketing Arts, Culture and Education (http://www2.gsb.columbia.edu/ socialenterprise/academics/courses/) All courses, including the first-year core curriculum, contain an element of the "Individual, Business, and Society" (IBS) Curriculum. The idea of IBS is to intertwine an element of business ethics and CSR into all courses for one or more full class sessions. For more information: (www.gsb.columbia.edu/leadership/curriculum/). CBS students may also take up to six graduate credits externally from the Schools of International and Public Affairs, Urban Planning, Law, and Teacher's College. Notable faculty members in areas of special interest to Net Impact members include Ray Horton (SE), Geoff Heal (CSR), Ray Fishman (ID, CSR), Suresh Sundaresan (MFIs), and Cathy Clark (Social Entrepreneurship).

The chapter in three words: Strong, Engaged, Momentum Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

100%

94%

Student Activities
The Social Enterprise at Columbia continues to grow to gain momentum. The Social Enterprise Club (Net Impact Chapter) is one of the biggest clubs on campus. We work with the SEP and other student groups to offer numerous events each year, including: Annual Social Enterprise Conference, Annual Catskill Mountain Retreat, speakers (such as Joan Bavaria of Trillium Asset Management), Social Enterprise Career Supercharger, corporate visits (to Ben & Jerry's, Seventh Generation), and more. The "Individual, Business and Society" curriculum discussed above features extracurricular events for students including high profile speakers from organizations such as Citigroup, Gap and Generation Investment which are devoted to the topic of CSR and business ethics. Students are enthusiastic, open, and creative in their drive to promote social enterprise issues on campus.
17 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

80

Somewhat agree

65%

60

40

Agree

20
Strongly agree

0

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Columbia University, continued
Career Services and Alumni
Resources for non-traditional career searches are out there and growing, but students must make an effort to take advantage of their full value. Two staff members from Career Services are devoted to supporting the Social Enterprise Program. We have panels each semester geared toward demystifying the non-traditional career search, and our Supercharger event brings in alumni and professionals to advise students on the process; however, the majority of interest from the student body, and therefore attention from Career Services, is still geared toward traditional careers (i.e. consulting and banking). Additionally, the Net Impact alumni pool is growing, and the core group is very supportive of students. There are two funds designed to support students with summer internships at nonprofits and for-profit social ventures. Both match or supplement salaries offered by the organization up to about $6,000. Columbia’s Loan Assistance Program helps graduates in the public and nonprofit sector repay MBA loans.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: 21% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 91% of students found internships using both their values and skills

Alumni: 50% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful Prominent alumni: • Rebecca Thomas (2004): Nonprofit Finance Fund • Noha Waibsnaider (2002): Peeled Snacks • Paul Guenther (1964): New York Philharmonic

Administration Support
The school has adopted Social Enterprise as one of its major growth initiatives for the next year. The Dean is committed and the faculty is outstanding and supportive. The Social Enterprise Program, under the leadership of Prof. Ray Horton, has three full-time, devoted administrators who provide students with a great amount of support. The chapter has just created a new officer level position devoted to prospective students and is working with Admissions to streamline the process for getting information on social enterprise to interested applicants.

Reasons to Attend
Think about what an MBA can mean for you in the field of social enterprise. Nonprofits, for-profit social ventures, international development groups/microfinance, and start-ups all need financial, managerial, and operational leadership. As a larger school (700 per class), you have a “There was wide suphigh variety of people and interests; one student wrote, “[Columbia’s greatest success is] port and activity across providing a lot of opportunities for students interested in different areas…and there is the administration, facalso a growing interest in international issues.”

To sum it up: Columbia Business School will be most fitting for someone who is interested in refining and growing a mostly socially aware program and student body.

ulty and students. I didn't want to go to an MBA program that just had a student club dedicated to social enterprise.”

Columbia has a very strong finance reputation and is located in the best networking city in the world. You will come out with strong technical abilities, fantastic connections to big business and capital markets, and international exposure second to none. In addition, the school is developing an exceptional management/leadership reputation, and the offerings in entrepreneurship and social enterprise are getting stronger each year. Students also love being in New York City!

Net Impact Chapter Leader: Greg Zumas GZumas07@gsb.columbia.edu Net Impact student admissions contact: Victoria Hess vlh20@columbia.edu

Survey respondents: 20 18 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006 3022 Broadway, Uris Hall, Room 216, New York, NY 10027 Email: apply@gsb.columbia.edu

Cornell University
The Johnson Graduate School of Management
“I knew that I could make the experience what I wanted and needed it to be. Johnson is very flexible and small so I had the faculty contact and support to pursue my goals. My expectations have been exceeded by far. There is no better place to be to study sustainable enterprise!”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 500 Very active Net Impact members: 20 Somewhat active members: 100 Program strengths: SE, ES, CD, CSR, ID Student activity level: Above average Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 3.9/5 4.2/5 Faculty: Admin: 4.1/5 4.3/5 3.9/5 4.1/5

Curriculum
The strength of the Johnson School curriculum is that there are a significant number of classes regarding business opportunities and strategies relating to social, environmental, ethical, political, and international issues. Many of these courses are affiliated with the Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise (www.johnson.cornell.edu/sge), which was endowed by the late Samuel C. Johnson to "enhance students' understanding of global sustainability and prepare them to be leaders of ethical, equitable and economically and environmentally sustainable enterprises." Further, Johnson students may take up to 25% of their coursework outside the business school, and Cornell University has an enormous range of classes available on any topic imaginable. “Cornell University Students can find courses at Cornell in everything from agriculture business chains to solar allows our students energy to political science to development economics to ecology. The most difficult part is to pursue any and deciding which of the numerous options to choose. The Johnson School Net Impact chapter has prepared a document highlighting relevant courses at Cornell University for students every aspect of interested in these issues; the document is available during orientation or on our website sustainability to its (http://forum.johnson.cornell.edu/students/orgs/netimpact/). One of the unique aspects of the Johnson School curriculum is the immersions, which are done in the second half of the first year. Immersions replace lecture and case-based training with integrated, experiential, reality-based learning. Students solve real problems under intense time pressure and are often evaluated as they would be on the job. This year, a new immersion in Sustainable Global Enterprise was introduced in which students are working on real projects with companies that are facing unique social and environmental issues. For example, one project is developing a business plan for a distributed energy device to be sold in Rwanda and another project sent the students to Cape Town to work with a fruit exporter that is shifting its sourcing strategy in response to post-apartheid government policies. Social/Environmental issues do come up in the core curriculum, primarily in economics, finance, accounting, marketing, and managing organizations, but there is no core class specifically focused on these issues. Overall there is significant room for improvement and incorporation into the core curriculum. There has been discussion both among students and faculty about incorporating elements more fully, but there has not yet been a major push. Given Cornell's strength in Sustainable Global Enterprise it seems likely that this will occur in the coming years. Stuart Hart is the most well-known of the faculty at the Johnson School in regards to Sustainable Global Enterprise. He is widely sought out by top business leaders. Students have a chance to meet these leaders when they come through campus.

fullest based on their interests.”

The chapter in three words: Leadership, Energy, Vision Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

100%

93% 82%

80
Somewhat agree

60

Student Activities
There are many opportunities for Net Impact members to get involved in the Johnson School community. The Net Impact Chapter was established three years ago and is building momentum. The chapter is focused on being the professional club for students interested in integrating Net Impact’s core values into their future careers. We specifically seek to leverage the vast resources of Cornell, including the Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise, to increase member exposure to (cont’d)
19 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

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Cornell University, page 2
(cont’d) events on campus. Key Net Impact events from the past year included a symposium (Capitalizing on Innovation, cosponsored by the Entrepreneurship and Private Equity Club), career fair/panel discussion, speakers, and networking breakfasts/lunches with professionals. Beyond Net Impact, the Student Council sponsors a school-wide community service day in which most of the student body, faculty, staff and many significant others participate. There are numerous Johnson School clubs that share Net Impact values, including: • Community Impact: conducts volunteer activities and Community Consulting, raises money for a local nonprofit and a nonprofit summer internship stipend through a Charity Auction • Microfinance Club: hosts speakers and a movie showing, is establishing a microfinance fund on campus • Big Red Ventures/Big Red Incubator: works with start-up companies as a VC fund and consulting group • Energy Club • Camp $tart-up: encourages entrepreneurship through a summer program for young women • Various international clubs • Associate Real Estate Council: develops and promotes Cornell’s contact with the real estate industry by hosting guest lecturers, promoting student research, and organizing trips to industry seminars, conferences, and current development projects • Ethics Action Group: seeks to strengthen the understanding of, commitment to, and integration of integrity, respect, mutual trust and ethical practices into everything we do throughout the Johnson School, Cornell and our future careers The greater Cornell community also has numerous organizations such as the Sustainable Enterprise Association, Engineers for a Sustainable World, Renewable Energy Society, Greens, Kyoto Now!, Society for Natural Resources Conservation, and Solar Decathlon. In addition, there is a Sustainability Hub that serves as a meeting place for students, faculty, staff, and organizations focusing on campus and global sustainability.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 56% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 100% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 83% found jobs

Alumni: 92% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Career Services and Alumni
There are numerous resources for Net Impact members to use in pursuing careers that support their values. The Career Management Center (CMC) supports the job search in a very personalized manner due to the small size of the school. One student wrote, “Because of the small size of the program, people really get to know what individuals are looking for, and know who to direct incoming opportunities to.” There is one staff member who supports the efforts of our members very closely, assisting with corporate outreach, alumni outreach and job search strategy. In the fall, there are two career work groups led by second year mentors dedicated to nonprofit, nontraditional and sustainable jobs. Companies that cannot travel to campus for recruitment are able to reach students through correspondence job postings. The Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise (CSGE) supports students by leveraging its contacts to generate internships within the sustainability space. Students in the immersion program participate in projects with companies that often lead to internship opportunities. Through the work of the center, Cornell has established itself as one of the preeminent institutions in the sustainability field. It has close ties with numerous companies, including those participating in the Base of the Pyramid Initiatives. Net Impact organized a career forum and discussion panel that accompanied the annual symposium. This had the full support of CSGE and the CMC. In addition, most CMC-sponsored events included representation (alumni, speakers or second year students) from non-traditional fields. Access to alumni is strong, though more work needs to be done to specifically identify alumni aligned with the interests of Net Impact. The CMC and CSGE are aiding Net Impact to identify, track and reach out to alumni working in related fields. (cont’d)
20 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Prominent alumni: • Justin DeKoszmovszky (2006): Strategic Sustainability Manager, S.C. Johnson • Andy Dijkerman (1985): CEO, The Emerging Markets Group • Kevin B. Thompson (2003): Program Manager for Corporate Citizenship, IBM

To sum it up: Cornell University Johnson Graduate School of Management consists of students and faculty that who are the forefront of social and environmental issues.

Cornell University, page 3
A nonprofit internship stipend is available through Community Impact, using funds raised during its annual Charity Auction. The Johnson School offers the Weil Fellowship, a loan forgiveness program, to alumni who are engaged in a viable entrepreneurial endeavor. There is currently no loan forgiveness program in place for nonprofit careers, but there are students working on establishing a fund for one. Finally, students are able to leverage career resources from the greater Cornell community. These include career centers at other schools, job fairs and the full university alumni network.

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leaders: Kate McGinnis mkm43@cornell.edu Dan Zook dlz5@cornell.edu

Administration Support
Net Impact-related issues, and sustainable business in particular, are a key focus of the Johnson School that are recognized in words and actions by both the Dean and the Director of Admissions. The faculty generally recognize this area as a strength of the Johnson School. In the Johnson School Five Year Plan, one of the five key initiatives is to develop centers of research, learning, and practice, of which the Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise is a focus. The vision for the Johnson School is to, "be known as the premier, Ivy League general management school that produces leaders as catalysts - people who create, transform, and sustain successful organizations in a very dynamic world” by 2009. Beyond the Johnson School, Cornell University has recently launched a university-wide platform called "Sustainability in the Age of Development." There is an ongoing faculty effort to drive a more coordinated effort across the campus – essentially a multi-disciplinary effort that will lead to more collaborative research and learning on campus in this area. Cornell’s depth and breadth of learning facilitates this process given the large number of disciplines of study on campus The Johnson admissions office values students with "Net Impact" interests, and students should emphasize their interest and experience in this area. The Johnson School offers 25 full tuition scholarships plus living stipends in the form of the Roy H. Park Leadership Fellowship to "develop and inspire the next generation of world class leaders through an experience based leadership program that is grounded in self-awareness and interpersonal mastery and manifests in an enduring legacy of service." Candidates are selected based on commitment to socially responsible business, leadership potential, past academic achievement, and professional and personal life achievement. Net Impact receives annual funding from the Johnson School, and it is not difficult to apply for additional funding as special events occur. Students have applied for and received funding for international study tours, socially responsible investment funds, conferences, and case competitions. Facilities are also readily available for meetings and events. The administration is very receptive to ideas from not only Net Impact, but also the general student body. As a small school, students take a very active role in developing and shaping the Johnson School experience for themselves and for future students.

Reasons to Attend
In considering the Johnson School, an applicant should have a close look at the Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise and speak to students who are involved in the sustainable global enterprise immersion program. The broader resources of Cornell University should be considered, as there are course offerings and research in any field imaginable and Johnson students have a large degree of freedom in customizing their experience around their specific interests. Applicants should also look at the Park Leadership Fellowship, which offers 25 full tuition scholarships to leaders with a commitment to social responsibility. Finally, the applicant should realize that the Johnson School is increasingly recognized as one of the top programs for MBAs with a commitment to sustainable enterprise and thus will be surrounded by peers who are enthusiastic and engaged in these important issues. One student summed it up by saying, “Johnson is the type of place where you can make a real impact as a student. You are encouraged to take risks and be a leader. There are numerous activities, workshops, alumni, resources and faculty to find innovative ways to meet your social or environmental initiatives/objectives.”
21 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Survey respondents: 30

Office of Admissions and Financial Aid, 111 Sage Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 Email: mba@cornell.edu

Duke University
Fuqua School of Business
“Fuqua is an incredible school! The entire school - not just the social impact club - is interested and actively developing skills in leadership, ethics, and teamwork. Furthermore, it is truly a student-run school. Change happens from within. I knew that the learning opportunities would stem not only from the classroom but also from my own ideas and those shared by my peers.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 850 Very active Net Impact members: 50 Somewhat active: 150 Program strengths: SE, ES, CD, CSR, NPM Student activity level: One of program’s most active clubs Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Faculty: Admin: Curriculum: Activities: 4/5 4.4/5 4.2/5 4.2/5 4.2/5 4.5/5

Curriculum
The primary social sector curricular focus at Fuqua is in social entrepreneurship. This follows the philosophy that social entrepreneurs are the driving force behind systemic change throughout the world, and that business leaders need to understand the power of innovative ideas and alternative approaches to creating societal wealth and benefits. Fuqua has made a considerable institutional investment to develop the Center for the Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship (CASE), which works closely with our Net Impact Chapter, the Social Impact Club (SIC), to support curricular, career and student development. Professor Greg Dees is nationally renowned for his thought leadership in the field of social entrepreneurship and leads a class on this topic. A new course in nonprofit management was introduced this year and is taught by CASE Managing Director Beth Anderson. Details are being finalized to add a social sector marketing and strategy course to the 2006-2007 curriculum. Another exciting addition will be a Global Academic Travel Experience (GATE) class focused on the social sector in India; students will spend six weeks studying social entrepreneurship in India and almost two weeks meeting social entrepreneurs in the field. Fuqua also has a strong mentored internship program for all students, and CASE works with the SIC to cultivate opportunities for students to work with local social sector organizations and receive course credit. The commitment to social and environmental ethics and innovation extends through the entire Fuqua curriculum. Students are given great flexibility to tailor their MBA, and many of the “Fuqua has put tremendous entrepreneurship, finance, marketing and operations classes complement the goals and resources towards building a studies of students pursuing social sector careers. Additionally, students have access learning center that focuses on to classes at the Sanford Institute of Public Policy, the Nicholas School of the Environissues surrounding ethical leadment, and at Duke Law; many students even choose to pursue dual degrees. ership and social entrepreneurship…the Center for the Advancement in Social Entrepreneurship [CASE] is Fuqua's think-tank for the study of social entrepreneurship and it is led by Greg Dees, one of the most influential thinkers in the field.”

The chapter in three words: Innovative, Engaged, Empowering Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

From the perspective of student life, the SIC has been very effective in collaborating with the MBAA (Fuqua student government) to institute social responsibility and sustainability as a principle for all student-led clubs and has provided much of the ideas and energy for advocacy with the Dean’s office to increase the acceptance of these concepts in the curriculum. The impact of these activities is evident in everything from clubs using green procurement strategies for events and materials to social sector issues being incorporated into a variety of symposia and conferences hosted at Fuqua.

100%

100%
Somewhat agree

86%

80
Agree

The values of social innovation, responsible decisions and strategies, and ethical leadership are widely accepted tenets of Team Fuqua. We feel fortunate to have the support of the Dean, faculty and other student leaders as we continue to grow this movement.

60

40
Strongly agree

Student Activities
The Social Impact Club (SIC) was formed three years ago as a consolidation of three different clubs: Net Impact, Business and Environment, and Community Involvement. These were all well-established, and the last three years have (cont’d)
22 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

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allowed us to leverage the strengths of our diverse membership. To meet the differing needs and interests in this "big tent," we have three guiding principles for the SIC. The SIC: (1) connects the Fuqua community with social innovators and thought leaders through a series of speakers and events; (2) offers students the opportunity to employ their business skills to affect the triple-bottom-line (social, environmental, financial) of citizen sector organizations; and (3) assists Fuqua in developing top-line leaders for social enterprises and mission-driven organizations. Our speakers and events series has added incredible value to the Fuqua community. Recent luminaries to speak at Fuqua include Muhammad Yunus, Wendy Kopp, David Bornstein, Tom Tierney and Ami Darr. We find these events not only inspire our core membership but draw in students from all sectors of Fuqua. Additionally we host a series of brown-bag lectures and off-site visits with local citizen sector organizations that add to the dialogue. Last fall we hosted a screening of the PBS "New Heroes" documentary to spark new discussions on social entrepreneurship. This spring we hosted a regional symposium called "Footprints," a non-traditional educational conference using debates, interactive breakouts, and traditional panels to integrate professionals – no matter their field – into the social fabric of our society both professionally and personally. The Business & Environment side of the club does many activities (speakers, case competitions, company visits) that link with other clubs at Fuqua and the Nicholas School of the Environment as well. For community involvement we seek to balance between meeting the volunteer needs of local organizations and providing opportunities for students to create their own programs, applying their learning to the benefit of other organizations. Our annual Day in Durham kicks off the school year and introduces new students to numerous community organizations. The Fuqua on Board program, coordinated by CASE, links students to area nonprofit boards for year-long consulting projects. SIC is constantly expanding student involvement in external consulting projects, with many successes this year: a team working with the World Bank on AIDS education and prevention in Africa, improving local education outcomes with Junior Achievement, and sponsoring a Habitat-for-Humanity home. One MBA commented “we worked hard this year to increase our programming - hosting a large event in the fall and a social impact symposium in the spring. The visibility of the social impact club is increasing as are the attendance at all events. Social/environmental impact themes in academia and in extra-curricular activities are on the rise at Fuqua!”

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 83% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 100% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 86% found jobs

Alumni: 89% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Career Services and Alumni
Fuqua has a strong Career Management Center (CMC); its commitment to students with social interests is visible and solid. The CMC has a dedicated advisor for career counseling in this area and also selects second-year Career Fellows with citizen sector expertise and interests. These students provide additional support with cover letters, resumés and mock interviews. Additionally, the SIC works with local alumni, the CMC and CASE to provide seminars, workshops, and career planning panels to benefit those seeking work in the citizen sector. Workshops and panels cover all areas of the citizen sector from corporate responsibility to traditional nonprofit organizations. In addition, job listings from the MBA nonprofit connection, among other sources, are posted to the school’s internal career management tool. CASE also cultivates Fuqua-specific internship opportunities for students. SIC organizes a week-long career trek to a major city every year for students to visit nonprofits, witnessing their management and operations. This year’s trek focused on Washington, DC. Driven largely by student interest, entrepreneurial nonprofits and international development agencies were visited, including Ashoka, College Summit, Global Giving, KaBOOM!, USAID, The World Bank, Inter-American Development Bank, Chemonics, Development Alternatives International, Share Our Strength, and Community Wealth Ventures. The key to success was advanced planning and CASE’s large network of social sector leaders.

Prominent alumni: • Robert P. Hargreaves (2003): Sr. Manager of Strategic Planning for the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) • Keith Artin (1999): COO of TROSA (Triangle Residential Options for Substance Abusers, Inc.) • Gordon Lefevre (1994): Vice President, Finance and Accounting, Institute for OneWorld Health

To sum it up: The Fuqua School of Business would best accommodate someone who is interested in building upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

23 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Duke University, page 3
Fuqua also has some of the most generous financial support for students committed to working in the social sector, and is committed to attracting top talent: a) CASE offers a Social Sector Scholarship, which provides two students with two years of financial support worth $25,000. b) The Fuqua Loan Forgiveness program gives significant assistance to first and second-years and is one of the (cont’d) most generous and comprehensive in the MBA community (http://www.fuqua.duke.edu/centers/case/students/ financialaid.htm#loan). c) Fuqua and CASE provide two funds to supplement social sector summer internships.

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leaders: Tom Mitchell tom.mitchell@fuqua.duke.edu Tim Scheu tim.scheu@fuqua.duke.edu Net Impact student admissions contact: mnash@duke.edu

Administration Support
One student told us that “Fuqua’s greatest success in the social impact area comes from the partnerships between the students, the faculty, and the administration.” The administration is very supportive of our chapter. The Dean of the Daytime MBA program has worked closely with the MBA Association at Fuqua to make sustainability and social responsibility core values that should be embraced by the school and all student organizations. The Social Impact Club is seen as a vital resource of information and leadership in this arena. Both the Dean of Fuqua and the Dean of the Daytime program attend key club events and receive important thought leaders in Social Entrepreneurship. More importantly, Fuqua established CASE to both research and explore the field of social entrepreneurship but also to work actively with students interested in pursuing a professional path in the social sector and other mission driven organizations. Fuqua’s intent in recruiting Greg Dees and establishing CASE was to strengthen its ability to develop future leaders in the field.

Reasons to Attend
Fuqua is a welcoming place for students with different levels of interest in social/environmental themes. First and foremost, it is an incredible MBA program that develops well-rounded and thoughtful leaders in many fields. Perhaps the greatest advantage for SIC members is the institutional support from CASE, the Career Management Center and the SIC leadership. CASE continues to grow and is very responsive to student interests. One student said, “ the Center for Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship (CASE) puts Fuqua on the cutting edge of a field that's revolutionizing the Social Sector.” Students seeking to be involved with SIC and CASE will receive great personal attention and guidance on how to best leverage their MBA experience with their interests in the social sector. One MBA commented that applicants “will be greatly impressed by the students, faculty, resources, and other opportunity at Fuqua. I wish there were more time in the day to take advantage of everything that is going on here.”
Survey respondents: 42

24 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Fuqua School of Business, Duke University, 1 Towerview Drive, Durham, NC 22708-0104 Email: admissions-info@fuqua.duke.edu

George Washington University
School of Business
“The environmental policy and management program not only provides students will an excellent curriculum, but the resources that the professors bring into the classroom (politicians, environmentalist, individuals working for non-profits) are outstanding.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 165 Very active Net Impact members: 15 Somewhat active members: 40 Program strengths: ES, CSR, ID, NPM Student activity level: Average Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 3.8/5 3.6/5 Faculty: Admin: 3.6/5 3.7/5 3.7/5 3.8/5

Curriculum
George Washington's (GW) core MBA curriculum is just beginning to incorporate social/ environmental impact themes, at the request of Net Impact Officers and members. Overall the faculty has been receptive to incorporating such themes and speakers into classes and “The George WashingGLOBE events. The GLOBE (Global Leadership of Business Enterprise) Program is a ton University School of series of co-curricular presentations, workshops and off-site visits that are scheduled Business ranks sixth in throughout the academic year. This semester, our Information Systems class included a listing of the top 30 an entire lecture on the social, ethical and environmental implications of information sysglobal M.B.A. programs, tems and technology. released by Beyond Grey Pinstripes (and There are countless Net Impact-oriented electives at GW such as NGO Strategy & Susthird amongst U.S. MBA tainability, Strategic Environmental Management, Sustainable Tourism, and many, many Programs).” others. It is easy to craft an individualized concentration (with a name of the student’s choice) based upon the courses taken. One student wrote, “GW’s program is at the cutting edge of the issues, pushing practical application of ideas learned in class to take one into the corporate/NGO world.” Students in the GW MBA program may take electives in any other school within GWU and also have access to the DC-area University Consortium, which includes the following universities: American University, Catholic University of America, Gallaudet University, George Mason University, Georgetown University, Howard University, Marymount University, Southeastern University, Trinity College, University of the District of Columbia, and the University of Maryland—College Park. GW also offers a joint MBA/JD degree with the GW Law School, as well as a joint MBA/MA degree with the Elliott School of International Affairs. There are a number of GW faculty that are leaders in the social/environmental impact theme areas; however, the most active is Dr. Mark Starik, who also happens to be the Net Impact Faculty Advisor. Dr. Starik is the Department Chair and Professor of Strategic Management and Public Policy (SMPP) in the GW School of Business. He is directing the GW SMPP Environmental and Social Sustainability Initiative (ESSI) and serves as the President of Sustainability Now! Dr. Starik also leads an annual summer study abroad program in British Columbia, Canada. The program is entitled "Sustainable Communities and Organizations" and enables MBA students to gain international management experience. Another notable professor is Dr. Don Hawkins who leads a sustainable tourism study abroad/consulting practicum in a different exotic international location each summer. Dr. Hawkins received the first World Tourism Organization (WTO) Ulysses Prize for individual accomplishments in the creation and dissemination of knowledge in the area of tourism policy and strategic management in 2003. He coordinated the WTO Tourism Policy Forum at GW, which focused on using tourism as a development assistance strategy for Lesser Developed Countries, and he received the WTO Themis Foundation Science Fellow Award.

The chapter in three words: Social, Active, Expanding Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

100% 80%
Somewhat agree

80

60

60%

Agree

40

20

Strongly agree

0

NI members

All

25 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

George Washington University, page 2
Student Activities
The GW Net Impact chapter started as the Socially Responsible Business Club in the mid 1990's. It went through a number of name changes before officially becoming a Net Impact chapter in 2002. The chapter is building momentum, is well-known throughout GW's full-time MBA program, and is beginning to be known in other GW programs. The GW Net Impact chapter is involved in Service Corps and also aims to have at least one community service event each academic year. This year we held a campus cleanup event, then brainstormed ideas for improving campus recycling education and awareness. We also designed a recycling bin prototype which will hopefully be implemented on campus. Our Vice President of Environmental Initiatives, our faculty advisor, and a number of other students have been involved in talks with the GW administration to encourage the creation of a green roof on campus. Net Impact often co-sponsors events and happy hours with other clubs, such as the MBA Association. Last semester we had a Social Marketing Speaker Panel and a Socially Responsible Investing Panel that we co-sponsored with the Marketing Club and Finance Club, respectively. In addition, we will begin working with the School of Law, Elliott School of International Affairs, and the School of Public Policy to encourage student participation and membership, as these GW schools offer a number of concentrations and coursework in social/environmental issues. Social/environmental issues were not really addressed during the 2005 first-year orientation; however, the current Net Impact board will be actively involved in planning activities for the upcoming 2006 orientation to ensure these issues will be addressed. Net Impact is greeted with many different types of reactions at GW, depending upon the person - enthusiastic, indifferent, or perplexed. Many people are unsure of what Net Impact is, and we are trying to change that.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 25% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 57% of students found internships using both their values and skills

Alumni: 18% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Career Services and Alumni
GW has a vast alumni network and is centrally located amongst a hotbed of social, environmental, international, and governmental organizations. As a result, there are plenty of opportunities and resources for students to pursue. One student said, “we have an excellent course offering and being in DC we have the most environmentally-based internship opportunities available in the US.” The school is extremely collaborative in every aspect, and most students and alumni will go out of their way to help individuals find internships or jobs and expand their networks. The GW Graduate Career Center provides access to the alumni network; however, most of their resources are currently focused on the more traditional MBA employment and internship opportunities such as consulting, finance, marketing, etc. The GW Net Impact Chapter Board encourages use of the Net Impact Online Career Center and has worked with the GW Net Impact faculty advisor to create a Sustainability Career Fair & Workshop. The GW Net Impact Board has recently initiated a competitive fund to assist students who accept unpaid summer internships that are aligned with Net Impact's mission and values. Only in its first year, we were able to provide funds to two students, and we will continue to raise funds to increase the number of students supported annually.

Prominent alumni: • Howard Tsai (2005): Information Technology Specialist, EPA • Tony Borck (2005): Investment Analyst, Global Environment Fund • Carl Schlemmer (2005): Business Analyst, US Department of the Interior

To sum it up: The type of person that would most enjoy George Washington University is someone who is interested in building upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact ac activities with opportunities for significant growth.

Administration Support
There are a number of key faculty and administration members at the GW School of Business such as the Director of the Strategic Management & Public Policy Department, the Ethics Chair, and one of the business school’s deans that have provided funds for Net Impact events, case competitions, and general budgetary needs. One of the GW Business (cont’d)
26 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

George Washington University, page 3
School’s Deans agreed to match up to a certain amount of funds raised for our GW Net Impact unpaid internship fund. The university provides meeting facilities for Net Impact Events and other student clubs for free.

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leader: Merove Heifetz merove@gwu.edu

Reasons to Attend
The George Washington University School of Business ranks sixth in a listing of the top 30 global M.B.A. programs, released by Beyond Grey Pinstripes (and third amongst U.S. MBA Programs). The ranking measures the extent to which business schools equip students with an understanding of the social, environmental, and economic perspectives of global business. This is the fifth time the GW School of Business has been recognized in the report. One student commented that “the program is very diverse: nearly 50% international and 50% women.” GW's Real Estate and International Business curricula and faculty are well-known and respected and provide a great venue for students interested in green buildings and international development. GW's finance program is also quite strong and offers a class that enables students to manage a real portfolio of investments; students interested in microfinance would do quite well here. Finally, GW has one of the few tourism graduate programs in the world with a number of courses offered in sustainable tourism. Given GW's breadth of course offerings, flexibility in individualizing MBA concentrations, central location, and growth potential of the Net Impact chapter, GW is a great venue to pursue a socially and environmentally conscious education and career. We have an excellent course offering and being in DC we have the most environmentally-based internship opportunities available in the US

Survey respondents: 15

27 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

710 21st Street, NW, Suite 206, Washington, DC 20052 Email: mbaft@gwu.edu

Georgetown University
McDonough School of Business
“Geographically Georgetown is in a prime location for professional development. Academically I have never seen a more committed student body and our faculty is extremely engaged and supportive. And I have honestly never been around more like-minded people. All of these factors combined make Georgetown an excellent place to learn.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 500 Very active Net Impact members: 40 Somewhat active members: 90 Program strengths: SE, ID Student activity level: Above average Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 4/5 4.4/5 Faculty: Admin: 3.9/5 4.2/5 3.7/5 4.2/5

Curriculum
McDonough School of Business (MSB) operates on a module system, with four modules per academic year. This system exposes students to a wide array of classes, as we take 20 classes per academic year. The first year consists of 18 required core courses and two elective options, while the second year consists of two required courses and 18 elective options. Students have the ability to build their own focus through both MSB electives and classes offered through other Georgetown graduate programs, such as the School of Foreign Service, the Law School and the School of Public Policy. The core curriculum has two classes that directly relate to the interests of students seeking socially responsible classes: Ethics and Business & Government. Other core classes such as International Business, Organizational Behavior, Strategy, and Managerial Communication consistently thread socially responsible cases into the course content. This year's Net Impact Sustainability VP has been working with faculty to bring specific environmental cases into the curriculum. The flexibility of MSB's module system creates extensive opportunities to explore the electives offered both within the Business School and in the graduate programs mentioned above. Some favorite courses that pertain directly to students interested in socially themed classes include: Social Marketing, Community Reinvestment, Nonprofit Consulting, Social Enterprise, Current Issues in Social Responsibility, Public Private Partnerships (School of Foreign Service), Poverty and the Social Safety Net (School of Public Policy), Government/Management Nonprofits (School of Public Policy). Georgetown's Washington DC location certainly lends itself to attracting professors that are highly involved and connected to the nonprofit/government sector. Currently, William Smith, Vice President of Advertising Education Development, is an adjunct professor teaching Social Marketing. Les Silverman of McKinsey Consulting is helping to create a new class for next year in Nonprofit Consulting that will allow students to partner with organizations such as the United Way, the American Red Cross, the Environmental Protection Agency, etc. Additionally, Professor Alan Andreasen is extremely well-known and respected for his work in Social Marketing and is an excellent resource for students. The faculty support for Net Impact-themed classes and the connections that these faculty members provide is invaluable to the Georgetown student body. MSB does have an International Business Development Certificate that is extremely popular among students interested in emerging markets. Students apply to be accepted into this program in the middle of their first year and then take a majority of their electives with candidates in the School of Foreign Service and School of Public Policy. Approximately 20 students per year are accepted into the International Business Development Program.

The chapter in three words: Dynamic, Respected, Beneficial Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

100% 90% 85% 80
Somewhat agree

Student Activities
As with the majority of business school programs, MSB students consistently juggle academics, job searches, and organizational activities. The time and effort that students dedicate to their preferred organizations is exceptionally impressive but also wise, as organizations are an excellent avenue to explore interests and build networks. Georgetown's Net Impact Chapter was one of the first chapters, established in 1993. Thirteen years later, we are well-established and respected within the MSB community, as many of our chapter's core systems and processes are in place: a strong board structure; (cont’d)
28 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

60

40

Agree

20

Strongly agree

0

NI members

All

Georgetown University, page 2
complimentary organizations like Board Fellows and the Nonprofit Internship Fund; and partnerships with other clubs like MBA Volunteers, Consulting Club, Capital Connections, and Emerging Markets Network. One member said that “the McDonough student body as a “Net Impact is the whole has a tendency to be socially aware and involved with Net Impact programs, remost important and gardless of their current career goals. The interest in Net Impact at MSB is expansive active student group and impressive.”

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 54% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 57% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 57% found jobs

at Georgetown. Between alumni and DC connections, this is the best place for a "Progressive MBA .”

Net Impact hosts an array of activities, as the organization exists to assist MSB students professionaly, educationally, and personally. In the fall our primary events focus on Career Development. Net Impact Functional Day hosts panels on Corporate Social Responsibility, Non Profit Management, Socially Responsible Investing/Finance Careers, and Nonprofit & Government Consulting. In addition, we also host speakers at Finance, Consulting, and Marketing Days so that students may explore social avenues across all fields. Net Impact also hosts Career Treks to Washington DC organizations of interest to our students, such as USAID, Chemonics, and Ashoka.

In addition to career development, we focus on creating volunteer opportunities, partnering with the MBA Volunteers throughout the year for projects such as the MS Walk, Habitat for Humanity, Project Prom and more. Net Impact also works diligently to bring speakers and events to campus that will be of interest to MSB students. Most recently, Lina Abirafeh, an independent gender and development consultant, came for Net Impact's Brown Bag Lunch Series, and the President of AES's South American operations, Mr. Andrus Gluski, spoke at an Ethics for Breakfast session. This year Net Impact and the Emerging Markets Network collaborated to create the first Annual MSB Case Competition. Additionally, Net Impact hosts the annual Walter Benson Summit. The Summit memorializes former Georgetown professor and international entrepreneur Walter Benson who, before his death in the summer of 1997, had become passionately involved in the National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship’s service program in the District. 90 DC High School Students come to Georgetown MSB for a day focused on entrepreneurial development and college opportunities.

Alumni: 63% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Career Services and Alumni
The MSB Career Management Office thrived under new leadership this year. Non-traditional students most directly benefited from the strong relationships that the MSB Career Management staff built with the Career Management staffs of other Georgetown Programs, such as School of Foreign Service, Public Policy, and Law. As always, the Career Management Office establishes and maintains relationships with nonprofit organizations for internships and full-time positions and also reaches out to our Alumni Network. Students at McDonough feel that the “Washington DC location provides access to a wealth of organizations focused on business and social policy. Our MBAs have excellent opportunities to do class projects and internships with world renowned organizations right in our own back yard.” Peer Advisors are an excellent source of guidance within the Career Management Office. Two advisors interested and wellversed in the area of Social/Environmental Impact are employed by the Career Management Office. These advisors work with students one-on-one to help them determine their own interests, establish connections, and assist in the development of Career Treks and Days for Net Impact-themed events. Additionally, students consistently find that Georgetown alumni are very receptive to assisting students looking for career advice and assistance in the Social/Environmental sector. The Georgetown brand is well established and respected among socially responsible businesses and nonprofits. (cont’d)
29 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Prominent alumni: • Andy Furrows (2005): Aspen Institute • Stephanie Stevenson (2005): Nike • Mary Balmaceda (2003): Calvert Foundation • Ziba Cranmer (2002): Nike • Amy Gleason (2002): Community Wealth Ventures, Inc.

To sum it up: Georgetown would be most fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school to help build upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

Georgetown University, page 3
Georgetown has a heritage of community service and tradition that is displayed in the classroom and translates well into the workplace. Georgetown's Washington DC location is certainly an advantage in this area, as many career opportunities come through speakers and events that either come to campus or that students are invited to and are able to attend due to our proximity to high profile organizations. The speakers and events that students are exposed to compliment the classroom education very nicely. Employers seem to recognize that there is more to a Georgetown MBA than finance, accounting, and marketing skills. Georgetown's Nonprofit Internship Fund helps to support students who take nonprofit internships with either low or no payment. Typically five students receive funding of approximately $5,000 each.

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leader: Renee Baiorunos rcb34@georgetown.edu Net Impact student admissions contact: MPG@msbmail.georgetown.edu

Administration Support
MSB has undergone an array of positive changes this year, most notably the arrival of our new dean, Dean Daly. Dean Daly is supportive of Net Impact's endeavors and recognizes that the initiatives that Net Impact supports can help the Georgetown Brand and the unique competencies that MSB and Washington DC have to offer. Net Impact is also fortunate to have the support of faculty that moves well beyond a curriculum standpoint; students feel that “Georgetown’s core group of faculty is committed to social values.” Professors are more than willing to assist with our fundraising endeavors and have been incredibly supportive of programs such as the nonprofit internship fund. As an organization, Net Impact is fourth in line for Student Government Funding. We are able to request supplemental funding depending on our programming, and other organizations also assist in our Net Impact events. The admissions office certainly values Net Impact applicants and works just as hard to attract these students as they do students of other disciplines. Furthermore, these students are highly valued in the classroom, as they add a new perspective to class discussion.

Reasons to Attend
The Georgetown heritage, connections, and Washington DC location combine to create the ideal environment for students who are serious about using their business skills to create a social impact. The prominent speakers and professors that come through Georgetown add great value to our educational experience, as does the opportunity to interface with organizations such as the World Bank, the United Way, USAID, etc. The connections and experiences that are in front of us as Georgetown students are not to be overlooked; they are certainly an aspect of our education that pushes Georgetown above other socially conscious programs.

Survey respondents: 39

30 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Box 571148, Washington, DC 20057-1148 Email: mba@georgetown.edu

Harvard University
Harvard Business School
“In the world beyond business school, an HBS degree will provide the most credibility, especially in international markets, to effect change within large organizations who might not be receptive to social/environmental issues, but who do value the brand name of the school from which you have come.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 1800 Very active Net Impact members: 10 Somewhat active members: 20 Program strengths: SE, ID Student activity level: Average

Curriculum
During the Required Curriculum (first year), Harvard Business School (HBS) students must take 11 classes that range from Finance and Strategy to Entrepreneurial Management and Marketing. One specific class, Leadership and Corporate Accountability, deals specifically with concepts such as CSR, Ethics, and using business to improve the world. Across the remainder of the Required Curriculum, approximately 7% of cases focus on elements of social enterprise, CSR, or the environment. During the Elective Curriculum (second year), students can select several classes that center on Net Impact related issues, including: Business Leadership and Social Corporate Citizenship (Professor Dutch Leonard), Business and Environment (Professor Forest Reinhardt), Effective Leadership of Social Enterprise (Professor Michael Chu), and Entrepreneurship in Education Reform (Professor Stacey Childress). Second-year students can also pursue faculty supervised independent field-based project work and can cross-register at the Kennedy School of Government, other Harvard University graduate schools, MIT, or the Fletcher School at Tufts University.

Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: 3/5 3.7/5 Faculty: Admin: 2.8/5 3.2/5 3.1/5 3.5/5

Over the past year, the student Social Enterprise Club and the school’s Social Enterprise Initiative have conducted assessments of social/environmental cases in the Required Curriculum and are continuing efforts to identify opportunities for continued integration of such cases in the curriculum. One student mentioned a reason to attend HBS is that “there is no better and more fun way to learn than the case method, and there is no better place to learn by the case method than HBS.”

Activities:

The chapter in three words: Work in progress Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

Student Activities
Although the Net Impact chapter is relatively small on campus, Net Impact type activities are countless. They take place mostly within the realm of the Social Enterprise Club and the Business and Environment Club. One student said that “the student-run Social Enterprise Club is one of the largest on campus, and is complemented by the Business and Environment Club and the International Business and Development Club; there is great student support for social/environmental impact themes.” Among other things, the Social Enterprise Club organizes the HBS Social Enterprise Conference, offers volunteer consulting opportunities, and operates a program that allows students to serve ex-officio on nonprofit boards. The Business and Environment Club is extremely involved on campus through the organization of its annual Green Week, the Green Living Program, student internship panels and several professional panels. Both clubs bring speakers to campus on a regular basis. The Social Enterprise Initiative has several well funded projects, such as summer fellowships, year-long fellowships for graduating students, and loan forgiveness programs. Next year, the Social Enterprise Club, Business and Environment Club, International Business and Development Club, and the Kennedy School's CSR Initiative will join to form one large Harvard Net Impact Chapter. Under that umbrella, the clubs will remain distinct, but we expect this merger to broaden awareness of Net Impact and the larger social responsibility movement.
31 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

100%

99%

80

Somewhat agree

60
Agree

50%

40

20

Strongly agree

0

NI members

All

Harvard University HBS, continued
Career Services and Alumni
Thanks to the Social Enterprise Initiative, HBS offers great opportunities in the social field. The school has not been as strong on the environmental front, but is working to build that area. There are countless resources available to students interested in working in the nonprofit sector, but few for students interested in corporate social responsibility or environmental sustainability.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: 80% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 100% of students found internships using both their values and skills

Reasons to Attend
HBS will give you an unparalleled background in business fundamentals, and offer you incredible resources to build your own education around social and environmental themes. Practicing the case method, you will become adept at honing your social/environmental arguments to address those who may have conflicting views. You will learn to form the business argument for the issues about which you care most, and you will be surrounded by students and faculty that are open to learning. In one student’s view, “Harvard Business School addresses social enterprise, ethical leadership, and environmental management, but is not yet a leader in tying all of these themes to the broader business purpose of creating economic value. I believe that many in the administration and faculty at HBS still view social enterprise as its own topic, rather than understanding that social/environmental impact themes MUST be integrated into a comprehensive management strategy.” Another student said, “the reason that I chose to go to HBS over all other schools was because at HBS, I felt that I had the greatest opportunity to impact change, both in the school and beyond. The student body is incredibly receptive to learning about social/environmental themes, and I felt that it would be a fulfilling learning experience to be surrounded by people who were different than, rather than similar to, me. A prospective Net Impact student should consider applying to HBS if she seeks to hone her arguments for social and environmental responsibility. The case method is a powerful vehicle for learning to voice one's opinion, which I believe is one of the most important skills for a future leader.”

Alumni: 80% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful Prominent alumni: Eve Bould: Marketing Director, Patagonia • Michael Sweeney: CEO, The Nature Conservancy California • Carter Roberts: CEO, World Wildlife Fund • Laura Scher: CEO, Working Assets

To sum it up: Harvard Business School is fitting for someone who is interested in building upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunities for significant growth.

Net Impact Chapter Leader: Lionel Bony (author) Annie Fishman (afishman@mba2007.hbs.edu)

32 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Admissions Office, Soldiers Field, Dillon House, Boston, MA 02163 Email: admissions@hbs.edu

Harvard University
Kennedy School of Government
“KSG is obviously engaged in social/environmental impact issues! The area that impresses me most, even in comparison to my great experience in business school, is its approach to and work on CSR. I am confident that KSG is doing more to engage companies, students, and faculty in CSR than most business schools.”

AT A GLANCE
Very active Net Impact members: 20 Somewhat active members: 200

Curriculum
The Kennedy School of Government (KSG) offers numerous electives on social and environmental themes and social entrepreneurship. Students are free to take courses at Harvard Business School and other Boston area schools. The school's Center for Business and Government has internationally recognized faculty in the field of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), including Jane Nelson, formerly of the UN Secretary-General's office and currently affiliated with the Prince of Wales International Business Leaders Forum (IBLF); and John Ruggie, Special Representative to the UN Secretary General on Business and Human Rights. KSG also features faculty in social entrepreneurship; Dutch Leonard, Mark Moore and Gordon Bloom teach Entrepreneurship for Social Value Creation and a practical Social Entrepreneurship Collaboratory. Professor Leonard also teaches a cross-listed course with Harvard Business School (HBS)--Strategic Corporate Citizenship. Other curriculum highlights include Public-Private Partnerships, Social Marketing, Ethics, Food Policy & Agribusiness, and Energy and Environmental Policy. One student praised KSG’s, “I did both business “real interdisciplinary approach and mix of domestic and international issues” Relevant school and KSG. I think courses at HBS include Business & the Environment and Business Approaches to Servit has been a great ing Bottom-of-the-Pyramid Markets. KSG students can choose from concentrations in combination and there Business and Government Policy, Political Economy and Development, Environment are a growing number and Natural Resources, and Nonprofit Sector, among others. (It should be noted that of students at KSG that the concentrations are currently undergoing a major review by the KSG administration think the same. My and may be significantly revised.) The second-year Policy Analysis Exercise (PAE) for class alone has ~40 Master in Public Policy students also presents an opportunity to complete a year-long joint degree students.” consulting project on a public interest topic related to CSR. Our chapter is working actively with faculty in the CSR Initiative at KSG to advocate for courses that deal more explicitly with the connection between business and society, such as a course on Business and the Millennium Development Goals.

The chapter in three words: Connected, Dynamic, Professional

Student Activities
Students at KSG explore CSR issues through the Corporate Responsibility Council (CRC), the official Net Impact chapter, as well as related clubs: Social Enterprise in Action, Environmental Professional Interest Council (PIC), and Business & Government PIC. The Corporate Responsibility Council, founded by Kennedy School students just two years ago, has quickly become one of the most visible and active student organizations in the Harvard community. The CRC serves as a lively forum for dialogue on CSR as well as a barometer of the growing interest in corporate citizenship. The CRC has served as a sounding board for Fortune 500 executives interested in fresh perspectives from tomorrow’s leaders by participating in strategic reviews of draft sustainability reports and forming focus groups to advise leading companies on CSR practices. The CRC has hosted lectures and discussions with top practitioners in the field from preeminent global businesses. Highlights from the 2005-2006 calendar year included discussions with the former CEOs of Coca-Cola and Heineken, SRI guru Steven Lydenberg, the directors of human rights programs at Reebok and Abbot Laboratories, and the head of Bayer China’s CSR activities. A number of CRC alumni have also returned to campus to discuss their work with organizations including Coca-Cola, Cemex, and the Global Business Coalition to Fight HIV/AIDS.
33 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Note: Since fewer than 5 students answered the survey, some data points are not included

Harvard University KSG, continued
Our chapter believes strongly in providing experiential learning opportunities through direct dialogue and focus groups with practitioners. This year, students contributed directly to the inaugural corporate citizenship report for InBev, the largest brewer in the world - the second year in a row that students were involved in producing a Fortune 500 CSR report. The Net Impact chapter and social enterprise club at KSG work very closely with counterpart organizations at Harvard Business School in co-hosting events such as the annual Social Enterprise Conference. The Kennedy School’s CRC is one of the nation’s most active graduate student-run organizations focused on CSR, and its ambitions are to be even more. The CRC’s mission is: “to promote dialogue and experiential learning in the field of corporate responsibility and to expand resources related to addressing this topic at the Kennedy School of Government, throughout Harvard University, and in the Boston Area.” There is broad student interest among policy students as private sector deepens involvement in social and environmental issues, taking on some formerly public sector functions.

AT A GLANCE
Prominent alumni: • Marika McCauley: Research Analyst, The Coca-Cola Company • Celina Gorre: Technical Manager, Global Business Coalition to Fight HIV/AIDS • Arturo Franco: Corporate Advisor for Social Responsibility and Community Development, CEMEX

Career Services and Alumni
Our chapter's goal is to be an employment resource for current KSG students interested in the field, and KSG Career Services is very supportive of achieving this by hosting practitioner panel discussions in the field of CSR, among other activities. By establishing a formal Alumni Network for KSG alumni working in the field of CSR, our chapter ensures that job and internship opportunities will continue to be offered in years to come. We are working actively with recent alumni in the field of CSR to develop specialized job and internship opportunities for chapter members. KSG Career Services specializes in placing students in nonprofits and is developing its capacity to support cross-sector opportunities. CSR opportunities are ad hoc, but faculty contacts are very helpful. Students wanting to start their own social enterprise can incubate in the Social Entrepreneurship Collaboratory. The school's reputation and alumni network are tremendous assets in the job search. Funding for unpaid summer internships is available through the Summer Internship Fund and various centers such as the Carr Center for Human Rights, Women and Public Policy Program, the Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations, and Center for International Development. The school also offers a four-year Loan Repayment Assistance Program for students working for the public interest and earning up to $50,000 for single applicants ($80,000 for married applicants).

To sum it up: Kennedy School of Government is someone who is interested in building upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunities for significant growth.

Administration Support
The purpose of the Kennedy School is to train leaders to solve public problems, and the administration demonstrates a commitment to fulfilling this mission by supporting diverse student activities and developing new curricula that reflect the changing needs of cross-sector professionals. Through the Kennedy School Student Government, funding is available for clubs and activities. Faculty also support CSR work through the centers listed above: Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative and Center for Business and Government, Carr Center for Human Rights, Women and Public Policy Program, the Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations, and Center for International Development.

Reasons to Attend
Because it is a policy school, the Kennedy School is unique among Net Impact chapters in providing the best of both worlds: in-depth study of social and environmental issues alongside core management, leadership, and evaluation skills. Students from a wide array of professional, educational, and geographic backgrounds thrive at the Kennedy School, as evidenced by this year's Net Impact leadership team, which represented eight countries and included a lawyer, a pharmacist, two investment bankers, a fair trade advocate, a journalist, a social worker, four MBA students, and representatives from the fields of healthcare, international development, philanthropy, education, and national security. Close interaction with cutting-edge faculty in CSR and social entrepreneurship at KSG is complemented with access to courses and activities at Harvard Business School and other Boston area schools.
34 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006 Admissions Office, Soldiers Field, Dillon House, Boston, MA 02163

Net Impact Chapter Leaders: Stéphane de Messières Heather Franzese heather_franzese@ksg07.harvard.edu

Indiana University—Bloomington
Kelley School of Business
“The Kelley chapter of Net Impact is well-established and builds momentum every year. More and more students and faculty are becoming interested in companies that are socially responsible and that work toward making the world a better place.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 400 Very active Net Impact members: 20 Somewhat active members: 50 Program strengths: SE Student activity level: Above average

Curriculum
Kelley’s flexible curriculum and small size allows students to pursue social/environmental issues – or any area of interest. In the core, social/environmental issues are included as part of case discussions. The depth of this discussion depends on the case, the professor, and student interest. The strategic discussions are led by Professor Kesner, the department chairperson, and are one of the strongest elements of the Kelley core. The debate-style discussions incorporate all aspects of corporate strategy, including social/environmental issues. Professor Metzger leads a critical thinking module that incorporates ethics, and several other professors discuss the relevance of social/environmental issues to their disciplines. Students interested in social/environmental issues can take electives at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA) located just across the street from the Kelley School of Business, as well as at other schools at Indiana University. In addition, many Kelley electives touch on these issues indirectly. Formal joint degree programs that may meet the needs of students with social/environmental interests are available at the School of Law and several other graduate schools. The Certificate in Social Entrepreneurship is a new program offered through Kelley’s entrepreneurship program and SPEA. This effort is viewed as a first step toward closer collaboration between these two schools, which will merge the respective schools’ strengths in private and public/nonprofit management and will strengthen Kelley’s offerings in social/environmental issues. Kelley International Perspectives (KIPs) is a series of annual trips, in which students learn about business development in foreign and usually developing countries. This program gives students the opportunity to learn about the impact of business in emerging markets. Recent trips include China, India, South Africa and Eastern Europe. Students join “academies,” which are a combination of a club and an academic class. These faculty-led organizations provide an intimate setting for learning and career development and give students opportunities to pursue their areas of interest, including social and environmental careers and projects. Since academies change from year to year depending on “Entrepreneurship, fidemand and interest, there is also the potential to initiate an academy more specifically nance, and marketing focused on social and environmental issues. programs at Kelley provide a good foundation Finally, the Kelley faculty and administration are extremely responsive to student for starting and growing a ideas and input. In addition to a general open door policy, this is formalized through business, a skill set very the Curriculum Advisory Committee, a student-led committee that brings students’ applicable to someone concerns and ideas to the faculty. The committee and faculty then work together to considering a nonprofit improve the program and implement ideas. Through this structure and informal colmanagement track.“ laboration, students have an incredible amount of input and opportunity to change the program to meet their needs.

Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Faculty: Admin: Curriculum: Activities: 3.2/5 3.3/5 3.3/5 3.4/5 3.3/5 3.7/5

The chapter in three words: Growing, Active, Committed Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

100% 91%
Somewhat agree

80 66% 60
Agree

40

20
Strongly agree

0

NI members

All

35 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Indiana University—Bloomington, page 2
Student Activities
Almost all of Kelley's graduate clubs consider the social/environmental aspect of business, but Kelley's Net Impact chapter leads the charge. The Kelley chapter of Net Impact is well-established and builds momentum every year. More and more students and faculty are becoming interested in companies that are socially responsible and that work toward making the world a better place. Net Impact has several events that are held every year. In the fall, for incoming students, Net Impact partners with the Consulting Club and Entrepreneur Club to hold a case competition that focuses on a socially relevant business problem taking place in the world today. Net Impact also hosts an ethics panel, where industry executives are invited to discuss ethical issues they have faced in the business world and to answer any questions students may have. Net Impact has also organized a group of students to participate in Service Corps. Service Corps offers free consulting services to local non profits and/or small businesses that are faced with a challenge they need help in addressing. Net Impact also volunteers within the community; for example, this year students helped plant trees to support Earth Day, and next year Net Impact will also host a clothing and book drive. To keep its members up to date and informed of all these activities, Net Impact provides a newsletter with socially relevant information. Aside from these activities, our chapter also works closely with the other graduate business clubs to make sure that events have a socially relevant component. For example, Net Impact partnered with the Investment Management Club to bring in a speaker from Calvert on socially responsible investing. Career/internship placement: • 91% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 78% of students found internships using both their values and skills

AT A GLANCE

Alumni: 55% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Career Services and Alumni
The Kelley School of Business has a Graduate Career Services (GCS) department that gives students the opportunity to prepare for interviews in the corporate setting, and these skills are also valuable to students pursuing careers in nontraditional settings. However, the vast majority of career services’ effort is geared toward corporate jobs, especially by corporations that recruit at Kelley. It seems that a majority of the people who attend Kelly are interested in the jobs offered by recruiters. As one student said, “at this point, I would say our program does not have a brand or reputation among socially responsible businesses and nonprofits, and it does not have funds to supplement students who accept internships with nonprofits.” However, there is support; another student wrote, “when a number of Net Impact members earlier this year wanted to set up a task force to look into focusing more on Socially Responsible Business opportunities, the career services team was very responsive and wanted to know what they could do to help out the students.” The GCS also has offered various and continuous workshops on how to pursue those jobs. The counselors offer a lot of tips on how to conduct job searches, and there are ways for students to contact alumni.

Prominent alumni: • Matt McDonell (2004): Strategic Business Development Analyst, 3M Corporation

To sum it up: Someone who is interested in attending a school where they can help build on an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

Administration Support
The leadership and administration of Kelley appreciate students who are interested in Net Impact and work to support the club in various ways. Net Impact receives a base of funding from the school that can be used for socially relevant events decided upon by the current Net Impact leadership. Most years, the school also reimburses a number of students for expenses incurred at the annual Net Impact conference, which they highly encourage students to attend. In addition to its base of funds, Net Impact can also receive additional funds from the Bunke's Ethics Institute, Dean's council or from the MBA club chairperson, (cont’d)
36 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Indiana University—Bloomington, page 3
Christine Davis. This year, Christine has volunteered to support the annual case competition which takes place in the fall. The Ethics Institute often covers much of the expense to bring in speakers focused on business ethics. Thus, the school at large recognizes the importance of Net Impact. However, the school can only deliver what is requested by the students, so it is imperative that in upcoming years there are dedicated students who keep social and environmental issues at the forefront of the minds of the leadership at Kelley.

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leader: Corinne Carter-Cohn: ccarterc@indiana.edu

Reasons to Attend
Indiana's Kelley School of Business has a strong Entrepreneurship program. As such, there are opportunities to pursue a social entrepreneurship certificate, which entails taking classes in both the School of Public Affairs and Environment (SPEA) and the Kelley School of Business. Entrepreneurship, finance, and marketing programs at Kelley provide a good foundation for starting and growing a business, a skill-set very applicable to someone considering a nonprofit management track. In addition, while Kelley does not have a formal loan forgiveness program, the school’s tuition is the lowest of any top business school. Considering that the school is also very generous with assistantships and grants, all students, not just those participating in a loan program, have a wide variety of career options available to them. While almost all students accept employment in the for-profit sector, many students pursue work that is aligned with their social and environmental priorities by working with companies with excellent reputations for corporate responsibility. Kelley’s Graduate Career Services office recently started an initiative to address the needs of students interested in less traditional careers.

Net Impact student admissions contact: Corinne Carter-Cohn ccarterc@indiana.edu

Survey respondents: 12

37 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

1275 East Tenth Street, Suite 2010, Bloomington, IN 47405-1703 Email: mbaoffice@indiana.edu

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
MIT Sloan School of Management
“The Net Impact Chapter at MIT Sloan has really taken off and has grown rapidly; there will be a community of like-minded individuals to help support your interests.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 720 Very active Net Impact members: 15 Somewhat active members: 15 (100 with interest) Program strengths: SE, ID Student activity level: Average Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 3.3/5 3.7/5 Faculty: Admin: 3.8/5 3.8/5 3.6/5 4.1/5

Curriculum
MIT Sloan offers a variety of classes, experiential learning opportunities, and special seminars related to using business for social and environmental impact and is currently expanding and integrating its offerings under the broadly defined heading of sustainability. The MBA program provides opportunities to acquire specialty skill sets in areas highly useful for pursuing careers in these sustainability areas. Systems dynamics, operations management, technology and entrepreneurship, and international management are just a few areas where MIT Sloan offers a plethora of opportunities. MIT Sloan is unique in that the core curriculum only lasts one semester, leaving three semesters to explore particular interests. Students love the way that their MIT Sloan education can be tailored so well to their own interests. In addition, MIT Sloan offers a week each semester called Sloan Innovation Period, during which students do not attend regular classes but instead select seminars, simulations and special events that don’t fit into the normal class schedule. Some examples include a screening of the documentary, “The Corporation,” social enterprise case studies, sustainability systems simulation, nonprofit leadership class, Bosnian peace-keeping simulation, and explorations of social impact through business. A sampling of courses MIT Sloan offers includes “Social Enterprise,” “Sustainability, Trade & the Environment,” “Nonprofit Management,” and “Ethics and Social Responsibility.” However, MIT Sloan is truly unique in the hands-on nature of offerings: consulting projects with nonprofits through New Sector Alliance; intensive in-country opportunities through global-lab (g-lab); and creative courses like “Leading Profound Innovation for a More Sustainable World,” where students teleconference together from all over the world to work on complex sustainability problems with business and NGO leaders. These offerings create a variety of stimulating experiential learning opportunities. About the curriculum, one student wrote, “MIT Sloan offers a lot of unique skills, from supply chain management to technology application to systems thinking... I wanted skills, especially skills that tend to be weaker in NGOs, Government, and other social impact arenas. I wanted an innovative, challenging, entrepreneurial environment, and this is what I am getting.” Working closely with students, MIT Sloan senior faculty members are currently developing additional offerings in sustainability. The goal of this effort is to provide greater cohesiveness to offerings as well as to further integrate social and environmental considerations into core components. It is an exciting time to be at MIT Sloan to help envision and shape the future of sustainability courses and experiential opportunities. Finally, as an institution, MIT provides an exciting environment for further exploration of social and environmental impact. MIT Sloan students can take two courses outside of MIT Sloan at MIT, HBS, or the Kennedy School of Government. MIT offers courses through a variety of centers and programs, including technology and public policy, human rights and justice, international development, and energy and the environment. In addition, MIT Sloan students from Net Impact are actively involved in moving MIT forward to develop a more comprehensive strategy around its sustainability initiatives. Under the leadership of new President Susan Hockfield, MIT has developed the Energy Research Council and operates at the cutting edge of energy and the environment.

The chapter in three words: ActionOriented, Entrepreneurial, Committed Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

80% 71% 60
Somewhat agree

57%

40

Agree

20
Strongly agree

0

NI members

All

38 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, continued
Student Activities
MIT Sloan offers numerous speakers, conferences, and events, such as Sloan Service Day. Additionally, MIT Sloan MBA students served as mentors for teams of undergraduate students from a variety of universities through Starting Bloc, an organization that promotes leadership skills in social responsibility through training and a case competition. We found that serving as mentors for this program was a truly rewarding experience.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 50% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 82% of students found internships using both their values and skills

“The energy in the chapter is tremendous. You can make great things happen if you come here.”

Net Impact organizes speakers, treks, and the Sloan Nonprofit Internship Fund. Several other clubs at MIT Sloan organize events that have a social and/or environmental impact. Examples include the Energy and Environment Club, Social Entrepreneurs for International Development, the Marketing Club, the Retail Club, the Student Senate and the Innovation Club. Opportunities to travel to a variety of countries exist during winter and spring breaks. Conferences have included in-depth looks at renewable energy, corporate leadership, business for a better world, microfinance, and particular world regions like Asia and Latin America. We also do a number of fundraisers. Students donated over $11,000 for Hurricane Katrina victims and raised money for a variety of charities through our student auction. The hardest part of being a MIT Sloan student is deciding between so many amazing opportunities.

Alumni: 37% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

We are working very hard to increase and improve the services and activities offered through Net Impact. For 2006-2007, we plan on developing a series of events (speakers, case studies, and trips) centered on a specific social/environmental impact topic for a month-long exploration each semester. We will also continue to attend the national Net Impact conference. We are working on a variety of other projects, including a guide to sustainability at MIT Sloan, and Orientation/Sloan Innovation Period offerings around social responsibility in business. Again, the MIT community at large offers a wealth of speakers, events, and conferences as well, and students benefit from the strong networks in the Boston area for university events— Boston College, Boston University, Babson, Harvard, and Tufts are just a few.

Prominent alumni: • Joel Lamstein: President, World Education, Founder & President, John Snow, Inc. • Catherine Humboldt (2006): CSR, Nike • George Chu, The Bridgespan Group

Career Services and Alumni
The MIT Sloan Career Development Office (CDO) is starting to develop more and more relationships as demand grows for jobs with social and environmental impact. Students have been competitive for placements at the United Nations, World Bank, Endeavor, and the Asian Development Bank. Students have interned with organizations like Ashoka and World of Good and have pursued projects with the Grameen Bank and post-tsunami economic development. Additionally, students have worked in CSR for companies like Reebok, Nike, and Starbucks. The CDO offers a panel of alumni in nonprofit management and social responsibility positions and posts job offerings as they receive them. However, more can and is being done to provide further support for students in non-traditional job searches. Currently, Sloan students interested in social and environmental impact are using a variety of formal and informal searches and connections to achieve their career goals. Additionally, students have access to both the MIT Sloan alumni network, as well as the larger MIT alumni network. Our Net Impact chapter is currently developing relationships with alumni interested in social and environmental impact and putting together an internship/job search information manual. Also, based on the consulting work that MIT Sloan students provide to a variety of non-profits and companies in these areas, MIT Sloan has a strong reputation for quality work and strong analytical abilities. (cont’d)
39 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

To sum it up: MIT Sloan would be most fitting for someone who is interested in building upon an existing base of social / environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, continued
MIT Sloan does offer the Sloan Nonprofit Internship Fund to help support internships in non-profits that don’t pay as well or don’t pay at all. For 2006, the available funds to support summer internships are approximately $28,000. Currently, there is no loan forgiveness program.

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leader: Kara Penn kpenn@sloan.mit.edu Net Impact student admissions contact: Jon McLaughlin jonmc@mit.edu

Administration Support
The administration is very engaged in expanding curriculum, activities, and careers that use business for social and environmental impact. This can be seen in the recent commitment of the Dean and senior faculty to create further offerings in sustainability, broadly defined. Students are working with faculty to help develop these new offerings. Additionally, the administration helped support the travel expenses for 16 Net Impact members to attend the Net Impact national conference at Stanford in 2005. The Dean’s Speakers series has helped bring in prominent leaders who have spoken about topics such as diversity and social responsibility in business. Also, during orientation, speakers on business ethics and corporate social responsibility played prominent roles. For example, Nike’s CSR director addressed the incoming class. Students interested in applying to MIT Sloan should emphasize their interest in social and environmental impact. The school is looking for those passionate about making a difference in the world. Currently international impact made by students is receiving a great deal of focus at MIT Sloan through media releases and student profiles.

Reasons to Attend
This is an extremely exciting time for students with interest in social and environmental themes to be at MIT Sloan and MIT in general. A genuine opportunity exists to make a substantial impact in the direction MIT takes related to sustainability, and the energy and environment initiative is a major and substantive undertaking for the institution. We are developing a number of additional offerings, and students are playing a large role in shaping and bringing those opportunities to the forefront. Applicants who come to MIT Sloan with these interests will not find themselves alone but instead with approximately 50 others who share similar committed interests and at least a 100 others who are relatively interested. The hands-on opportunities MIT Sloan provides are truly spectacular, and the hard skills in technology entrepreneurship, operations management, and systems dynamics are the best available. One student wrote, “MIT Sloan is very hands-on; meaningful opportunities to partner with organizations on social impact projects, social entrepreneurship, etc, exist and are a huge benefit.” Applicants interested in MIT Sloan will find that they are particularly valuable to organizations/companies focused on social and environmental impact. They will also find themselves in a supportive, entrepreneurial, hard-working, collaborative, global and adventurous environment. Visionary students with a drive to effect social and environmental change would find a welcome home at MIT Sloan.

Survey respondents: 22

40 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

50 Memorial Drive, E52-126, Cambridge, MA 02139 Email: mbaadmissions@sloan.mit.edu

Monterey Institute of International Studies
Fisher Graduate School of International Business
"The Fisher School embraces the instruction of corporate social responsibility issues from an international perspective, which is immensely valuable considering the modern multinational business climate.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 100 Very active Net Impact members: 8 Somewhat active members: 15 Program strengths: CD, ID, NPM Student activity level: Above average

Curriculum
Although Corporate Social Responsibility themes are not part of the core curriculum, it is possible to create a CSR concentration through a series of workshops, electives, and other full-term classes through the School of International Policy Studies. CSR themes are touched upon briefly in a variety of core classes such as finance and organizational behavior, but they do not constitute their own separate requirement. Specific workshop classes in the business school include Corporate Responsibility, Social Impact Management, and Business Planning for Sustainability. These classes are normally offered on Saturdays and Sundays for either one or two weekends total. Students may also enroll in Global Business and the Environment and Sustainable Development, two full-semester classes that are offered through the policy school. As a result of faculty and student involvement, the business school is in the process of adding more CSR themes into the curriculum, and there should be several more workshops offered in the future. It should however be noted that creating full-term CSR-related classes through the business school is a goal that may not come to fruition for several more years. Because of the small size of the business school (less than 80 students), the CSR concentration is not a common specialization, but it is indeed possible. Students should look for classes offered by Bruce Paton in the business school and Jason Scorse in the International Policy school.

Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Faculty: Admin: Curriculum: Activities: 4.3/5 4.7/5 4/5 4.2/5 3.8/5 3.8/5

The chapter in three words: Ambitious, Female-dominated, on an upswing

Student Activities
In the 2005-2006 school year, our Net Impact chapter was in its third year and is definitely gaining momentum. The leadership team for 2006-2007 is strong and will undoubtedly be successful in recruiting new members and planning a variety of activities that further the goals of social, economic, and environmental sustainability. Our big event each year is the Annual Monterey Institute Net Impact Forum and Exhibition held in the spring, usually in February or March. This day-long event features speakers and panel discussions on a variety of themes and topics, all related to sustainability and how it can be applied to business. Being involved with Forum planning offers students a unique chance to network with leaders in the CSR circuit as well as establish contacts with fellow students, faculty, and the community. Other events include Environmental Trivia Night, the Organic Feast, the Earth Day Festival, and talks with thought leaders from the local area. The Environmental Task Force (ETF) is another active organization on campus that shares common themes with Net Impact. ETF has spearheaded a campus greening project, and there is much collaboration between our two groups on this initiative. Unfortunately, social and environmental themes are not overly present at student orientation, but this could be a possible project for future MIIS Net Impact chapters. Net Impact is a very active organization on campus and is very well-respected among students and faculty. The Monterey Institute is a very liberal campus overall, and social/ environmental concerns are paramount in people's minds. People look to Net Impact for direction and information related to the corporate sustainability movement. Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

100%

100% 83%

80

Somewhat agree

60

Agree

40
Strongly agree

20

0

NI members

All

41 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Monterey Institute of International Studies, continued
Career Services and Alumni
Career services for people conducting a non-traditional job search are ad hoc at best. Because of the Monterey Institute's location and size, students usually find it more productive to network and attend career fairs in San Francisco rather than wait for employers to come to campus. There is a staff member, who identifies with socially and environmentally responsible business, on hand to facilitate the career search, but the bulk of the work remains the student's responsibility. Access to alumni is possible through informational interviews and through identifying target companies to match students with. Although the Fisher School is small, the brand is relatively well-known, especially in the non-traditional sector, Washington DC, and on the West Coast. There is no additional funding for those that go into nonprofit nor is there a loan forgiveness program available. Note from MIIS Admissions: “Every MBA student receives a ‘personalized’ career service which includes: web based assessment, one on one meetings to revise each client's resume and personal introductions to our alumni network. FGSIB has a network of over 2,000 alumni in 62 countries The Career Services Director is a Lifetime member of Net-impact and attends their events. The Fisher School Career services subscribes to CSR and non-profit job postings targeted to MBA graduate students.”

AT A GLANCE
Prominent alumni: • Andrew Johnson (2005): Financial Analyst, REC Solar • Catherine Barnes (2005): Marketing department, Patagonia

To sum it up: Fisher Graduate School of International Business would be most fitting for someone who is interested in building upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

Administration Support
The administration is very supportive of Net Impact, through attendance at events as well as through financial and facility sponsorship of the Annual Forum. Additionally, each year the student council allocates $300 for each club. The Dean is interested in green initiatives but, unfortunately, what he can accomplish in this area is often limited by funding. However, we always feel comfortable approaching our administration with any requests or ideas we may have. I am unsure of the Admissions Office's exact perspective on "Net Impact" applicants, but I know that they would view it as a positive trend.

Net Impact Chapter Leader : Kate Butchart (author) Elizabeth Brogaard elizabeth.brogaard@miis.edu Maria Kovacs maria.kovacs@miis.edu

Reasons to Attend
Both the most positive and the most negative attribute of our program is its small size, which gives students the opportunity to excel and be a "big fish" but at the same time imposes some limitations. One student wrote, “with such a small student body, one can really make a difference and cause changes in the way things are done.”

“Although the Fisher School is small, the brand is relatively well-known, especially in the nontraditional sector, Washington DC, and on the West Coast.”

Things at MIIS are changing, and the administration is in the process of adding more socially responsible coursework, but the size once again impacts the financial possibilities of adding as much as Net Impact or the Dean would like. The combination of workshops through the business school and the full-term policy classes are more than adequate to lay a foundation of CSR knowledge, but for those that already have this base knowledge, it may not be the most appropriate choice. However, things are definitely changing, and the Fisher School at the Monterey Institute is definitely worth consideration for the CSR specialization! Students also love Monterey; one MBA wrote, “Monterey is a beautiful and quiet place to study/live and is not too far from big city activities.”

Survey respondents: 7

42 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

460 Pierce Street, Monterey, CA 93940 Email: admit@miis.edu

North Carolina State University
College of Management
“The NC State MBA program has been very successful in attracting bright talent in the few years since its inception. This is the 'business school of the future.’”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 80 Very active Net Impact members: 7 Somewhat active members: 10 Student activity level: Average

Curriculum
Currently, NC State does not have formal classes dedicated to socially responsible business practices; however, the Net Impact chapter was influential in getting a CSR focus included in a course entitled “Creativity in Management” for the upcoming Fall 2006 semester.

Student Activities
The Net Impact chapter formed in Fall 2005 and gained campus recognition early in January 2006. We are a young chapter trying to build momentum. Since we are such a young club, new members have the opportunity to help shape the club to be what they would like to see. Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: 3.1/5 3/5 Faculty: Admin: 3/5 3/5 3/5 3.3/5

Administration Support
The Director of the MBA program is very supportive. She helped tremendously in making socially responsible business the central theme of next semester’s Creativity in Management class. In addition, due to her attendance at a past Net Impact conference, she was very excited to see us forming a chapter here at NC State and helped two of our members secure complete funding to attend the most recent Net Impact conference at Stanford. She will be very helpful as we try to make changes to the curriculum. One student remarked “I think our Admissions Office values diversity and anything of interest that applicants can bring to our program. Though I cannot say for certain they'd value Net Impact-type applicants, I do think they should emphasize their interest.”

Activities:

The chapter in three words: Learning, Excited, Influential Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?

Reasons to Attend
Someone who has a desire continue to lay the groundwork for Net Impact and educate their fellow students in the various aspects of CSR would feel comfortable here. In addition, someone who has an interest in a Supply Chain concentration can take advantage of the “Ample opportunities strong faculty and curriculum we have at NC State in Supply Chain. One student says, for involvement and an “with the current support from administration, coupled with...the idea of Net Impact objecurban environment tives communicated to the faculty, the seed has been sown in the minds of the MBA poised for significant program to adopt more social/environmental awareness into the program.” change and receptive to
student-led initiatives make Raleigh's North Carolina State University an excellent program.”

Preparation for socially responsible leadership

50% 44% 40
Somewhat agree

33%

30

20
Agree

10
Strongly agree

0

NI members

All

43 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

North Carolina State University, continued
AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement • 71% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful

Alumni 43% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Prominent alumni: • Jenny Smith (2005): Burt’s Bees

To sum it up: North Carolina State University MBA program would be most exciting to someone who is interested in helping to lay the foundation for social/ environmental awareness at a program.

Net Impact Chapter Leader: Gary Bernstein, garymbernstein@yahoo.com Net Impact student admissions contact: Jennifer Arthur, jennifer_arthur@ncsu.edu
Survey respondents: 9 44 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

2102 Nelson Hall, 2801 Founders Drive, Raleigh, NC

Northwestern University
Kellogg School of Management
“Kellogg was the perfect mix of a highly-regarded well-rounded MBA curriculum and an active student body that is conscious about and involved in social impact-related extracurricular and career pursuits. I was confident that I was going to be part of a committed group of highly-involved students interested in social impact as well as be supported by the community-focused orientation of the broader student body.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 1200 Very active Net Impact members: 70 Somewhat active members: 120 Program strengths: SE, CD, CSR, NPM Student activity level: One of program’s most active clubs Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Faculty: Admin: Curriculum: Activities: 4.1/5 4.6/5 3.9/5 4.3/5 4.3/5 4.5/5

Curriculum
Dean Dipak C. Jain declared to a group of leaders from the Social Impact Club (as Net Impact is known at Kellogg) on May 12, 2004: “We are in the business of producing socially responsible global leaders.” Since this time, Kellogg has worked to incorporate this message into its curriculum and brand. Prior to 2004, Kellogg had several academic offerings for students who were interested in the social sector, such as the Public/Nonprofit Management program and major and the Business and its Social Environment (BASE) major. However, despite the strength of these programs, there was little integration of course materials and teaching. To that end, a committee that included the President, Academic Chair and Strategy Chair from the Social Impact Club and a multidisciplinary group of faculty and administrators convened to discuss how to enhance the programs. After multiple discussions, Social Enterprise at Kellogg (SEEK) was born with the goal of creating an academically rigorous, globally relevant, holistic curriculum that provides students with strong skills to manage in whatever sectors they choose to pursue after Kellogg. SEEK includes disciplines such as ethics and values based leadership, corporate social responsibility, political economy, public, nonprofit and business and its social environment. SEEK 440A, Values and Crisis Decision-Making, is the required SEEK course during the second year. The academic committee of our club is focusing on creating partnerships with professors within the traditional departments (Marketing, Strategy, and Finance) to incorporate social/environmental topics into the core curriculum. Already, many professors from the Strategy and Management and Organizations department teach SEEK courses. The Ford Center for Global Citizenship at Kellogg provides students with access to the thought leaders on these topics and the professors. Both the Director, David Messick, and affiliated faculty, Daniel Diermeier, are accessible for independent research. Professor Deirmeier also teaches SEEK 440A during the fall quarter for second-years. One of the highlights of the SEEK program is Kellogg’s Board Fellows class. This program combines two courses in board governance with a year-long practical experience as a non-voting board member of a Chicago-area nonprofit. Approximately 40 students participate in this program each year, and it has been consistently oversubscribed. This course also brings together students that have a spectrum of nonprofit to private-sector professional interests.

The chapter in three words: Collaborative, Holistic, Evolving Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

100%

96% 79%

80

Somewhat agree

60

Student Activities
40

Agree

First, the Social Impact Club is the leading club at Kellogg that influences and educates our classmates on how they can use their business talents for social and environmental good in any industry that they will belong to. During the academic year the club hosts over a dozen speakers on campus, a career fair, and a faculty case debate. Kellogg hosted the 1996 Net Impact conference and will be hosting the 2006 conference as well. Our classmates are eagerly planning this event with the Net Impact organization. (cont’d)
45 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

20

Strongly agree

0

NI members

All

Northwestern University, page 2
The Board Fellows Program prepares Kellogg students and alumni to be civic leaders by being effective nonprofit board members. This offers great support to nonprofits and builds Kellogg’s reputation of producing strong, community-oriented leaders. The program was launched in 2004 (15 fellows) and continues to grow at a rapid pace. We have 40 fellows in the class of 2006, and over 120 class of 2007 students expressed interest in participating next year. The Global Health Initiative, which is still being outlined, gives students the chance to develop, market, and implement health products in third world countries to better the lifestyles of those with HIV. Kellogg students work closely with Northwestern engineering students in the development of the products. There are also a few ways that students can work with outside organizations for credit or just at an extracurricular level. Students may research an area of their liking during the Global Initiatives in Management course, for which they travel to other parts of the world. Fur“Kellogg has a very thermore, students may be part of the Neighborhood Business Initiative, which does prostrong Net Impact chapbono marketing or strategy consulting for local organizations. ter that works closely with faculty and adminiFinally, we host the Innovating Social Change Conference. On October 5, 2005, apstration to continually proximately 300 attendees came to the seventh annual event. The conference explored improve and expand our the heightened responsibility of today's global leaders in creating sustainable value for social impact-related increasingly informed and demanding stakeholders. Through a series of expert panels, offerings both inside debates and keynote speakers, we examined how progressive leaders in the private, and outside of classes.” public, and nonprofit sectors are working together to better integrate social, environmental, and economic considerations into every aspect of their organizations' strategy and operations.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 83% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 96% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 44% found jobs

Alumni: 95% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Career Services and Alumni
Within Kellogg’s Career Management Center (CMC) there is a full-time career counselor responsible for social/environmental and non-profit career paths. The CMC is well set up for non-traditional and off-campus job searches, and around 50% of first-year students get their internships from off-campus sources. Each spring, the Social Impact Club hosts a career fair specific to these interests. Most of the organizations are from the Chicago area; however, there are always a few from other parts of the country. Additionally, our club sets up career treks to cities and companies of interest to the students. In the past, these treks have gone to San Francisco and Washington DC to meet with both nonprofit and for-profit organizations.

Prominent alumni: • Hans Baritt (2003): World Health Organization • Louise Belmont-Skinner (2002): Vice President, Chicago Children’s Museum • Nell Edgington (2002): Executive Director, Capital Area Food Bank • Stephanie Blackburn Freeth (2002): Northwestern University • Roshini George (1997): Managing Director, American Cancer Society

Administration Support
The Social Impact club is funded by the Kellogg Student Association, the Ford Center for Global Citizenship, and the Center for Nonprofit Management. Just like any club at Kellogg, the Social Impact Club has access to all of the facilities. Our club and interests are fully supported by the administration. This can be seen by its commitment to the new SEEK major and the priority Dean Jain places on creating socially responsible global leaders. The Kellogg community places a large value on socially responsible and aware candidates. The admissions office is very interested in hearing how applicants have been involved in society and with the environment.
46 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

To sum it up: Kellogg School of Management would be most fitting for someone who is interested in refining and growing a mostly socially aware program and student body.

Northwestern University, page 3
Reasons to Attend
The combination of Kellogg’s SEEK program and the Social Impact Club make Kellogg an excellent place for students interested in social/environmental themes. While academic rigor is provided in the classroom, the active Kellogg student body organizes activities that enhance the classroom learning experience on a weekly basis. “I was confident that I was going to be part of a committed group of highly-involved students interested in social impact as well as be supported by the community-focused orientation of the broader student body,” said one MBA. As many of these activities are organized by current students, leadership opportunities to dig deeper in this field are endless. Additionally, events with these themes are often co-hosted with other Kellogg student clubs. This highlights that Kellogg students interested in social/environmental themes are very integrated with other professional interest areas and are not a small, marginal interest group. One student wrote that, “Kellogg also succeeds at creating an environment that embraces students from a range of professional backgrounds, which means that [social impact]-minded students find a greater proportion of the student body interested in/receptive to the issues they care about or have professional experience with.”

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leader: Ben Nimmergut bnimmergut2007 @kellogg.northwestern.edu

Survey respondents: 53

47 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

2001 Sheridan Road, 2nd Floor, Evanston, IL 60208 Email: MBAadmissions@kellogg.northwestern.edu

Pennsylvania State University
Smeal College of Business
“To date, Smeal has made a name for itself by integrating ethical leadership into the MBA curriculum. We are very proud of Smeal’s leadership position in this arena.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 140 Very active Net Impact members: 15 Somewhat active members: 25 Program strengths: SE, ES, CSR Student activity level: One of program’s most active clubs

Curriculum
The Smeal MBA program is unique because it combines large university assets and individual focus. On one hand are the power and vast resources of Penn State and an expansive alumni network. On the other, it is an MBA program remarkable for its intimate scale: small classes, easy access to world-class faculty, tailored offerings, and the ongoing engagement of alumni. To date, Smeal has made a name for itself by integrating ethical leadership into the MBA curriculum. We are very proud of Smeal’s leadership position in this arena, and we feel that this provides us with a huge opportunity to take the initiative and incorporate more social/environmental themes in our curriculum. To us, this addition represents the next logical step of the continuous improvement of our program. Penn State Net Impact has been able to play a leading role in laying the foundation for curriculum evolution. While our education initially began as primarily peer-to-peer, due to our small program size, we have full access to our dynamic faculty, and we’ve been able to approach them about raising more social/environmental issues and implications for business in class. We have been careful to focus exclusively on the “business case” so as not to moralize too much or alienate anybody within our program. We have also been quick to enlist the help and tap the knowledge of parties around the university, particularly from our School of Earth and Mineral Sciences and our the School of Forest Resources. These schools have both allowed us to take classes in their programs and have helped us design and introduce a Sustainable Business class this year for the MBA program. This class is unique in both its content and its cross-listed status for grad students of multiple schools at Penn State. This class has been received well by the faculty and students in the business school, and we look forward to its continued success. Additionally, we have put together an advisor board comprised of professors representing a broad range of academic interests. We feel that this can only help us towards our goal of broad improvements in our curriculum.

Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 4.1/5 4.5/5 Faculty: Admin: 4.1/5 4.1/5 3.8/5 3.9/5

The chapter in three words: Active, Energetic, Growing Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

Student Activities
Penn State Net Impact will soon be entering its third year of existence, yet we are still building momentum and striving to reach our full potential. The environment in which we operate-“We encourage you to from the student, faculty, and administrative perspective--is one of great excitement and participate in Net Imrealizable potential. Our areas of focus are: Peer-to-peer education: monthly themed chapter meetings and discussions External speaker education: six business world speakers per academic year (on average) with subsequent networking events • Career advancement: lead sharing, network sharing, and resume building • Pro-bono work: most recent projects include building a marketing plan for a local affordable housing non-profit, and creating a business plan for a center within the university who wanted to incorporate sustainable business practices into African oil exploration Corporate visits/field trips: one per year, scheduled visits to various organizations (cont’d)

100%

100% 89%

80
Somewhat agree

pact as soon as you set foot on campus. Opportunities to speak to Social/ Environmental issues begin as soon as classes do.”

• •

60

40
Agree

20
Strongly agree

0

NI members

All

48 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Pennsylvania State University, continued
in fields of interest. (2003 and 2005 - Washington D.C., 2004 - Pittsburgh) We encourage your to participate in Net Impact as soon as you set foot on campus. Opportunities to speak to Social/ Environmental issues begin as soon as classes do. We encourage first-years to take leadership opportunities within Penn State Net Impact early and often.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 57% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 33% of students found internships using both their values and skills

Career Services and Alumni
Our career services team at Penn State does a tremendous job of assisting MBAs in their career search. Given our program’s relatively small size, students are able to get a lot of one-on-one time with the career services team. They provide great assistance in helping us develop and hone our value proposition as well as with networking. We have a vast, active alumni network that is always eager to interact with us. Alumni have been extremely helpful not only in finding specific jobs, but also in helping us gain better insight and direction as we begin to plot our respective career trajectories. Given that our chapter of Net Impact still has a grass roots feel, a lot of knowledge, leadership, and network sharing takes place between group members. Members are quite active in helping each other find opportunities as well as helping each other develop the most effective personal marketing materials.

Alumni: 71% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Administration Support
Our business school administration’s support has been solid and continues to grow. Fortunately for us, the administration was quick to see how social/environmental issues have resonated with their students. The school’s leadership has been supportive from both a funding and recruiting standpoint. We are given equal funding compared to the other MBA organizations, and our admissions department has realized the unique value that MBA candidates who are interested in social/ environmental themes offer. We have made continuous progress with our administration over the past three years regarding these issues and are poised to continue doing so.

Prominent alumni: Ed Robinson (1995): President, Capacity Building Solutions • Tricia McGoldrick (2005): Market Segment Manager, DuPont • Glenn Milano (2001): Operations Specialist, USAID

To sum it up: Penn State University is most fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school where there is opportunity to build upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth. Net Impact Chapter Leader: Jarret Chirafisi JarretC@psu.edu Ian Joseph ipj100@psu.edu Survey Respondents: 10

Reasons to Attend
As a student interested in social/environmental themes, you should consider attending Smeal, because you have the opportunity to convert potential into tangible returns. Net Impact is the most active and the most entrepreneurial MBA organization at Penn State. In just three years we have gained great influence, both inside and outside the business school. When it comes to integrating socia/environmental themes into our business education, we have taken the initiative to make sure that we have gained access to the necessary knowledge. Whether it has been through peer-to-peer education, curriculum change, corporate visits or pro bono work, we have accomplished what we set out to do--get a better idea of how to leverage business to create a better world. We hope that you will consider Smeal and help us continue to move towards making this vision a reality.

49 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

220 Business Building, University Park, PA 16802 Email: smealmba@psu.edu

Presidio School of Management
“Presidio School of Management, is hands down, the best MBA program for a student interested in social/environmental impact themes.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 80 Very active Net Impact members: 10 Somewhat active members: 40 Program strengths: SE, ES, CD, CSR, NPM Student activity level: Above average Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Faculty: Admin: Curriculum: Activities: 5/5 4.9/5 5/5 4.8/5 4.9/5 4.8/5

Curriculum
The entire Presidio curriculum is based around sustainability. The MBA itself is referred to as an "MBA in sustainable management." Every student at Presidio considers environmental and social themes as they relate to business the main reason they enrolled in this particular program. The curriculum consists of the traditional nuts and bolts of business (i.e. marketing, accounting, finance, etc.) interwoven with the principles of sustainability. This occurs in every class. Presidio is a small MBA-only program that currently does not offer electives. Though this may at first seem limiting, we find there is value and synergy in taking the same four courses with the same people every semester - the "collaborative learning community.” One Presidio student says, “Presidio’s greatest success is in its critical approach to old school business management practices. Presidio challenges us to think differently.” The faculty consists of recognized leaders in sustainability, notably Hunter Lovins and Ron Nahser, with a constant stream of guest lecturers from both business fields and activism. A few students mentioned the benefit for a greater focus on “real-world opportunities: because these themes are still evolving in our society, integrating classes into real world projects will provide students with real world experience that will help them to be more effective after graduation.” Similarly, a student said “I am very excited about Presidio developing a higher number of strong relationships with local businesses and corporations to incorporate more hands-on project learning into the curriculum.”

The chapter in three words: Diverse, Committed, Informed Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

Student Activities
We have been fortunate to have the school sponsor our Net Impact dues and, as a result, boast 100% membership in Net Impact. Currently, half the students are actively participating in Net Impact activities, though interest continues to grow. Net Impact is very much seen as an ally for the school, and an organization with whom Presidio can become a key example. Presidio's mission is to develop leaders who understand the important role of business in creating more sustainable practices that protect the environment and benefit society. These ideas are the foundation of each course, they aren't just tacked on to traditional business classes or offered through electives or clubs. The chapter at Presidio emphasizes social events, the Net Impact website resources, and the national conference. Because of the size of the school, there are not a lot of full-fledged clubs – rather, there are a lot of well-connected individuals involved in an astonishing array of activities and groups, the majority of which are in some way connected to environmental or social concerns.

100%

100%
Somewhat agree

100%

80

60

40

Strongly agree

20

0

NI members

All

50 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Presidio School of Management, continued
Career Services and Alumni
The Presidio brand is growing faster than I ever thought it would. With only one class having graduated so far, that's saying a lot – but the school's name is increasingly discussed both inside and outside of "sustainability" circles. It's a tight-knit school with all grads ready to chat about what they're doing - some entrepreneurs, some in large companies, some in the nonprofit sector. One recent graduate remembers that “the environment is extremely supportive of the personal development and skill building required to achieve a corporate transformation.” At Presidio, access to alumni is as easy as picking up the phone, and there's almost always someone who will come and have coffee with you to discuss matters. The faculty is extremely well connected and can arrange meetings with a wide network of folks.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 36% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 40% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 83% found jobs Alumni: 29% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful Prominent alumni: • Elizabeth U (2005): Program Officer of the Investors’ Circle Slow Money project • Simran Sethi (2005): host/writer, PBS series, Ethical Markets; coauthor of series’ companion guide • Dedee Delongpre (2005): Director of the Office of Sustainability, University of Florida To sum it up: Presidio School of Management would be most fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school where students and faculty are on the forefront of social/ environmental issues. Net Impact Chapter Leader: Nick Aster, Joey Feinstein: naster@presidiomba.org Net Impact student admissions contact: George Kao gkao@presidiomba.org
Survey respondents: 39

Administration Support
The school has covered the $25 fee for students, as well as the chapter dues, and is actively supportive of Net Impact as a key organization for the students as well as the school.

Reasons to Attend
Presidio is one of the leading institutions addressing sustainability through the lens of business in its MBA curriculum. It is also a small school with a great deal of hands-on opportunities to offer the student and a well-known and well-connected faculty who will happily take the time to offer personal guidance on projects big and small. Presidio's mission is to develop leaders who understand the important role of business in creating more sustainable practices that protect the environment and benefit society. These ideas are the foundation of each course, they aren't just tacked on to traditional business classes “Traditional MBA or offered through electives or clubs. One Net Impact member speaks of her program as, “offering a unique way to study business -- through the lens of sustainability, adprograms only dressing the social, environmental, and economic issues of today.” throw in sustain-

ability as a side dish; at Presidio, it’s the main course.”

51 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Presidio Building 36 P.O. Box 29502 San Francisco, CA 94129 Email: info@presidiomba.org

San Francisco State University
College of Business
“We are the most affordable program in San Francisco and the program is growing in its emphasis on social/environmental issues.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 196 Very active Net Impact members: 4 Somewhat active members: 8

Curriculum
The MBA/MSBA program at San Francisco State University is mainly a traditional graduate business program. One of the core course requirements of the program is a course called the Political, Social and Legal Environment of Business. This course covers ethics, environmental and social issues, and responsibilities of businesses. In addition, the SFSU program offers a course called Business and Environmental Leadership. Many of the same issues are discussed as in the core course, but this is an elective course and therefore the students in the class tend to be more interested in the issues. Other than these two classes, there are no specific socially or environmentally responsible business classes in SFSU's MBA/MSBA program.

Student Activities
SFSU's Net Impact chapter was started in fall 2003. It is still a very small group of students, though it is gaining momentum. Though the Net Impact chapter is small, one recent grad described her SFSU Net Impact experience as “always having a small group of people who are active.” The group has activities like sponsoring career skills events, organizing a green fair, and hosting "green" happy hours.

The chapter in three words: Scrappy, Committed, Optimistic

Career Services and Alumni
Every semester, the Business Relation Center of SFSU's College of Business hosts at least one career skills seminar (out of the four they host each semester) on socially and environmentally responsible business. Leaders in the local business community attend and speak at these events. Students have the opportunity to engage these inspirational leaders and get leads for internships at these events.

To sum it up: San Francisco State University MBA/MSBA would be most fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school to help build upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

Reasons to Attend
SF State is a good value for an MBA program in the San Francisco Bay Area. One member noted, “we are the most affordable program in San Francisco and the program is growing in its emphasis on social/environmental issues.” While the program does not specifically concentrate on social/environmental themes, by the very fact that it is in the Bay Area, students have easy access to hundreds of resources and like-minded individuals in this region. The dean and career center are valuable resources. Net Impact Chapter Leader: Kelly Lawson kelly.lawson@earthlink.net Note: Since fewer than 5 students answered the survey, some data points are not included
52 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132 Email: mba@sfsu.edu

University of Alberta
School of Business
“The university promotes Net Impact, and the student body is greatly receptive of the chapter.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 130 Very active Net Impact members: 10 Somewhat active members: 50 Student activity level: Average

Curriculum
The University of Alberta incorporates corporate responsibility and governance into each of its core MBA courses. There is a Corporate Social Responsibility elective course and a mandatory ethics component as part of the program. There are many environmental issues dis“At U of A, the incussed within the Natural Resources and Energy Specialization. One student notes “At U terests of the stuof A, the interests of the student body are what influence the activities and discussion in the classroom.” dent body are

what influence the activities and discussion in the classroom.”

Leading edge faculty for teachings of CSR and corporate governance include Dr. Randall Morck, Dr. David Deephouse, Dr. Michael Lounsbury, Mark Anielski, and PhD candidate Tyler Wry.

Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 3.3/5 3/5 Faculty: Admin: 3.5/5 2.9/5 3.3/5 3.4/5

There are also centers and institutes that operate within the School of Business including the Canadian Corporate Governance Institute and the Canadian Centre for Social Entrepreneurship. Students tend to chose U of A because the high quality of education and smaller class sizes as well as the variety of courses for all interest areas.

Student Activities
The Net Impact University of Alberta chapter was started in 1999 and has grown from 5 original members to over 60 today. We find that the issues Net Impact focuses on bringing forward are becoming more and more part of business culture, and therefore need to be part of a business school education. One student said that “the university promotes Net Impact and the student body is greatly receptive of the chapter.” Our chapter is pleased to host 4 to 5 speaker events per school year. We periodically jointly present speakers with other programs within the School. For instance, this past year we presented a couple of speakers along with the International Business Specialization. Net Impact U of A is also involved in the orientation process for new students and hosts events throughout the year for the overall MBA student body.

The chapter in three words: Curious, Transforming, Responsible Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

80% 71% 60

57%

Career Services and Alumni
The University of Alberta School of Business has a career placement service with two full-time career advisors assigned strictly to MBA students. There are numerous MBA 'lunches' held throughout the school year that connect potential employers with the students through company presentations that are followed by networking time. Alberta is home to an abundant amount of natural resources. Many oil and gas companies are located in the province and corporate responsibility is a priority to most of these companies, allowing for career opportunities within this sector.
40
Somewhat agree

20
Agree

0

NI members

All

53 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

University of Alberta, continued
Administrative Support
The University of Alberta School of Business provides the Net Impact chapter with the means and tools with which to provide students an opportunity to explore the areas of corporate governance, sustainability, and social impact. Conference funding is provided to the MBA student body that enables interested candidates to attend the annual Net Impact conference. Funding is also provided through a case competition fund to send U of Alberta MBA students to such competitions as the Leeds School of Business annual case competition. The school's Dean also supports our chapter by providing facilities and catering for speaker events called 'Dean's Forums'. This past year, two examples of speakers we hosted were Mr. Jim Carter, the President and COO of Syncrude Canada, and Robin Rowland, the founder and chairman of Global Links Initiative. The Dean himself usually introduces the speaker for these events. These resources provided by the School of Business are very much appreciated by the Net Impact chapter, as they provide for growth both in membership and interest in the values that Net Impact holds.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 67% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful

Alumni: 67% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Reasons to Attend
The MBA Program at the University of Alberta has four dynamic and unique specializations which can provide outstanding career opportunities upon graduation. 1. The Natural Resources and Energy specialization provides students with opportunities by focusing on an industry sector that is key to the Alberta economy. The Oil Sands project in northern Alberta, part of the University of Alberta landscape, and the many energy corporate offices in Calgary offer graduates of this program distinct careers. 2. The International Business specialization offers MBA students the chance to look at the global business world and the ever changing commerce involved with shrinking borders among countries. 3. The Leisure and Sport Management specialization is Canada's only graduate business program offering a combined collaborative degree between the faculties of business and physical education. 4. The Technology Commercialization specialization gives business and marketing tools to those with leading edge technological ideas that allow for the successful commercialization of the idea into marketable product.

To sum it up: University of Alberta School of Business is most fitting for someone who would like to attend a school to help lay the foundation for social/environmental awareness at the program.

Net Impact Chapter Leader: Brent Porter Netimpact@ualberta.ca

Survey respondents: 7 54 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006 2-30 Business Building, Edmonton, AB T6G 2R6 Canada Email: mba@ualberta.ca

University of British Columbia
Sauder School of Business
“Net Impact is active at UBC and is developing an increasingly powerful local network.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 110 Very active Net Impact members: 10 Somewhat active members: 32 Program strengths: SE, ES Student activity level: Above average Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 3.4/5 3.4/5 Faculty: Admin: 3.6/5 3.3/5 3.8/5 3.6/5

Curriculum
The MBA program incorporates social and environmental impact into some areas of the core curriculum, and improvements continue to be made. The first three and a half months of the Sauder full-time MBA is the same for all students and features 12 courses as well as integrated projects, case studies and critical issue papers. Topics such as social/ethical marketing, balanced scorecard performance analysis, business ethics and the economic perspective of CSR are covered in various courses. Social and environmental themes are considered during several integrated cases studies, and students are required to prepare a paper in response to “The Corporation,” a critical review of the pathological pursuit of profit by the contemporary corporation. In addition, students are required to incorporate sustainability into their CORE business plan projects, and typically, a large number of the plans have a sustainability focus. MBA specializations such as Finance or Supply Chain Management generally have little consideration for social and environmental impact. Following the CORE, students can choose from approximately 90 different modules, including specific modules on Business Ethics and Sustainable Development. Additional improvements to the program are likely - a “Sustainability in Business” specialization has been pro“Many of the imposed and is pending Senate review. The administration has been supportive of these provements to the initiatives; for example, they have sponsored students to attend change-curriculum concurriculum have ferences, and there has been an effort to attract suitable faculty for the program. Most been led by previous students support these initiatives, with about 10-20% remaining skeptical.

Net Impact members in cooperation with the faculty and administration.”

The chapter in three words: Education, Experience, Exposure Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

One student describes the curriculum as containing “a significant exposure to sustainability in the entrepreneurship-oriented courses, and there is a strong focus on corporate governance and ethics.”

The Sauder School of Business features almost 100 full-time faculty, including: Dr. James Brander, who is interested in the role of renewable resource management in economic growth and decline; Dr. Peter Nemetz, who has researched natural resource policy related to energy and the environment; and finally, Dr. Charles Weinberg, who specializes in public and nonprofit organization marketing.

60%

55%

Student Activities
40

A growing Net Impact Chapter at the Sauder School of Business leads student initiatives in the areas of social and environmental impact. The Net Impact chapter at UBC is approximately four years old. Although it is a well established MBA club, it continues to grow in momentum by attracting interest from a greater number of students and by holding a greater number and wider variety of events. In general, Net Impact is considered the most organized and well connected club at UBC and is respected by members of the class. UBC Net Impact has developed a “Three-E” strategy: education, experience, and exposure. • Education: through curriculum development as well as corporate and community-related speaker events and conferences, we strive to ensure that members and the MBA community as a whole develop a greater understanding of social and environmental issues. (cont’d)
55 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Somewhat agree

33%

20
Agree

0

NI members

All

University of British Columbia, continued
• •
Experience: activities such as a new campus greening program and case competitions for local companies help to develop practical skills for our members. Exposure: we aim to expose Net Impact and our members to the local business community using various methods, such as holding networking events, attending events in the local business community, and aligning with like-minded organizations. Our exposure strategy ties back to our education and experience strategy to ensure strategic fit between the three strategies.

AT A GLANCE

Career/internship placement: 57% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful

The Business Career Centre has the flexibility to provide support for students interested in non-traditional careers and there is funding available for students interested in nonprofit internships.

Career Services and Alumni
The UBC Business Career Centre does not have a focus on helping students who wish to enter non-traditional social/ environmental careers. However, they have contacts with many related organizations, and customized career coaching is provided for any interest that a student may have. The administration typically sponsors several summer internships in the nonprofit sector and is open to specific requests from students. Net Impact fosters relations with local companies and organizations, with the goal of facilitating eventual career opportunities for students. UBC is one of three host schools for the annual Community Experience Initiative Career Fair and Conference. Net Impact is heavily involved with the organization of this regional event which includes panel discussions on careers in the nonprofit, social enterprise, international development, and sustainable development sectors. The career fair and networking session allows students to find out about specific career opportunities in related sectors.

Alumni: 33% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Prominent alumni: • Helen Goodland (2000): Executive Director, Sustainable Building Centre • David Lee (2001): Cluster Facilitator, Building Opportunities with Business • Nina Winham (2000): VP, Ecotrust Canada

Administration Support
The administration at the Sauder School of Business is a strong supporter of social and environmental leadership in the school. There is funding available for student initiatives that focus on MBA student involvement in the community, such as helping local organizations with the development of business plans. In addition, there is funding available for studentorganized events, case competitions or conferences that focus on sustainability and social development in business. The School’s Associate Dean, Academic Programs, Dr. Dale Griffin is a strong supporter of Net Impact and has been instrumental in curriculum change initiatives. Dr. Griffin has led Net Impact-organized workshops and attended the Net Impact conference in 2005. The administration supports events, case competitions or conferences that focus on sustainability and social development in business. To sum it up: The Sauder School of Business would be most fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school to refine and grow a mostly socially aware program and student body.

Reasons to Attend
Vancouver is rated by the Economist Intelligence Unit as one of the World’s top cities in terms of quality of life. A primary reason for this ranking is that Vancouver has avoided some of the unsustainable development practices that have plagued other North American cities. Accordingly, there is a strong awareness of social and environmental responsibility, creating a solid platform for business students hoping to develop a career in this area. One student emphasizes that “Vancouver is a city with a lot of volunteer and social programs. People here CARE.” While the Sauder School of Business is known for the quality of its traditional MBA program, in areas such as Finance, Supply Chain Management or Entrepreneurship, there are growing opportunities for students interested in the environmental and social impact of business. These changes are occurring as a result of Net Impact-led student initiatives as well as good support from the administration. Net Impact is active at UBC and is developing an increasingly powerful local network.
56 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Net Impact Chapter Leader: Andrew Haughian ahaughian@shaw.ca
Survey respondents: 9

#160 - 2053 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z2 Canada Email: mba@sauder.ubc.ca

University of California—Berkeley
Haas School of Business
“Haas is a leader in social impact for good reason: it boasts top notch faculty, impressive company relationships, an interested or at least supportive student body, and a track record of accomplishment.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 140 Very active Net Impact members: 40 Somewhat active members: 12 Program strengths: SE, ES, CD, CSR, ID, NPM Student activity level: One of program’s most active clubs Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 4.2/5 4.6/5 Faculty: Admin: 3.8/5 4.1/5 4/5 4.2/5

Curriculum
The expansive Haas curriculum allows students to not only master principles of general management but also to tailor the educational experience to focus on social/environmental impact themes. The intense core curriculum includes a comprehensive corporate social responsibility (CSR) component as part of the required ethics course. Almost 50% of the cases addressed directly pertain to CSR, focusing on issues such as global trade and human resources, and the importance of business leadership. In addition, the marketing, organizational behavior, accounting, and statistics classes include cases focusing on social themes. “Haas is arguably the best place to take courses that cater to students interested in corporate social responsibility, nonprofit management, and social entrepreneurship,” says one MBA. We also have many students studying international development, technology and emerging markets, renewable energy, and socially responsible investing. Many classes involve hands-on consulting projects, which provide students with excellent opportunities to choose their own socially responsible themes and companies. The Center for Responsible Business and the Nonprofit and Public Management Program (the latter ranked 4th in the nation by US News & World Report) complement the core by offering electives in Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility, Social Venture Development, Nonprofit Boards, Business & Public Policy, and Corporate Environmental Management, just to name a few. The Strategic CSR class is an unparalleled opportunity for students to consult on meaningful projects for industry leaders in CSR such as Hewlett-Packard, Gap, Ernst & Young, Clif Bar, Yahoo!, and Nokia. We also have faculty members who are on the forefront in these fields including Dr. Kellie McElhaney, recipient of the Aspen Institute’s Faculty Pioneer Award for Institution Leadership; Nora Silver, Director of the Nonprofit Management Program; and David Vogel, author of the Market for Virtue and editor of the California Management Review, which dedicates an annual issue to CSR. Furthermore, Haas students have access to the entire UC Berkeley campus, which has more top-ranked programs than any other US university. Specifically, many Net Impact members take courses in the Department of Environmental Science Policy Management, the Energy and Resources Group, the Goldman School of Public Policy, and the Boalt School of Law.

The chapter in three words: Energy, Commitment, Diversity Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

100%

97% 88%
Somewhat agree Agree

80

Student Activities
60

Haas is a student-run school and offers incredible leadership opportunities for students interested in social/environmental issues. The Haas Net Impact chapter is over ten years old and is one of the largest student clubs on campus. In 2004, we merged with the Nonprofit Management Club and continue to grow every year in membership and activity. Our Net Impact chapter offers meaningful benefits to our members through networking opportunities, career development, and social events. Our two primary goals are: (1) to support our members in pursuing careers concerned with social/ (cont’d)
57 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

40

Strongly agree

20

0

NI members

All

University of California—Berkeley, page 2
(cont’d) environmental impacts and (2) to educate our peers pursuing traditional MBA careers about how Net Impact issues affect them.
“An incredibly high portion of the student body is oriented towards using business for positive impact. These are the people you will learn from, work with, and remain connected to for the rest of your career. Even those who are not involved in a Net Impact field are supportive of its value.”

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: 62% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 91% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 62% found jobs

Some key 2006 events include: • Firm Night: A career fair that connected nearly 30 companies with 100 students. • Days on the Job: Over 75 students visited eight different Bay Area organizations that focus on responsible business practices, including Business for Social Responsibility, Clif Bar, Genentech, and TransFair USA. • Nonprofit Alumni Dinner: Students networked with alumni and nonprofit leaders at a banquet featuring the President of one of the largest private foundations in California. • CSR: Myth or Reality Debate: Jeffery Hollender, founder and CEO of Seventh Generation, debated David Vogel, Haas professor and author of the Market for Virtue, about the merits of corporate social responsibility. The event was promoted and podcasted nationwide.

In addition to Net Impact, Haas students benefit from the Global Social Venture Competition (GSVC), the oldest student-run business plan competition with a social and environmental focus. GSVC is an incredible opportunity for students to learn from social venture capitalists and initiate social enterprises of their own. Other clubs on campus that share the values of Net Impact include the Education Club, Global Initiatives at Haas (International Development), and the Energy and Resources Collaborative. Students for a Greener Berkeley is a university-wide graduate student organization that works with Net Impact on campus greening. Volunteerism is important at Haas and is organized through the student government by the elected Vice President of Community, in close coordination with Net Impact. Young Entrepreneurs at Haas (YEAH) allows Haas MBA and undergraduate mentors to use the principles of business to excite, educate, and prepare under-served youth for academic and economic success. We are also active in an inter-MBA Challenge for Charity organization. During this year’s Orientation Week, students helped paint an Oakland school and raised money for the Special Olympics. Social/environmental impact themes permeated the 2005 first-year Orientation Week. Professor McElhaney, Director of the Center for Responsible Business, gave a presentation to the entire class about her program’s offerings and applications. Paul Rice, Haas alum and Founder/CEO of TransFair USA, was the keynote speaker at the student banquet and Priya Hadji, Haas alumna and successful social entrepreneur, kicked off community impact day with an inspirational speech about social innovation. Finally, all students participated in an innovation workshop with Leapfrog to help them develop triple bottom line applications for a new educational product.

Alumni: 77% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Prominent alumni: • Joanna Mackness (2004): CSR Integration Leader, Ernst & Young LLP • Marcus Chung (2004): Manager, Social Responsibility Strategic Planning and Communications, Gap Inc. • Erin Carlson (2005): Community Relations, Yahoo Inc. • Paul Rice (1996): Director/CEO, TransFair USA • Steve Hardgrave (2005): Manager, Investments, Omidyar Network

Career Services and Alumni
Students conducting a non-traditional job search at Haas must be proactive, but they can take advantage of incredible resources at their fingertips. Haas has an excellent reputation among companies that appreciate social/environmental mindsets, which is apparent when you send in your resume cold. The Career Services Office (CSO) assigns a case manager to support Net Impact members and trains several students to be peer Career Coaches. The CSO also provides students with access to job listings and workshops from the MBA-Nonprofit Connection, an organization that serves as a clearinghouse for job and internship opportunities at nonprofits looking for MBAs. Additionally, the CSO recently put together an entire binder of CSR job resources and has allocated part of an adjunct advisor's time exclusively to CSR-type job counseling.
58 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

To sum it up: Haas is most fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school where students and faculty are on the forefront of social/ environmental issues.

University of California—Berkeley, page 3
Net Impact not only organizes Firm Night and Days on the Job (described under Student Activities) but also provides important mentorship opportunities for first-years to learn from second-years. In addition, the Haas and Berkeley alumni are incredible and accessible. It is evident that Haas has a culture of peer support that is consistent throughout the years. The online searchable database allows students to find alumni working at nearly any organization in the Bay Area. Finally, the Haas for Students Fund provides first years who intern for nonprofit organizations with stipends to help cover costs of living. The Fund is completely student-run and supported. Historically, 100% of the applicants were awarded grants. The Haas Loan Repayment Assistance Program provides loan postponement and forgiveness for students who work in nonprofit or government for up to ten years after graduation.

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leaders: Rob Kaplan and Jamie Dean

Administration Support
The administration openly promotes the principles of using business for social/environmental impact. Dean Tom Campbell, a founding board member of the Center for Responsible Business, is deeply committed to public leadership. He has served as a congressman and, most recently, as the Director of Finance for the State of California. He frequently publicly supports the importance of social/environmental impacts in business and has committed to raising those questions to the guests of the Dean’s Speaker Series. Haas is primarily student-run, so the administration’s support of Net Impact’s efforts is important. They have provided funding for key career and social events and they also support the Center for Responsible Business (CRB) and Nonprofit and Public Management Program. The CRB sponsors the Peterson Lecture Series in Corporate Responsibility, which brings diverse thought leaders to Haas, and the Levi Strauss Small Grants Program, which awards funding to students who promote innovative ideas on how to advance the CSR agenda both inside and outside of the Haas community. The admissions committee values personality and individuality. They want people who are passionate and care about the world. They look for students interested in responsible business, but those who have a foundation and interest in mainstream business and quantitative methods as well.

Reasons to Attend
Haas is a unique MBA program because it serves the needs of a diverse group of students - both those pursuing a career in social/environmental impact and those interested in obtaining a top-notch traditional business education from a highly-ranked institution. There is no better place to go for students interested in corporate social responsibility and social entrepreneurship. One student said, “Haas was the only place I applied for MBA because it has a genuine program that focuses on not only making money but also making an impact in the society. I'm pleased with the diverse perspectives I learned from world-class professors as well as the opportunities provided for fellowships, conferences, and competitions around the world. Haas prepares me well to contribute as an ethical business leader for social change.” If you value the opportunity to engage with stuSurvey respondents: 76

59 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

430 Student Sevices Building #1902, Berkeley, CA 94720-1902 Email: mbaadms@haas.berkeley.edu

University of California—Davis
Graduate School of Management
“If you are an applicant that wants to use business as a means to make positive social impact, attend a school that is supportive of this effort, make a lasting impact on the school itself, and play a role in creating new programs and driving change, then the GSM is the place for you.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 110 Very active Net Impact members: 12 Somewhat active members: 34 Program strengths: SE, ES, CD, CSR, NPM Student activity level: One of program’s most active clubs Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Faculty: Admin: Curriculum: Activities: 4.3/5 4.6/5 3.8/5 3.6/5 3.8/5 3.8/5

Curriculum
UC Davis Graduate School of Management (UCD GSM) requires six core classes (with the possibility of testing out) that must be completed prior to taking elective courses. A number of the core and elective classes, while not solely focused on areas of social or environmental concern, incorporate social and ethical topics into case discussions. For example, Professor Michael Maher discusses ethics and nonprofits frequently in his accounting and management courses. Nearly all the faculty encourage students to focus course projects on nonprofits and social enterprises as well as traditional corporations. One student recommends the school ”because the smaller school size and intimate relationship between students and faculty allows and encourages innovative thinking and entrepreneurial actions among students.” Another describes the “great access to work with faculty and the opportunity to create change in the curriculum.” GSM’s curriculum strengths in environmental and social issues are concentrated in the electives, and have grown out of faculty expertise and student initiative. Examples include: • Social Entrepreneurship, taught by Net Impact board member and GSM alumnus Cleveland Justis, which was added in 2005 as a result of student request • Socially Responsible Investment, planned for 2007, growing out of a student research team under the direction of Professor Brad Barber. Currently, the student research team is creating a socially responsible mutual fund that will be managed by second-year students in coming years. • Management of Nonprofit Organizations, taught by Lung Association Executive Jane Hagedorn In addition, there is a class on Real Estate, which emphasizes a smart growth planning approach. Also, innovative, clean technologies are frequently discussed in a variety of courses, including Andrew Hargadon's and Richard Dorf's classes on innovation and entrepreneurship. Finally, the GSM has an active Community Consulting Group, through which students team up to apply management skills in solving problems for nonprofit organizations. Also of note is that Professor Barber heads the newly formed Center for Investor Welfare and Corporate Responsibility, which advocates for improved corporate practices and educates investors through research.

The chapter in three words: Innovative, Sustainable, Community Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

50%

50%

50%

40

Student Activities
30

Somewhat agree

The Net Impact chapter is well established but continues to develop momentum and grow with each incoming class. The chapter is well respected by the faculty and staff, who are increasingly looking to chapter leaders for an understanding of student interests. For the past several years, the GSM chapter has been recognized at the annual Net Impact conference as having the highest per capita attendance of any chapter. Local chapter events are well-attended, diverse in topics, and driven by student interest. The chapter has grown due to active leadership. The past couple years have been marked by the addition of curriculum enhancements, speakers series, organization site visits, and a new website (www.davisnetimpact.org). Themes ranging from green building to sustainable (cont’d)
60 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

20
Agree

10

0

NI members

All

University of California—Davis, page 2
agriculture to services for the disabled to microfinance are actively explored. We are particularly excited about our new Board Fellows program that will place students as ex-oficio members on regional nonprofit boards for a year. Our Green Bag lunch speaker series is also off to a great start in 2006 (offering free organic pizza doesn't hurt!). In addition, the Net Impact “The UC Davis GSM chapter is actively involved in planning first-year orientation. In 2005, the chapter organNet Impact chapter ized and led the orientation trip to Evergreen Lodge in Yosemite National Park, which is is one of the stronga social enterprise affiliated with Juma Ventures. Here we were able to introduce inest clubs at the coming students to Net Impact and the idea of using business as a way to create social school with nearly change (in this particular case by employing and training underserved youth). Together, these activities are building momentum for the chapter. 50% of the student

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 74% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 63% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 40% found jobs

body included in its membership.”

Other student groups of interest to Net Impact members include the Community Consulting Group, which places students on consulting teams to conduct pro bono projects for Sacramento and Bay Area nonprofits, and Challenge for Charity, which is actively involved in community service with the Special Olympics and the Boys and Girls Club.

Alumni: 47% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

One student comments that “our program provides ample opportunity to not just learn about socially responsible practices in the classroom, but to put it to use in clubs, consulting projects, business competitions, and internships.”

Career Services and Alumni
Career Services is active and flexible in providing assistance for job searches. The Career Services staff strives to tailor their assistance to the needs of each individual student and is able to do this because of the GSM's small size. The GSM subscribes to the MBA Nonprofit Connection jobs database as a result of Net Impact members' request for more services for non-traditional jobseekers. In addition, GSM students have good access to alumni in fields of interest to Net Impact members conducting a non-traditional job search. In general, alumni are very receptive to counseling students and aiding them in their job search. A number of students cite the program’s strengths with nonprofits; one student described “a strong interest in nonprofit work. We have a Community Consulting Group, which does consulting projects for nonprofits on a volunteer basis (students receive class credit). Faculty members are also fairly active with nonprofits, and our Net Impact chapter is great.”

Prominent alumni: • Jamie Anderson (2005): Rural Finance Consultant, United Nations Fund for Agricultural Development • Kyle Salyer (2006): Senior Vice President, Portfolio Management, MicroCredit Enterprises • Cleveland Justis (2004): Executive Director, Headlands Institute; Net Impact Board member • Morlee Griswold, Director of Direct Mail, Patagonia, Inc.

Administration Support
The GSM administration is strongly supportive of the Net Impact chapter at UC Davis. The chapter receives annual funding from the school to help cover conference costs and general chapter activities. Specifically, the Dean of the school is very enthusiastic and supportive of the chapter and is a strong advocate for Net Impact related topics. She has been very supportive of the developing Board Fellows program. Additionally, the school is creating a Center for Investor Welfare and Corporate Responsibility that will facilitate a student-managed socially responsible mutual fund. Over the past several years, the administration has been very receptive to responding to student initiatives around social topics, including the creation of a class on social entrepreneurship. The admissions office values “Net Impact” applicants, and it seems that the school is admitting an increasing number of students who are interested in using business to create social change. These students are interested in a diverse range of fields from social entrepreneurship to corporate social responsibility, sustainable agriculture, green technologies and (cont’d)
61 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

To sum it up: UC Davis is most fitting for someone interested in attending a school to help build upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunities for significant growth.

University of California—Davis, page 3
microfinance. When applying to the program, students should feel free to emphasize their interest in social and environmental issues while making it clear why an MBA is relevant to the applicant’s ability to address those interests through their career. In addition, the school anticipates constructing a new facility in the near future, and it is looking at incorporating green building practices into the design.

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leader: Thomas Nelson thnelson@ucdavis.edu Geoff Jennings gcjennings@ucdavis.edu

Reasons to Attend
An applicant interested in social and environmental themes should consider the GSM because the school has a world-class faculty and curriculum that will prepare students for a career that will make an impact on society. The school's small size, flexibility, and willingness to work with the Net Impact chapter presents engaged students with the opportunity to leave a lasting impact on the school. The school currently offers a number of classes focused on topics of interest to Net Impact members, and it incorporates social and environmental themes into many of its core, breadth, and elective courses. In general, the student body is engaged and supportive of social and environmental concerns and activities. The community at the GSM is a tight-knit group that is unique among top business schools. One student says that “this is a small program aimed at collaborative style learning with a great sense of community. When I originally joined the program social/ environmental opportunities were not part of my consideration, however their availability at my school greatly enhanced my experience.” If you are an applicant that wants to use business as a means to make positive social impact, attend a school that is supportive of this effort, make a lasting impact on the school itself, and play a role in creating new programs and driving change, then the GSM is the place for you.

Net Impact student admissions contact: Geoff Jennings gcjennings@ucdavis.edu
Survey respondents: 25

62 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 Email: admissions@gsm.ucdavis.edu

University of California—Los Angeles
UCLA Anderson School of Management
“Anderson is very entrepreneurial and therefore student-driven, and the administration and faculty are very supportive of student initiatives to create new Net Impact opportunities. UCLA-Anderson is an excellent choice for Net Impact interested students.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 1000 Very active Net Impact members: 15 Somewhat active: 25 Program strengths: SE Student activity level: Average Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 3.1/5 3.6/5 Faculty: Admin: 3.6/5 3.9/5 3.6/5 3.9/5

Curriculum
While most of the curriculum at Anderson tends to focus on traditional MBA topics, there has been an increase in the number of social/environmental classes offered each year. Many of these changes have been successfully initiated by current students and have been well embraced by the faculty and the dean. One student wrote that “it seems like there is one or more new courses added every quarter.” Another agreed that “the momentum towards socially responsible changes to the curriculum is wonderful. There are plenty of opportunities for MBA students to impact the school and help to shape the new courses offered.” Anderson offers courses in traditional social/environmental issues as well as courses in newer fields. Traditional electives include nonprofit management, public sector management, and “UCLA Anderson sold environmental management. Less traditional courses include topics on the public educame on the fact that the tion system, social entrepreneurship, and emerging markets. Students tend to enjoy the faculty was amenable to plethora of guest speakers who come in to share first hand knowledge about their fields. respond to student interThis greatly enhances these classes and the overall learning experience. ests. We were able to create and host a new Each year, several groups of students also opt to do their second-year, required Applied course in social entreManagement Project (AMR) on Microfinance. These projects allow students to work with preneurship within my organizations in emerging countries to improve their micro-lending institutions. Many of two years at Anderson.” the expenses, including a trip to the country, are subsidized either through a corporate partner or through Anderson's Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER). In addition to the class offerings at Anderson, all students can cross enroll in any UCLA graduate program course. The most popular cross enrollment typically occurs with the School of Public Affairs which includes departments in Social Welfare, Urban Planning and Public Policy. Students will often cross enroll in the School of Education, the School of Public Health and the Law School as well. In addition to elective classes, Anderson has offered in the past a Certification Program in Environmental Management (CEM) in conjunction with four other UC MBA programs. Although this program no longer exists, Anderson will be offering a similar program on its own starting 2006-2007.

The chapter in three words: Collaborative, Growing, Inclusive Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

100% 82% 80
Strongly agree

60

Agree

Student Activities
Net Impact members at Anderson pursue and share their diverse interests through a range of different activities, including a few key events that the chapter focuses on organizing and executing. While there is room to enhance the cohesiveness of the Net Impact community at Anderson, individual members are energetic and active in promoting events of interest. There is a steady flow of emails through the Anderson Net Impact email group, as members spread the word about upcoming (cont’d)
63 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

40
Somewhat agree

32%

20

0

NI members

All

University of California—Los Angeles, page 2
events and opportunities taking place on the UCLA campus and in the greater Los Angeles community. Through this network, members have participated in events with the Sustainable Business Council of Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Net Impact Professional Chapter, and other UCLA programs. Additionally, Net Impact has collaborated in planning events with other groups, such as the UCLA Energy Forum, a lecture and discussion series developed in cooperation with the UCLA Sustainable Resource Center. Members also participate annually in various small group events such as national case competitions and Service Corps projects. Networking events with alumni, faculty, and community members are also orchestrated by the chapter. One of the largest events of the year for Net Impact at Anderson is the annual career night; the chapter hosts 10-15 companies/organizations that have programs related to social and environmental responsibility. The event is attended by Net Impact members as well as other members of the student body and draws about 100 students to participate in small group discussions with the presenters. Another large campus event that is new to the Anderson campus is the Nonprofit Consulting Challenge. This event brings local nonprofit organizations to campus to partner with teams of MBA's on a short term business problems. In short, Net Impact has a longstanding campus presence that has recently seen exciting and accelerating growth. The club is focused on perpetuating this growth and fostering new opportunities to draw in increasingly larger portions of the student body.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 47% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 92% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 80% found jobs

Alumni: 53% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Career Services and Alumni
Anderson provides a variety of career services for students interested in the non-traditional job search. Net Impact hosts events that both directly and indirectly impact a job. These services include research, networking, informal advice and funding tools. Anderson's career office coordinates Anderson Career Teams (ACT groups). ACT groups are small groups of first-year students organized by industry interest who are focused on finding summer internships. These meetings are led by secondyear students who are advised by and receive material from an Anderson career counselor. There is an ACT group that is devoted specifically to Net Impact each year. Students can find out about non-traditional jobs through several venues. First, Anderson offers a summer internship on campus in partnership with Johnson & Johnson that helps directors of Head Start programs and community health centers improve their impact. In this 10-week internship, students act as Teaching Associates in addition to consulting with these nonprofit professionals on management development plans. Anderson also receives numerous job and internship listings sent directly to the career office and subscribes to the MBA Nonprofit Connection for full-time job listings. Although some organizations actively recruit on campus (such as the Broad Foundation), Anderson needs to increase the number of social/ environmental employers that come on campus. For more indirect career contacts, Anderson has an extensive online alumni network. Additionally, Net Impact hosts an annual career night which typically draws 12-15 organizations. Companies that attended last year's Net Impact Career Night include Toyota, Gap Inc., Ethos Water and many others. Several students have made long lasting networking connections through these events. Lastly, Anderson can financially subsidize a student's summer internship through our Haskamp Fund. The Haskamp fund provides potential matching funds for students interning at public or private nonprofit organizations.
64 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Prominent alumni: • Matt Hill (2005): Project Manager Strategic Projects (Broad Resident), Oakland Unified School District • Douglas Buchalter (2005): Executive Managing Director, Green Coast Foundation • Sandra A Matsumoto (2002): Project Director, The Nature Conservancy

To sum it up: UCLA Anderson is most fitting for someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

University of California—Los Angeles, page 3
Administration Support
Anderson has a supportive administration when it comes to social/environmental areas. Current funding through the school is on par with other student organizations. Students have found the dean, professors, and several Anderson research centers very supportive. This support comes in the form of developing new curriculum, funding initiatives and projects, and recruiting social/environmental focused students. However, despite the support, there is much more to push for. It typically takes tremendous student initiative and follow-through for actual changes to happen. One student said that “there are tremendous opportunities in social entrepreneurship, international development, and environmental sustainability. The school has put financial resources behind all of these subjects and is eager to give students an opportunity to pursue their interests therein.”

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leader: Brandon Malmberg Brandon.malmberg.2007@anderson.ucla.edu Ellen Lin ellen.lin.2007@anderson.ucla.edu Net Impact student admissions contact: Karen.lee@anderson.ucla.edu

Reasons to Attend
In addition to a highly rigorous academic experience, UCLA Anderson has a wealth of resources available for students interested in social and environmental themes. Students are encouraged to make social impact a priority through the subsidization of projects and internships in microfinance and other fields. Additionally, Anderson has an extremely strong entrepreneurial spirit, and the student body has a passion for driving change. The student body is quite diverse in its interests, and faculty and administration are very receptive to student initiatives to pursue these interests. Students are increasingly focusing on social entrepreneurship, corporate social responsibility and sustainable development and are pushing these issues forward through innovative programs and projects. It is an exciting time to be at Anderson for those who desire to be leaders in advancing social and environmental causes through business. One student said “there's as much opportunity here as you're willing to create. If you've got ideas, you'll be supported in following them through.” Another added “students are collaborative and low key, relative to other top notch MBA programs. They really make the school as great as it is.”

Survey respondents: 24

65 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

110 Westwood Plaza, Gold Hall, Suite B201, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1481 Email: mba.admissions@anderson.ucla.edu

University of California—San Diego
Rady School of Management
“The Rady School is a program focused on Innovation and Sustainability with deep resources in Science, Technology and other transformative industries. We have strong partnerships with other graduate programs at UCSD like Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Climate Control), Graduate School of International Relations Pacific Studies (Environmental Policy & CSR), Jacobs School of Engineering (Environmental Tech) and our own Beyster Institute (International Development/ Entrepreneurship).”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 150 Very active Net Impact members: 15-20 Somewhat active members: 30-35 Program strengths: ES, ID

Curriculum
The graduate curriculum at Rady is always reinventing itself. Highly regarded for its many top-tier graduate programs, UCSD strongly supports multi-disciplinary education, particularly at Rady. After just one year of operating its full-time MBA program, Rady has founded a chapter of Net Impact, has developed a foundation for strong resource and course development in social and environmental sustainability, and has helped link the various world-class graduate programs at UCSD in science, engineering, international policy and economics. Core courses at the Rady School incorporate sustainability themes throughout Marketing, Operations, Organizational Strategy, Finance, Strategy, and other courses. In the 2006-2007 academic year we plan to offer an elective in Sustainable Enterprise and then to grow the elective curriculum in this area based on student interest. Offered across UCSD are graduate courses in Corporate Social Responsibility, Corporate Strategy and the Environment, Nonprofit Management, Sustainable Development, Environmental Engineering, Environmental Policy and extensive earth and marine science coursework at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The Administration has embraced sustainability primarily due to our campus ESI (Environment & Sustainability Initiative) program and Rady's role in the effort. Net Impact hosted a speaker series in 2005-2006 that engaged various UCSD faculty members and industry experts. UCSD’s Chancellor, the Dean of The Rady School and key faculty and staff members at IRPS, SIO and JSE are very supportive and aware of Net Impact’s presence and capabilities. The Rady School is actively recruiting faculty and staff that have an interest in social and environmental sustainability.

Student activity level: Average

Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 3.6/5 3.8/5 Faculty: Admin: 4/5 4/5 3.8/5 4.1/5

The chapter in three words: Innovative, Multi-disciplinary, Dynamic Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

50%

50%

50%

40

Somewhat agree

Student Activities
Net Impact UCSD Chapter is an interdisciplinary organization creating unique networking, educational and hands-on opportunities for students and professionals to support the symbiotic relationship between business, society and the environment. We strive to become San Diego’s premier nonprofit affiliate in the promotion and education of sustainability while highlighting the role of industry in that endeavor. As stewards for the “sustainable enterprise,” the Net Impact UCSD Chapter views corporate, social and environmental responsibility as both a competitive business strategy and a critical framework for supporting today’s rapid industrial transformation. (cont’d)
66 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

30

20
Agree

10

0

NI members

All

University of California—San Diego, page 2
Net Impact UCSD Chapter was founded in Fall of 2005. The chapter has an interdisciplinary character, with participation from the Scripps Institute of Oceanography, Rady School of Management, Jacobs School of Engineering and the departments of International Relations and Pacific Studies, Chemistry, Sociology, and Economics. We accomplished a lot during the 2005-2006 academic year. In addition to attending and participating in various campus and industry events focused on social and environmental sustainability, we hosted/sponsored the following: PROJECTS

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 57% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 40% of students found internships using both their values and skills

• Innovations in Sustainability Report - submitted to Chancellor’s Committee for Environment & Sustainability • Service Corps – three students completed two strategy and marketing projects with local nonprofits
EVENTS HOSTED/CO-HOSTED • Viewing of “The Corporation” • Holiday Food Drive with San Diego Food Bank • Tijuana Clothing/Blanket Drive • Surfrider Foundation beach clean-up • Presentation by Matt St. Clair, Sustainability Specialist for UC Office of the President “There is infinite • Net Impact Speaker Series opportunity to af• And more

fect change and create a more sustainable future with this brand new school.”

Net Impact at UCSD has collaborated with the following graduate clubs: Rady Life-Tech and Investments, Scripps Environmental Science & Policy, IRPS Environmental Society, Jacobs School Biofuels Association. These clubs have partnered with Net Impact on events related to sustainable technology, discoveries and investments.

To sum it up: UCSD Rady School of Management would be most fitting for someone who is interested in helping to lay the foundation for social/environmental awareness at a program.

Rady and other graduate programs at UCSD have strong relationships with corporations, consultancies, and investment firms committed to environmental sustainability. Nonprofit efforts are developing at Rady, and are in high density at our partner program, the Graduate School of International Relations Pacific Studies, as well.

Career Services and Alumni
Our latest UC MBA/Graduate Career Fair included various companies focused on sustainability, and many workshops are in motion via our ESI initiative and collaboration between UCSD’s graduate schools. Additionally, our Career Connections Director, Robin Darmon, is a Net Impact member. Rady's alumni base and reputation are growing rapidly. The Rady School’s first full-time year was 2005-2006, so we currently have one class of alumni. In addition, through Net Impact and Rady’s strong relationships across the UC system, Rady students interested in sustainability and other related fields will likely be welcomed by fellow UC graduates. Given the Rady School’s stage in its development, no alumni can be named at this time; however, two Rady MBAs completed a project for CE2 (Clean Energy Clean Environment) Capital in the Spring of 2006. Alumni from other UCSD programs currently focus on social and environmental issues at Diversa Corporation, BP, Booz Allen Hamilton and Nonprofit Strategies, to name a few.
67 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

University of California—San Diego, page 3
Reasons to Attend
The ideal candidate is someone entrepreneurial and interested in sustainable technology, process innovations and how science can drive sustainable business practices. Over time, our curriculum in nonprofit management will strengthen -- we are already in contact with various resources related to cause marketing, sustainable development, and nonprofit management. One student highlighted the relative youth of the program as a strength, writing, “there is infinite opportunity to affect change and create a more sustainable future with this new school.”

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leader: Jay Brandeis jbrandeis@rady.ucsd.edu Net Impact student admissions contact: Margie Frazee mvfrazee@rady.ucsd.edu
Survey respondents: 11

68 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Pepper Canyon Hall, 3rd Floor, 9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0093, La Jolla, CA 92093-0093 Email: MBAAdmissions@ucsd.edu

University of Chicago
Graduate School of Business
“Chicago GSB offers great education in business and organizational fundamentals that are applicable to any industry.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 1100 Very active Net Impact members: 75 Somewhat active members: 90 Student activity level: Slightly below average

Curriculum
Unlike many other MBA programs, University of Chicago Graduate School of Business (GSB) does not have a prescribed core curriculum. Although there is no formal program to integrate social/environmental themes into basic business courses, cases and/or group projects deal with these issues on an ad-hoc basis. One student said, “The curriculum is second to none and will prepare you for senior leadership in a nonprofit organization. It is becoming increasingly important that nonprofit leaders have some business acumen and the GSB no doubt does that.” The business school currently has an elective called Social Entrepreneurship that focuses on issues of social impact in business. Another elective course associated with the school’s annual business plan competition (New Venture Challenge) offers a special track for social entrepreneurship projects. Similarly, there are several hands-on “lab” courses, in which students help real-world organizations tackle business challenges. These courses have offered projects with organizations aligned with social missions, some of which have been nonprofit. A positive feature of the school's flexible curriculum is that students may take up to six electives outside of the business school. For students interested in social & environmental issues, the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago offers many applicable courses. Some students pursue a combined MPP/MBA degree while others simply take classes at the Harris School to augment their business courses. Possible areas of study include environmental, health, and education policy, poverty & inequality, and international development. There is no formal social/environmental concentration or certificate available at this time.

Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Faculty: Admin: Curriculum: Activities: 2.6/5 3.4/5 2.5/5 3.1/5 2.4/5 3.2/5

The chapter in three words: Expanding, Diverse, Ambitious Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

Student Activities
Our chapter is building momentum. We experienced significant membership growth in the last year and aim to continue growing membership this year. There are a large number of activities, both Net Impact-sponsored and otherwise, that engage students in sustainability is“As a Net Impact sues, community service and other social impact topics. The Net Impact Club organizes events featuring guest speakers and roundtable discussions with experts on a variety of issues including corporate social responsibility, nonprofit management, international sustainable development and microfinance, social entrepreneurship and social impact career options.
80% 64% 60
Somewhat agree

member you have an open canvas to continue crafting the extra-curricular activity around Social/ Environmental issues and business.”

50%

40

Agree

Our club is actively involved in the Service Corps program which gives students the opportunity to put their business skills to work by assisting local nonprofits. We are also committed to the Board Fellows program which gives students the opportunity to bring valuable business skills to nonprofits while learning about nonprofit management and governance. (cont’d)

20

0

Strongly agree

NI members

All

69 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

University of Chicago, page 2
For the second year in a row, Net Impact has collaborated with the GSB Emerging Markets Group, Kellogg School of Management and Harris School of Public Policy (University of Chicago) to plan and host the Chicago Microfinance Conference. For the first time this year, a GSB-Kellogg Faculty Debate on corporate social responsibility is also planned. We hope that this event will become an annual one. In addition to these events, the club organizes networking and social events for Net Impact members and other interested individuals. While a lot of students aren’t sure what the mission of Net Impact is, they are curious and often very supportive of our group. We believe there is potential to grow membership considerably through building awareness of the group and its goals. The full-time MBA program is currently involved in a number of community service activities, many of which are organized by the school’s Giving Something Back club. The Ray School Tutors program pairs up MBA students with elementary school children to act as tutors and mentors. We organize an annual charity auction to benefit local nonprofits. Students periodically organize to prepare and serve dinner to residents at the nearby Ronald McDonald House. Student groups often respond to crises and/or natural disasters globally by initiating fundraisers to generate financial and in-kind donations to the groups affected. A number of students are involved in a tax assistance program that provides free tax counseling and tax services to underprivileged individuals in the community. Students also volunteer for Junior Achievement.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: 88% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 100% of students found internships using both their values and skills

Alumni: 75% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Career Services and Alumni
Chicago GSB provides weekly job postings and in some cases on-campus recruiting for students interested in non-traditional sectors that prioritize social/ environmental impact. Sarah Burkhart, MBA Career Service’s Job Development Manager, is in constant contact with the MBA Non-Profit Connection (MNC) (www.mnc.org), an organization that links non-profit organizations with top MBA candidates. While MNC is a link, they are also an advocate for both students and organizations, assuring that all jobs are of MBA caliber (and salary), and that students are able to apply directly with the organization of their choice. Through Sarah’s interaction with MNC, GSB has had over 200 non-profit job postings in the last year, with functions ranging from marketing to finance to supply chain management. Career resources do not vary for different interests in this sector. The University of Chicago also holds an annual non-profit and public service career fair, which is open to all U of C students and alumni searching for volunteer, internship/fellowship, and part- and full-time opportunities. Students also have access to an online community directory, allowing them to search for alumni in fields of interest using numerous criteria such as employer certifications, area of expertise, clubs, professional and personal interests, as well as volunteer activities. For the sixth year, the GSB Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship will offer a social entrepreneurship summer internship program, which gives students the opportunity to work for a company with a social mission, a start-up or small business. The Polsky Center provides assistance in locating companies that qualify to host an intern. Through the supplemental awards, qualifying interns will receive financial assistance from the Polsky Center and host companies match that amount at least dollar-for-dollar. (Companies are welcome to compensate their interns above this amount.) Currently, there is no loan forgiveness program for individuals who go to work at nonprofit organizations.

Prominent alumni: • William Richardson, Ph.D. (1971): President & CEO, W.K. Kellogg Foundation • David Vitale (1976): Chief Administrative Officer, Chicago Public Schools • Robert Drumheller (1975): Vice President for Finance, Overseas Private Investment Corporation • Jon Corzine (1973), Governor of New Jersey

To sum it up: Those interested in building upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth would benefit most from the GSB program.

70 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

University of Chicago, page 3
Administration Support
Like all student organizations at the GSB, Net Impact is primarily responsible for raising its own funds, which it does primarily through membership dues. The Graduate Business Council, through its Community Fund that supports groups with more limited income, provided Net Impact with a small amount of funding this year. Net Impact receives the same access to facilities and support as any other official student group. The school is always interested in supporting and encouraging speakers, lectures and other activities that enhance the circulation of different viewpoints and ideas. While faculty members are given great leeway in determining course content, initiatives to broaden the curriculum to more fully incorporate social/environmental themes would require demonstration of extensive student interest before the administration would actively back them. The admissions office seems to be increasing its outreach to students interested in “Net Impact” themes. It has recognized the growing number of such talented applicants that would be valuable assets to the GSB community. Emphasizing such goals or values through the admissions process will likely enhance an applicant’s file, although a person must authentically articulate how Chicago’s strengths – which do not include an explicit focus on social/environmental concerns – will contribute to his/her professional goals.

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leaders: Chau Ly cly@chicagoGSB.edu Micki O’Neil moneil1@chicagoGSB.edu Carlos Goncalves cgoncalv@chicagoGSB.edu Kendra Krolik kkrolik@chicagoGSB.edu Mike Mehawich mmehawic@chicagoGSB.edu

Reasons to Attend
Chicago GSB is widely recognized as a factory for original thought, having revolutionized the teaching of such business foundations as finance and economics. One student wrote that Chicago GSB offers, “great education in business and organizational fundamentals that are applicable to any industry.” This strong, rigorous grounding provides meaningful training for managing any type of organization. Chicago offers students tremendous flexibility, encouraging students to choose classes based on interests and subject expertise. For students with social/environmental interests, the broader university, including the Harris School of Public Policy and the School of Social Service Administration, offers many classes that complement the GSB’s curriculum, and the curriculum’s flexibility gives ample opportunity for such exploration. The school’s only mandatory class is LEAD, an innovative course taught by second-year students on topics like team-building and ethics. Additionally, student groups are well-supported and enjoy significant freedom.

Survey respondents: 20

71 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

5807 South Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 Email: admissions@chicagoGSB.edu

University of Cincinnati
College of Business
“Students are able to find or create venues for seeing their educational ideas to fruition and have the ability to gain the leadership experience they desire.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 250 Very active Net Impact members: 8 Somewhat active members: 8

Curriculum
The University of Cincinnati College of Business (CoB) core curriculum provides a means for students to develop the variety of business-related skills needed to manage in today's business world. The core curriculum interweaves topics such as business ethics and best practices through core classes such as accounting, finance, and behavior and theory courses. For the student who desires to increase their knowledge in the areas of corporate social responsibility, nonprofit organization management, sustainability, and more, there are a variety of options. Several elective courses, such as Business Ethics, which is taught by a professor who also teaches a core management theory course, offer insight and opportunity for exploration into these topics. Another ethics professor teaches both in the College of Medicine and the College of Business, allowing students to make the connection of ethical decisions across disciplines. Students are also afforded the opportunity to take a more active role in expanding on a socially-conscious curriculum by choosing appropriate topics in electives such as Business Readings and Capstone courses. The UC College of Business, in conjunction with the UC Conservatory of Music, offers a dual MBA/MA degree for students interested in arts administration and business. This program is one of the most respected of its kind in the country and has produced graduates that are working at some of the top nonprofit arts organizations across the country. An exciting recent addition to the curriculum is the opportunity for students to complete a Service Corp capstone course. Service Corp benefits both MBA students and the nonprofits; students gain "hands on" experience working with the nonprofits, as the nonprofit receives consultation from students on projects and issues they are facing. The addition of Service Corp resulted from a cooperative effort by students, administration and the professor who teaches this course. The curriculum at UC is continually reviewed and updated in an attempt to address some of the many issues surrounding social responsibility from both an academic and corporate standpoint.

The chapter in three words: Emerging, Evolving, Effective

Student Activities
2005 serves as the founding year for UC's Net Impact Chapter. It resulted from a group of students and college administrators who took the vision of Net Impact to heart and wanted to do something to make a difference. One of the key highlights in the MBA program at UC is the “Students wanting to opportunity for students to really take charge of their educational experience. gain leadership ex-

During its first year, the UC Net Impact Chapter has held several events: lectures, a "coffee sale" to bring about fair trade coffee awareness, Service Corp projects and a night at the local art museum participating in "One World Wednesday," an event sponsored by the Young Professionals group of Cincinnati that features a different country each month. Initiatives are under way for future events, sustainability awareness, and fundraising. The chapter is very accepting of new ideas and members who want to take an active role in the group. (cont’d)
72 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

perience find the Net Impact Chapter a valuable venue, since there are so many opportunities available.”

Still in its first year, our Net Impact Chapter is gaining momentum. This provides an incredible opportunity for incoming students to participate in a very active way and take leadership of areas where they feel they can help. Note: Since fewer than 5 students answered the survey, some data points are not included

University of Cincinnati, continued
The UC Net Impact Chapter is promoted at all new student orientation sessions. Net Impact members attend orientation sessions to give a presentation about the chapter. In addition, members attend various receptions and social events for full and part-time students to facilitate greater awareness about the chapter. Recently, UC launched the President’s Advisory Committee on Environmental Sustainability. The formation of this committee was led by students of the environmental studies group and faculty. The committee has representation from each of the major UC administrative units (e.g., Housing, Facilities, etc.), two VP’s, faculty and students. This year a campus-wide policy on environment and sustainability was adopted by the University. This exciting development will allow individuals to be more involved with environmental sustainability at the campus-wide level.

AT A GLANCE
Prominent alumni: • Jerry Durst, Hospice of Dayton • Penelope Orr, Catholic Social Services of Southwestern Ohio

Career Services and Alumni
The CoB provides a Career Services department solely for graduate business students. This provides students with easy access and the ability to meet with advisors on an individual basis to develop comprehensive goal-driven career plans. The Career Services Office is very supportive of the Net Impact Chapter and other student groups such as the MBA Association. In the past, they have worked with student groups to plan and sponsor career-related events such as networking events and career fairs. They are receptive to working with Net Impact to offer career-related events for Net Impact members. This provides students with access to professionals from organizations with goals aligned with Net Impact. While there are currently no standard nonprofit partnership/internship programs nor loan forgiveness programs for individuals who choose to work in the nonprofit sector, students feel that the Office would be receptive to working with students and organizations to establish these types of initiatives if there is student interest. Career Services is very proactive in bringing industry leaders to campus for forums and lectures as well as in providing students with workshops and sessions that help them conduct their career planning and job searches. The Net Impact Chapter is currently working with Career Services in co-sponsoring a forum in October. This forum will feature high level executives who are willing to speak about the decisions they make regarding corporate social responsibility. Once again, there is an opportunity for students to work with the Career Services Office to identify who they need to meet and how to go about finding the niche that they feel serves their career goals. To sum it up: UC College of Business would be most fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school to help build upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

Administration Support
The administration within UC CoB is extremely supportive towards students with varying interests, and in particular, the Net Impact group. Their support and leadership has been instrumental in the founding of the College's Net Impact Chapter. Funding of $500 annually is provided to the chapter, in addition to verbal expertise and support. The entire MBA office, including the Director, has provided encouragement; the Director has served as a lecturer and has attended most Net Impact events. In addition, the chapter’s graduate advisor has been instrumental in helping the chapter coordinate events and secure facilities. She meets with the chapter several times per month to help plan and execute events and activities, and she serves as a liaison to other members of the administration. The opportunities that exist within the College are present in large part due to the support and flexibility of the administration. Net Impact Chapter Leader: Sarah Ramsey, Sarah.Ramsey@uc.edu Miah Schneider miahschneider@gmail.com

Reasons to Attend
The University of Cincinnati College of Business offers a wide variety of course options through the full-time and part-time programs as well as a variety of dual degrees. Students are able to find or create venues for seeing their educational ideas to fruition and have the ability to gain the leadership experience they desire.
73 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Net Impact student admissions contact: George Jackie Elcik Jacqueline.Elcik@uc.edu

Carl H. Lindner Hall, Suite 103, PO Box 210020, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0020 Email: graduate@uc.edu

University of Colorado—Boulder
Leeds School of Business
“Leeds is up-and-coming in the area of sustainability. Couple that with the entrepreneurial bent of the school and I think there are great opportunities here.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 105 Very active Net Impact members: 10 Somewhat active members: 25 Program strengths: SE, CSR, ES Student activity level: Above average Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Faculty: Admin: Curriculum: Activities: 4.3/5 4.2/5 3.6/5 3.8/5 3.4/5 3.8/5

Curriculum
Curriculum that supports social/environmental impact is growing stronger at the Leeds school. Our core curriculum includes a full semester course on business ethics as well as more limited case studies and dialogues in our other core classes. Since our program is small, the electives that specifically address these issues are limited in actual number, but quite significant in relation to the total number of offerings. There is also an adequate amount of flexibility in our requirements that allows for access to engineering, environmental studies, law, land use planning and other University of Colorado graduate electives. This makes the curriculum opportunity at Leeds feel more than adequate. Within the Leeds program, there is a particular interest in market-based solutions to sustainability issues. Much of the push for their development comes from the Deming Center for Entrepreneurship, one of our Centers of Excellence. One course example is Sustainable Venturing, taught by Tom Dean, a well-known thought leader in the area. A limitation of our program’s curriculum is the absence of classes that specifically address the public and nonprofit sectors. Students believe this will begin to change in the near future with the strength of the nonprofits in the area and a number of federally funded labs such as the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Our Leeds Net Impact chapter has been working with the school to further develop its curriculum in the social/environmental business area. Key faculty members and administrators are also very supportive. Best of all, our program is small enough that change can happen relatively quickly. A group of students came together this year to encourage the development of a class focusing on entrepreneurial development issues in developing countries. Two excellent professors will be teaching it in the fall of 2006.

The chapter in three words: Opportunistic, Entrepreneurial, Leader Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

Student Activities
There is a strong and growing movement developing around sustainability at the Leeds school and a well-established network at the University of Colorado at Boulder (CU). One student wrote, “the small entrepreneurial culture allows students to really get involved and even create their own opportunities if they are interested in doing so.” This year has been a very important one for synthesizing the many initiatives and interests around campus. Any limitation we have in curriculum is more than made up for by the interconnected network in the Boulder/Denver area. The Leeds Net Impact chapter gained “It is great to be in strength when we offered to host the Leeds/Net Impact Case Competition six years ago. a place where The Leeds School of Business/Net Impact Case Competition brings together teams from there are too across North America to formulate sustainable and profitable solutions to a current company's business issue. Teams, comprised of four students from each institution, present many opportunito a panel of industry and academic leaders during preliminary and final rounds. Since ties rather than the competition launched, events have continued to develop and the chapter has contintoo few.” ued to strengthen. We are also involved with some key events other than the case competition: Sustainable Opportunities Summit, the University of Colorado's Sustainable Energy Initiative (http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2006/104.html), the MBAA Speaker Series, smaller panel discussions, a Sustainable Business Plan Competition, and others. (cont’d)
74 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

100% 84% 80 66% 60
Somewhat agree

40
Agree

20
Strongly agree

0

NI members

All

University of Colorado—Boulder, page 2
In general, we have a strong and active core group and a very wide engaged network. Energy around sustainability at Leeds is very high and this is a fun time to be involved. With that said, there is some sense that there is so much more to do than we can take on. Every time we get engaged in a new project we find three more compelling opportunities. Within the Leeds school, our Centers of Excellence are very active in the social/environmental area. Each offers its own set of opportunities and networks. Those centers include: The Center for Business and Society; the Deming Center for Entrepreneurship; the CU Real Estate Center; and, the Center for Sustainable Tourism. Their networks are highly engaged and our small size provides excellent student access. Just this year, we have built much stronger ties with other very active and socially/environmentally responsible clubs and programs on the University of Colorado campus. These include the Solar Decathlon Team (Building Systems Program), Engineers without Borders, CU Boulder Environmental Center, the Undergraduate Responsible Business group, and others. Additionally, since our CU Environmental Center is among the strongest student-run campus environmental centers in the country, our Net Impact chapter has not been as involved in the past. This is another resource we are only beginning to tap into.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement • 61% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 50% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 60% found jobs

Career Services and Alumni
The biggest advantage in working with the Leeds Career Services is personalized support. Because our program is very small, our career services staff can really help to engage companies that students want to target. However, for students who prefer that companies come to them, the size of the program can be a disadvantage. There is a strong base of companies in Colorado and particularly in the Boulder area that are aware and interested in hiring MBAs with socially responsible business skills. Our career center has made great strides to build contacts with these companies in the past year, and I would expect those contacts to be solidified in the 2006-2007 academic year. Much of the internship and job placement at Leeds happens through the network in our Centers of Excellence. These connections are very strong; the Real Estate Center goes so far as to guarantee placement for Real Estate track students and their list of companies focused on green building design, sustainable design and development, and concepts such as New Urbanism is quite extensive. Although there is some funding available to supplement unpaid internships, the formal channels are not in place. The Alumni Network is developing at Leeds. Traditionally, our program has done a poor job of keeping track of Leeds alumni and the same can be said of our Net Impact alumni. We are in the process of tracking these individuals down and would expect significant development in the near future.

Alumni 28% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Prominent alumni: • Jeff Yorzyk– Five Winds International • Phi Filerman– Perry Rose, LLC • Tina Stenquist– Design Workshop • Renaud des Rosiers– Domani Sustainability Consulting, LLC

To sum it up: Leeds School of Business would be most fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school to help build upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

Administration Support
Transition in leadership is leading to opportunity in the area of administrative support and the new Dean of the business school is interested and engaged in the program-wide sustainability push. The Dean also sees the construction of, and transition to a LEED certified building in 2006-2007 academic year as an opportunity to expand the sustainability movement on campus. Along with the new building, the program will likely go through a "visioning" process. With the current push toward social/environmental issues both nationally and on campus, the Leeds school is well positioned to develop in that area. Other key administrators are also interested and engaged, though not all of them find the topic compelling. Much of their concern surrounds placement issues after graduation, but this will gradually change as more professional opportunities are created. The MBA student government is the primary financial vehicle for the Net Impact (cont’d)
75 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

University of Colorado—Boulder, page 3
chapter; however, there are clearly opportunities to do some development work for the chapter.

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leader: Chad Arnold chad.arnold@colorado.edu

Reasons to Attend
Without question, location must be considered in making the decision to attend the Leeds School of Business. For many years, the Boulder community has drawn individuals and companies interested in social/environmental issues. There is a strong entrepreneurial community focused on sustainability. One student wrote, “Leeds is up-and-coming in the area of sustainability. Couple that with the entrepreneurial bent of the school and I think there are great opportunities here.” Additionally, our program has a strong faculty list, and the small size of our program also makes for a unique business school experience. Applicants should make sure that the intimate program size, with both benefits and challenges, is right for them.

Survey respondents: 19

76 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Business 204, UCB 419, Boulder, CO 80309 Email: leedsMBA@colorado.edu

University of Denver
Daniels College of Business
“Daniels is ranked 4th in the world for producing highly ethical graduates.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 306 Very active Net Impact members: 15 Somewhat active members: 50 Program strengths: CSR, ID Student activity level: Above average Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 3.8/5 4.2/5 Faculty: Admin: 4.3/5 4.4/5 3.7/5 3.9/5

Curriculum
For the second consecutive year, the Wall Street Journal has recognized the Daniels College of Business as one of the top schools in the world for producing graduates with high ethical standards. This year’s WSJ/Harris Interactive ranking of top business schools has Daniels in the 4th top position. Students describe the ethics focus as important: one student says “ethics is the core of the entire curriculum taught here at Daniels,” and another that the school’s strength is “developing frameworks necessary for ethical and socially responsible decisionmaking.”

“Ethics and social responsibility are threaded throughout the entire program, regardless of concentration.”

Daniels’ signature core curriculum includes a Values Based Leadership course, in which students examine business in the context of community. Through legal, public policy, and ethical perspectives, students develop sensitivity and awareness of managerial decision-making as well as a set of analytical skills required for dissecting complex values decisions. The course teaches students to adapt to meet their social obligations within the constraints of organizational realities and to effectively implement as business people. Daniels’ emphasis on ethics goes beyond this course; as one student says: “the entire MBA program incorporates business ethics in all classes. Professors challenge student to think critically and proactively about the business environment. I was most pleasantly surprised to have had many finance and accounting professors discuss, in class, the ethical ramifications of business decisions.”

Moreover, students may enhance their MBA degree with additional coursework in Values Based Leadership. Courses include: The Legal and Regulatory Environment of Business, E-Commerce Law and Ethics, Law of Business Organization, Risk Management Insurance, Science and Management of Organizational Ethics, CEOs and Corporate Governance, Strategic Corporate Citizenship and Leadership, Teams & Values. One student explains that “as in anything, you get out what you put in… I would highly recommend the program and tell incoming students to work their schedules to include and focus on corporate social responsibility in the areas that interest them since a concentration in CSR does not exist at this time.” Some students describe the addition of coursework in sustainability and corporate social responsibility as a key opportunity area.

The chapter in three words: Supportive, Generous, Receptive Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

100%

99%
Somewhat agree

99%

Agree

80

Student Activities
The Daniels faculty and staff offer tremendous amounts of support to Net Impact and its members. Administrators have committed generous resources to assist attendance at the national conference. Moreover, many departments and professors collaborate and offer their expertise to Net Impact activities. Since its inception, Net Impact has instrumentally supported campus initiatives and community partnerships. Notably, the school's Voices of Experience (VOE) speakers series, in which renowned business-leaders and newsmakers visit the campus for a day of dialogue and networking, has benefited from student coordination and volunteerism. Furthermore, Net Impact partners annually with the Colorado Ethics in Business Alliance (CEBA). The students perform due diligence on companies nominated for their ethical practices, as well as have opportunities to network.
77 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006
60
Strongly agree

40

20

0

NI members

All

University of Denver, continued
Career Services and Alumni
Career Services continuously seeks to improve upon ways in which it can assist students to build the careers that they want and love. Counselors are on hand for specialized advising. However, one of the best features of Daniels' career services is that they “offer unconditional career service support to alumni.” One student adds that “the faculty break their backs to help students with career development opportunities.“

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 56% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful

Reasons to Attend
Daniels offers strong programs in Values Based Leadership, Financial Services and Information Technology. There exists much opportunity to leverage Net Impact activities with these outstanding departments and their resources. One student explains, “I chose Daniels for the International MBA program and because of the ethics and quality of education. Another very important factor was the small class sizes and increased opportunity for interaction with faculty/students and within organizations.” Another adds “I am attracted to the ethical component of the curriculum. The program, as well, is committed to dynamic growth… also, Colorado has many companies modeling exemplary environmental practices. Daniels has a great recruiting reputation regionally.” Alumni: 22% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful Prominent alumni: • Jim Hankins (2005) Director of Corporate Compliance and Ethics, EchoStar Satellite • Andre Janusz (2005) Director, Asia Pacific Access • Chris McKnett (2005) Index Project Manager, KLD Research & Analytics, Inc. To sum it up: Daniels College of Business would be most fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school to help build upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

Net Impact Chapter Leaders: Jeffrey Blaugrund (author) Mike Niyompong, mniyompo@du.edu Chase Whitney, cwhitney@du.edu Net Impact student admissions contact: Zach Ragland, zraglan2@du.edu

78 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

2101 South University Boulevard #255, Rifkin Center for Student Services, Denver, CO 80208 Email: daniels@du.edu

University of Maryland—College Park
Robert H. Smith School of Business
“Prospective students should apply to have a chance to be a leader on campus, to champion and bring this perspective to others, and to change, guide, and actually create curriculum.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 245 Very active Net Impact members: 20 Somewhat active members: 60 Program Strengths: SE Student Activity Level: Above average Support of Social/Environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 3.6/5 3.7/5 Faculty: Admin: 3.8/5 4.1/5 3.3/5 3.3/5

Curriculum
While both the core and elective curriculum remain largely traditional on the surface, we have recently seen amazing strides towards incorporating social/environmental themes into mandatory course material, including a new mandatory first-year program designed by Smith Net Impact second-years. There are no electives targeting issues of sustainability, corporate responsibility (CR) or triple bottom line (3BL) specifically at this time (though there have been in the past). However, these issues surface very early on in the program. The Global Economic Environment, for example, is a first-year core course that includes lectures and readings dedicated to topics such as income inequality, poverty, NAFTA and WTO, etc. Themes such as globalization, international development, and government regulation dominate this course. Other core courses and electives dedicate a number of class hours to topics of business and society as well. Most exciting and relevant, however, is an evolving mandatory first year "course" designed and managed with incredible autonomy by the Smith Net Impact chapter. This year Net Impact is designing 25-30 hours of mandatory activities that will span the entire school year. Activities in the past have included stake-holder dialogues, simulations, panel discussions, guest lecturers, movies (with discussion) etc.-- all dedicated to topics of CR, 3BL, business and society and ethics in business. Topics can range from the profitability of material conservation in manufacturing to indigenous cultures and natural resource exploitation to drug patents to the formation and foundations of individual moral and ethical standards. One student writes that “this is an entrepreneurial environment that allows students to co-create programming… and there are faculty who will champion student initiative.” Smith is a small school (245 students), making it hard to sustain electives that might not appeal to the majority of students. However, the staff has proven extremely receptive to change, as long as there is student support and no significant adverse external affects. For instance, we are in the process of initiating a relationship with the World Resources Institute (WRI). The central pillar of this relationship will be the opportunity to be placed by WRI's New Ventures program with "sustainable" small and medium enterprises in emerging economies as a means to satisfy the mandatory second year Group Field Project.

The Chapter in Three words: Empowered, Important, Effective Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

80% 67%

“This is an entrepreneurial environment that allows students to cocreate programming. There is a lot of opportunity to grow the program's knowledge and embrace of these issues”

There are numerous additional opportunities for those willing to seek them out. With permission, students can take classes outside of the business school. Of particular interest might be the very highly regarded environmental policy program. Smith also has agreements with other schools in the area such as Georgetown and GW that have developed more of a specialization in international business and sustainable business (respectively). One students comments that classes at Smith “present the issues with all due complexity, avoiding rigid ideologies on either side of the dollar sign.”

60
Somewhat agree

56%

40

20

Agree

Strongly agree

0

NI members

All

79 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

University of Maryland—College Park, page 2
Student Activities
The Smith Net Impact chapter is an active and well established club that is very much the epicenter of socially and environmentally responsible business on campus, though we are increasingly working with other clubs and organizations. With a membership of roughly 40% of the student body, the Smith Net Impact is one of the biggest and most influential clubs at Smith. The Smith Net Impact chapter has identified mainstreaming CR and 3BL as one of the club's primary objectives. In order to do this, the club is actively positioning itself as a "functional" club along the lines of the Marketing, Finance and Consulting clubs. We look to integrate our values into the curriculum and promote the "smart business" aspects of CR and 3BL as well as represent the vast and growing "alternative" career paths such as CR officers, nonprofit management, international development, environmental consulting and socially responsible investing. With one club for every four people, event planning and competing for students’ time at Smith is a strategic process. Smith Net Impact works with other clubs and organizations to present activities of mutual interest. For our most recent event, Net Impact teamed with the Finance Association to hold a happy hour discussion on a social venture capital fund. Roughly thirty people attended to eat, drink, and participate in this discussion moderated by a guest from the IFC (World Bank). The Smith Net Impact chapter often makes strategic use of other clubs’ resources and efforts by, for example, working with them to place speakers on their panels. For instance, we might work with the consulting association to have a representative from Dalberg Consulting (global development advisors) placed on a consulting panel. We are actively engaged in exploring the many areas of mutual interest with other clubs such as the Black MBA, Tech Club, International club, etc. Of course, not all events are joint events. Some past and planned Net Impact events include: "alternative" career panels, resumé workshops, guest speakers, mini-forums, panel discussions, movies, field excursions, simulations, etc. Smith Net Impact currently houses a volunteer officer that works on multiple projects but focuses on two marquis events a year. In addition, one of our officers is leading a green campus initiative.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 57% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 70% of students found internships using both their values and skills

Alumni: 36% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Career Services and Alumni
There is room for the Smith Office of Career Management (OCM) to improve the representation of "alternative" career paths. Professional opportunities as they pertain particularly to social and environmental impact appear to be neither totally embraced nor disdained by Career Development staff. The OCM does take advantage very effectively of low-hanging fruit such as local businesses and organizations. This in combination with the fact that we are located in the area of Washington D.C. is promising for incoming students interested in non-traditional careers. The OCM has very good relations with many government agencies and other associations and nonprofits. Local companies such as Calvert and the Global Environment Fund are also well represented. Simply being in the area is a great strategic advantage for those seeking non-traditional career paths. One student says that “The Baltimore-Washington area is rich with employers and people interested in social/ environmental issues and there are ample opportunities to have an impact and find jobs.” Another comments that “Smith has a fantastic network of alumni in the area.” Net Impact is assigned a specific liaison within OCM whom we continue to work with to attain greater representation of nontraditional professional opportunities. The Office of Career Management is very responsive to students' needs and interests. The office is a strategic resource, and while jobs related to social/environmental responsibility are not as readily apparent as more traditional jobs, much can be accomplished by an assertive student. They will gladly do everything they can to accommodate a student, and they are often adept at doing so. There are many connections to be had in odd and interesting places through OCM, and it is often just a matter communicating interest to the appropriate people. The office also helps (cont’d)
80 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Prominent alumni: • Michael Robbins (2000): Director of New Schools Development, Washington DC, The Seed Foundation • Ben Cope (2005): Director of Strategic Development, Team Academy, A Kipp School • Christina Nichols (2005): Communications Manger, Energy Star., D&R International Ltd.

To sum it up: Robert H. Smith School of Business would be most fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school to help build upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

University of Maryland—College Park, page 3
fund the Smith Net Impact chapter's trip to the National Net Impact conference. There is no official funding for students who take low-wage internships with social/environmental underpinnings; however, the Smith Net Impact chapter has an annual fundraiser for this purpose. Students are also a great resource in this area. A surprising number of interesting contacts in the world of non-traditional career paths can be leveraged through fellow students.

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leader: Noah Greenberg ngreenbe2007@rhsmith.umd.edu

Administration Support
The faculty and administration at Smith are very supportive of Net Impact. As mentioned above, we are working with the academic director to design a mandatory curriculum for first-year students with full support of the administration. In addition we are working with the associate dean to initiate a relationship with the World Resources Institute. The faculty has been equally receptive to Net Impact, often incorporating issues of importance to Net Impact in class and mentioning the club when appropriate. We strive to include faculty as observers or participants in our activities and, though time is scarce, they usually do everything in their power to attend events and accommodate the club generally. Smith Net Impact is funded as any other club, and additional money is available from a myriad of resources, such as the career office and other administration offices. These resources can easily be leveraged to help fund guest speakers, travel, event catering etc. It seems that the admissions office values "Net Impact" applicants and seeks to maintain some minimal critical mass of such candidates in every class, and hence students with such interests would do well to stress such interests and their contribution to the community at Smith.

Reasons to Attend
This is a small program with a small but fairly well developed and supported Net Impact “movement.” Students with such interests who come here will have the opportunity to lead and shape this movement with the support of faculty, staff, and students. Such students can be the vocal representative of the "Net Impact" perspective, can actively shift the dynamics of the community dialogue and can have a great and lasting influence on colleagues, students, and the program as a whole. One student comments that “the school is very entrepreneurial, and receptive to interests of students. The school faculty and administration has opened up significantly in the last year to Net Impact issues so there is definite momentum.” Another comments that “I chose Smith because it felt right. I was impressed by the caliber of students and faculty and the facilities;” another speaks about the “great return on investment with outstanding research faculty, active Net Impact chapter, and SRI opportunities.” As with most schools, Smith is what you make of it. While there are many resources available in entrepreneurship, international business, public and private equity, environmental policy etc., one needs to be proactive in pursuing these. With that approach, the resources are endless. It may also be worth mentioning our strategic position regarding government consulting. Smith's strong reputation in consulting, combined with our proximity to D.C., makes it a prime school for people interested in this field.

Survey respondents: 21

81 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

2308 Van Munching Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-1871 Email: mba_info@rhsmith.umd.edu

University of Michigan—Ann Arbor
Stephen M. Ross School of Business
“I chose Michigan for the outstanding overall quality of the program and the particularly warm culture of the school. Michigan really does combine top-notch academics with an incredibly diverse, friendly and upbeat student body that believes in teamwork. It has also a very strong emphasis on social and environmental issues, much more than most would expect from an MBA school. It was the perfect school for me.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 830 Very active Net Impact members: 75 Somewhat active members: 50 Program Strengths: SE, ES, CSR, ID Student Activity Level: Above Average Support of Social/Environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 3.9/5 4.3/5 Faculty: Admin: 4/5 4.3/5 3.6/5 4.1/5

Curriculum
At the Ross School, our curriculum is designed to give students a strong multi-disciplinary business skill set, and there are great opportunities to take socially and environmentally engaged courses. Many of the core classes have Net Impact-related topics and/or have the ability to incorporate them. For example, in our core Marketing class this year, students created marketing plans for distributing AIDS prevention information to African cities and for selling T-shirts to socially-conscious shoppers. Many faculty members have included triple-bottom-line issues in core classes as well – a great example from last year was a section of the finance final exam that focused on not only the bottom line of a logging company but also on the externalities of harvesting in a national forest. To encourage these developments, Ross Net Impact has also created a student committee to target specific core classes where improvements can be made in the coming year: strategy, marketing, and management & organizations. One student comments that “Michigan has been good at creating classes that deal with these topics, but it would be great if more of these themes ran through the core curriculum.” A big part of the Ross experience is "action-based learning.” One of the signature programs is the Multi-disciplinary Action Project (MAP). Nearly all Ross MBAs complete their first year with the MAP program and have the chance to put their newfound skills to work immediately in a real-life consulting project working with businesses and nonprofits outside the University, and many Net Impact students have the chance to work on triple-bottom-line sensitive projects. Throughout recent years, the Ross faculty has broken ground with some incredible electives that regularly attract Net Impact members. Some of the most popular are: Competitive Environmental Strategy, Financing the Sustainable Enterprise, Social Institutions of Energy Production, Social Enterprise, Social Marketing, and the Green Building and Design Seminar. In creating these courses, the Ross faculty has been very responsive to the interests of the Net Impact community and has moved to maintain relevance in the changing business world. Our greatest trailblazing professors include C.K. Prahalad, Michael Gordon, Andrew Hoffman, Tom Gladwin, and Tom Lyon. In order to stay connected with professors and have a channel for exchanging ideas, Net Impact has created a faculty advisory board of six key professors who are dedicated to incorporating social and environmental topics into their courses. These advisor professors teach strategy, marketing, economics, organizational change, finance, and base of the pyramid business development. One of the Ross’ greatest strengths is the fact that students can take classes from other University of Michigan schools or even take on additional degree programs to support their career interests. Many Net Impact members are drawn to this and combine their MBAs with a Masters from Public Policy, Public Health, Law, Social Work, or Natural Resources and Environment, the last being a dual-degree with the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise. These dual-degree programs tend to open great doors for Net Impact members and provide access to resources that are normally outside the field of business.

The Chapter in Three words: Active, Innovative, Diverse Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?

Preparation for socially responsible leadership

100%

96%
Somewhat agree

80

75%

60

Agree

40

Student Activities
20

Strongly agree

At Ross, Net Impact students have a large variety of activities and clubs to get involved in, and they are well-supported by Net Impact’s strong presence on campus. Ross Net Impact is a long-standing professional development club, so it creates ways for members to advance themselves while advancing their own social and environmental missions. Some of the (cont’d)
82 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

0

NI members

All

University of Michigan—Ann Arbor, page 2
major Net Impact activities include: our signature conference, the MBA Idealist; our fall flagship, the Urban Symposium; our big yearly marketing push, Net Impact Week; Ross NI Alumni Panels and co-sponsored panels with other Ross clubs; documentary movie nights; and Career Trips to cities around the U.S. These events continue to evolve every year to reflect the diverse and exciting interests of our membership. There are many other clubs at Ross that Net Impact members tend to get heavily involved in as well. Some of the most popular are the Emerging Markets Club, the Nonprofit Management Club, the Community Consulting Club, the Global Citizenship Club, and the Ross chapter of Habitat for Humanity. These clubs and others often co-sponsor events and panels with Net Impact when the subject matter has overlapping interest for members. In addition to these clubs, there are a number of more formal institutes and organizations housed partially or completely within the Ross School. These include the William Davidson Institute, the Samuel Zell & Robert H. Lurie Institute for Entrepreneurial Studies, the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise, the Nonprofit and Public Management Center, and the Nonprofit Board Fellows program. At the start of the year, there are additional opportunities for Net Impact interests to come to the surface of the Ross community. During Ross orientation, the Ross Leadership Program (RLP), students go through a two-week learning and bonding experience that reinforces the importance of doing business well while doing good. Much of RLP focuses on ethics in action, discovering our own leadership potentials, and volunteering to give back to the community. This past year, Net Impact members have also been active in leaving lasting effects at the University of Michigan. Working with U of M staff members, Net Impact students planned the University’s first attempt at a “zero-waste” conference, which greatly reduced the environmental impact of the event and supported local organic food suppliers! Net Impact members have also played pivotal roles in successfully encouraging the Ross administration to make the new $146 million building project go green. The soon-to-be-constructed main building of the Ross School is currently planned to be a certified Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver-rated building.

AT A GLANCE
Career/Internship Placement: • 55% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 93% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 63% found jobs

Alumni: 86% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Career Services and Alumni
Ross Net Impact students are successful in pursuing a variety of non-traditional careers. Ross' career center offers workshops, networking events, and counseling for students engaged in self-directed job searches. Several Net Impact members are trained and hired as career counselors each year by the Office of Career Development (OCD) and provide continual resumé reviews, interview practice, as well as general career counseling to students with alternative career interests. Ross subscribes to the MBA Nonprofit Connection and allows searching by key terms such as "nonprofit" or "environment" in their job database. Each year, the Ross Net Impact chapter plans an alumni career panel, student internship panels, and career tours to major cities. The William Davidson Institute (www.wdi.umich.edu) funds 10 - 15 internships related to social enterprise, base of the pyramid, and international development work in emerging markets. The Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise (www.erb.umich.edu) supports a number of internships in CSR and sustainability. The Nonprofit and Public Management Center (www.umich.edu/~nonproft), a partnership among the schools of Business, Public Policy, and Social Work, provides funding for public and nonprofit internships. The Zell Lurie Institute for Entrepreneurship also funds internships with some social ventures. There are a number of institutes affiliated with the business school and housed inside the school that support non-traditional career paths. Domesticorps funds 30 non-profit internships each summer for MBA students. One student writes “Domesticorps funds student internships in the non-profit sector at $10,000 for the summer. The program organizes internships and students interview with the organizations. I don't know of any other school that has such a program with such a high level of compensation attached.” Ross' large and dedicated alumni network is one of its largest assets. Ross' alumni database is easily searchable by (cont’d)
83 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Prominent Alumni: • Meghan Chapple-Brown (2002): Senior Advisor, SustainAibility • Jennifer Layke (1997): Director of Business Engagement, World Resources Institute (WRI) • Ruth Scotti (2005): US Fuels Policy Advisor, BP

To Sum it Up: The Ross School of Business would be most fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school to help build, refine and grow a mostly socially-aware program and student body.

University of Michigan—Ann Arbor, page 3
areas of interest. Our reputation among socially responsible businesses and nonprofits is very strong. Ross students have annual internships in the CSR departments of many large corporations, innovative social ventures, and well-respected nonprofit organizations.

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leader: Molly Christiansen mollych@umich.edu Doug Wein dougwein@umich.edu Net Impact student admissions contact: Al Cotrone acotrone@umich.edu

Administration Support
The Ross administration functions as a facilitator to the many student-led initiatives for environmental and social good on campus. The leadership’s mission is to continue building a top tier business program across all disciplines. While this mandate is much broader than focusing on how social and environmental change will be the future of business, the leadership recognizes that the social and environmental dimensions of business are becoming increasingly important and must be supported inside and outside the curriculum. The leadership at Ross is intent on leading, and when the students can make a convincing case for that leadership coming in the social or environmental realm, the administration listens and responds. This year, for example, the administration has responded to input from students to adopt a commitment to LEED certification for the new Ross facility. Lastly, without a doubt the Admissions Office values “Net Impact” applicants. The continued success of programs within Ross, such as the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise and the William Davidson Institute, speaks to the administration’s ongoing support and the strength of the Net Impact voice here at Ross. The ongoing success stories of Net Impact members at Ross and beyond keeps that voice strong.

Reasons to Attend
Net Impact benefits parallel Ross’ overall strengths: action-based learning, powerful team spirit, and a great crossdisciplinary education. One student says that “Michigan combines superior academics with a friendly and supportive community of dedicated students. It is a very collaborative place where student input is supported and encouraged. Michigan balances theory with action better than comparable schools in the upper rankings bracket. Students leave Michigan extremely well prepared-- socially, academically, and professionally.” The MAP project is the cornerstone of the core curriculum. Students have the opportunity to add a second ‘real-world’ experience to the summer internship—MAPs are available in scores of different industries and in over a dozen countries. The team spirit at Ross is all-embracing. Students feel it from professors, who are accessible as teachers and mentors; from alumni, who are 60,000 strong and with a “Go Blue!” are there to help; and from fellow students, who are happy to share knowledge and experience with “It is a very close classmates. One student describes that “peers at Michigan share similar values to me in knit, highly motithat the greater reward is shifting the tide rather than personal reward.” Interdisciplinary action is real. Ross has excellent professors in core disciplines as well as some leading thinkers on Net Impact topics from environmental management to base of the pyramid strategies. As electives, Ross students can also add breadth by drawing on the excellent schools of policy, social work, natural resources, law, urban planning, and education.
Survey respondents: 66

vated, exceptionally genuine crowd. These are the people who roll up their sleeves to do something to its fullest.”

Whew- there’s a lot going on here!

84 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

710 E. University, Rm. E2540, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1234 Email: sjkoh@umich.edu

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Kenan-Flagler Business School
“Kenan-Flagler is at the heart of all the things Net Impact supports, and students that are interested in sustainable enterprise choose UNC.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 565 Very active Net Impact members: 55 Somewhat active members: 100 Program strengths: SE, ES, CD, CSR Student activity level: One of program’s most active clubs Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 4.2/5 4.4/5 Faculty: Admin: 3.4/5 3.9/5 4.1/5 4.1/5

Curriculum
A number of students say that they choose Kenan-Flagler because of the curriculum. The Kenan-Flagler Business School offers a concentration in Sustainable Enterprise, which includes classes such as Global Corporate Social Responsibility, Entrepreneurship in Developing Economies, and Systems Thinking for Sustainability. These classes are offered as either full quarter or weekend workshop electives. In terms of core classes, Net Impact members are researching ways to add social/environmental themes to core courses. One student mentioned the opportunity to “incorporate sustainability issues into the 'core' curriculum so that ALL students can learn about them.” As part of this effort, students have joined the Net Impact Curriculum Change Delegation and are using Caseplace.org and other resources to develop a list of possible case studies to add to one or two core courses. The school also recently added Sustainable Enterprise as a custom core class to encourage more students to gain exposure to this way of thinking. Finally, the school recently hired two new professors with expertise in the areas of environmental and social economics and development. Our Net Impact chapter worked closely with school administrators to help bring these latter two events to fruition. To better round out their education, students are encouraged to take classes in other UNC graduate programs, including the schools of City & Regional Planning, Environmental Science & Engineering, Government, and Public Policy. Finally, UNC is proud to have Jim Johnson and Al Segars as distinguished faculty members. Jim is the director of the Urban Investment Strategies Center at the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute and is helping to establish a new school for students from distressed urban communities in Durham, North Carolina. Al is the director of the Kenan Institute's Center for Sustainable Enterprise and is considered an expert in the areas of innovation and technology management, specifically as they relate to design for sustainability, financial and operational metrics around sustainable enterprise, and innovation strategy.

The chapter in three words: Respected, Influential, Diverse Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

Student Activities
The KFBS Net Impact chapter is well established; it was founded over six years ago and hosted the Net Impact national conference in 2001. Our chapter focuses on integrating issues of sustainability, environment, and social equity into the overall program as well as creating career opportunities for sustainability-minded students. We have many events over the course of the year that fall under the broad categories of professional development, networking/community, and awareness building. Some of our activities cross all these areas; for example, our Career Forum in the fall is an opportunity for students to build independent job search skills, to meet other members, and to learn about career paths in sustainability. It is followed up with the Career Fair in February. Our club works to build relationships with many different groups. These include other student clubs (Consulting, Real Estate, Marketing, etc.), larger organizations (NC Sustainability, UNC Sustainability Coalition, WUNC, etc), and other Net Impact chapters (Fuqua, NC State, Wake Forest, Triangle Professional). (cont’d)

100%

100%
Somewhat agree

80

78%

Agree

60

40

Strongly agree

20

0

NI members

All

85 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, page 2
We have dedicated resources to working with our UNC Sustainability coalition, which facilitates our involvement with the Campus Greening Initiative project. We also have created a club atmosphere of learning and community through our brown bags, salons, and general club meetings. We are a supportive and energetic group of students, and the club seeks to help provide a platform for discussion and networking.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 56% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 86% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 50% found jobs

Career Services and Alumni
As interest in sustainability continues to grow, UNC Kenan-Flagler's Career Management Center (CMC) has increased coordination with UNC's Net Impact chapter to best serve students focused on non-traditional career searches. Net Impact, in conjunction with UNC’s Center for Sustainable Enterprise (CSE), also supplements existing CMC services via several different mechanisms. • CMC: In addition to the traditional on-campus career search services, CMC is working on two new guidebooks that will help students: (1) organize a job search that relies mainly on off-campus resources; and (2) plan career treks that connect students to sustainability-minded companies. Recently, a new associate director was named as the point person for students seeking careers in sustainability. She is very enthusiastic about working with Net Impact to help shape CMC’s services to better meet the needs of Net Impact’s membership. • Net Impact/CSE: Net Impact sponsors an annual Sustainability Career Forum in the fall to expose students to individuals who have foraged successful careers in various sustainability fields. While the primary purpose of this forum is not direct recruiting, the forum helps students build networks in their field of interest. In the spring, CSE hosts an annual Sustainability Career Fair, which is a recruiting event that connects students to sustainability-minded companies seeking interns or full-time employees. Additionally, Net Impact offers a diversity of workshops throughout the year focused on non-traditional career searching (e.g., Independent Career Searching, Sustainability Consulting, etc.). CSE is also an invaluable resource that provides students with direct connections to people and alumni in sustainability fields via its CSE mentorship program, its sustainability-focused speaker series and its willingness to individually counsel students in their job search. These combined activities have helped boost UNC’s strong brand reputation amongst socially responsible companies (for- and nonprofit). This year, Net Impact will focus on building a stronger relationship with CMC to best leverage Net Impact, CSE and CMC’s collective resources to support students involved in non-traditional career searching.

Alumni: 75% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Prominent alumni: • Rebecca Swartz (2005): Human Rights Assistant Manager, Reebok International • Valerie Cook Smith (2002): Manager of Environmental Affairs, Citigroup • Brad Sparks (2004): Senior Associate, Sustainability Services, KPMG LLP

Administration Support
The support of our Administration for Sustainable Enterprise has grown with the interest of the student body. The budget of the Net Impact club is now over $8,000. The Dean attended the initial Net Impact meeting of the year and consistently praises the successes of our club members. Additionally, the administration has increased its support of students participating in sustainability case competitions. When a Net Impact team was selected for the final round of an international global citizenship competition this spring, the Administration agreed to an unusual subsidy beyond the club budget to cover the students’ flights. The school also supports new ventures made by our Center for Sustainable Enterprise, such as the recent announcement of a Sustainable Enterprise Business Incubator. Focus has increased on providing information for applicants interested in Sustainable Enterprise. The Admissions Office consistently reaches out to Net Impact students to discuss the Sustainable Enterprise program with interested prospective students. During the admitted students weekend, a student was asked to speak to the group specifically about (cont’d)
86 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

To sum it up: Kenan Flagler Business School is most fitting for someone who would like to attend a school that helps refine and grow a mostly socially aware program and student body.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, page 3
sustainability. Sustainable Enterprise has become a strong branding tool for the school, and the administration has publicly stated its support for Sustainable Enterprise as an agenda at Kenan-Flagler. One student comments that “each year more and more incoming students come here to study Sustainable Enterprise, and the faculty and administration are increasingly supportive. I think the school truly sees it as a critical field of study for the 21st century, and so is seriously investing in the program.”

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leaders: Deb Parsons deborah_parsons@unc.edu Elena Miller elena_miller@unc.edu Rachel Kaufman rachel_kaufman@uncbusiness.net Allison Moy allison_moy@unc.edu

Reasons to Attend
KFBS is a strong program overall. The Net Impact chapter and our relationship with the Center for Sustainable Enterprise create an enriching learning experience as well as great professional development opportunities. One student said that “our Center for Sustainable Enterprise is world-class and an incredible resource for students interested in social/environmental themes. The CSE is heavily involved in improving our experience, both while we are here and as we look for careers.” “The administra-

One student commented “I initially chose UNC for the curriculum, which has a great infusion of sustainability (particularly with the ability to obtain a sustainable enterprises concentration enrichment). At the end of the day, though, I came to UNC because of the community. The student body and professors made me feel incredibly comfortable, welcomed and respected. It was a sense of teamwork and community that is completely unique to UNC, and I didn't want to spend a penny of my major education debt anywhere else!” Another said “I knew my interest in sustainable, socially responsible business would be shared by equally passionate and talented classmates. Kenan-Flagler's depth and breadth of sustainability resources impressed me enough that I turned down more lucrative offers from 'higher ranked' schools to come to UNC. I have not once regretted that decision.”

tion has publicly stated its support for Sustainable Enterprise as an agenda at KenanFlagler.”

The program’s strength is its people. This program attracts a diverse set of thoughtful individuals with whom you would want to do business with. A distinguishing value of KFBS program is teamwork, and more than ever this has been proven in the success of student teams at case competitions.

Survey respondents: 20

87 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

CB #3490, McColl Building, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3490 Email: mba_info@unc.edu

University of Pennsylvania
The Wharton School Graduate Division
“The quality of the education will give me the tools I need to make sound (i.e. sustainable and credible) business decisions linking social responsibility to my industry. In addition, the network I am developing is second to none, especially with the international student population.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 1600 Very active Net Impact members: 15 More active Survey Respondents: 50 Program strengths: SE, ID Student activity level: Above average Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 3.2/5 4/5 Faculty: Admin: 3.2/5 3.2/5 3.1/5 3.3/5

Curriculum
Wharton and the University of Pennsylvania offer a wide variety of courses that relate to social and environmental themes. The core curriculum taken by all first-year students includes a half-credit course on Leadership and a quarter-credit course on Business Ethics. One student commented that “the Business Ethics and Leadership programs at Wharton are excellent and highly promoted within the school.” In addition, the core includes a number of cases that touch on issues of corporate social and environmental responsibility. Over 20 electives offer more in-depth courses on social entrepreneurship (Management), environmental sustainability (Operations and Information Management), community reinvestment (Management), urban fiscal policy (Finance), and international development. Many of these courses have been the result of students partnering with faculty to develop and design a new piece of the curriculum. Among our many distinguished faculty in this area are: Thomas Donaldson; Mark O. Winkelman, Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics; and William Laufer, Associate Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics and Director of the Carol and Lawrence Zicklin Center for Business Ethics. A recent curriculum review found that over 80 graduate-level courses related to these broad issues are offered outside of Wharton through programs such as The Fels School of Government, the Graduate School of Education, the Law School, the School of Social Policy and Practice, the School of Design, and Urban Studies. Wharton students need 19 credits to graduate and can take 21 credits total. 15 of these credits must be through Wharton courses, so there is plenty of room to explore courses in other schools on campus. One student said that Wharton has an opportunity to “increase awareness on campus for the programs and resources that support [Net Impact] themes. Our program also needs to highlight the for-profit opportunities in socially responsible businesses.”

The Chapter in three words: Growing, Inclusive, Broad Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

Student Activities
Wharton prides itself on student involvement, and the number of student clubs involved in social impact issues reflects this distinguishing characteristic of the school. Wharton Social Impact (WSI) serves as the Wharton School's Net Impact chapter. With over 250 members (membership has been growing steadily for the past few years), WSI coordinates career resources, a regular speaker series, an annual Social Impact Management conference (www.simconference.org), alumni outreach, and many opportunities for informal networking and relationship-building. Beyond WSI, Wharton student clubs provide opportunities to make an impact in the local community and around the world. Wharton International Volunteer Program (WIVP), one of the most recognized student clubs on campus, sends teams of Wharton students all over the world for two to four week consulting projects with very small NGOs (budgets less than $50,000) over the summer months. WIVP organizes many social events during the year (including the annual Winter Ball) and derives much of its financial support from the student body. First-year students apply to be one of the 60 members accepted into the program each year. (cont’d)
88 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

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University of Pennsylvania, page 2
Wharton Community Consultants (WCC) provides consulting and advisory services to nonprofit and community organizations throughout the Philadelphia area. The organization is managed entirely by Wharton MBA and undergraduate students who volunteer their time on behalf of the club. Wharton Healthcare International Volunteer Project (WHIVP) gives healthcare management students the opportunity to participate in service projects for healthcare systems with limited resources and severe health problems such as HIV. The projects give participants exposure to healthcare challenges in the developing world as well as the opportunity to work closely with organizations on the ground to develop viable strategies to improve their organizations. The Nonprofit Board Leadership Program (NPBLP) strives to create an experiential learning environment for students that would also support local nonprofits. NPBLP provides second-year MBAs with a greater sense of how their leadership skills can be used to make a significant contribution within the nonprofit sector. Summer Public Interest Fund (SPIF) encourages and supports first-year students who wish to pursue careers in areas that serve the public good by supplementing their summer salaries. The fund, financed primarily by fellow students pledging 1% of their summer salaries, represents an important commitment by the Wharton community to those students who work in the public interest. A number of additional community service programs (Rebuilding Together, Say YES to Education, BIZ World, and others) provide other opportunities for students to serve throughout the academic year. In addition, many professional and cultural clubs offer programs that relate to social and environmental issues. For example, the Finance Conference included a session on Microfinance, and the Technology Conference included a panel on community-building through technology. The many ways in which Wharton students express their understanding of social impact is evident by the fact that each of these community service programs, as well as the conferences, are student-initiated and student-run.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 70% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 80% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 80% found jobs

Alumni: 75% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Career Services and Alumni
Wharton's MBA Career Management Office (MBACM) is very committed to working with our club in providing resources to students interested in socially responsible career paths. They support our club's compilation and distribution of a resume book that we send to an annually generated list of employers and assist our club in coordinating a variety of public interest career panels at key points throughout the recruiting calendar. While the MBACM has limited resources to have someone working on these issues full-time, they designate a member of the staff to be our primary liaison. In addition, Wharton recently received a donation to establish a loan forgiveness program, which will likely enhance the existing resources for this purpose. Details of this program are still in development, but we believe the donation was approximately $1 million. Wharton's reputation as a recruiting focus for jobs with a social and environmental focus continues to be enhanced through speakers, conferences, and other events. The number of job and internship opportunities made available to us through formal channels reflects this trend.

Prominent alumni: • Tom Arnold (2005): Chief Environmental Officer, TerraPass • Mark Deitcher (1992): Vice President, Fairmount Ventures, Inc. • Katherina Rosqueta (2001): McKinsey & Company (pro bono practice)

To sum it up: Wharton would be most fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school to help build upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

89 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

University of Pennsylvania, page 3
Administration Support
The Wharton administration has supported numerous initiatives related to using business for social and environmental impact. For example, Wharton started the first PhD program in the United States devoted to Business Ethics and has supported the development of a Nonprofit Leadership Education Program through the School of Social Policy and Practice and the Fels School of Government. (cont’d) While numerous activities and initiatives exist at all levels of the university, the administration has not put resources into tying these efforts together and sharing this work in a cohesive way with the outside world. In our opinion, Wharton faces a marketing challenge much more so than a lack of attention or energy put into these issues. However, as students, we have found numerous resources and opportunities both within Wharton and across the University of Pennsylvania system. As Wharton celebrates its 125th anniversary through the "First" campaign (Wharton was the world's first business school), the administration is very interested in showcasing the breadth of Wharton's offerings. We believe that social impact fits nicely into this initiative and are working with the administration to better position Wharton's work in this area.

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leader: Dan Kessler danielgk@wharton.upenn.edu Jordan Bookey bookey@wharton.upenn.edu Net Impact student admissions contact: Rana Ghahremanpour ranag@wharton.upenn.edu

Reasons to Attend
Applicants factoring the presence of social and environmental themes into their MBA decision-making process will find Wharton an exciting place to be. While Wharton does not market the depth and breadth of opportunities available, students with these interests will find a surprisingly supportive community. These opportunities are becoming more cohesive in recent years, and Wharton is at a tipping point in this area. Over the next few years, students will continue to play a key role in shaping the distinctive features of Wharton's social impact program. Wharton's expertise in global business, leadership, and rigorous analytics are reflected in the various components of our approach to social impact. The co-production philosophy here gives students a true voice in shaping our community. Applicants who are passionate about demonstrating bottom-line results and who want to be part of this ongoing process of development and improvement will fare well at Wharton.

“Wharton prepares you for anything by instilling strong business fundamentals.”

A number of students commented that Wharton’s general strengths fit their needs well. As one student said “it was one of the best overall programs and will give me credibility in any setting (which will be especially important among my peers if I'm trying to institute change), and it had the resources to serve my interests in social/environmental issues.” Another comments “I felt that its reputation, its quantitative rigor and its entrepreneurial environment would complement my background in nonprofit management.” One MBA adds that “Wharton prepares you for anything by instilling strong business fundamentals. In a large program, you can take advantage of or create unlimited opportunities for development, growth, networking. Since I already had undergraduate training and 8 years of experience in the environmental field, I wanted to balance this with a solid business education so that combined, my education and experience would allow me to pursue the career of my dreams.”

Survey respondents: 26

90 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

420 Jon M. Huntsman Hall, 3730 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6340 Email: mba.admissions@wharton.upenn.edu

University of San Francisco
Masagung Graduate School of Management
“Whether you want to start the next bio-tech company or create a new nonprofit for international development, USF prides itself on creating the next generation of business leaders.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 300 Very active Net Impact members: 6 Somewhat active members: 30 Student activity level: Above average

Curriculum
The University of San Francisco is best known for its entrepreneurial campus. While much of the MBA curriculum consists of a required set of core classes, there is still opportunity to tailor your education to suit your professional interests and goals. Within the core curriculum, students are required to take a four unit course entitled Ethical, Social & Legal Environment. This course introduces students to such topics as corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, socially responsible investing, and the role of nonprofits in business. Another aspect of the USF curriculum that many MBAs find exceptionally rewarding are the Service Learning Projects that are required in several classes, including the Leadership course. These projects allow students to gain real work experience by providing consulting services to local nonprofits or governmental agencies. Many students find the experience so rewarding that they continue to volunteer their time after the project and the class are finished.

Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Faculty: Admin: 3.6/5 3.6/5 3.6/5 3.5/5 Curriculum: Activities: 2.9/5 2.9/5

“The faculty and staff are definitely supportive of students choosing extra-curricular projects with Net Impact themes, and encourage students looking for class projects to consider nonprofits in the area.”

On the electives front, one of our most popular classes is Social Entrepreneurship. In addition, a course on Sustainable Business Development was added to the list of electives for Fall 2006. If this new course proves to be a student favorite, the MBA program may add a third social impact themed elective such as Socially Responsible Investing or Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility. As three electives is the requirement for an MBA subject emphasis/concentration, USF is well on its way to offering MBAs the opportunity to focus their studies and tailor their curriculum with social/environmental themes.

The chapter in three words: Limitless, Innovative, Welcoming Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

Beyond curriculum change, there have been many positive changes at USF in the last year, with many more planned for the upcoming year. The most significant recent development is that a new Dean of the Business School, Michael Duffy, was just welcomed to the USF community. There is a great deal of excitement and anticipation on campus from both students and faculty to see what kind of changes and opportunities he will bring to the school.

Student Activities
The University of San Francisco has ample opportunities in the form of clubs and activities for MBA students to participate in, and it is truly up to the student to decide how much or how little they want to be involved. Due to the relatively short period of time in which students finish their MBA, there exists a great deal of turnover in clubs, and it is therefore critical to have firstyear students involved in club activities from the start. This presents a great opportunity for motivated students who are new to the school to jump right into leadership roles within the MBA community and get to know key faculty, administrators, and alumni. A highlight of the Net Impact Club's activities in 2005 was the Day on the Job event where USF MBA students joined MBA students from other Bay Area universities to meet with managers from leading Bay Area nonprofits and businesses involved in corporate social responsibility initiatives. Participating organizations in this event included Clif Bar, BSR, Cisco and Transfair. Currently, the USF Net Impact Club is focusing on activities for Fall of 2006 -- aiming to have several events in place for the first two months of the new school year. These will include a speaker series where business leaders within the Bay (cont’d)
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(cont’d) Area can come and speak about their experiences with social/environmental themes in the "real world." In addition to Net Impact, there are several other active MBA clubs such as: Entrepreneurship Club, Marketing Club, Technology Club, and Finance Club. There are also related undergraduate clubs, such as EnVision, which aims to make the USF campus more environmentally friendly.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 0% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 25% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 14% found jobs

Career Services and Alumni
Career Services at the University of San Francisco are currently being completely re-organized to better cater to the needs of the MBA community. The new Dean of the Business School arrived in Spring 2006, and he has continued to pledge his support to broadening the depth of our Career Services. We anticipate many positive changes in the upcoming year for career service support for MBAs. Given USF's strong reputation for entrepreneurship, students interested in social entrepreneurship and starting their own nonprofits will find an existing network of support from faculty and alumni and will have every opportunity to learn as much as they want. The University truly believes in its mission statement of "Educating Hearts and Minds to Change the World," and for those students that describe themselves as passionate and self-starting, there has never been a greater opportunity to use this MBA education to start a career in social entrepreneurship.

Alumni: 13% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful Prominent alumni: • Oren Jaffe (2005): Social Compliance/Factor Assessments Business Development Manager, Bureau Veritas

Administration Support
The administration of the University of San Francisco is open and accessible for the entire student body and actively supports student initiatives. This added value can be seen most dramatically with the small class sizes and personal interaction with the faculty and administration. Net Impact has two enthusiastic faculty members that participate in the development of ideas and assist us with functional needs such as funding and facilities. While the admissions office most certainly is interested in students who are passionate about using business to make the world a better place, the community also values students with an entrepreneurial drive who wish to develop that spirit with high moral values and integrity.

To sum it up: University of San Francisco would be most fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school to help build upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

Reasons to Attend
USF is the leading campus on the West Coast for fostering the entrepreneurial spirit. If you have ever thought of starting your own business, or if you want to be around people who are passionate about creation and innovation, this school is fantastic. Whether you want to start the next bio-tech company or create a new nonprofit for international development, USF prides itself on creating the next generation of business leaders. Many students described the location as a key asset: for example, one student said “the location is a center-piece of opportunity. San Francisco is one of the most exciting places to live and work,” and another said “access to a wide range of companies and organizations in the Bay Area was also another attractive feature.” Another student described the “huge opportunity to work with the faculty and create an impact that will be reflected in curriculum changes and permanent school programs.”

Net Impact Chapter Leader: Andy Bornstein, ambornstein@usfca.edu Brad Wetstone, bwetstone@hotmail.com Net Impact student admissions contact: USF_netimpact@hotmail.com

Survey respondents: 16 92 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006 2130 Fulton Street, Lone Mountain, San Francisco, CA 94117-1045 Email: graduate@usfca.edu

University of Southern California
Marshall School of Business
“The program is extremely responsive to student requests and interests, and any prospective Net Impact student who wants something in specific from their curriculum can, with a little elbow grease, get it to happen.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 500 Very active Net Impact members: 10 Somewhat active members: 10 Student activity level: Above average

Curriculum
Our core curriculum includes one class on Leadership and Accountability, with a CSR project and one day of CSR speakers from outside of USC. Last year, this one day event included a speaker from Nike regarding outsourcing, a speaker from the Camejo group on socially “I chose Marshall primarily responsible investing, as well as speakers on sustainable energy resources and the efdue to its PRIME program, a mandatory international fects of immigration. Although there is only one elective class on Social Entrepreneurconsulting project for 1st ship in the Marshall School of Business, other departments at USC offer classes that are years. This was a great much more related to CSR (the schools of Public Policy, Education, Social Work are all experience which allowed accessible to USC Marshall students). One student mentioned that, “there is a growing me to apply everything I'd opportunity to work on creating a dual degree program with the School of Public Policy.” learned in the core and Professor Adler of the Marshall school is a leader in social impact theme areas, and he gain a global perspective teaches courses in Management and Organization that draw on several key CSR issues. of business.” Students are currently petitioning for a Social Innovation concentration, which, if successful, would be available to 2008 candidates.

Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Faculty: Admin: Curriculum: Activities: 3.1/5 3.5/5 3.1/5 3.4/5 3.3/5 3.6/5

The chapter in three words: Developing, Dedicated, Passionate

Student Activities
Students at the USC Marshall School of Business are active in several clubs, a few of which include social and environmental impact themes. As a chapter that started only a few years ago, Marshall Net Impact has focused on a broad range of issues. Speakers and events this year have covered topics including education, environment, energy, socially responsible investing, CSR in a large corporate business, social entrepreneurship, and much more. The largest and most active club within Marshall is Challenge for Charity (C4C). C4C organizes after school tutoring, Saturday "fun days" with inner city children, JA in a day (teaching business issues to elementary students), and fundraising for Special Olympics. The year concludes with a weekend full of athletic competition against seven other schools on the west coast. Students on campus are very friendly towards Marshall Net Impact members, and many understand the importance of the club even though they choose to participate. Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

60%

58%
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Career Services and Alumni
There is one staff person in the Career Center whose responsibility includes non-traditional job searching. However, the Career Center is generally focused on marketing, consulting, and finance—where the majority of our graduates work. Unfortunately, our program does not have funds available for students who intern with nonprofits and does not have a loan forgiveness program.
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Administration Support
Support exists for our program, as we have a program director who will help us find facilities and funding as well as a contact in the Career Resource Center who dedicates part of his time to working with non-traditional MBA jobs. I believe that the Admissions Office does value "Net Impact applicants;” however, they definitely focus on the traditional MBA types. I also believe that the administration is starting to prioritize social and environmental issues, as they have become "hot topics" within other business schools as well. One student praised faculty and administration responsiveness saying, “the program is extremely responsive to student requests and interests, and any prospective Net Impact student who wants something in specific from their curriculum can, with a little elbow grease, get it to happen.”

AT A GLANCE
Career/Internship placement: • 53% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 89% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 57% found jobs

Reasons to Attend
In making a decision to attend USC, the prospective MBA should understand that the vast majority of students here are focused on consulting, finance, marketing, entrepreneurship, and entertainment. You won't find yourself surrounded by people focused on nonprofits, education, or CSR outside of Marshall Net Impact. You will, however, have the opportunity to raise awareness about such issues and meet people who are going into more traditional MBA jobs; they can provide much needed support for our causes. To improve any part of society, the private and nonprofit sectors must work together; USC educates students who are going into both. One student encouraged potential Net Impact applicants to “be the change that will affect one of the most well-connected and influential business schools in the country.”

Alumni: 67% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Prominent alumni: • Adam Miller (2005): Director of Finance, California Charter Schools Association • Jordan Newman (2004): Financial Products Manager, Sharp Solar Division To sum it up: Someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth would benefit from attending USC.

Net Impact Chapter Leader: Michael Bonino michael.bonino.2007@marshall.usc.edu

Survey respondents: 20 94 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006 Popovich Hall Room 308, Los Angeles, CA 90089-2633 Email: marshallmba@marshall.usc.edu

University of Utah
David Eccles School of Business
“The David Eccles School of Business has one of the best campus environments in the nation. This is immediately apparent, and the faculty and administration have been helpful in all of my pursuits, social, environmental, and otherwise.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 120 Very active Net Impact members: 5 Somewhat active members: 6 Student activity level: Average

Curriculum
Currently, the David Eccles School of Business’s (DESB) MBA program offers two courses that incorporate social and environmental themes specifically: Managerial Ethics and the Non-Profit Consulting service learning class. Undergraduate courses in Business and Society and Business and Nature can be audited on a non-credit basis by graduate students. Currently, masters-level organizational behavior, accounting, and entrepreneurship classes incorporate discussion of ethics, but DESB faculty are interested in integrating ethics and corporate responsibility themes into core coursework in other disciplines as well; a member of Net Impact sits on the MBA Program Committee and is involved in discussion of how to do this effectively. Students in the MBA program are able to take up to 12 credit hours outside of the school of business, so long as they are relevant to the individual's career and academic goals, and permission is gained from the other department. Relevant coursework in other schools include: • Economics - Public Policy Towards Labor; Poverty and Inequality; Urban Economics; Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; Multinational Firms: International Trade & Investment; Gender and Economic Development in the Third World • Parks, Recreation, and Tourism - Environmental Ethics; On-site Policy Analysis • Political Science - Politics and the American Economy; Foundations of International Organization • Public Administration - Management of Nonprofit Organizations; Developing Revenue in Nonprofit Organizations; Nonprofit Sectors and Organizations; Public Budgeting and Finance

Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Faculty: Admin: Curriculum: Activities: 3.2/5 3/5 3.2/5 3.5/5 4.2/5 4.2/5

The chapter in three words: Building momentum quickly! Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

Student Activities
Net Impact is building momentum at the David Eccles School of Business. The chapter has been in existence and constantly evolving since 2003. In the last three months alone, Net Impact has initiated a board fellowship program (with 25 students anxious to participate), hosted a panel discussion of nonprofit board participation by local business leaders, engaged Salt Lake City mayor Rocky Anderson - a leader in municipal greening - to speak with students, and held a drive to assist a local charity. Field trips, a more-robust “It is a small prospeakers series, involvement in curriculum change efforts, and collaboration with other gram, so [the adminiUniversity programs and local chapters are also in the works. Last year, a case competition club was spawned from Net Impact members, and it continues to be involved in genstration] is willing to eral and with CSR-relevant case analyses and competitions. let the students

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choose their own path and participate actively in whatever they choose.

Net Impact at DESB does face some hurdles; the concepts that the club promotes are often new or different from what many business students are familiar with or expect from a business program. Goals for this next academic year include promotional activities to educate and help make students aware of Net Impact and its relationship to effective business practice. We hope that Net Impact will be able to sponsor first-year orientation and team-building activities, in which students participate in a day-long community service project.

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Career Services and Alumni
Career services at DESB are very supportive of students' personal career goals and are happy to assist students seeking a non-traditional career path on an informal basis. Currently, though, there are few formal mechanisms for supporting career searches in social/environmental businesses or nonprofit organizations – either financially or structurally. Internship and loan-forgiveness assistance are not available to any student in the program. We hope that current initiatives, such as the Board Fellowship program and nonprofit consulting class, will expose students to potential career opportunities and networks.

AT A GLANCE

Career/internship placement 40% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful

Administration Support
The DESB chapter of Net Impact receives financial support through both the university and the MBA program. Funds support chapter activities as well as help subsidize student participation in the Net Impact annual conference and other B-school activities related to CSR. One student said, “the David Eccles School of Business has strong administrative and faculty support for student initiatives promoting social and environmental impact. The development, launch, and support of new programs have been made much easier by this.” The master’s program staff is very supportive of the chapter, and one staff member is helping to start a professional chapter. The program facilitates Net Impact exposure through our school’s external relations office with radio spots, press releases to local media, etc. The school’s dean is a vocal supporter of programs such as our new Board Fellows Program. All in all, the program is great in supporting student efforts focused on Net Impact themes. DESB faculty sees ethics/integrity education as an MBA program goal. They are working to integrate applied discussion of ethics and corporate responsibility into the core curriculum. Students with a strong sense of integrity and a social/community orientation are interesting to the program staff; these attributes may have some influence on admissions decisions. While the faculty’s commitment to teaching ethics is strong, their orientation towards these attributes in admissions decisions – relative to other things such as grades and GMAT scores - is not known.

To sum it up: David Eccles School of Business would best accommodate someone who is interested in building upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

Net Impact Chapter Leader: Stormy Sweitzer stormita@yahoo.com

Reasons to Attend
David Eccles School of Business is extremely supportive of student initiatives. Applicants interested in helping build current initiatives are encouraged to apply. Students are also fond of Salt Lake City; one student said, “Salt Lake has strong nonprofit sector and local living economies movement, interesting alternative communities, and a very green and communityoriented municipal body.” The school's Net Impact chapter, though small, has great energy currently and is looking for students who are interested, engaged, and able to appeal to their peers and faculty to help grow the chapter. One student summed it up by saying, “I really feel that being in such a small program has helped me to really develop my social/environmental interests, and I feel that the Net Impact chapter has been key to that.”
Survey respondents: 6 96 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006 1645 East Campus Center Drive, Room 101, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9301 Email: raddesb@business.utah.edu

Net Impact student admissions contact: Bryan Eldrege dofbbe@business.utah.edu

University of Washington
University of Washington Business School
“In addition to a strong core MBA program, the University of Washington offers a number of specialized certificates as well as significant flexibility for independent study and focus. Students seeking a traditional MBA with access to Net Impact-themed course work and activities and significant flexibility to seek out independent learning would do well in this program.”

AT A GLANCE
Full time MBA students: 404 Very active Net Impact members: 18 Somewhat active members: 60 Program strengths: SE Student activity level: Above average

Curriculum
The core curriculum focuses almost exclusively on traditional MBA topics, and, aside from ethics, there is almost no inclusion of social and environmental impact themes. However, electives offer more opportunities to explore Net Impact-related topics. Core Accounting, Finance and Marketing professors address ethics frequently, and there is a required core ethics course that students take in their second year. Aside from this, there are occasionally cases that mention responsibility or sustainability, but those aspects of the cases do not factor much into class discussion without being initiated by students. One student mentions that “more cases dealing with sustainable issues need to be brought into the core curriculum.” There is one case in management that focuses on President Bush’s leadership and decision-making on and after 9/11. This case sparks lively class debate, and it is often difficult for students to stick to the topic of management. Almost all of the professors will thoughtfully entertain Net Impact themed questions in the classroom. There are also many team projects in classes such as strategy, management and information technology, where students study a company of their choice and some students use this as an opportunity to explore a socially or environmentally responsible business. In second-year electives, Business FutureWorks (taught by Martin Westerman) is open to both undergraduate and graduate students and focuses on sustainability and the triple bottom line. Business Strategy and the Natural Environment (taught by Kevin Laverty) addresses topics such as cradle-to-cradle and CSR and draws many graduate students from outside the business school. A new course, “Marketing Cases in Sustainability” was piloted this year and was reported by many students to be “the most amazing class of their MBA careers.” Another notable course is “The Contemporary U.S. Workplace,” which explores the relationship between profit maximization and workplace social justice and is co-taught by a professor in the business school and a professor in the school of social work. This course is only scheduled to run for two years, but hopefully it is indicative of an interest in Net Impact topics that may be sustained in new, innovative and interdisciplinary courses in years to come. In addition to these stand-alone electives, there is a certificate in Environmental Management offered through the University of Washington’s (UW) Program on the Environment. The certificate is open to students across graduate schools and focuses on an interdisciplinary approach to environment management. There were 16 students in the certificate program this year, three of them from the business school. Another available program, less common among business students, is the certificate in International Development Planning and Management offered through the Evans school of Public Affairs. Students may also take up to four classes outside the business school toward their MBA, and are free to take as many classes as their schedule will allow aside from the MBA. Many students take classes from the Jackson school of International Studies, the School of Law and the Evans school of Public Affairs.

Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Faculty: Admin: Curriculum: Activities: 3.6/5 3.5/5 3.4/5 3.5/5 3.5/5 3.7/5

Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

100% 81%

80

60

Somewhat agree

54%

Student Activities
The UW Net Impact chapter is building momentum and was honored to be recognized at the 2005 Net Impact Conference as the “Revival/Small Net Impact Chapter of the Year.” We have a very strong core leadership team this year and are looking forward to building on the success of last year’s team. (cont’d)
97 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

40
Agree

20
Strongly agree

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University of Washington, page 2
Each quarter Net Impact hosts a couple of lunchtime speakers and holds one significant evening event. In Spring 2006, our evening event was an outdoor showing of the documentary, “The Corporation,” with a keg of beer and a lot of mingling. Past events have included speaker panels, keynote speakers and happy hours. We often co-sponsor lunchtime speakers with other clubs such as marketing, operations management, finance, real estate and entrepreneurship. As for special events and competitions, the Net Impact National Conference is a major focus of fall quarter, and we try to help cover some student travel and registration expenses. This year, with support from the UW MBA program office, a team from UW participated in the LEEDs case competition at the University of Colorado. At UW, the Global Social Entrepreneurship Competition takes place every year and draws teams from around the world. The Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship also sponsors a popular business plan competition on campus and often offers a $5,000 Best Idea in Sustainability award. In the past, this award has been sponsored by the UW Net Impact chapter. A couple of Net Impact members also help coordinate an annual one-day conference on “teaching sustainable business” for business school faculty from schools on the west coast. Other MBA clubs with a responsibility focus include Challenge for Charity and the Business Consulting Network. Challenge for Charity is a competition among major business schools on the west coast to provide volunteer hours and fundraising support to the Special Olympics and the Boys and Girls Club. The Business Consulting Network organizes student teams to serve as consultants to Seattle area businesses. Every year, there are a few projects that are nonprofit or community oriented. UW also has a very well established board fellows program that is run through the Business and Economic Development Center. Last year the program placed 13 students with 10 nonprofit organizations as non-voting board members, and that number is expected to grow this year. Often, a Net Impact member serves as the student coordinator of the program. Because UW is located in the Pacific Northwest, it has a relatively small class of MBAs and is highly committed to fostering a collaborative environment (and does so successfully!) The atmosphere is supportive and welcoming. Many students who are not members of Net Impact express appreciation when a question regarding social responsibility is raised in class or a speaker with a sustainability perspective is brought to campus. Of course, those with a passion for these issues feel that not enough is being done and wish for more activities.

AT A GLANCE

Career/internship placement: • 75% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 71% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 29% found jobs

Alumni: 45% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

To sum it up: University of Washington would be most fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school to help build upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

Career Services and Alumni
The career services available to students with an interest in corporate social responsibility and other less traditional MBA fields are the same as those available to everyone else. Each student is given a career coach and is welcome to meet with anyone in the business connections center. A couple of the coaches have experience in the nonprofit sector. Each summer, the Business and Economic Development Center arranges a few internship opportunities with area businesses. These internships usually have a small business development related focus, and they tend to appeal to Net Impact minded students. In general, the career center is focused on traditional MBA internships and jobs. The school is working on building a comprehensive MBA-specific alumni database, but access to alumni at this point is done through personal contacts and referrals from career counselors and MBA faculty, staff and administrators.

Administration Support
The Net Impact chapter, and all other clubs, is well supported by the MBA association, the student-run umbrella organization that administers funds and logistical support to the clubs. The Executive Director of the MBA program, Dan Poston, (cont’d)
98 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

University of Washington, page 3
is incredibly supportive of student activities, including Net Impact. At a campus level, the President of the University has brought greater focus to issues of sustainability in the past couple of years, and his initiatives have the potential to affect the way that administrators across the university plan for the future. The Dean of the Business School holds a breakfast speaker series that brings in a prominent business community member each month. Two of the speakers this year have been particularly relevant to Net Impact: William Gates Sr. on Washington State tax reform and Gary Erickson on his company Clif Bar. As for admissions, while students with social and environmental interests are not explicitly sought out, Admissions seems to value students with integrity, passion and diverse interests. They want to know who the applicants are, including the activities they are likely to participate in as MBAs, and what they value in their careers, their education and their lives.

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leader: Carolyn Bell bellce@u.washington.edu Kaia Peterson kaiap@u.washington.edu

Reasons to Attend
In addition to a strong core MBA program, the University of Washington offers a number of specialized certificates as well as significant flexibility for independent study and focus. Students seeking a traditional MBA with access to Net Impact-themed course work and activities and significant flexibility to seek out independent learning would do well in this program.

The majority of Net Impact-related activities at UW are student initiated and the strength of focus on social and environmental responsibility comes from the interests and initiative of the students in collaboration with a select number of faculty and staff. Students can expect to find a supportive and welcoming environment in which to pursue the topics and career paths that are to them the most important. One student says that “the student body is cooperative and values teamwork, not cut-throat like the students I met at other schools. Students here actually help each other learn and succeed, rather than worrying that their own place on the curve will be affected.” The school’s location is also a draw. One student comments that “life in Seattle immerses you in environmental issues, and the student body of the UW MBA program reflects that.” Another speaks of the “opportunity to help grow the [Net Impact] program, and be surrounded by a community (Seattle) that embraces the CSR attitude.”

“UW offers a small, supportive community environment with an excellent education. UW also has a strong history of environmental management/sustainability, which MBA can continue to leverage.”

The Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship provides access to a wide variety of entrepreneurs and the location in the Pacific Northwest provides access to techoriented businesses, many of which focus on social responsibility through healthcarecentric technologies. The business school is also initiating a Retail Management program next year and interaction with businesses like Starbucks, Costco and REI will provide a rich experience for students interested in retail and corporate responsibility. The interdisciplinary Environmental Management Certificate Program also offers a unique experience for students looking to enter that field.

Survey respondents: 27

99 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

110 Mackenzie Hall, Box 353200, Seattle, WA 98195-3200 Email: mba@u.washington.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
School of Business
“The University of Wisconsin-Madison MBA program is filled with many, many students who actively support Net Impact's values. Further, most residents of the city of Madison have similar values and act to support community and environment.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 220 Very active Net Impact members: 15 Somewhat active members: 15 Program Strengths: SE, NPO Student activity level: Average Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Faculty: Admin: Curriculum: Activities: 3.4/5 3.3/5 3.5/5 3.5/5 3.3/5 3.4/5

Curriculum
The Business School at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has added a number of classes over the last three years to help prepare MBA students for the challenge of operating a business in a sustainable manner. We have also added key faculty (Ann Terlaak, who comes to us with a background in Environmental Management, and Tom Eggert, who splits time between the Business School and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources). In addition, we are developing expertise in environmental risk management, and many faculty are addressing areas related to social and environmental responsibility in accounting, strategy, risk and quality. The Business School has also brought in a number of prominent speakers to speak to the university community on subjects relating to the social and environmental responsibilities of business. A student group grew out of our Environmental Strategy and Sustainability class that is dedicated to advancing the idea that businesses can and should operate in a sustainable manner. The Business School has also expanded its relationship with the Gaylord Nelson Institute of Environmental Studies by crosslisting three new business courses in the Institute's selection of courses. The mix of business and IES students in classes offers a diversity of perspectives and viewpoints that makes for an exciting learning environment. Faculty from the Business School and other schools on campus participate in an informal faculty environmental roundtable every other Tuesday morning during the school year. In addition, several business school professors have drawn on the rich tradition of the UW-Madison in environmental knowledge and expertise and invited non-business professors to make guest presentations in School of Business courses. Many of our professors make good use of the expertise in the business community by bringing senior managers in to talk to their classes about such things as "The Role of Heart in Running a Business" and "What Systems Thinking Means for Sustainability". In addition, the Business School continues to work with potential funders on expanding our commitment to sustainability by broadening the class options for students. University of Wisconsin-Madison has a rich history in the area of social responsibility. It was one of three founders of the Consortium for Graduate Studies in Management, the country’s first “A number of cooperative equal educational opportunity graduate fellowship program for minorities. It crecourses in sustainated the first graduate program in the country in a variety of fields, including applied security ability, the programs analysis and arts administration, and in recent years has created highly focused MBA program based on career specializations ranging from corporate finance to marketing research. core curriculum does

The chapter in three words: Growing, supportive, entrepreneurial.

Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?

100%

80

76%
Somewhat agree

62%

60

a good job incorporating social/ environmental issues into the teaching.”

Professors have in recent semesters included course cases with social and environmental themes. Commented one student, “a number of courses in sustainability, the programs core curriculum does a good job incorporating social/environmental issues into the teaching.”

40
Agree

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Strongly agree

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100 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

University of Wisconsin-Madison, continued
Student Activities
The Net Impact chapter at the University of Wisconsin is building momentum and adds new members each semester. Usually, a core group of 15-20 members attend each event, but there is a rotating cast of other students as well. The other MBA students and the Business school are quite supportive of the organization. Net Impact frequently co-sponsors events with other organizations and departments on campus. Recent events have included partnerships with the Law School, the School of Engineering, an Undergraduate Sustainability Group, and the Student Union.

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement • 56% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 87% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 75% found jobs Alumni: 56% rated their alumni network as helpful or very helpful.

Career Services and Alumni
The University of Wisconsin has a storied history of producing socially active and aware graduates, and prospective employers are aware of this history. While career services spend most of their time dealing with traditional MBA opportunities, the office is quite open to other career choices, and is enthusiastic about developing a targeted job search plan for those interested in careers in social responsibility and sustainable enterprise. Beyond campus, the Madison area has many professionals in the social and environmental arena who are regularly willing and available to chat with MBA students about their career plans. The Weinert Center for Entrepreneurship and the Bolz Center for Arts Administration each have dedicated staff, and their students focus nearly entirely on non-traditional careers.

Administration Support
Within the realm of the University of Wisconsin, the Business School is slightly less progressive than the rest of the campus, but in the grand scheme of business schools across the country, UW's Business School Administration is supportive of Net Impact's mission. It is quite easy to make an appointment to meet with top figures.

To sum it up: The University of WisconsinMadison School of Business would be best for someone who is interested in refining and growing a mostly socially aware program and student body.

Reasons to Attend
Students who are seeking a supportive environment with in the MBA program and an overwhelming wealth of social and environmental opportunities elsewhere on campus, and in the Madison area, would be well served by choosing the University of Wisconsin. One student remarked, “I chose to attend this program because of its small class size and commitment to each student. This extends into having an impact in student organizations, which includes social and environmental applications.” Another mentioned that “the surrounding city is very supportive of social/environmental issues – more so than most communities in the Midwest.”

Net Impact Chapter Leader: Tom Godfrey tgodfre@wisc.edu

101 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

3150 Grainger Hall, 975 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 mba@bus.wisc.edu

Vanderbilt University
Owen Graduate School of Management
“There are many opportunities to explore the social and environmental themes across the other seven highly ranked professional schools at Vanderbilt, and to thereby create your own specialization.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 400 Very active Net Impact members: 20 Somewhat active members: 20 Program strengths: ES, CSR Student activity level: Above average

Curriculum
Owen offers many opportunities that allow students to take advantage of their interest in Net Impact related subject matter. In addition, to conserve resources, many professors only accept and return homework via electronic means. Among the classes Owen offers related to CSR topic areas are Corporate Strategies for Environmental and Social Responsibility, Private Environmental Law and Voluntary Overcompliance, and Ethics in Business. Additionally, Owen offers many seminars appealing to Net Impact members such as the required day-long, first year Leadership in Practices Seminar: CSR.

Student Activities
The Net Impact Chapter at Owen has been around since the early nineties, but has remained a relatively small club until recently. In the last year, we have more than tripled our National Conference attendees, and we have more than doubled our club membership. We hope to be one of the largest clubs at Owen in the upcoming school year. The program is continuing to improve and there is a lot of opportunity to really make an impact on the school’s social responsibility program. Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: Owen’s largest focus is on using business skills to help motivate social and environmental change. During Net Impact Week, our club brings in speakers, hosts panel discussions, holds open discussions in our lobby, and sponsors social documentary screenings. We hold this week near the beginning of the school year to help with recruiting first year students. During the rest of the year, we host a variety of events with Net Impact themes. 3.3/5 3.5/5 Faculty: Admin: 3.9/5 3.8/5 3.8/5 4.1/5

“Net Impact is developing rapidly at Owen, and students, faculty and administration are becoming more enthusiastic.”

The chapter in three words: Team, Growth, Impactful Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

Another club at Owen, 100% Owen, is an organization dedicated to service and community development. 100% Owen has ongoing projects with Boys’ & Girls’ Club, Youth About Business, Habitat for Humanity, and PENCIL Partners. Talks are ongoing to merge the 100% Owen club and the Net Impact club to create a stronger, more united community development effort.

100% 90% 89%

Career Services and Alumni
Students at Owen have ample opportunity to follow a non-traditional business career search. The Career Management Center (CMC) offers a host of one-on-one career coaching options for students desiring a non-traditional career after graduation. Our club’s career adviser, Karen Weist, also regularly sends members job postings via email that are nonprofit or CSRfocused. Although Owen does not have an explicit nonprofit concentration, one of our club’s goals is to start one. Nashville is home to many nonprofits, particularly healthcare nonprofits, so it would make sense for Owen to move toward this end.

80
Somewhat agree

60

40
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Strongly agree

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102 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Vanderbilt University, continued
Administration Support
Dean Jim Bradford is one of our strongest advocates. Being a former CEO of a glass manufacturer, he understands the environmental aspects of running a business as well as the social struggles of managing human capital. We are also fortunate to have a renowned CSR faculty member, Mark Cohen, on staff at Owen. He, along with many other faculty, have been very helpful in seeing the success of Net Impact at Owen. Our Admissions department seems to have taken notice of Net Impact’s recent growth at Owen. At a recent welcome weekend event for students who have accepted their admissions offer from Owen, we met several students who were very excited to join our club. For example, one woman is an architect about to sit for her LEED certification exam. Another man came from a nonprofit and was interested in studying CSR. We are encouraged by the pool of applicants that Admissions has selected to join us next year. Our club, much like the other clubs at Owen, is allotted a nominal amount of money by the administration to be used for operations throughout the year. The amount is usually in the neighborhood of $500, which has been enough to run the club in previous years. In future years, we will be holding fundraising events throughout the year in order to raise further funds. In addition to our allotment, the administration also reimburses students for travel to the Net Impact National Conference, as well as Net Impact case competitions (usually there is a limit of $250 per person for each of these).

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: • 88% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 75% of students found internships using both their values and skills

Alumni: 56% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful Prominent Alumni: Carl Liebert: Executive VP, Home Depot Stores

Reasons to Attend
Owen Graduate School of Management is one of the many prestigious graduate schools located on the campus of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. As one student said, “there are many opportunities to explore the social and environmental themes across the other seven highly ranked professional schools at Vanderbilt, and to thereby create your own specialization.” Net Impact has experienced a large amount of growth in club membership over the past year and will likely be one of the larger clubs at Owen in the upcoming year. Owen prides itself on our students’ ability to work in teams, as well as their technical business acumen. There is a strong sense of community and camaraderie among students at Owen. Faculty members are approachable and excited to see their students succeed. Another unusual aspect of Owen is that students get into their electives much sooner than at most schools. First-year Owen students take core classes their first semester, while the second semester is split roughly equally between core classes and electives. The combination of strong analytical skills, outstanding team communication, accessible faculty, and a growing community make Owen an ideal breeding ground for Net Impact-related activities.

To sum it up: Owen Graduate School of Management would be most fitting for someone who is interested in building upon an existing base of social / environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth.

Net Impact Chapter Leader: Chris Jones Christopher.Jones.2007@ owen.vanderbilt.edu Julie Sinton Julie.Sinton.2007@owen.vandebilt.edu

Survey respondents: 22 103 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006 401 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37203 Email: admissions@owen.vanderbilt.edu

Yale University
School of Management
“SOM is an environment where environmentally/socially oriented career goals are the norm, not the exception. Net Impact students will find an incredibly supportive environment. The student body, and their diverse experiences, provides fantastic opportunities for learning and networking across a wide range of fields.”

AT A GLANCE
Full-time MBA students: 440 Very active Net Impact members: 125 Somewhat active members: 50 Program strengths: SE, ES, CD, CSR, ID, NPM Student activity level: One of program’s most active clubs Support of social/environmental themes: Students: Curriculum: Activities: 4.5/5 4.6/5 Faculty: Admin: 4.4/5 4.2/5 4.6/5 4.6/5

Curriculum
The Yale School of Management (SOM) was founded 30 years ago with a noble mission: to educate leaders for business and society. This mission has stayed constant throughout the history of the School. Yale SOM provides a strong foundation on all levels for a rigorous management education that considers social/environmental impact. And this applies to all students; as one student explained, “there is great enthusiasm and broad interest across the student body about Net Impact issues. While there are bankers and consultants at Yale SOM, many of them chose to take classes such as Public and Private Management of the Environment or Nonprofit Management.” The new SOM core curriculum, which will be introduced in the fall of 2006, represents Yale SOM’s desire to create a model of management education that systematically links rigorous foundations and values-based considerations with meaningful aspirations. As a sample, one first-year core course in the Organizational Perspectives segment is exclusively devoted to State & Society. This course will examine the way in which managerial decisions affect – and can be affected by – both governmental and societal interests. In addition, values-based approaches will be integrated into every aspect of the core. In the second year, a wide variety of courses reflect Yale’s attention to social/environmental impact. The electives include classes like Services Marketing: Strategies for Nonprofits and for-profits; Entrepreneurial Business Planning; Business Ethics: Succeeding Without Selling Your Soul; Philanthropic Foundations; CSR: Social Venture Management; Banking and the Public Interest; and Strategic Management of Nonprofit Organizations. Yale SOM also boasts a number of faculty thought leaders, including Sharon Oster, Frederic D. Wolfe Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship and Director of the Program on Social Enterprise; and Edward Kaplan, William N. and Marie A. Beach Professor of Management Sciences & Professor of Public Health. The Yale School of Management is unique among other management schools in its close ties with the entire breadth and depth of Yale University. SOM students may take classes in almost any other program at Yale, including Yale Law School, where SOM students recently worked in a clinical class with Law students to establish a Community Development Bank. Many SOM students take advantage of the School’s close linkage and proximity to the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, which continues to develop experts to responsibly steward the environment. SOM students may also pursue a variety of joint degrees, including MBA/JD with Yale Law School, MBA/MEM or MF with Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, MBA/MPH with Yale School of Public Health, MBA/MD with Yale School of Medicine, MBA/MDIV or MAR with Yale Divinity School, and MBA/MA in International Relations with Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. In addition to comprehensive joint-degree offerings, the Yale School of Management offers a Concentration in Nonprofit Management.

The chapter in three words: Purposeful, Ambitious, Well-supported Leadership: Does program prepare Net Impact members and the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership?
Preparation for socially responsible leadership

100%

99% 93%
Somewhat agree Agree

80

60

Student Activities
Student life at Yale revolves around a small, tight-knit and diverse community that embodies the mission of the school to develop leaders for society AND business. Net Impact has been present since the school's founding and the majority of students attend the events. In addition, SOM won the 2005 Net Impact Chapter of the Year award (of Net Impact’s 120 chapters network-wide). (cont’d)
104 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

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Yale University, page 2
The Net Impact club has many activities, including the following highlights: • McKinsey Social Enterprise Case Competition: a single day, student-body wide competition, sponsored by McKinsey and analyzing a socially responsible business case. • Business & Society CSR Panels: a series of three panels focused on Social Enterprise, Socially Responsible Investing, and CSR. “There is a strong • Philanthropy Conference: a one-day conference drawing experts in philanthropy to community of discuss key and controversial issues in modern philanthropy. students here • Meet the Other Firms: an event, co-sponsored by the Yale Career Development interested in applying Office, where 2nd year students with public interest and non-profit summer internships share experiences with first years considering social enterprise careers. their knowledge and • Career Treks: Education, Non-Profit Consulting, Social Marketing. These treks are skills to improving conducted based on student interests and open to the student body. the world and not • Speaker Events: at least one per month, ranging from traditional speaker events to just their place in it.” more intimate lunch/dinner interactions. Examples range from a VP of CSR at Starbucks to Bright Horizons founder Linda Mason (a Yale SOM graduate), to Vince Perez (former Energy Minister of the Philippines) and David Vogel (Berkeley Sustainability expert). • Social Events, including a club hike during Admissions weekend, kickball during orientation and end of the year party • Career Mentors: a mentorship program tailored to the individual job searches of the mentees

AT A GLANCE
Career/internship placement: 54% of students described career services as helpful or very helpful • 83% of students found internships using both their values and skills; 58% found jobs

Alumni: 87% of respondents rated their Alumni network as helpful or very helpful

Career Services and Alumni
The Yale School of Management is committed to supporting students interested in pursuing careers in areas of social/ environmental impact. About 5% of Yale SOM graduates choose to take positions in the nonprofit sector. This choice is often made possible by our innovative and generous SOM Loan Forgiveness Program, the first program of its kind at U.S. business schools. This program has served as a model for similar programs at other professional schools throughout the country. Participants with annual incomes under $70,000 receive 100% of their loan payments through the program. Alumni may apply during the first 10 years following graduation, and both U.S. and international students are eligible for the program. The School’s Career Development Office (CDO) has a dedicated professional whose role is to develop job leads and assist in recruitment and placement with private, public and nonprofit organizations, especially in the areas of Corporate Social Responsibility and Socially Responsible Businesses. The CDO has created a shared database with input from students and staff to disseminate information and contacts with nonprofit organizations. In addition, the CDO sponsors a number of wellattended events with outside consultants from MBA Nonprofit Connection and NewSource and conducts workshops on pertinent issues.

Prominent alumni: • Neal Keny-Guyer (1982): CEO, Mercy Corps • Seth Goldman (1995): TeaEO, Honest Tea • Gina Boswell (1989): COO, Avon North America

To sum it up: Yale School of Management would be most fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school to where students and faculty are on the forefront of social/ environmental issues.

Connections made by the School’s Center for Social Enterprise frequently lead to internships and permanent employment opportunities for SOM students. Students in Professors Stan Garstka’s and Sharon Oster’s Workshop on Entrepreneurship in the Nonprofit Sector often work with real organizations on real-world problems, providing students with highly relevant experience and exposure to mission-based organizations that proves helpful in the students’ planned careers. Finally, the strength of the network of Yale SOM alumni who work in relevant fields cannot be underestimated. These graduates serve as career mentors, professional contacts, and often, hiring managers for Yale SOM students.

105 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Yale University, page 3
Administration Support
At the Yale School of Management, the Dean and administration are dedicated to creating an environment for educating leaders who will approach business with a holistic viewpoint and understand both the management and societal reasons for business decisions. The mission of the school is to create leaders for business AND society, and the administration adamantly emphasizes this duality. Points of Highlight: • Program for Social Enterprise & Program on Nonprofit Organizations – focuses on nonprofit and socially responsible enterprises by bringing university-wide research to SOM. A seminar series highlights the work of researchers and professionals in the international nonprofit or socially responsible arena. The program staff provides resources and support to student clubs and events focused on social enterprise. • Yale SOM Internship Fund – the Internship Fund at Yale SOM provides financial support to students pursuing employment as summer associates in the public or nonprofit sectors. It was the first program among its kind at U.S. management programs and has supported over 800 Yale MBA internships for over 25 years. In addition, the Yale SOM Dean’s Office routinely pledges to match 100% of student donations to the Internship Fund. • Yale Center for Corporate Governance – the center is founded on the premise that today the corporation is an institute expected to enhance society. The Center sponsors research and discussion challenging the idea that corporations can and should better serve society. • Recently, the School received a gift of $1.5 million to develop business education that gives students a values-based foundation to meet real world challenges throughout their careers. This values-based approach will be completely integrated into the core and elective curriculum.

AT A GLANCE
Net Impact Chapter Leaders: Stacy Abder & Zac Christie Student Admissions Contact: Fawzia Ahmed fawzia.ahmed@yale.edu

Reasons to Attend
The percentage of students interested in social and environmental issues in business is very high. The ethos of social responsibility pervades the entire student body and campus; one student explains that there are “fantastic students--warm environment, friendly, fun--simply, nice people! Integration of social/environmental themes within the 'standard' curriculum resources at Yale.” Another student writes that “it is a small, supportive program where students have a highly academic experience within the context of a challenging business school environment. The Yale University resources are tremendous. The proximity to New York allows students to live at a reasonable cost of living, while still being close to a major center for potential job opportunities. Plus: it's just a fun place!” In addition, the new curriculum was developed to focus on values and ethics in business with particular attention to the effect of business on society. This curriculum integrates multiple viewpoints within an organization and society to provide a holistic approach to leading business for the betterment of society. Finally, the program is focused on empowering students to take initiative and leadership positions within the school and integrating with the community. Such initiatives range from cultural events and pro-bono consulting (locally and internationally) to volunteering for local, nonprofit board service and providing business advice through a partnership with the Yale Law School.

Survey Respondents: 62

106 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

135 Prospect Street, PO Box 208200, New Haven, CT 06520-8200 Email: mba.admissions@yale.edu

Part II: Ratings and Aggregate Responses

107 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Survey Responses
Program Babson MBA Bainbridge Graduate Institute Boston College Carroll Graduate School of Management Brandeis International Business School Brigham Young University Marriott School of Business Carnegie Mellon Tepper School of Business Case Western Reserve Weatherhead Claremont Drucker and Ito School of Management College of William and Mary Mason School of Business Columbia Business School Cornell Johnson Graduate School of Management Dartmouth Tuck School of Business Duke Fuqua School of Business Emory Goizueta Business School George Washington University School of Business Georgetown McDonough School of Business Georgia State University Robinson College of Business Georgia Tech College of Management Harvard Business School Harvard University Kennedy School of Government HEC MBA Indian School of Business Indiana University Kelley School of Business INSEAD Johns Hopkins University SAIS London Business School McGill MBA Melbourne Business School MIT Sloan School of Management Michigan State Eli Broad College of Business N 14 24 5 2 7 8 5 3 4 20 30 2 42 6 15 39 5 8 10 3 9 2 12 1 1 4 17 3 22 7 Program Monterey Institute of International Studies -Fisher Graduate School of International Busimess NYU Stern School of Business North Carolina State College of Management Northwestern Kellogg School of Management Norwegian University of Science and Technology Penn State Smeal College of Business Pepperdine Graziado School of Business Portland State School of Business Administration Presidio School of Management Purdue Krannert School of Management Rice Jones Graduate School of Management St. Joseph’s University Haub School of Business San Francisco State MBA Santa Clara University Leavey School of Business School for International Training Simmons School of Management Simon Fraser University School of Business Stanford Graduate School of Business Thunderbird Garvin School of International Management Tufts Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy Tulane A.B. Freeman School of Business University of Alberta School of Business University of Arizona Eller College of Management University of British Columbia Sauder School of Business UC Berekeley Haas School of Business UC Davis Graduate School of Management UC Irvine School of Management UCLA Anderson Graduate School of Management UC San Diego Rady School of Management University of Chicago Graduate School of Business N 7 11 9 53 2 10 5 2 39 6 9 3 3 6 1 5 1 21 9 3 1 7 1 9 76 25 2 24 11 20 Program University of Colorado Boulder Leeds School of Business University of Denver Daniels College of Business University of Iowa Henry B. Tippie College of Business University of Maryland Smith School of Business University of Michigan Stephen M. Ross School of Business University of Minnesota Carlson School of Management University of Navarra IESE Business School University of New Mexico Anderson School of Management UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School University of Notre Dame Mendoza College of Business University of Oregon Lundquist School of Business University of Pennsylvania Wharton School University of Rochester William E. Simon Graduate School University of San Francisco School of Management University of South Carolina Moore School of Business University of S. California Marshall School of Business UT Austin McCombs School of Business University of Toronto Rotman School of Management University of Utah Eccles School of Business University of Virginia Darden School of Business University of Washington Business School University of Wisconsin Madison School of Business Vanderbilt Owen Graduate School of Management Villanova College of Commerce and Finance Wake Forest Babcock Graduate School Washington University St. Louis Olin School of Business West Virginia University MBA Yale School of Management York University Schulich School of Business N 19 13 4 21 66 8 3 4 20 6 2 26 3 16 1 20 5 1 6 22 27 65 22 3 21 4 4 62 11

108 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Program Ratings
Please note: ratings are not meant to give a definitive ranking of business programs; rather, the data presents a way to compare student opinions of their schools. When reviewing the data, please keep in mind the “n” represented by each school (on page 106) since any school with over five survey respondents was included on the lists. You may want to take into account the number of survey respondents for each school when considering the rating tables. We also encourage you to read through the school profiles for more information on the program’s strengths and accomplishments.

Overall
Rank
1 2 2 4 4 6 7 7 7 7 7 12

Program
Bainbridge Graduate Institute Duke University Fuqua School of Business Simmons School of Management Presidio School of Management Yale School of Management Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management Boston College Carroll Graduate School of Management Cornell University Johnson Graduate School of Management UC Berkeley Haas School of Business University of Michigan Stephen M. Ross School of Business University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler School of Business York University Schulich School of Business

Times Appearing within the Top 10*
15 14 14 13 13 10 8 8 8 8 8 7

*Overall rating is a compilation of the number of times a school appeared in a top-10 list for any of the questions asked in our student survey. The survey contained 20 questions total. For sample size (n) for each school, please see page 106.

109 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Program Ratings

Program prepares Net Impact students for ethical and socially responsible leadership
Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 9 11 12 12 14 15 16 17 17 19 20 Program Bainbridge Graduate Institute University of Denver Daniels Simmons School of Management Presidio School of Management Yale SOM UNC Kenan-Flagler Duke Fuqua UC Berkeley Haas Boston College Carroll Notre Dame Mendoza UVA Darden Cornell Johnson Monterey Institute Fisher York Schulich University of Michigan Ross Northwestern Kellogg Brigham Young Marriott Harvard Business School Indiana University Kelley Santa Clara Leavey 7 Pt Scale 6.92 6.75 6.60 6.54 6.42 6.39 6.38 6.35 6.20 6.20 6.18 6.17 6.17 6.11 6.10 6.02 6.00 6.00 5.92 5.83

Program prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership
Rank 1 2 3 4 4 6 6 8 9 10 11 12 12 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Program Bainbridge Graduate Institute Presidio School of Management Yale SOM Brigham Young Marriott Monterey Institute Fisher Boston College Carroll Simmons School of Management University of Denver Daniels UVA Darden Duke Fuqua UC Berkeley Haas Purdue Krannert Notre Dame Mendoza Stanford GSB UC Davis Vanderbilt Owen Northwestern Kellogg Cornell Johnson Georgetown McDonough Penn State Smeal 7 Pt Scale 6.88 6.38 5.93 5.83 5.83 5.80 5.80 5.75 5.73 5.60 5.54 5.40 5.40 5.37 5.36 5.32 5.29 5.24 5.15 5.13

Average

5.66

Average

5.04

Programs with fewer than 5 survey responses were removed from the list. The Average includes the average of all programs, not just the programs included in the top 20. For sample size (n) for each school, please see page 106.

110 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Program Ratings

Administrative support of Net Impact themes in curriculum
Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 8 10 11 11 13 14 14 14 14 18 19 20 Program Bainbridge Graduate Institute Presidio School of Management Simmons School of Management Yale SOM Georgia Tech Northwestern Kellogg Duke Fuqua Boston College Carroll Emory Goizueta University of Utah Eccles Thunderbird Garvin UNC Kenan-Flagler NYU Stern Case Western Weatherhead Columbia Business School Notre Dame Mendoza York Schulich UC Berkeley Haas Cornell Johnson UVA Darden 5 Pt Scale 4.96 4.87 4.80 4.64 4.43 4.32 4.23 4.20 4.20 4.17 4.11 4.11 4.09 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.96 3.93 3.91

Administrative support of Net Impact themes in extracurricular events and activities
Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 9 11 12 13 14 15 15 15 18 19 20 Program Bainbridge Graduate Institute Simmons School of Management Presidio School of Management Michigan State Eli Broad Yale SOM Northwestern Kellogg Duke Fuqua Georgia Tech Case Western Weatherhead Notre Dame Mendoza Thunderbird Garvin UC Berkeley Haas Pepperdine Graziadio NYU Stern Emory Goizueta University of Minnesota Carlson University of Utah Eccles Georgetown McDonough Cornell Johnson UC San Diego Rady 5 Pt Scale 4.96 4.80 4.77 4.67 4.59 4.52 4.49 4.43 4.40 4.40 4.33 4.23 4.20 4.18 4.17 4.17 4.17 4.15 4.14 4.13

Average

3.82

Average

3.90

Programs with fewer than 5 survey responses were removed from the list. The Average includes the average of all programs, not just the programs included in the top 20. For sample size (n) for each school, please see page 106.

111 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Program Ratings

Faculty support of Net Impact themes in curriculum
Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 13 13 13 13 13 19 20 Program Bainbridge Graduate Institute Presidio School of Management Simmons School of Management York Schulich Yale SOM Brigham Young Marriott University of Denver Daniels Duke Fuqua Penn State Smeal Cornell Johnson UVA Darden University of Michigan Ross Boston College Carroll Monterey Institute Fisher Pepperdine Graziadio UC San Diego Rady University of Minnesota Carlson Notre Dame Mendoza Vanderbilt Owen Georgetown McDonough 5 Pt Scale 5.00 4.97 4.60 4.56 4.44 4.33 4.25 4.18 4.13 4.10 4.05 4.02 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.89 3.88

Faculty support of Net Impact themes in extracurricular events and activities
Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 10 12 12 14 15 16 17 18 19 19 19 19 19 Program Bainbridge Graduate Institute Simmons School of Management Presidio School of Management University of Denver Daniels Michigan State Eli Broad Cornell Johnson University of Michigan Ross Northwestern Kellogg Yale SOM Case Western Weatherhead Notre Dame Mendoza Georgetown McDonough Duke Fuqua Monterey Institute Fisher Penn State Smeal York Schulich UC Berkeley Haas University of Maryland Smith Boston College Carroll Brigham Young Marriott Pepperdine Graziado UC San Diego Rady University of Minnesota Carlson 5 Pt Scale 4.88 4.80 4.79 4.42 4.33 4.31 4.29 4.27 4.24 4.20 4.20 4.18 4.18 4.17 4.13 4.11 4.10 4.06 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00

Average

3.70

Average

3.79

Programs with fewer than 5 survey responses were removed from the list. The Average includes the average of all programs, not just the programs included in the top 20. For sample size (n) for each school, please see page 106.

112 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Program Ratings

Student support of Net Impact themes in curriculum
Rank 1 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 13 13 16 17 18 19 20 Program Bainbridge Graduate Institute Presidio School of Management Yale SOM Simmons School of Management Monterey Institute Fisher UC Davis University of Colorado Boulder Leeds UC Berkeley Haas UNC Kenan-Flagler Penn State Smeal York Schulich Northwestern Kellogg Boston College Carroll Brigham Young Marriott Georgetown McDonough Duke Fuqua University of Michigan Ross Cornell Johnson University of Denver Daniels George Washington University 5 Pt Scale 5.00 5.00 4.54 4.40 4.33 4.32 4.28 4.21 4.17 4.13 4.11 4.08 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.95 3.89 3.86 3.83 3.80

Student support of Net Impact themes in extracurricular events and activities
Rank 1 2 3 3 5 6 7 7 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 16 18 19 19 19 19 19 Program Bainbridge Graduate Institute Presidio School of Management Michigan State University Eli Broad Monterey Institute Fisher UC Davis Yale SOM UC Berkeley Haas Northwestern Kellogg Penn State Smeal Simmons School of Management UNC Kenan-Flagler Duke Fuqua Georgetown McDonough University of Michigan Ross Cornell Johnson University of Colorado Boulder Leeds University of Denver Daniels Boston College Carroll Brigham Young Marriott Notre Dame Mendoza Stanford GSB York Schulich Case Western Weatherhead 5 Pt Scale 4.96 4.85 4.67 4.67 4.60 4.59 4.56 4.56 4.50 4.40 4.39 4.38 4.36 4.32 4.21 4.17 4.17 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00

Average

3.57

Average

3.79

Programs with fewer than 5 survey responses were removed from the list. The Average includes the average of all programs, not just the programs included in the top 20. For sample size (n) for each school, please see page 106.

113 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Program Ratings

Most helpful career services
Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 9 9 11 11 13 14 14 14 14 18 19 20 Program Michigan State Eli Broad Simmons School of Management University of Chicago GSB Georgia State Robinson Duke Fuqua Northwestern Kellogg UVA Darden Vanderbilt Owen Indiana Kelly Stanford GSB Georgia Tech University of Alberta Bainbridge Graduate Institute Emory Goizueta Penn State Smeal Purdue Krannert Notre Dame Mendoza University of Washington UC Berkeley Haas UPenn Wharton 5 Pt Scale 5.00 4.60 4.38 4.33 4.31 4.24 4.19 4.19 4.18 4.18 4.17 4.17 4.06 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.95 3.92 3.91

Found a job that utilizes their values and business skills
Rank 1 1 3 4 4 4 7 7 9 9 9 12 12 14 15 16 16 18 19 20 Program Stanford GSB University of Maryland Smith Duke Fuqua Cornell Johnson Presidio School of Management Wake Forest Babcock UCLA Anderson UPenn Wharton University of Wisconsin Madison Columbia Business School George Washington University Bainbridge Graduate Institute UVA Darden University of Michigan Ross UC Berkeley Haas Boston College Carroll University of Colorado Boulder Leeds Yale SOM Georgetown McDonough USC Marshall % Yes or Somewhat 100% 100% 86% 83% 83% 83% 80% 80% 75% 75% 75% 67% 67% 63% 62% 60% 60% 58% 57% 57% 61%

Found an internship that utilizes their values and business skills
Rank 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 9 10 11 11 13 14 15 15 17 18 19 19 Program Cornell Johnson Duke Fuqua UVA Darden NYU Stern University of Chicago GSB Boston College Carroll Harvard Business School Northwestern Kellogg University of Michigan Ross UCLA Anderson UC Berkeley Haas Columbia Business School USC Marshall University of Wisconsin Madison UNC Kenan-Flagler Babson College Yale SOM MIT Sloan UPenn Wharton Carnegie Melon Tepper % Yes or Somewhat 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 96% 93% 92% 91% 91% 89% 87% 86% 86% 83% 82% 80% 80%

Average

3.69

Average

Average

78%

Programs with fewer than 5 survey responses were removed from the list. The Average includes the average of all programs, not just the programs included in the top 20. For sample size (n) for each school, please see page 106.

114 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Program Ratings

Active student clubs (relative to other clubs at program)
Rank 1 2 3 4 4 6 7 8 9 10 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 20 Program Case Western Weatherhead Yale SOM Penn State Smeal Northwestern Kellogg UC Berkeley Haas York Schulich UC Davis UNC Kenan-Flagler Duke Fuqua University of Michigan Ross Georgetown McDonough University of British Columbia Sauder Columbia Business School McGill University Thunderbird Garvin Vanderbilt Owen Cornell Johnson University of Maryland Smith University of Washington Monterey Institute Fisher Pepperdine Graziado 5 Pt Scale 5.00 4.87 4.86 4.67 4.67 4.63 4.58 4.56 4.50 4.46 4.46 4.38 4.36 4.27 4.22 4.13 4.12 4.06 4.05 4.00 4.00

Helpfulness of fellow students
Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 9 11 11 13 14 15 16 16 16 19 20 Program Bainbridge Graduate Institute Duke Fuqua University of Michigan Ross UNC Kenan-Flagler UC Berkeley Haas Northwestern Kellogg Cornell Johnson Stanford GSB Georgetown McDonough UCLA Anderson UVA Darden Yale SOM Notre Dame Mendoza Columbia Business School UPenn Wharton Carnegie Melon Tepper Thunderbird Garvin USC Marshall Presidio School of Management UC San Diego Rady 5 Pt Scale 4.94 4.93 4.71 4.69 4.66 4.63 4.60 4.59 4.58 4.58 4.57 4.57 4.50 4.43 4.39 4.33 4.33 4.33 4.32 4.29

Helpfulness of alumni network
Rank 1 2 3 4 5 5 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 13 15 15 17 18 19 20 Program Thunderbird Garvin Simmons School of Management Northwestern Kellogg Emory Goizueta Yale SOM University of Michigan Ross Cornell Johnson UVA Darden Duke Fuqua Harvard Business School University of Minnesota Carlson Penn State Smeal University of Chicago UNC Kenan-Flagler Stanford GSB UC Berkeley Haas USC Marshall Notre Dame Mendoza UPenn Wharton Bainbridge Graduate Institute 5 Pt Scale 4.67 4.60 4.51 4.50 4.48 4.48 4.42 4.38 4.37 4.20 4.17 4.14 4.13 4.13 4.12 4.12 4.07 4.00 3.95 3.93

Average

3.95

Average

4.25

Average

3.82

Programs with fewer than 5 survey responses were removed from the list. The Average includes the average of all programs, not just the programs included in the top 20. For sample size (n) for each school, please see page 106.

115 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Program Ratings

Strong in social enterprise
Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 10 10 10 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Program Duke Fuqua Bainbridge Graduate Institute UC Berkeley Haas Simmons School of Management Boston College Carroll Stanford GSB Presidio School of Management UNC Kenan-Flagler UC Davis Brigham Young Marriott Columbia Business School Notre Dame Mendoza York Schulich Cornell Johnson University of Michigan Ross Yale SOM University of Colorado Boulder Leeds Northwestern Kellogg Thunderbird Garvin UVA Darden 5 Pt Scale 4.97 4.92 4.87 4.80 4.75 4.71 4.68 4.65 4.53 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.48 4.46 4.45 4.44 4.40 4.33 4.29

Strong in environmental sustainability
Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 17 17 17 Program Bainbridge Graduate Institute Presidio School of Management University of Michigan Ross Cornell Johnson Yale SOM UNC Kenan-Flagler York Schulich University of Colorado Boulder Leeds Boston College Carroll Stanford GSB Simmons School of Management Duke Fuqua UC Berkeley Haas UC San Diego Rady UC Davis George Washington University Penn State Smeal University of British Columbia Sauder University of Minnesota Carlson Vanderbilt Owen 5 Pt Scale 4.96 4.94 4.84 4.72 4.68 4.65 4.63 4.61 4.25 4.24 4.20 4.18 4.15 4.14 4.11 4.08 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00

Average

4.28

Average

3.87

Programs with fewer than 5 survey responses were removed from the list. The Average includes the average of all programs, not just the programs included in the top 20. For sample size (n) for each school, please see page 106.

116 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Program Ratings

Strong in corporate social responsibility
Rank 1 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Program Bainbridge Graduate Institute Boston College Carroll UC Berkeley Haas Presidio School of Management Simmons School of Management University of Denver Daniels York Schulich UNC Kenan-Flagler University of Michigan Ross UC Davis Yale SOM Northwestern Kellogg Notre Dame Mendoza Stanford GSB University of Minnesota Carlson Cornell Johnson George Washington University Penn State Smeal UVA Darden Duke Fuqua 5 Pt Scale 5.00 5.00 4.94 4.81 4.80 4.67 4.63 4.47 4.45 4.37 4.32 4.27 4.25 4.24 4.17 4.16 4.15 4.14 4.10 4.09

Strong in community development
Rank 1 2 3 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 12 14 14 16 17 18 18 20 Program Bainbridge Graduate Institute Simmons School of Management Boston College Carroll Monterey Institute Fisher Duke Fuqua UNC Kenan-Flagler Yale SOM Presidio School of Management York Schulich UC Berkeley Haas UC Davis Northwestern Kellogg Cornell Johnson Brigham Young Marriott Notre Dame Mendoza Georgetown McDonough University of Michigan Ross Thunderbird Garvin University of Denver Daniels George Washington University 5 Pt Scale 4.63 4.60 4.50 4.50 4.42 4.41 4.40 4.31 4.13 4.08 4.05 4.04 4.04 4.00 4.00 3.92 3.89 3.78 3.78 3.77

Average

4.06

Average

3.72

Programs with fewer than 5 survey responses were removed from the list. The Average includes the average of all programs, not just the programs included in the top 20. For sample size (n) for each school, please see page 106.

117 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Program Ratings

Strong in international development
Rank 1 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 12 14 15 16 17 17 17 20 Program Brigham Young Marriott Monterey Institute Fisher Georgetown McDonough University of Denver Daniels Thunderbird Garvin University of Michigan Ross Cornell Johnson Harvard Business School George Washington University Bainbridge Graduate Institute McGill University UC Berkeley Haas York Schulich Stanford GSB MIT Sloan Yale SOM Columbia Business School UC San Diego Rady UPenn Wharton UNC Kenan-Flagler 5 Pt Scale 4.75 4.75 4.71 4.67 4.56 4.45 4.36 4.33 4.23 4.17 4.15 4.13 4.13 4.12 4.05 4.04 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.94

Strong in nonprofit management
Rank 1 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 19 Program Case Western Weatherhead Simmons School of Management Yale School of Management Bainbridge Graduate Institute Stanford GSB Duke Fuqua Monterey Institute Fisher Northwestern Kellogg York Schulich UC Davis UC Berkeley Haas Presidio School of Management University of Wisconsin Madison George Washington University University of Michigan Ross Harvard Business School Georgetown McDonough University of Denver Daniels Brigham Young Marriott Notre Dame Mendoza 5 Pt Scale 5.00 5.00 4.89 4.71 4.59 4.55 4.50 4.49 4.38 4.32 4.31 4.25 4.14 4.00 3.98 3.83 3.79 3.78 3.75 3.75

Average

3.80

Average

3.81

Programs with fewer than 5 survey responses were removed from the list. The Average includes the average of all programs, not just the programs included in the top 20. For sample size (n) for each school, please see page 106.

118 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Aggregate Responses

My program adequately prepares committed / interested students (e.g. Net Impact members) for ethical and socially responsible leadership

My program adequately prepares ALL students for ethical and socially responsible leadership

Disagree 3% Stronlgy disagree 1% Somewhat disagree 4% Neutral 7% Somewhat agree 16%

Stronlgy disagree 3% Strongly agree 17% Disagree 7% Somewhat disagree 8% Neutral 12%

Strongly agree 38%

Agree 26% Somewhat agree 27%

Agree 31%

N=1097

N=1096

119 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Aggregate Responses
Students at my program are ____________ about social/environmental themes in the curriculum Students at my program are ____________ about social/ environmental themes in extra-curricular events and activities

Unfriendly 1% Enthusiastic 26%

Unfriendly Indifferent 8% 1%

Indifferent 10%

Enthusiastic 37%

Receptive 21%

Receptive 28%

Supportive 35%

Supportive 33%

N=1099

N=1096

120 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Aggregate Responses
Faculty at my program are ____________ about social/environmental themes in the curriculum Faculty at my program are ____________ about social/ environmental themes in extra-curricular events and activities

Enthusiastic 25%

Unfriendly 1%

Unfriendly 0%

Indifferent 8%

Indifferent 9% Enthusiastic 27% Receptive 19%

Receptive 26%

Supportive 41%
N=1096 N=1087

Supportive 45%

121 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Aggregate Responses
Administration at my program are ____________ about social/environmental themes in the curriculum Administration at my program are ____________ about social/environmental themes in extra-curricular events and activities

Enthusiastic 26%

Unfriendly 1% Indifferent 10% Receptive 24%
Enthusiastic 34%

Unfriendly 0% Indifferent 8% Receptive 18%

Supportive 40%

Supportive 40%
N=1087

N=1091

122 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

Aggregate Responses

Alumni

Career Services

Fellow students

Not at all helpful 4% Very helpful 35%

Not very helpful 8%

Very helpful 29%

Not at all helpful 5% Not very helpful 9%

Not at all helpful 1%

Not very helpful 4% Somewhat helpful 17%

Somewhat helpful 26%

Somewhat helpful 28%

Very helpful 52%

Helpful 26%

Helpful 27%

Helpful 29%

N=852

N=879

N=880

123 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

124 Business as UNusual: The 2006 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs Content submitted by current students in spring 2006

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