by Ruth Isenberg

East Side Borough officials are
very pleased with the recent work
done through a Carbon County
grant. Street committee chair Rudy
Schoch praised the contractors dur-
ing the January 7 meeting, saying
“They did a wonderful job!” A pay-
ment to Luzerne County Site
Contractors for their work on the
project was among the bills
approved for payment.
Council chair John Marotta said
the next step was to fill in more
toward the building from the former
reservoir area that was filled.
Council has applied for a grant to for
this purpose and to finish upper
Washington Street.
Council was also pleased that
they’d adopted another balanced
budget with no tax increase for
2011. The budget adopted in
December totals $56,885 in the
general fund; $15,271.06 in the
Highway Aid Fund; $41,847 in the
Garbage Collection Fund; $45,440
in the Sewer Tapping Fee Account;
and $166,221.24 in the Sewer
Operation & Maintenance Fund for
a total budget of $325,664.30.
Council will act on the Judith
Blakey subdivision request at the
March meeting; a 90-day extension
had been granted.
The November report from the
White Haven Volunteer Fire
Company included one response to
a car fire on Interstate 80 in the bor-
ough.
A new Emergency Medical
Services run card was approved.
For Basic Life Support, Comm
Center will be directed to call White
Haven BLS first, then Weatherly
BLS, Freeland BLS, and finally Lake
Harmony BLS. For Advanced Life
Support, the order will be White
Haven Medic 22, Valley Regional
Medic 26, Plains Medic 2, and
APTs Medic 11. Mayor Gerald
Jones Jr. will deliver the information
to Carbon County Comm Center.
The mayor also noted that pine
trees near his home are causing
problems with snow plowing, and
said that plowing needed to be clos-
er to the berms of the road through-
out the town.
Zoning officer Richard Clause
was absent, but forwarded his
report, including one permit for a
home in advance of the requirement
for sprinkler systems in all new con-
struction.
GSP Management sent a new list
of tenants at Spring Hill Mobile
132
nd
YEAR, NO. 7 THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 2011 SINGLE COPY—50¢ (USPS 277440) 131
st
YEAR, NO. 33
VOL. 30, NO. 20
© 2011, JOURNAL NEWSPAPERS, INC. All Rights Reserved
THE JOURNAL-HERALD
THE JOURNAL-HERALD
CONTINUING:
THE WHITE HAVEN JOURNAL
ESTABLISHED 1879 INSIDE
CONTINUING:
THE WEATHERLY HERALD
ESTABLISHED 1880
Thursday, January 13
Joy Through Movement – 10:00
a.m. – W.H. United Methodist
Church
W.H. Lions Club Dinner Meeting –
6:30 p.m. – Sitkoʼs Barn Rest -
aurant
Foster Township Planning Com -
mis sion Meeting – 7:00 p.m. –
Township Municipal Building
Friday, January 14
W.H. Food Pantry – 11:00 a.m. to
Noon – Rear, Haven Hall, White
Haven Center
Free Community Lunch – Serving
11: 30 a.m. to Noon – St. Paulʼs
Lutheran Parish Hall
Saturday, January 15
Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting -
7:00 p.m. – St. Patrickʼs Parish
Center
Sunday, January 16
Marine Corps League Detachment
1039 Meeting - 1:30 P.M. – V.F.W.
Post 6615
Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting -
7:00 p.m. – Mountainview Com -
munity Church
Monday, January 17
Martin Luther King Legal Holiday
Free Community Lunch – Serving
11: 30 a.m. to Noon – St. Paulʼs
Lutheran Parish Hall
TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly)
Meeting – 5:45 p.m. - W.H. United
Methodist Church Social Hall
Dennison township Planning Com -
mission Meeting – 7:00 p.m. –
Town ship Municipal Building
Tuesday, January 18
Joy Through Movement – 10:00
a.m. – W.H. United Methodist
Church
W.H. Borough Planning Commis -
sion Meeting – 6:00 p.m. – Muni -
cipal Building
Wednesday, January 19
Yoga Class – 10:00 a.m. – St.
Paulʼs Lutheran Church
Alcoholics Anonymous. Meeting –
10:00 a.m. – Mountainview Com -
munity Church
Free Community Lunch – Serving
11: 30 a.m. to Noon – St. Paulʼs
Lutheran Parish Hall
W.H. Volunteer Ambulance Asso -
ciation Meeting – 7:00 p.m. –
Ambulance Building
AOH Meeting – 7:00 p.m. – V.F.W.
Post 6615
American Legion Post 592 Meeting
– 8:00 p.m. – Post Home
Thursday, January 20
Joy Through Movement – 10:00
a.m. – W.H. United Methodist
Church
W.H. Area Senior Citizens Meeting
– 1:00 p.m. – V.F.W. Post 6615
Kidder Township Board of Super -
visors Meeting –7:00 p.m. – Town -
ship Municipal Building
THIS WEEK IN WHITE HAVEN
by Clara R. Holder
Some of the more interesting
local events reported in The
Journal-Herald during 2010 are list-
ed here. PLEASE NOTE: This is not
a review of the year’s major events,
only of things noted in this paper,
and dates listed (unless specified
otherwise) are those of the publica-
tion, not of the events themselves.
CONTINUED FROM LAST
WEEK’S PAPER
JULY 1 – Gerald J. Fulk, an origi-
nal owner of Gerry & Mike’s
Nursery, Kidder Township, died at
the age of 79.
JULY 15 – Packer Township
Supervisors voiced support for
township resident Jim Dulcey’s
plans to keep his property un-devel-
oped, despite what he believed to
be pressure from some unnamed
members of Weatherly Area School
Board.
World War II and Korean Conflict
veteran John “Jay” Faust of Weath -
erly died at the age of 87. He had
been employed by the Hazleton
Standard-Speaker for 49 years,
retiring as production coordinator,
and was active in community affairs
including service as a member and
chairman of the former Weatherly
Municipal Authority.
Korean Conflict veteran and for-
mer Weatherly Borough Council
member Conrad Pfeiffer died at the
age of 80.
JULY 29 – White Haven Borough
Councilman Herbert Albee, 53, died
July 22 of injuries suffered four days
earlier in a motorcycle accident. He
was the owner of one of the town’s
oldest family businesses, Albee’s
Fuel Service & Trucking.
AUGUST 5 – Bear Creek
Township Supervisors held a meet-
ing at White Haven Poconos, where
they, residents and representatives
of the White Haven Fire Company
discussed mutual concerns.
Please turn to page A6
DRIFTS WERE THE ORDER OF THE DAY on Sunday in Packer Township and throughout the area, as
Saturday’s snow blew across area roads in sculpted patterns. Photo by Ruth Isenberg
by Donnell Stump
Two Weatherly women, Amy
Potsko and Georgeann Herling,
were selected to fill the unexpired
terms of Joanne Dougherty and
Gilbert Gerhard on the Weatherly
Area School Board when that body
met in special session on
Wednesday, January 5.
Board president John Toft Jr. nom-
inated Potsko, the nomination was
seconded by director Bonita L.
Urban and approved unanimously
by the board.
Potsko is the wife of George
Potsko and mother of Mackenzie
Sherman, a third-grade student at
Weatherly Area Elementary School.
She is an accountant employed by
Hazleton Shaft Corp., Stockton.
To fill the second vacant seat,
Urban nominated Herling, the nom-
ination received a second from
Director Edward “Skip” Snyder and
was also approved unanimously.
A Weatherly graduate with three
adult children who were also raised
in Weatherly, Herling is the daughter
of Ruth Anthony of Weatherly.
Herling is a licensed practical nurse
at the Weatherwood nursing home
in Weatherly.
Potsko and Herling
named to WASB
YEAR IN REVIEW
by Seth Isenberg
On Thursday afternoon, January
6, White Haven Police arrested 33
year old Carl Holliday for robbing
the PNC Bank, and the Rite Aid, last
month.
White Haven Police spent the last
few weeks speaking with area busi-
nesspeople and alerting residents
to look for suspicious activity.
On Thursday, businessman Henry
Straub, owner of Main St.
Coffeeworks, noticed a car much
like the one that was near the PNC
Bank during the last robbery. It was
parked parallel to the caboose, fac-
ing the bank, and had been there for
a long time. According to Police
Officer-in-Charge Tom Szoke,
Straub walked directly to the White
Haven Borough Municipal Building
in search of the police. (Szoke
thanks Henry for making the report.)
Szoke, who was on duty, set up
observation and called for backup.
Officer Gary Shupp, who was off
duty but on call, started his drive
from his home to the borough. At
some point during this time, Holliday
started his car and made a drive up
Towanda Street where he saw the
police cruiser. According to Szoke,
Holliday turned his car up
Susquehanna St. Szoke began to
follow up Cherry Street in the cruis-
er, while Shupp arrived at the top of
Susquehanna Street in his personal
car and started down the hill.
Holliday turned his car at Elmira
St. (toward James St.) and Szoke
blocked it with the cruiser. Shupp
then arrived to complete the box.
Holliday was then arrested without
incident.
White Haven Police, assisted with
information from the FBI’s Scranton
office, interviewed the man for sev-
eral hours. Toward the end of the
session, he began to confess. It
turned out that Holliday, a former
local policeman from south New
Jersey, had actually robbed six
banks, one of them twice – South
Whitehall, PA, north of Allentown;
Towamencin Township, PA near
Lansdale; and in south Jersey,
Harrison Township, Paulsboro, and
Millville – twice; plus the White
Haven PNC Bank. He also robbed
the White Haven Rite Aid.
Szoke added that Holliday, who
was divorced, was staying in a
White Haven Police
arrest bank robber
Please turn to page B1
Please turn to page A6
THIS WEEK IN
WEATHERLY
Thursday, January 13
Senior Citizens Friendship Club
Meeting – 1:30 p.m. – Salem
U.C.C.
Weatherly Area Community Li -
brary Board Meeting – 7:00 p.m. –
Library
Greater Weatherly Area Ambu -
lance Association Meeting – 7:30
p.m. – Ambulance Building
Saturday, January 15
“Inspire Your Heart With The Arts”
- 2:00 to 3:00 p.m. – Heritage Hill
Senior Community
WAHS Athletic Hall of Fame
Activities – Girls Basketball Game
at 1:00 p.m. – Buffet Dinner at
4:30 p.m. - Boys Basketball
Games at 6:00 p.m. – Weatherly
Area Schools Complex
Sunday, January 16
Childrenʼs Free Throw Contest,
sponsored by K of C Council
12105 -–1:00 p.m. – Eurana Park
Pavilion
Monday, January 17
Martin Luther King Legal Holiday
Turkey Dinner – 4:00 t0 7:00 p.m. -
Silver Ridge Hunting Club
Weatherly Borough Council
Meeting – 7:00 p.m. – Municipal
Building
Weatherly Area Chess Club – 7:00
p.m. – First Presbyterian Church
Wednesday, January 19
Weatherly Area PTA Meeting –
7:00 p.m. – W.A. Elementary/
Middle School Cafeteria
Weatherly Area Historical Com -
mission Meeting – 7:00 p.m. -
Weatherly Municipal Building
Thursday, January 20
Weatherly Rotary Foundation
Meeting – 9:00 a.m. – Weatherly
Municipal Building
Weatherly Rotary Club Dinner
Meeting – 6:30 p.m. – Weatherly
Country Inn
Weatherly Lions Club Meeting -
6:00 p.m.- Weatherly Borough
Building
East Side grant work
pleases borough officials
JOSEPH LENAHAN
Joseph P. Lenahan, Jr., 67,
of White Haven died Monday,
January 10, 2011 in Lehigh
Valley Hospital, Allentown.
A son of the late Joseph
and Miriam Byron Lenahan,
he was born in Philadelphia,
and had resided in the White
Haven area since 1966.
Prior to retirement he was
a self-employed barber for 49
years, and was the last per-
son to operate a barbershop
in White Haven.
He was a member of St.
Patrick’s R.C. Church of
White Haven and a Fourth
Degree Knight of its Knights
of Columbus Council 10616.
Surviving are his wife of 41
and a half years, the former
Carol Ann Perch; son and
daughter-in-law Joseph, III
and Terri Lenahan of White
Haven; daughters and sons-
in-law Rose Mary and Jeffrey
Fox of Freeland, Theresa and
Daniel Cook of Pottsville;
grandchildren Deanna,
Sarah, Andrew, Brooke,
Alyssa and Anna; sisters
Maureen Seftchick of
Pittsburgh, Miriam Cassidy of
Aston, Colleen Fox of
Doylestown, Sharon Lore of
Walnut Creek, Cal. and Claire
Dembinski of Pocono Pines;
nephews and nieces.
The funeral will be held
Friday at 9 a.m. from the
Joseph E. Lehman Funeral
Home, White Haven, with a
Mass of Christian Burial at
9:30 a.m. in St. Patrick’s R.C.
Church, celebrated by the
Rev. John McHale, pastor.
Burial will be private, at the
convenience of the family.
Friends may call at the
funeral home this evening
(Thursday) from 5 to 8 p.m.
Memorial Donations may
be made to St. Patrick’s R.C.
Church Building Fund, 411
Allegheny Street, or to White
Haven Area Community
Library, P.O. Box 57, both of
White Haven, PA 18661.
VICTOR MIKUS
Victor J. Mikus, 85, of RR2,
Weatherly died Sunday, Jan -
uary 9, 2011 in Weatherwood
Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center, Weatherly.
A son of the late Karol and
Helen Selecky Mikus, he was
born in New York City, N.Y.,
and was a U.S. Army veteran
of World War II. He was an
accomplished artist.
Surviving is his wife of 56
years, the former Anna
Maracek.
Private arrangements with
burial in Sky-View Memorial
Park, Hometown, are by the
Philip J. Jeffries Funeral
Home, Weatherly.
MILDRED BRIESE
Mildred D. Briese, 90, of
Weatherly died Friday, Jan -
uary 7, 2011 in Hazleton
General Hospital.
A daughter of the late
George and Lucy Hinkle
Heiney, she was born in
Weatherly and was a mem-
ber of Zions Evangelical
Lutheran Church of Weath -
erly and the Weatherly
Senior Citizens.
Prior to retirement she was
employed as a customer
service specialist for Sears
Roebuck in Hazleton.
Preceding her in death was
her husband, Alvin Martin
Briese, in 1993, and brothers
Harold and George Heiney.
Surviving are daughters and
son-in-law Bonnie and Donald
Gerhard of Warn ersville, and
Linda Briese, with whom she
resided; grandson Keith
Gerhard; sister Verna Gerhard
of Weath erly; companion Arthur
Mar tin Briese of Weatherly.
A memorial service was
held Wednesday from the
Philip J. Jeffries Funeral
Home, with Charles Engle -
hart officiating. Burial was in
Union Cemetery, Weatherly.
Memorial donations may
be made to Zions Evangelical
Lutheran Church, 335 Third
Street, Weatherly, PA 18255.
KAREN STEVENS
Karen R. Stevens, 64, of
Schnecksville died Friday,
January 7, 2011 in Blough
Health Center, Bethlehem.
A daughter of the late
Arthur and Dorothy Eckroth
Wetzel, she was born
October 26, 1946 in Hazle -
ton.
She was a member of
Union Evangelical Lutheran
Church of Schnecksville, and
prior to retirement was
employed as an administra-
tive assistant for the Diocese
of Allentown.
Preceding her in death was
her husband, Walter C.
Stevens.
Surviving are daughter and
son-in-law Laura and Kevin
Querio of Schnecksville; son
and daughter-in-law Chris -
topher and Elizabeth Stevens
of New Tripoli; grandchildren
Justin, Matthew and Scott;
sister and brother-in-law
Janet and Robert Graham of
Weatherly; brother and sis-
ter-in-law Charles and Mary
Ann Wetzel of Weatherly;
nieces and nephews.
The funeral was held
Tuesday from Union Evan -
gelical Lutheran Church with
the Rev. Dennis W. Moore
officiating. Burial was in
Heidelberg Union Cemetery,
Slatington.
Memorial donations maybe
made to the Diocese of
Allentown, c/o Heintzelman
Funeral Home, P.O. Box 196,
Schnecksville, PA 18078-
0196.
JOHN ZIMINSKY
John J. Ziminsky, 78, of
Albrightsville died Monday,
January 3, 2011 in Wilkes-
Barre.
A son of the late William
and Leona Miller Ziminsky,
he was born in White Haven
and was a 1950 graduate of
White Haven High School.
He was an active member
of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church
of Albrightsville, and served
on the church council. He
was a former Kidder Town -
ship Tax Collector and a for-
mer member of the township
zoning board.
Prior to retiring in 1997 he
owned and operated Gary L.
Ziminsky Excavating, Al -
brightsville, for ten years.
Before that he had worked for
J. E. Smith of Penn Forest
Township, and owned and
operated a bakery delivery
business for many years. He
had also worked as a truck
driver for his brother-in-law,
Homer Heimbach.
Preceding him in death
were son Gary Ziminsky,
brothers Edward and William
Ziminsky, and sister Elsie
Ziminsky.
Surviving are his wife of 58
years, the former LaRue
Heimbach; son John W.
Ziminsky of Albrightsville,
daughter Roseanne Ziminsky
of Lehighton; brother and sis-
ter-in-law Alvin and Minnie
Ziminsky of Florida; nephews
and nieces.
The funeral was held Fri -
day from St. Paul’s Lutheran
Church with the Rev. Douglas
Holtz officiating. Burial was in
the church cemetery.
Memorial donations may
be made to St. Paul’s Luth -
eran Church, P.O. Box 200,
Albrightsville, PA 18210.
NANCY DEISENROTH
M. Nancy Deisenroth, 80,
of Allentown died Monday,
September 27, 2010 in
Lehigh Valley Hospital, Allen -
town.
A daughter of the late
Harold and Manetta Sen -
senbach Teel of White Haven,
she was born October 5,
1929 in Wilkes-Barre. She
was a 1947 graduate of
White Haven High School.
Prior to retiring in 1971 she
was employed in the produc-
tion control department of
Mack Trucks, Allentown.
Preceding her in death was
her husband of 56 years,
Milton Deisenroth, who died
nine days earlier, on Sep -
tember 18.
Surviving are sister-in-law
Lamay Sensenbach of White
Haven and brother-in-law
Melvin Deisenroth of Allen -
town.
Arrangements were pri-
vate, at the convenience of
the family.
PAGE A2—THE JOURNAL-HERALD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 2011
THE JOURNAL-HERALD
(USPS 277-440) Published weekly at
211 Main Street, White Haven, PA 18661
Telephone (570) 443-8321
Subscription Price—$25 per year in Luzerne & Carbon Counties, Pennsylvania, payable in advance.
$30 per year elsewhere, payable in advance.
Publications postage paid at White Haven, PA 18661.
POSTMASTER, send address change to:
THE JOURNAL-HERALD
211 Main Street, White Haven, PA 18661
(JAY E. HOLDER, Co-Publisher 1954-1997)
Clara R. Holder, Publisher
Seth Isenberg, General Manager
Ruth Isenberg, Editor-in-Chief
Martha Searfoss, Office Manager
Donnell Stump, Assistant Editor
Christy Brady, Finance
Steve Stallone, Sports Editor
Heather Maslo, Production Manager
Member, White Haven Chamber of Commerce
Carbon County Chamber of Commerce
Pocono Mountains Chamber of Commerce
White Haven Economic Development Association
THE JOURNAL-HERALD is printed with U.S. made soy inks on part-recycled newsprint.
© Copyright 2011, Journal Newspapers, Inc.
Editorial
Death Roll
To the Editor,
I’ve been receiving your
paper since 1951 when I
married Allen “Bunny” Sear -
foss and we moved to
Bethlehem. He was a watch-
maker.
Bunny died in 1984.
I was Kathryn Christman
and my sister Hannah was
the cook for Mr. and Mrs.
Taylor. * . . . That goes back in
the 40s.
I have paintings that are
beautiful painted by Edward
E. Sensenbach. He was
Bunny’s grandfather. He
never took a lesson but
enjoyed painting.
He died in 1946.
Allen Searfoss, Bunny’s
father, died in 1960.
I have had the paintings
ever since . . . I’m 85 years old
now.
Mr. Sensenbach was a
Lehigh Valley railroad engi-
neer.
I would like to donate the
paintings to the library in
White Haven. They are very
pretty.
Who could I contact?
Sincerely,
Kathryn C. Poczak
Bethlehem
(Editor’s note - *They would
be Journal publisher Walter
Taylor and his wife, Maude.
We have contacted the
library about Mrs. Poczac’s
offer.)
To the Editor,
Please Stop the Madness
in Lehigh Township
Tuesday, January 4, 2011
There was an appeal hear-
ing in Jim Thorpe this morn-
ing and at least one more will
be necessary. Our supervi-
sors are trying to stop Paula
Hoffman from receiving
unemployment compensa-
tion after they replaced her
without giving cause. The
supervisors had contemplat-
ed replacing our secretary in
the beginning of the year
when they contacted Ms.
Lenahan. This was addres -
sed in the minutes of the April
meeting. Why was the gar -
bage bill collection contract-
ed out? Perhaps Ms. Lena -
han wouldn’t do it. So, Ms.
Hoffman was replaced and
granted unemployment com-
pensation by the state, but
the supervisors felt it would
be much better to spend our
money trying to stop it. So,
itemized expenses thus far:
Mr. Hludzik-arrival 8:30
a.m. for the 9:30 a.m. hearing
at $95/hr. The hearing ended
at 12:15 p.m. and a second
hearing will be necessary. Mr.
Hludzik is paid portal to por-
tal or from the time he leaves
home until he returns home
or to his office. A minimum
expenditure of $500.
Mr. Skinner & Mr. Wagner-
$12/hour plus 50 cents/ mile.
A minimum expenditure of
$90.
Wasn’t it bad enough that
the supervisors didn’t sup-
port Ms. Hoffman and Ms.
Strauss during 3 frivolous
lawsuits resulting from doing
their job as directed by the
supervisors and Mr. Hludzik?
Is this how we want our
money spent; on frivolous
lawsuits? Hasn’t there been
enough of that?
Please remember that this
money in the township cof-
fers is OUR money and some
day we may get the opportu-
nity to say how we want it
spent. In the meantime, the
goals for the township appear
to be SPEND, SPEND,
SPEND! Our General Fund
has diminished from approxi-
mately $200,000 to under
$100,000. We pay from $600
to $1,200/month for legal rep-
resentation at each monthly
meeting for a township of 525
residents, but the supervisors
will not stand behind our
employees when they’re
sued for doing their job!
Perhaps our township lead-
ers can show some fiscal
responsibility and loyalty to
our employees. That would
be a novel approach to run-
ning our township!
Happy New Year.
Myra Wolf Hoffman
Help make the snow go
by Ruth Isenberg
After a relatively calm and quiet, though cold, December,
January is turning into a season of snow. Our area isn’t being
hit quite as hard as our neighbors to the south, but we’re get-
ting enough of the white stuff to cause school delays and can-
cellations, and multiple traffic mishaps.
Everyone can help ease these weather woes. First and fore-
most, drive carefully. Even if you have good snow tires and
four-wheel drive, ice can appear in surprising places. And an
unfortunate number of drivers seem to think that driving an
SUV means they can go anywhere, in any weather, at any
speed. It’s not true. Slow down, and stay in control.
Sidewalks need to be shoveled. Too many people are wait-
ing for nature to clear their walks for them. That makes it hard
for walkers to get around without taking to the streets, where
they compete with drivers for space on roads made narrower
by snowbanks.
Those who do shovel must also help out. Please don’t throw
the snow from your sidewalks back out into the street. Pile it
in your yard, or to the side. And please be understanding of
the plow drivers. They aren’t plowing your driveway in deliber-
ately. In order to clear the streets, they need to keep the plows
down and keep moving.
Pay attention to alternate side of the street parking rules
and other special regulations for snow storms. Cooperation
will help get the streets cleared faster.
Most important, remember that this too shall pass. Spring is
on its way!
Reward
for Good Drivers!
IF YOU:
•have at least one car that is
less than 10 years old
•haven’t had an insurance claim or
a traffic violation for 3 years
•have an excellent credit history
•are currently insured with
Erie, State Farm, Prudential,
Allstate, Nationwide
(or any other insurance carrier)
pick up the telephone and call
Daniel H. Suitch
Insurance Agency, Inc.
Weatherly • White Haven
427-8011 • 443-7880
800-526-6425
Collect your reward in
lower insurance rates!
Letters Policy
The Journal-Herald welcomes letters to the editor.
Preference is always given to those on topics of local inter-
est, and obvious “form letters” are not published. The writer’s
name and telephone number must be included. No letter will
be published without the writer’s name; the phone number is
for our verification only, and will not be published. AND
PLEASE – If at all possible, type your letter. We do not refuse
handwritten submissions, but errors can occur with hard to
read scripts.
Letter to the Editor
PRAYER TO THE BLESSED VIRGIN
(Never known to fail)
Oh, most beautiful flower of Mt. Carmel, fruitful vine splendor of Heaven, Blessed Mother of the
Son of God. Immaculate Virgin, assist me in my necessity. Oh, Star of the Sea, help me and show
me, herein you are my mother. Oh, Holy Mary, Mother of God, Queen of Heaven and Earth! I
humbly beseech you from the bottom of my heart to succor me in this necessity. There are none
that can withstand your power. Oh, show me herein you are my mother. Oh Mary, conceived with-
out sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee (3x). Holy Mother, I place this cause in your hands
(3x). Holy Spirit, you who solve all problems, light all roads so that I can attain my goal. You who
gave me the divine gift to forgive and forget all evil against me and that in all instances in my
life you are with me. I want in this short prayer to thank you for all things as you confirm once
again that I never want to be separated from you in eternal glory. Thank you for your mercy
toward me and mine. The person must say this prayer 3 consecutive days. After 3 days, the
request will be granted. This prayer must be published after the favor is granted.
J.M.P.
Two little snowstorms made
for some challenging driving
Friday and Saturday. In both
cases, treatment and traffic
made roads safe. On Friday, it
took until about noon, and it
took until mid-morning on Sun -
day, except where wind was
blowing snow. There were piles
of blown snow all around where
we drove on Sunday afternoon.
As of this writing, we may get a
little more snow on Tuesday
into Wednesday—exciting, but
thank goodness, no blizzard.
Sunday, on our way to shop-
ping, we sighted a line of ducks,
making their deliberate way
from a wide, warm creek to the
back yard of a nearby house. I
was able to pull the truck over
to watch, and we learned the
object of their desire was a full
feeder, likely containing ducky
delights. It certainly drew a
crowd…of ducks, that is.
Also on our trip Sunday, we
passed a bed and breakfast
whose main distinguishing fea-
ture was the feature of four
Border Collies, outside in the
yard. Three had taken up posi-
tions guarding the door back
inside from the backyard, while
the fourth had gone out on
patrol, to check the perimeter
against intruders, perhaps.
On Friday evening I had a trip
to Lehighton to make, and
chose to take the Turnpike,
because it was faster. I didnʼt
know how much it would cost,
just that the prices had gone
up, so I figured Iʼd look at the
toll ticket. However, this was
when the tickets without price
information. I learned it would
cost $1.85 when I got off. It
used to cost 75¢ not so long
ago.
Saturday was devoted to our
attending the PA Farm Show in
Harrisburg. I had gassed up in
Lehighton, paying $3.07.9 per
gallon. We arrived mid-after-
noon, and made a beeline to
the food court. First stop was
the PA Livestock Association
stand for lamb stew for Ruth,
while I selected a nice bowl of
turkey chili from the PA Poultry
Producers, along with some red
beet and mustard eggs.
Fortified, we took a long walk
from one end of the show to the
other, viewing cattle being pre-
pared for show, and 4-Hers in
line to have their goats judged,
with the line behind them being
the first group for sheep judg-
ing. There were a lot of nervous
kids.
We witnessed an official talk-
ing to groups of the kids, getting
them ready, telling them to
smile, and to work to keep their
animals under control (“Four
hooves on the ground”) and to
have fun. Some of them looked
like they were having fun.
We made our way over to
where the Hershey cake judg-
ing was taking place. As we
have learned, at the proper
hour, judged cakes are shared
with the audience. We were
pleased to be able to sample
three small slices—one of
which we really liked!
From there was the butter
sculpture to admire, entries in
competitions are varied as mini-
landscapes, quilts, apples, can-
ning, wine and the most won-
derful apple pies (sadly only on
display, no samples). There
were a few minutes to be spent
watching the cooking competi-
tion; Ruth got a small cookbook
signed by one of the contest-
ants, the chef of the Water -
works Restaurant in Philadel -
phia. We also were able to
sample the dish they were
preparing, wagon wheel pasta
with wild mushroom sauce (it
was mushroom day). On our
way, we passed a beautiful dis-
play of mushrooms, including a
contest where mushrooms
were used to create a scene—
worth seeing, very clever.
Cutting back, we went
through the poultry room just
after they had judged the best
in show. There were all kinds of
chickens, some quite beautiful
and others quite ugly. For that
matter, there were a number of
types of turkey on display. I only
noticed that ducks were on dis-
play after hearing a cock-a-
doodle-doo followed up by a
quack-quack-quack. The ducks
were on a lower level of cages.
At this point we had walked
ourselves enough distance to
want to sit down for a while, and
so went to the large arena to
enjoy the rodeo, only to find it
full up. Eventually some of the
seats opened up, and we were
able to sit down and enjoy the
show. Once that wrapped up,
we grabbed a couple more
things to eat, of course a milk
shake from the PA Dairymen,
and a baked sweet potato from
the Potato Producers. Ruth
also bought some maple candy
from the PA Maple group. We
got cider to take home from the
Apple Growers, and the only
groups we missed were the
Honey Producers, the Vege -
table Growers and the Mush -
room Growers.
The 2011 Farm Showʼs daily
through Saturday. Admission is
free; parking is $10.
It was earlier than our norm
when we started our ride home,
which was a good thing,
because it started to snow, and
we needed to take our time,
because it eventually began to
accumulate. The dogs had
been in White Haven, and we
arrived there just as the snows
tapered off. Funny timing.
We tuned in to the Jets-Colts
football game long enough to
hear the Jets win. Their game
next week against the Patriots
could be a good one, or not.
On Sunday, we tuned in to
hear the Ravens win, and then
later listened as the Eagles lost.
That leaves me with the
Patriots to cheer for.
In our ride through the snow,
I had the radio on in order to
keep me alert, and remember
listening to AM stations in
Chicago and Hartford, and then
Boston, where WBZ was
broadcasting the Kim Koman do
Show, providing tech news to
feed our inner geek. I learn ed
something during her show.
On Sunday I drove by a sign
that said 20¢ off per gallon if
you bought a carwash at
Turkey Hill. Coming back in the
other direction a couple of
hours later, the gas gauge hov-
ering at E, I thought why not.
Our dark green truck was basi-
cally a shade of white from the
road salt. We filled up at a cost
of $3.11.9, less 20¢ per gallon,
and promptly spent it back on
the carwash—a much needed
carwash. Later that night, Ruth
had trouble finding our truck in
the parking lot because it was
actually clean.
We sighted a fox in our trav-
els, and also sighted a pair of
pheasants.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Dennison Township
Board of Supervisors will hold a
workshop meeting on Thursday,
January 20, 2011, at 4 p.m. in
the Dennison Township
Municipal Building, 76 Walnut
Street, White Haven, PA.
DENNISON TOWNSHIP
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the Dennison Township
Board of Supervisors intends to
appoint a certified or competent
public accountant or a firm of
certified or competent account-
ants to replace the elected audi-
tors and to make an examina-
tion of all the accounts of
Dennison Township for the 2010
fiscal year. The Dennison
Township Board of Supervisors
intends to make such appoint-
ment at a special meeting to be
held on Saturday, February 12,
2011, at 10:00 a.m. in the
Dennison Township Municipal
Building, 76 Walnut Street,
White Haven, Pa.
DENNISON TOWNSHIP
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that
the White Haven Zoning and
Hearing Board will hold a
Reorganization Meeting on
Thursday, January 13, 2011, at
5:30 p.m. in the White Haven
Municipal Building, 312 Main
Street, White Haven, PA.
This Pubic Notice was sub-
mitted on January 3, 2011 and
will appear in two consecutive
weekly issues of The Journal-
Herald as follows: January 6
and January 13, 2011. This is in
compliance with the
Pennsylvania Municipalities
Code as amended by Act 170 of
1988.
CATHY L. FULK
Secretary,
White Haven
Zoning and Hearing Board
1/6 & 13
LEGAL NOTICE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANDREW J. TROVITCH,
Deceased, late of the Borough
of Weatherly, County of Carbon,
and Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania.
Notice is hereby given that
Letters Testamentary have been
granted in the Estate of
Andrew J. Trovitch, Deceased,
who died on the 5th day of
December, 2010. All persons
having claims against the estate
are requested to make known
the same to the Executrix or the
attorney, and all persons indebt-
ed to the decedent to make pay-
ment without delay to:
Desiree Miller
755 North Street
Weatherly, PA 18255
or her attorney:
CYNTHIA S. RAY, ESQUIRE
121 Carbon Street
Post Office Box 49
Weatherly, PA 18255
1/13
PUBLIC NOTICE
The 2011 meeting schedule
for Weatherly Borough Council
is as follows:
WORKSHOP MEETINGS
February 16th
March 16th
April 13th
May 11th
June 15th
July 13th
August 10th
September 14th
October 12th
November 16th
December 14th
REGULAR MEETINGS
January 17th
February 21st
March 21st
April 18th
May 16th
June 20th
July 18th
August 15th
September 19th
October 17th
November 21st
December 19th
All meetings will be held at
7:00 P.M. in the Municipal
Building, 10 Wilbur Street.
Eloise E. Hinterleiter
Borough Secretary
THE JOURNAL-HERALD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 2011—PAGE A3
Seth’s Sightings by Seth Isenberg
Public Notices
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GROCERY
Libby’s Canned Vegetables 14.5-15 oz (assorted varieties) ......................44
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Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes 17 oz or Fruit Loops 12.2 oz ..................
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BAKERY
Heritage Fresh Baked Paczki Donuts 4 pk ..................................
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Speaker!
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GOLD CARD TODAY!
Having taken the oath of
office to begin her second term,
State Senator Lisa Baker says
the hard work of problem-solv-
ing needs to begin immediately.
“Dealing with the substantial
budget deficit is going to require
a lot of time and difficult choic-
es. But there are nu merous
matters, ranging from trans-
portation funding to juvenile jus-
tice reform, where re sponsible
agreement was not reached
under the Rendell Admini -
stration. These issues are auto-
matically part of the agenda,”
Baker said.
Baker kept her chairmanship
of the Senate Veterans Affairs
and Emergency Prepared ness
Committee. “This committee
serves some very important
consti tuencies – veterans, fire -
fighters, emergency re sponders
– and deals with significant
issues. It has been an active
and productive committee, in
terms of moving legislation,
holding public hearings, and
investigating problems, and that
will continue to be true in the
new session.”
“There are very few areas of
state government that will be
off-limits as we search for sav-
ings and cost cuts to deal with
an enormous multi-billion dollar
budget deficit. But we cannot in
good conscience cut corners on
the services and care promised
to Pennsylvaniaʼs veterans. I
feel strongly on this point – they
did their duty, and now it is time
for us to meet our obligations,”
she added.
In her role as part of the
Corbett transition team, Baker
has submitted recommenda-
tions for overhauling and redi-
recting the stateʼs homeland
security effort.
Legislative and community
debate over the economic ben-
efits and environmental conse-
quences of natural gas drilling in
the Marcellus Shale is ongoing.
“New regulations have help ed,
but that is not the full answer.
We have to find a way to reach
agree ment on getting money to
protect communities and the
environment from the ef fects of
natural gas drill ing,” she stated.
Baker will reintroduce bills to
implement recommendations
from the Interbranch Commis -
sion on Juvenile Jus tice.
The Senate is likely to take
early action on a package of
reform bills that died in the
House last session. The change
of leadership in the House
improves the prospects for
reform pro posals becoming law.
Senator Baker outlines priorities for second term
Send information about your
organization’s events to:
journalnews@pa.metrocast.net
or call 443-9131 xt304
for the editor.
Senator Baker is joined by her husband Gary, and their son
Carson, after being sworn-in to serve a second term represent-
ing the 20th Senatorial District.
On January 9, 2011, in Pennsylvania Supreme Court Chief
Justice Ronald D. Castille’s Chambers, Superior Court Judge
Correale Stevens (center) was sworn in as Superior Court
President Judge by Chief Justice Castille. Brittany Stevens
holds the Bible for her father. Stevens was elected to a five-
year term as President Judge beginning January 9.
Journal deadline is always 5 p.m. Monday.
Incubator at Farm Show.
A fine feathered entry.
Penn State University
Jacey Lynn Hallock has
attained the Dean’s List at
Penn State University, State
College, where she is study-
ing secondary education with
a major in history. On Sunday,
January 9, she left for
Barcelona, Spain, to continue
her spring semester under
International Educational
Studies until the end of May.
She is the daughter of
Joseph and Lee Mary
Hallock of White Haven.
Luzerne County
Community College
Michael Murphy, Jr., son of
Deborah Murphy of White
Haven and Michael Murphy,
has attained a 4.0 average at
Luzerne County Community
College. His major is Motor
Sports Technology.
Lock Haven University
Lock Haven University has
released the names of stu-
dents who achieved Dean’s
List recognition for the Fall
2010 semester. The Dean’s
Honor List, prepared at the
end of each semester, recog-
nizes those students who
have achieved academic dis-
tinction. To qualify for the
Dean’s List, the student must
have earned a GPA of at
least 3.5 in 12 hours of letter
grades.
Dr. David L. White, dean of
the College of Arts and
Sciences, and Dr. Thomas C.
Ormond, dean of the College
of Education and Human
Services, praised the stu-
dents’ commitment to aca-
demic achievement and
noted the discipline and hard
work required to qualify for
the Dean’s List.
Local students named to
the Fall 2010 Lock Haven
University Dean’s List are:
Sophomore Kirk J. Datz , a
resident of Freeland, study-
ing Exploratory Studies.
Sophomore Jeffrey P.
Lesko , a resident of Weath -
erly, studying Sport Admini -
stration.
Senior Matthew T. Palko , a
resident of Freeland, study-
ing Sport Administration.
York College
of Pennsylvania
Haley Mahon of Weatherly,
a junior Criminal Justice
major, has been named to
the Dean’s List for the Fall
2010 semester at York
College of Pennsylvania.
To be eligible for this honor,
a student must be registered
for at least 12 academic cred-
it hours and earn a semester
GPA of 3.50 or higher.
King’s College
Dr. Nicholas A. Holodick,
vice president for academic
affairs at King’s College,
recently announced the stu-
dents who have qualified for
the Fall 2010 dean’s list.
Named to the list from
White Haven were Molly
Brown, Michael Deegan, Eric
Grego, Catherine Grey, Lorrie
Gruner, Zachary Plescia, and
Jason Wheeler.
PAGE A4—THE JOURNAL-HERALD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 2011
DEAN’S LIST DIRECTORY
Accidentally
Acid
Adding
Aid
Any
Arts
Ate
Awe
Be
By
Caring
Classificatio
n
Coin
Die
Dim
Do
Duke
Dyed
Each
Ear
Echo
Egg
Elf
Entire
Family
Fern
Fool
Full
Gallons
Go
Guy
Had
Harm
Has
He
Hill
Him
Hit
Hook
Icy
Improve
Issue
Items
Its
Lad
Led
Lies
Line
Loom
Low
Male
Mast
Mat
Meals
Men
My
Nails
Nets
No
Of
Ordinarily
Our
Owe
Own
Pay
Pray
Rag
Ran
Red
Reed
Retreat
Run
Satisfaction
Scraps
Seal
See
Show
Shy
Slid
Steak
Sums
Symbol
Tell
Top
Toss
Trap
Try
Tub
Typewriters
Up
Us
Weak
Wet
Yoga
What Time Is It?
The answer to that question depends upon where you are in the world. At
midday in Chicago, your watch might read 12 p.m., Friday, January 15, 2010,
whereas in Sydney, Australia, it would read 5 a.m., Saturday, January 16, 2010.
The difference in time around the world has to do with the International
Date Line and time zones. The International Date Line is an imaginary line in
the middle of the Pacific Ocean that divides the earth into two days. Generally
places in the eastern hemisphere are a day ahead of places in the western
hemisphere.
Earth is divided into time zones. The United States has several, including
Eastern, Central, Mountain and Pacific Standard Time. Generally, the farther west
the area, the earlier in the day it is. At 7 p.m. Central Time in Chicago, it is 6 p.m.
Mountain Time in Denver and 5 p.m. Pacific Time in Los Angeles.
A n s w e r s : 1 ) F a c t , 2 ) F i c t i o n , e v e r y f o u r y e a r s , a L e a p Y e a r t a k e s p l a c e a n d F e b r u a r y h a s 2 9 d a y s ,
3 ) F i c t i o n , N o v e m b e r h a s j u s t 3 0 d a y s , w h e r e a s o t h e r m o n t h s h a v e 3 1 , 4 ) F a c t , 5 ) F i c t i o n , s e v e n
m o n t h s h a v e 3 1 d a y s , 6 ) F a c t , 7 ) F i c t i o n , J u n e h a s j u s t 3 0 d a y s , w h i l e J u l y a n d A u g u s t h a v e 3 1 d a y s ,
8 ) F i c t i o n , M a r c h h a s 3 1 d a y s , w h i l e A p r i l a n d S e p t e m b e r h a v e 3 0 , 9 ) F a c t , 1 0 ) F a c t
List 10 words that rhyme with “time.” 1. ______________
2. ______________ 3. ______________ 4. ______________
5. ______________ 6. ______________ 7. ______________
8. ______________ 9. ______________ 10. _____________
S o m e a n s w e r s : c h i m e , c r i m e , d i m e , g r i m e , I ’ m , l i m e , m i m e , p r i m e , r h y m e , s l i m e
Years are divided into 12 months, January through
December. Some months are shorter than others. Do you
know how many days are in each month? Take this quiz
and find out.
1) February is the shortest month of the year. Fact or Fiction?
2) There are only 28 days in February. Fact or Fiction?
3) November is the longest month of the year. Fact or Fiction?
4) There are more months with 31 days than 30. Fact or Fiction?
5) Eight months have 31 days. Fact or Fiction?
6) Four months have 30 days. Fact or Fiction?
7) June and July have 31 days, Fact or Fiction?
8) March, April and September have 30 days. Fact or Fiction?
9) May and October have 31 days. Fact or Fiction?
10) January and December have 31 days. Fact or Fiction?
Fact or Fiction?
Month Challenge
Unsteady Steps
1
14
17
20
23
30
39
43
51
59
63
66
69
2
31
52
3
32
53
4
24
27
47
5
21
48
18
40
44
64
67
70
6
15
28
33
54
60
7
25
45
49
8
34
41
61
9
26
29
50
55
22
42
46
68
71
10
16
19
35
65
11
36
56
62
12
37
57
13
38
58
ACROSS
1. Headquartered
6. Lovers' skirmish
10. One "36" of 36-
24-36
14. Prefix with
physicist
15. Dinghy propellers
16. 440-yard-long
path, perhaps
17. Lloyd Price #1 hit
of 1959
19. Turkey's monetary
unit
20. Peppermint Patty,
to Marcie
21. Billionaire Bill
22. What "i.e." stands
for
23. "__ the money ..."
25. Part of a ship
above the water
line
27. Atlas enlargement
29. Atom with a
charge
30. Maya Angelou's
"Still __"
33. Pain-in-the-you-
know-what
35. Euphoric feeling
39. "The Satanic
Verses" author
Salman
41. Mortarboard
attachments
43. Teamster's rig
44. Sign away
46. Ribbed fabric
47. Bill, the "Science
Guy"
49. Met performance
51. Useless member
of an entourage
55. President Zachary
59. Chemically
nonreactive
60. Social justice org.
62. Clark's
"Mogambo"
costar
63. Push a pawn
64. Chorus director's
sounders
66. Garfield's pal
67. Gibson of oaters
68. Three-time
Wimbledon
winner Chris
69. "Miss Peach"
cartoonist Lazarus
70. Concerning,
legally speaking
71. Formation at a
river's mouth
DOWN
1. Low man at the
Met
2. John of "The
Addams Family"
3. Blank look
4. Bit of work
5. Dad-blasted
6. Put into piles
7. Portrait painter's
handful
8. Joe Cocker's "You
__ Beautiful"
9. Mao __-tung
10. Dominating
11. Like Wrigley
Field's walls
12. Dissect
grammatically
13. Mattress supports
18. Huskers' units
22. Prefix with thermal
or metric
24. Line holder
26. Gyro bread
28. Pointless Olympic
event?
30. Apr. addressee
31. Feel remorse
about
32. Doctrine
34. Interval from C to
D, musically
36. Waikiki souvenir
37. Right-angle bend
38. Immigrant's subj.
40. Torte topper
42. Hard up for dough
45. Contributor to a
cause
48. To this point
50. Inscribe indelibly
51. Sidelines TV
greeting
52. Battery terminal
53. "On the Beach"
penner Shute
54. Vidalia or
Bermuda
56. Place for a
squirting flower
57. Open to view
58. Jamaican cultist
61. Entr'__ (play
break)
64. Honor society
letter
65. "__ been had!"
American Profile Hometown Content 1/9/2011
Answers on Page B6
Answers on
page B6
© 2009 Hometown Content
Sudoku Puzzle #2053-M
Medium
1 2 3
4 5 6 7
5 3 8
7 3 5 1 6
6 2
8 2 4 9 5
9 8 1
5 2 6 3
7 9 4
© 2009 Hometown Content
Sudoku Puzzle #2053-D
Difficult
1 2 3
1 4 5
6 7 1
1 3 8 4
5 6
4 8 9 2
4 9 8
3 5 7
2 8 3
SUDOKU INSTRUCTIONS: Each row, column and 3x3 grid must contain
all the numbers 1 through 9, with no repeats.
Brandon Hinkle, son of Jim
and Dorothy Breslosky,
Weatherly, and grandson of
John and Dorothy Hinkle,
Weatherly, has been named
Senior of the Month for
December at Weatherly Area
High School.
He has been the captain of
the boys’ soccer team for two
years, and he is active in
Hazleton’s local hockey pro-
gram. For his graduation proj-
ect, Brandon coordinated
and ran a summer soccer
camp for 6th, 7th and 8th
graders, and he has been
chosen as the recipient of
this year’s Schuylkill League
Soccer Scholar Athlete
award.
Hinkle is also involved in
the Learn and Serve grant,
which brings technology to
the residents of Heritage Hill,
and he is a student corre-
spondent for the Standard
Speaker’s School Times col-
umn, for which he submits
news items for the school on
a weekly basis. In addition to
school-related activities, he
enjoys working outdoors with
his grandfather in the sum-
mer, and fishing with his dad.
Sponsors for the month of
December are Weatherly
Casting & Machine Company
and Delrose Awards.
Brandon Hinkle is December
Student of the Month
JOURNAL PUZZLES
Send information
about your
organization’s events
to: journalnews@
pa.metrocast.net
or call 443-9131
xt304 for the editor.
AMUSEMENTS
On January 7, attorney
Joseph Matika of Lehighton
announced that he is a candi-
date for Judge of the Carbon
County Court of Common
Pleas.
Matika, 48, is a partner in
the law firm of Velitsky and
Matika of Summit Hill, has
been an attorney in the coun-
ty for over 22 years. He has
extensive experience in civil
court with over 3,000 clients,
and as an Assistant District
Attorney for Carbon County
since 1994, prosecuting over
1,000 cases. He has also
been a court-appointed
Arbitrator for 22 years. He is
solicitor for a number of
boards, associations and bor-
oughs in southwest Carbon
County.
He is married to Jeanine
Lee (Erdman) Matika of
Weatherly. They have four
children, ages 20 to 2.
He is seeking to fill the
vacancy on the court due to
the passing of Judge David
Addy last April.
More information about
attorney Matika is at
www.matikaforjudge.com. His
campaign also has a
Facebook page.
Matika announces candidacy
for judge in Carbon County
Attorney Joseph Matika, left, announces that he is a can-
didate for Carbon County Judge at his home in front of
supporters and family.
State Sen. John Yudichak
has been appointed Demo -
cratic Chairman of the Se -
nate Environmental Resourc -
es and Energy Committee.
Yudichak said the commit-
tee assignment is an oppor-
tunity to protect Pennsyl -
vanians from repeating the
mistakes of the past while
developing the economy of
the future.
“Everyone in Northeastern
Pennsylvania knows that
we’re still suffering with – and
paying for – the last energy
boom,” Yudichak said. “If we
learn well and act prudently,
we can protect our waterways
while growing the job market,
and creating new jobs in
clean-energy industries.
“We are slowly emerging
from one of the worse eco-
nomic recessions in our his-
tory. But in our haste to cre-
ate new jobs and economic
activity, we can’t run
roughshod over the land and
water. Future generations
should not have to pay for
carelessness today.”
Yudichak was also tapped
to serve on the Appro -
priations committee, which
he said will be very critical in
the upcoming session. He will
also serve on the Aging and
Youth, Vet erans Affairs and
Emergency Preparedness,
Policy and Local Government
committees.
Yudichak named Democratic Chair of
Environmental/Energy Committee
The Village Squire
Route 115, just south of
Blakeslee Corners
by Seth Isenberg
A meal out after a busy day
was just the thing to cap a
nice weekend. It was after 7
when we rolled in to the
Village Squire restaurant's
parking lot off of Route 115 in
Blakeslee. Our timing was
excellent, in that the table
nearest the gas fireplace was
open. Ruth promptly took a
seat closest to the heat, while
I chose one facing the road,
and then decided it was
warmer on the other side of
the table and moved there.
Having checked out the
specials blackboard, we had
an idea of what we wanted
for dinner, but listened to our
server, just in case she had
something extra to add. It
was Prime Rib special night,
and I selected the 12 oz.
English Cut for $12.95. Ruth
also chose a special,
cheese-stuffed rigatoni with a
sauce of sundried tomatoes,
feta cheese and spinach,
$15.95. Both entrées came
with a choice of soup or
salad; each of us chose
salad.
But first, we ordered an
appetizer of steamed mus-
sels in a basil, garlic, white
wine sauce, $6.95. Seven
plump, juicy mussels were
served in their shells, swim-
ming in a bowl of pale green
sauce. We needed extra of
the warm crispy whole wheat
rolls just to sop up the broth.
(This dish is also available
with red Marinara sauce, and
as an entrée.)
Ruth was sipping a glass of
Merlot, $6.50, while I con-
tented myself with a refillable
Diet Pepsi with a slice of
lemon, $2.95.
Our entrées were attrac-
tively served—and large. The
prime rib was a perfect medi-
um, as ordered. It was a thick
cut, juicy and flavorful. The
baked potato I chose as my
side dish was a good accom-
paniment with just a bit of the
sour cream served on the
side. Mixed vegetables were
perfectly steamed, still crisp
and very flavorful.
Ruth's plate was crowded
with flat, hollow pasta. Inside
each tube was a ricotta filling,
smooth and creamy. On top
was a wonderful combination
of sweet sundried tomatoes,
rich garlic and slightly salty
feta. The patches of dark
green spinach dressed up
the plate and provided a
pleasing contrast to the rich
sauce. Though the dish was
filling, she ate all of it, except
for a few tastes for me.
We weren't planning on
dessert. But our server
brought a tray filled with
appealing choices, so we
split a slice of very good
caramel-apple cheesecake,
$4.25. Ruth enjoyed a cup of
coffee as well, and we sat
and relaxed, and studied
some of the bits of local his-
tory displayed throughout the
room.
Others were enjoying as
well. One family of skiers was
finishing dinner. Another
group arrived straight from
the slopes to enjoy the hospi-
tality of the friendly bar in the
Charles Dickens Pub. It was
a beautiful cold snowy night
in the Poconos, and we were
all in just the right spot to
enjoy it.
The Village Squire is
closed on Mondays. Credit
cards are accepted, and
there's plenty of free parking.
Phone: 646-3446
villagesquirerestaurant.com
THE JOURNAL-HERALD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 2011—PAGE A5
Dining Out
JANUARY 15, Saturday –
“Inspire Your Heart With The
Arts,” sponsored by Heritage
Hill Senior Community,
Weath erly
JANUARY 15, Saturday –
Hall of Fame Festivities (Din -
ner, Basketball Games & In -
duction), sponsored by
Weath erly Area High School
Athletic Hall of Fame Com -
mittee
JANUARY 16, Sunday –
Children’s Free Throw Con -
test, sponsored by Knights of
Columbus Council 12105,
Weatherly
JANUARY 17, Monday –
Turkey Dinner, sponsored by
Silver Ridge Hunting Club,
Weatherly
JANUARY 22, Saturday –
Spaghetti Supper, sponsored
by Christ Church UCC,
Conyng ham
JANUARY 29, Saturday –
Winter Carnival, sponsored
by American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 360, Weatherly
JANUARY 29, Saturday –
Souper Bowl Soup Sale,
sponsored by Christ Luth -
eran Church, Conyngham
JANUARY 30, Sunday –
Pre Souper Bowl Party, spon-
sored by Mountain Top Elay
For Life Team
FEBRUARY 4, Friday –
Clothing Giveaway, spon-
sored by Freeland Presby -
terian Church (continuing
first Friday of every month)
FEBRUARY 6, Sunday –
Breakfast, sponsored by
Marine Corps League Det.
1039 at St. Patrick’s Parish
Center, White Haven
FEBRUARY 6, Sunday –
Breakfast, sponsored by
Albrightsville Volunteer Fire
Company
FEBRUARY 13, Sunday –
Breakfast, sponsored by
Silver Ridge Hunting Club,
Weatherly
MARCH 17, Thursday –
Ham & Cabbage Supper,
sponsored by Presbyterian
Church of White Haven
APRIL 14, Thursday –
Spaghetti Supper, sponsored
by Presbyterian Church of
White Haven
MAY 27 & 28, Friday &
Saturday – Flea Market,
sponsored by Presbyterian
Church of White Haven
SEPTEMBER 15, Thurs -
day – Chicken & Waffle Sup -
per, sponsored by Presby -
terian Church of White Haven
OCTOBER 13, Thursday –
Pork & Sauerkraut Supper,
sponsored by Presbyterian
Church of White Haven
NOVEMBER 5, Saturday –
Holiday Bazaar, sponsored
by Presbyterian Church of
White Haven
This column is open to all
organizations in the Weath -
erly, White Haven, Freeland,
Albrightsville, Blakeslee,
Conyngham/Drums, Lake
Har mony & Mountain Top
areas. If your organization is
planning a fund-raising activ-
ity, or other special event
open to the public, you may
have it listed by calling 443-
9131. There is no charge for
this service.
Coming Events
Week of January 17:
Monday: Pork & sauerkraut, mashed potatoes, whole-
wheat roll, spiced apples.
Tuesday: Baked chicken, brown rice, chuck wagon corn,
corn bread, fruit cocktail.
Wednesday: Batter dipped fish, pierogies, broccoli salad,
sandwich roll, apricots.
Thursday: Baked ham, parsley potatoes, lima beans, rye
bread, peach cobbler, tortilla chips.
Friday: Tomato soup, shepherd’s pie, lettuce wedge with
bleu cheese, whole-wheat bread, banana cake.
SENIOR CENTERS MENU
Grilled Cheese. Tomato Soup Team Up For Creative Kitchen Fun
6KDULQJ+RPHWRZQ5HFLSHV&RRNLQJ7LSVDQG&RXSRQV
H
ere`s a wonderIul example oI what happens when
you indluge a taste Ior classic favors and a love oI
kitchen creativity. Both dishes are hearty enough to serve
on their own. but pairing them up is doubly satisIying.
These recipes are so solid that they can easily hold up to
experimenting. too.
See step-by-step photos oI Vail Bee`s Grilled Cheese
and Tomato Soup recipe and thousands more recipes Irom
other hometown Americans at:
www.justapinch.com/grilledcheese
You`ll also fnd a meal planner and coupons Ior the recipe
ingredients. Enioy and remember. use 'iust a pinch...
www.justapinch.com/grilledcheese
What You Need
FOR SOUP:
3 tbsp butter
1 sm yellow onion. chopped
1 md carrot. diced
1 stalk celery. diced
2 cans crushed tomatoes
2 cloves garlic. minced
1 bay leaI
1/4 c Iresh basil. chopped
6 sprigs parsley
4 c vegetable stock
1/2 tsp dried thyme
1/2 c heavy cream
salt and pepper to taste
FOR SANDWICHES:
1 loaI sliced sourdough
sliced Iontina
sliced gruyere
sliced aged cheddar
sliced manchego
butter
Directions
· SOUP: Melt 2 tbsp oI butter in
large pot and sautee onion. garlic
and celery until soIt.
· Add tomatoes. parsley. carrots.
bay leaI and stock. Bring to a boil
and immediately reduce heat to a
MY Grilled Cheese
and Tomato Soup
simmer and cover the pot.
· Skim the top oI any Iat or Iroth. iI
desired. Remove parsley and bay
leaI and blend the soup in batches
oI 2 cups or so. Move blended soup
to another pot.
· Once everything is blended and
in the new pot. add heavy cream.
thyme. basil. and 1 tbsp butter.
Season to taste with salt and pepper.
NOTE: Keeps well in the Iridge.
· SANDWICHES: Butter one side
oI each slice oI bread. Put an even
amount oI slices oI each type oI
cheese on halI oI the bread slices.
Top each with second bread slice to
Iorm your sandwiches.
· Grill on a fat pan. or use panini
press or personal-size grill Ior about
5-7 minutes.
· Dip sandwich in soup and
enioy!!Grill on a fat pan. or use
panini press or personal-size grill
Ior about 5-7 minutes.
· Dip sandwich in soup and enioy!!
Submitted by: VaiI Bee, Orange County, CA (Pop. 3,026,786)
'Seriously one
of my favorite
things to make
AND eat! It's
good for any
time of year,
picnic in the
summer or
next to a fire in
the winter."
Vail Bee
Orange County, CA
(Pop. 3,026,786)
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The White Haven Chapter
TOPS meeting began at 6:15
p.m. on Monday, and the
members said the pledge.
Dona, weight recorder,
gave the report and an -
nounced Bernadette to be
the Chosen Achiever.
The no-nos for January are
chips and French fries.
The program for the even -
ing was “Seven Small Chang -
es to Keep Pounds Off.”
Members participated in light
exercises and were encour-
aged to make good use of TV
time to do them to strengthen
their muscles.
At the January 17 meeting,
Shelly will led the program.
Open House will be held
January 24.
Our theme for this year is
The Road to SUCCESS.
Mem bers will pick a target
destination at which to arrive
by the last weigh-in of De -
cember. Then, we will pick a
short road trip that heads us
in the right direction for the
current month. Each selects
the tools needed, the dis-
tance to travel, and the per-
sonal reward waiting when
the month’s destination is
met. These are some of the
great ideas we have going on
for our New Year Road Trip.
Plan on attend Open
House and you will be on you
way!
Please join us. Meetings
are Mondays, 5:30 to 7 p.m,
at the United Methodist
Church Social Hall, White
Haven.
Weatherly Country Inn
RES TAURANT & CATERI NG
570-427-8550
Located 6 Miles from White Haven, 1 Mile from County Home in
Weatherly on Lehigh Gorge Drive (Weatherly-White Haven Highway)
Open Tues.-Sat. 4–10 p.m. Reservations Suggested!!
n
Open Valentine’s Day! Open Valentine’s Day!
Monday 5-8 p.m.
Regular Menu plus
Special Dinners for Two
Specials also available Saturday
Closed Sunday
Wrecker
shirts for sale
The Weatherly Area PTA
has Orange and Black Tie-
Dye T-shirts available for
sale. “Weatherly Wreckers” is
screen printed in white on
the front of each shirt. The
shirts come in Adult and
Youth sizes and long and
short sleeve. Long sleeve
shirts are $18 and short
sleeve shirts are $14. The
shirts will be available for
sale at the January 19 PTA
meeting or anyone interest-
ed in purchasing a shirt can
contact PTA president Tara
Bresnak at 443-5726 or any
PTA officer.
Serving Dinner 5 p.m.-9 p.m. • Call For Daily Specials 443-8359
FRIDAY, JANUARY 14
5-9 p.m.
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT SPECIAL
Stuffed Flank Steak
with mashed potatoes, vegetable & dessert.
Adult:
$
9.25 Child:
$
6.25
SATURDAY, JANUARY 15
5-9 p.m.
16 oz. New York
Strip Steak
with baked potato & vegetable
$
17.95
EAST SIDE INN
Route 940, East of White Haven
All Specials are In-House Only.
EVERY SUNDAY–
Joe’s Cheesesteak
w/fresh cut fries–$6
.95
5-9 p.m. in house only.
TUESDAY NIGHT—6-9 p.m.
Wings 30¢ each in-house,
35¢ each to go—10 Sauces!
Peel & Eat Shrimp
1/2 lb.–$6 • w/Fries–$7
.95
EVERY WEDNESDAY–
Spaghetti & Meatballs,
w/salad & garlic bread–$5
.95
THURSDAY NIGHT—6:30-?
Clams........$1
.50
/Dozen
Pints..........$1
.50
Each
EVERYDAY–
EARLY BIRD DINNER SPECIAL
3-5 p.m.
WE ARE NOW A WI-FI HOT SPOT
Journal deadline is always
5 p.m. Monday.
RICHARD M.
HUGHES, III
Attorney
-At-
Law
40 North Mountain Blvd.
Mountaintop, PA 18707
(570) 474-7242
Offering
Comprehensive
Legal Services
TOPS NEWS
I Portraits I Family Photography
I Seniors & Children I Engagement
IWedding & All Occasions
Call and ask about our Winter Specials.
Forum Photography... when quality counts!
Tel. 570.788.8057
www.ForumPhotographyInc.com
Home Park. Marotta noted
that there were quite a few
vacancies at present.
East Side Borough would
be the host community for a
grant the Mountain Laurel
Golf Course has applied for. If
approved, the $1.5 million
would be used to extend
sewer and water lines to the
property.
Council voted to name Meri
Jones, wife of Mayor Jones,
to the Planning Commission,
and to re-appoint Steve
Pompella to the Zoning
Hearing Board.
Present at the meeting
were council members
Elizabeth Berger, Helen
Jones, Marotta, Sharon
Mrozinski, Schoch and Helen
Stockinger; Mayor Jones;
solicitor James Nanovic; sec-
retary/treasurer Carol
Lenahan and this reporter.
Council member Francis
Becker was absent. The next
meeting is Thursday,
February 3 at 7 p.m.
PAGE A6—THE JOURNAL-HERALD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 2011
East Side…
Continued from page A1
by Seth Isenberg
White Haven borough
council named Patsy Shel -
hamer to fill the vacancy left
by the death of Steve Draus
in late December during
council’s January 11 regular
meeting from a list of candi-
dates that included Barry
Drasher, Fred Meier, and
Pete Swerdon, all present,
and George Madigan and
Shelhamer, both absent.
Katie O’Donnell nominated
Shelhamer. Linda Szoke
nominated Drasher. Harvey
Morrison, O’Donnell, Marge
Reilly and Bob Spadell voted
for Shelhamer, and Szoke
added her name to make it
unanimous. Joe Knowles was
absent.
Swerdon asked council to
enforce the sidewalk ordi-
nance – sidewalks are to be
shoveled within 24 hours of a
snow. Properties on both
sides of his have not shov-
eled yet this winter, he said.
This led to a discussion of the
parking rules during snows,
in that cars must move to aid
plowing. Those that are not
will now get ticketed, and
then towed out of the way.
Spadell, who is chairman of
the Streets Committee, noted
that people will watch the
plows pass, but not move
their cars.
Spadell was also officially
added to the plow list. He was
asked if there were enough
drivers on the list. “I think we
have enough,” he answered.
It was noted that the small
dump truck caught an edge
at the Susquehanna Street
overpass and sustained
some damage.
Spadell also reported that
late at night during last
week’s snows, some riders of
4-wheel ATVs harassed driv-
ers for a time, then they van-
ished. Officer-in-Charge Tom
Szoke mentioned that police
are aware and will be looking
for these ATV riders.
Zoning officer Meier men-
tioned that he was working
with someone who is inter-
ested in opening a Chinese
restaurant in the borough.
By a 4-1 vote, council voted
to have police review policies
and procedures for the
department. Linda Szoke
was opposed, because coun-
cil had not agreed to what
version of those policies and
procedures they were going
to review (possibly those
from 1994, among several
choices).
The White Haven
Recreation Board will reor-
ganize for 2011 on February
7 at 7 p.m. at the municipal
building.
More about this meeting in
next week’s issue.
Five citizens and this
reporter attended the meet-
ing. The next regular meeting
is Monday, January 24,
beginning at 7 p.m.
WH Council appoints Shelhamer
motel in Kidder Township
while working for a railroad
construction company that
had work in the area. He
would return to New Jersey
on weekends.
On Thursday, while he was
planning to rob the PNC
Bank again, he had removed
the license plate from his car.
To gain some courage (he
told Police), he made himself
a drink while ducking down
behind the dashboard to
make the car look empty by
pouring some vodka from a
bottle he had bought at the
White Haven state store into
some Diet Pepsi he bought at
the local McDonald’s.
Szoke noted that the man
had been a suspect based on
evidence and surveillance
footage, but an arrest was
days away. His suspicious
activity Thursday saved
police “a lot of work.”
During the investigation,
Szoke and Shupp had can-
vassed the borough, and
business owners were help-
ing and staying alert. Szoke
added, “I am so proud of this
town for them getting
involved… and helping…”
Holliday was turned over to
the FBI, and is in the Federal
lockup in the Lackawanna
County jail to await trial(s).
WH Police…
Continued from page A1
The following programs will
be held during February at
Nescopeck State Park. For
more information or to regis-
ter, please call 403-2006.
Registration required unless
otherwise noted.
Snowshoe Weekends,
9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
On weekends, beginning
on Sunday, February 13, a
limited number of snowshoes
will be available for use in
Nescopeck State Park free of
charge. When there are six or
more inches of snow on the
ground, interested partici-
pants may borrow snow-
shoes on a first come, first
served basis. Staff is avail-
able to give brief instruction.
A valid driver’s license must
be provided in order to bor-
row. Snow conditions will be
available by phone every
Friday after 5 p.m. No regis-
tration required.
Saturday, February 5
WINTERFEST 2011,
11 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Join us for the 9th Annual
WinterFest! Enjoy a variety of
activities including snow-
shoeing, ice fishing and chil-
dren’s games. A detailed
event schedule will be avail-
able soon. Activities may be
modified due to weather con-
ditions.
Saturday, February 12
Tracking on Snowshoes
with Audubon Society;
1:30 p.m.
Join members of the
Greater Wyoming Valley
Audubon Society as they
enjoy the park on snow-
shoes. With park staff we will
look for tracks to ID and deci-
pher the story behind them.
Registration is required by
calling hike leader John
Jakoby at 474-5884. If you
have snowshoes bring them.
If you need to borrow a pair
from the park, please reserve
them by calling the park at
403-2006.
Sunday, February 13
Jr. Bird Club: Owl Pellet
Investigation, 1 p.m.
Kids ages 9 and up are
welcome to join the
Nescopeck Jr. Bird Club and
participate in a hands on sci-
ence experiment. Dissecting
owl pellets is a fun and
informative way to learn
about the natural history of
our elusive night raptors –
owls! You will also learn
which owls are common in
our area and what they are
up to at this time of year. A
one-time material fee of $5 is
requested from new mem-
bers. This program support-
ed by the Greater Wyoming
Valley Audubon Society.
Sunday, February 13
Get Involved: Great Back -
yard Bird Count, 3 p.m.
Do you feed winter birds at
your home or workplace? At
this informational program,
learn how you can take part
in the upcoming Great
Backyard Bird Count organ-
ized by the Cornell Lab of
Ornithology and the National
Audubon Society. This pro-
gram encourages folks to
become involved in a citizen
science program aimed at
counting birds in their back-
yards in as little as 15 min-
utes on one day during
February 18-21.
Saturday & Sunday,
February 19-20
Great Backyard
Bird Count,
9 a.m.- 3 p.m. each day
Check out our bird feeding
station and help the Cornell
Lab of Ornithology and the
National Audubon Society by
participating in the Great
Backyard Bird Count along
with birders around the coun-
try. Learn about what the bird
count entails and their impor-
tance before conducting your
own bird count at our bird
feeders or your feeders at
home. Bird count is February
18-21 and can be done in as
little as 15 minutes. No regis-
tration required.
Sunday, February 20
Family Ice Fishing Clinic;
10 a.m.- 1 p.m.
Learn how to ice fish with
the PA Fish and Boat
Commission. This program is
designed for families new to
ice fishing and will include
instruction on equipment,
basic skills, and safety. The
program is free and fishing
licenses will not be required.
All equipment and materials
will be provided. A parent or
mentor is required to partici-
pate with their child (ages 8
and up). The program will
begin indoors at the park
office regardless of weather
conditions and end at Lake
Frances pending ice condi-
tions. Adults should ensure
that they and their children
are dressed appropriately for
cold and wet weather. More
information can be obtained
from the Fish & Boat Com -
mission at 477-2206. Free;
registration required.
February at Nescopeck State Park
Master Gardeners
to meet in Drums
Penn State Master Gardeners will hold a series of work-
shops on the third Wednesday of each month at Good
Shepherd Church, Drums.
On Wednesday, January 19 at 1 p.m., Dave Orbin will
present “Common Landscaping Mistakes & How to Avoid
Them.”
Take advantage of this opportunity to begin planning
your gardening efforts in the new year. The fee to attend
the workshop is $5. To register and/or to obtain a complete
listing of workshops for 2011 at both the Drums and
Wilkes-Barre area locations, call the Luzerne County
Extension at 1-888-825-1701 or e-mail LuzerneExt@
psu.edu.
Interested persons may also register at the workshop.
The Scranton Chapter of
Pennsylvanians for Human
Life is accepting reservations
for charter bus transportation
to the annual March for Life in
Washington D.C. on Monday,
January 24. The date com-
memorates the 38th anniver-
sary of the Roe vs. Wade
decision of January 1973,
which legalized abortion on
demand, and has resulted in
the death of more than 48
million unborn children.
Buses will be leaving for
the Nation’s capital from the
Keyser Oak Plaza and Mary -
wood University at 6:45 a.m.
and will return at approxi-
mately 11 p.m. The cost of
the trip is $32 for adults and
$20 for students. Sponsor
contributions are welcome
from those unable to attend.
Reservations can be made
by contacting Anne Domin at
842-9653.
Helen Gohsler, president of
the local chapter, is urging
pro-lifers to attend in great
numbers “as we continue to
fight the abortion agenda in
the Halls of Congress.” Local
marchers will join the more
than 250,000 expected in
Washington D.C. bearing wit-
ness to the sanctity of human
life.
The event will begin with a
peaceful rally at noon on the
Mall, opposite the Wash -
ington Monument, followed
by the march, which will pro-
ceed along Constitution Ave -
nue to the Capitol and the
Supreme Court Building.
Marchers should bring signs
and banners to carry in the
march. They are encouraged
to carry bagged lunches.
Buses will be leaving
Washington at approximately
5 p.m. and a supper stop will
be made en route home.
Trip planned to annual March for Life
The annual Respect Life
Prayer Breakfast sponsored
by the local pro-life organiza-
tion, Pennsylvanians for
Human Life, will be held to
mark the anniversary of the
legalization of abortion-on-
demand thirty-six years ago.
It will take place on Saturday,
January 29, at 9 a.m. at St.
Mary’s Center, 320 Mifflin
Ave. Scranton.
The principal speaker will
be the Rev. Clenard Chil -
dress, Jr., president of the
Northeast Life Education and
Resource Network, who is
known for speaking about
Planned Parenthood’s alleg -
ed agenda to promote abor-
tion among minority groups.
The cost of the Breakfast is
$18 for adults $9 for children
ages 6 to 12 and children
under 6 are free. Reser -
vations may be mailed to
Joseph Alinoski, 9 B Rachel
Drive, Archbald, PA 18403.
Further information may be
obtained by contacting Joe
Alinoski at 876-4087 or
Pennsylvanians for Human
Life at 347-8299.
The National Canal Mu -
seum will hold its annual
Rail road Film Night on Friday,
Jan uary 28, in the auditorium
of Two Rivers Landing, 30
Centre Square, Easton.
Mitch Dakelmann, film his-
torian and curator for the Na -
tional RR Historical Society,
will be the host. Films will
focus on the birth and early
development of steam loco-
motives and their triumph
during the early years of the
20th Century. His presenta-
tion will illustrate why steam
locomotives were so rapidly
replaced by diesels after
World War II. Mitch’s films will
document attempts during
the 1990s to create new
classes of modern steam
locomotives. Unfortunately,
all these efforts failed.
Admission to this event is
$5 for museum members and
$7 for the general public.
Doors open at 7 p.m. and the
film will be shown at 7:30
(approximately three hours
long). Seating is limited to
125 persons on a first-come
first-served basis.
Two Rivers Landing is
located ½ mile south of U.S.
Route 22 or 1½ miles north
of I-78 in downtown Easton.
Enter the building at the Pine
Street (rear) entrance.
Parking is available on the
street or in the parking
garage (fee $5) across from
the building. For further infor-
mation, call the National
Canal Museum at 610-559-
6613.
The Evolution and Decline of the
Steam Locomotive theme for film night
Respect Life prayer
breakfast in Scranton
TURKEY
DINNER
MONDAY, JANUARY 17 • 4-7 P.M.
at Silver Ridge Hunting Club
2200 E. Main St. (Lehigh Gorge Dr.), Weatherly
Domestic Turkey with stuffing,
mashed potatoes/gravy, corn, string beans,
coffee, tea, birch beer and dessert.
VARIOUS WILD GAME DISHES
will be available! While supplies last.
ADULTS–
$
9 Children (ages 6-12) –
$
5 Under 6 –Free
Take-outs Available. Call 427-4910 for information.
Spaghetti supper helps
fire police officer
A benefit spaghetti dinner will be held from 2-7 p.m. on
Sunday, January 30 at Hazle Township Fire and Rescue
Station 1, at 1113 N. Church Street (Route 309) in Hazleton.
The benefit, which will also include a bake sale and tricky
trays, is for Dave Shema, a Hazle Township fire department
fire police officer who is battling cancer. Shema is traveling to
Philadelphia twice a week for testing and treatment.
Art Show
Saturday
An art exhibit of work done
by students at Weatherly
Area High School will be
open at Heritage Hill Senior
Community, 800 Sixth Street,
Weatherly on Saturday,
January 15 from 2 to 3 p.m.
Admission is free and
refreshments will be served.
THE JOURNAL-HERALD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 2011—PAGE B1
Packer Township Super -
visors accepted a gift of two
acres of land from Joe
Andreuzzi as a beginning of
Andreuzzi Park, to be named
for his father and located
adjoining the old township
schoolhouse property al -
ready owned by the township.
AUGUST 19 – Weatherly
Area School Board vice pres-
ident and long time member
Gerard Grega resigned, and
board president Joanne
Dougherty resigned from that
office. John Toft was named
president and Bonnie Urban
vice president.
AUGUST 26 – Katie
O’Donnell was appointed to
serve on White Haven
Borough Council as a re -
place ment for the late Her -
bert Albee. Council members
Joseph Knowles and Linda
Szoke, and police officer Tom
Szoke resigned from the
White Haven Recreation
Board.
Shayla’s Garden at Twe -
edle Park in Weatherly was
created by the town’s Cadette
Girl Scout Troop, and dedicat-
ed in memory of Shayla Bird
who had been a Brownie
Scout at the time of her
death.
SEPTEMBER 2 – Despite
protests from residents of the
development, Kidder Town -
ship Supervisors approved
the rephrasing of Golden
Oaks Village, believing it to
be their best choice.
World War II veteran, for-
mer Weatherly Borough
Coun cil member and deputy
game warden, and self-em -
ployed excavating contractor
Allen Hoffman died at the
age of 94.
SEPTEMBER 9 – Free land
Borough Mayor, owner of
Videomania stores there and
in White Haven, and active in
area civic and service organ-
izations, Tim Martin died of
cancer at the age of 52 – just
before the second “Martin’s
Mission” cancer fundraising
event named in his honor
was held in his home com-
munity.
SEPTEMBER 16 – Weath -
erly Area School Board
named Girard Fewins of
Lehigh Township as a mem-
ber to replace Gerard Grega.
David Marsiglio was hired as
Business Manager/ Board
Secretary.
The “White Haven” sign
from the former Jersey Cen -
tral Railroad Station was
donated to the White Haven
Area Community Library by
former resident Charles
Feist.
SEPTEMBER 23 – Clos ing
of Weatherly Borough’s pur-
chase of the Trainworks
Complex was held, with bor-
ough, Rotary, Rotary Foun -
dation and Historical Com -
mission members participat-
ing.
White Haven Borough
Coun cil voted to apply for
grants for a new community
building to include borough
and police offices as well as
space for senior and other
community events.
SEPTEMBER 30 – Dollar
General Store opened in
Weatherly, in the building that
formerly housed the town’s
only food market.
OCTOBER 7 – Lehigh
Township Supervisors dis-
missed Paula Sakse-Hoff -
man as township secretary/
treasurer, garbage fee collec-
tor and right to know officer.
Albrightsville Volunteer Fire
Company held groundbreak-
ing for a new three bay
garage.
OCTOBER 21 – Re -
signation of veteran Denni -
son Township Supervisor
Rus sell Miller for reasons of
health was accepted with
regret by his fellow supervi-
sors.
White Haven United Meth -
o dist Church celebrated its
175th anniversary with a spe-
cial service and dinner.
OCTOBER 28 – Barry
Drash er was appointed to
serve as a member of the
White Haven Borough Re -
creation Board.
Former Foster Township
Supervisor and Roadmaster
John Potoskie died at the age
of 65,
NOVEMBER 11 – John
“Jack” Koehler of Weatherly
was the recipient of the 2010
Commandant Award from the
Delaware & Lehigh National
Heritage Corridor Partners, in
recognition of his years of
dedication to the Audubon
Auto Tour and preservation of
area railroad history, etc.
Bruce Thomas was nam ed
to the Dennison Township
Board of Supervisors, replac-
ing Russell Miller.
The 2011 General Elec tion
had some interesting local
and area results. Re publican
Hazleton Mayor Lou Barletta
was successful in his third
attempt to unseat veteran
Congressman Paul Kan -
jorski. Republican Tarah
Toohil pulled an astonishing
upset in defeating State
Representative Todd Eachus
in lower Luzerne County.
Carbon County voters chose
Republican Doyle Heffley to
replace long time Democratic
State Representative Keith
McCall, who was not a candi-
date for reelection. Luzerne
County voters approved a
Home Rule Charter that will
change the county system of
government.
NOVEMBER 25 – Kidder
Township Supervisors voted
to lay off three police officers
and enact a one-mill tax
increase, due to economic
conditions.
PNC Bank’s White Haven
office was robbed by a lone
man on November 18. (More
on this next year!)
A season-long continuation
of the traditional rivalry
between the Crestwood High
School and Wyoming Semi -
nary field hockey teams
ended when Seminary down -
ed the Comets 2-1 in the
PIAA Class 2A semi final.
Semi nary had defeated
Crestwood by the same
score to win the Wyoming
Valley Conference Champ -
ion ship, and the Comets had
retaliated by defeating Semi -
nary 2-1 for the District 2
Championship. (Seminary
went on to win the state
championship, defeating
Lehighton 5-0.)
DECEMBER 2 – Packer
Township Tax Collector for
over 30 years, and retired
Weatherly Area High School
Secretary Joan (Gerhard)
Hinkle died unexpectedly at
the age of 66.
DECEMBER 9 – Long time
White Haven Borough Coun -
cil member Margaret Reilly
was honored on her retire-
ment from the office of Se -
cretary of the Luzerne
County Association of Town -
ships and Boroughs, after 28
years of service.
John Toft was elected pres-
ident, and Corey Gerhart vice
president, of Weatherly Area
School Board.
John Schwika, Penn Lake
Park’s first mayor when it
became a borough in 1975,
died at the age of 79.
DECEMBER 16 – Weath -
erly Area School Board
accepted the resignations of
board members Joanne
Dough erty and Gilbert Ger -
hard.
Eckley Miners’ Village was
undergoing the restoration of
ten dwellings under direction
of Pennsylvania’s Depart -
ment of General Services
and the Historical and Mu -
seum Commission.
DECEMBER 23 – White
Haven Borough Council
voted to seek a $750,000
grant from gaming funds gen-
erated by Mohegan Sun, to
build a new community build-
ing.
Weatherly Borough Coun -
cil voted to form a Trainworks
Committee, and appointed
the Rev. Don Adams, Ruth
Isenberg, Daniel Dargay and
John Koehler as members
along with Mayor Thomas
Connors.
White Haven Borough
Coun cil member and long
time community activist Ste -
phen Draus died at the age of
62, after a long illness.
Lynn Nyer was appointed
Packer Township Tax Col -
lector, succeeding the late
Joan Hinkle.
DECEMBER 30 – Lehigh
Township Supervisors voted
to approve a $10,000 contri-
bution (in addition to the
usual $5,000 and a $849
public safety fund) to the L &
L Fire Company, towards pur-
chase of a new tanker. The
Supervisors also named
Carol Ann Lenahan to serve
as township
Secretary/treasurer – a post
she had held in the past
White Haven Police were
in vestigating another robbery
– this one at the Rite Aid
Pharmacy.
Year in
Review…
Continued from page A1
If you are a member of
North Branch Land Trust, you
are in for a treat. On Sunday,
February 20, NBLT members
can join Paul Lumia, Exe -
cutive Director of North
Branch Land Trust, for a
cross country skiing outing
on a conserved property in
Bear Creek Village. This
activity will take place from 1
to 3 p.m. If there is inade-
quate snow cover, partici-
pants will go for a hike.
Bear Creek Village is
unique in that it has a forest
ecosystem similar to the
boreal forests of Canada. The
Land Trust has conserved
several properties in this
community and one has been
selected for this activity.
Please meet at the Bear
Creek Village Post Office
parking lot at 1 p.m.
This activity is open only to
NBLT members and it’s free.
If you are not a member,
please become one today by
visiting www.nblt.org.
Children must be accom-
panied by an adult. Please
call 696-5545 or register
online at www.nblt.org by
February 15 to reserve your
spot. Registration is required
so that we can notify you of
any cancellation. Participants
must have their own equip-
ment. There are no restroom
facilities at the location.
The North Branch Land
Trust was formed in 1993 to
help protect the quality of life
in this region. We are Land
Trust Accreditation Com -
mission Accredited.
For more information on
this event or NBLT in general,
please call the office at 696-
5545 or e-mail lumia@
nblt.org.
Cross Country Skiing at Bear Creek
We’re working on our website,
www.pocononewspapers.com
where you can find a link to place a free
classified, and new features every week. Or
find us on Facebook and become a fan!
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Delta Dental Participating Dentist
Accepting all other insurance including United Concordia
450 WASHINGTON STREET, FREELAND, PA 18224 • (570) 636-0660
1 Block East of Centre Street, on the Corner of Route 940 and Washington Street.
The Senior Ski group affili-
ated with Generation 2 Gen -
eration, the Area Agency on
Aging of Luzerne and Wyom -
ing Counties, and Jack Frost
Ski Area, has announced its
coming events. The group
consists of individuals 55
yeas of age or older, but all
ages are urged to participate.
Group leader William Run -
ner announced these activi-
ties:
Free Senior Ski Clinics –
every Wednesday now
through March 2 (except for
February 23) for Seniors 55
and up. Sign in at the Snow
Sports Learning Center at
9:30 a.m. Clinic starts at 10
a.m.
“Bringing Generations To -
gether” program at Big
Boulder on Sundays after 3
p.m. (except for holidays
January 16 and February
20). Special family rates are
$20 lift and $15 rentals.
For more information con-
tact Senior Programmer Run -
ner at 675-5055 or at run-
ner1@epix.net.
Senior Ski programs offered
Every Thursday, North -
eastern Laboratory Medicine
Inc. provides blood draws
from 9 to 9:30 a.m. at the
Weatherly Senior Center,
335 Third St., in the annex of
Zions Lutheran Church.
This service is available for
everyone with no age re -
quirement. There is no need
to call for an appointment,
simply show up at the desig-
nated time.
Most insurances will be
accepted. Medicare and Gei -
singer insurances are defi-
nitely accepted.
Blood work available at
Weatherly Senior Center
Winter Carnival
promises cure
for doldrums
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 360, Weatherly, will hold
its first Winter Carnival on
Saturday, January 29 from 11
a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Legion
building, Veterans Lane,
Weatherly.
The event will feature a
menu of the Legion’s famous
pork barbecue, French fries,
homemade soup, hot dogs
and beverages.
There will be a Chinese
auction, as well as a bake
sale, a 50/50 ticket raffle, ice
sculpting by Jack Vozar and
games for the kids.
The public is welcome to
attend.
Socks are
sought
A drive for socks for veter-
ans will be held on Saturday,
January 15 from noon to 5
p.m. in White Haven. VFW
Post 6615 is spearheading
the drive, which will be held
in front of Antonio’s Pizzeria
on Main Street.
Melissa Dummitt, junior
vice commander of Post
6615, said packages of new,
white socks will be accepted.
The Trainworks Association
has items for sale, including
adjustable caps with logo for
$10; T-shirts in medium,
large, and extra large for $10;
railroad coal cars, Blue Coal,
two numbers, three bay kits
for $15, and Lehigh Valley
coal car, two bay kits, for $15.
The kits can be put together
for an extra $2 fee.
The items are available at
the Weatherly Area Com -
munity Library.
The association is also
selling tickets for train sets
and cars. Ticket prices are $1
each or six tickets for $5 and
can also be purchased at the
library.
For more information, call
Terry at 427-8700.
Trainworks items and raffle
tickets available at Library
Heritage Hill offers
lunch and movie
Heritage Hill Senior Community, 800 Sixth Street,
Weatherly will host lunch and a movie on Wednesday,
January 26 at 1:30 p.m. Seating is limited, so please call early
to reserve a seat. Call Lisa Marie Halecky at 427-4500. The
movie to be shown is On Golden Pond. The snow date is
Wednesday, February 2.
Kenneth and Mary Rose
Minnick, Weatherly, an -
nounce the engagement and
approaching marriage of their
daughter, Kasey Rae, to
Justin Lee Chyko, son of
Joseph and Barbara Chyko,
Weatherly.
The bride-to-be is the
granddaughter of George
and Lucy Minnick, Weatherly
and the late Joseph and
Theresa (Gombeda) Kapes.
She is also the great-grand-
daughter of Irene Carter,
Weatherwood.
She is a 2005 graduate of
Weatherly Area High School
and a 2010 graduate of
Cabrini College, Radnor,
where she obtained a Bach -
elor’s Degree in English &
Communication. She is em -
ployed as an audio/visual
coordinator with Advanced
Audio Visual, West Chester,
subcontracted to Shire Phar -
maceuticals in Wayne.
The groom-to-be is the
grandson of the late Nicholas
and Cora Chyko and the late
Walter and Sarah Solt. A
2002 graduate of Weatherly
Area High School, he is
employed by the United
Parcel Service, Bethlehem.
Justin proposed to Kasey
on a cruise the couple took to
Bermuda.
The couple will be married
in June during an outdoor
ceremony at the Crestview
Chapel at the Stroudsmoor
Country Inn in Stroudsburg.
PAGE B2—THE JOURNAL-HERALD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 2011
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Electronics
DIRECT to home Satellite TV
$19.99/mo. FREE installation,
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customers - No Activation Fee!
Credit/Debit Card Req. Call 1-
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Employment
ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS -
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job. No experience. All looks
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Equipment
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Journal Classifieds
443-8321 • 1-800-822-5334
reaching readers of The Journal Herald, the Journal of the Pocono Plateau,
the Journal Valley Views, the Journal-Mountaintop and the Journal of Penn Forest
ADOPTION — Love, security,
warmth and absolute
devotion await your child.
Let us help each other.
Call Suzanne (anytime),
1-888-803-1883.
Expenses paid.
Pocono Fencing Club
Take a stab at FITNESS and FUN
Beginner Classes Tuesday Nights
7 to 8 pm starting Jan. 18
Not a
beginner?
Scrape the
rust off your
sword and
have at it.
For more details go to:
www.PoconoFencingClub.com
INSTANT
LICENSE PLATES • NOTARY SERVICE
Out of State Transfers A Specialty
State Authorized Motor Vehicle Messenger Service to Harrisburg. All Paper Work taken
by us directly to Motor Vehicle Bureau, that means you get yours back quickly!
CARS • TRUCKS • MOTORCYCLES • MOTOR HOMES • TRAILERS
SNOWMOBILES • LEARNERS PERMIT • DRIVERS LICENSE RENEWALS
LICENSE PLATE RENEWALS • BOAT REGISTRATIONS • APP/PLATES
Have a problem or question? We will gladly give you
FREE INFORMATION
Rt. 611, 1/4 mile North of the Light, Bartonsville
8 to 7:30 Monday through Friday, Saturday to 4:30
5 Notaries on Duty - Call Terry, Marguerite, Barbara, BeaAnn or Ron
Decentralized Motor Vehicle Service Agent
FAX 570-629-3242 • Phone 570-629-3344 or 800-421-3350
Attn: ALL 4wheel drive owners!!
We want your vehicle!!
TOP $$ PAID
Call Doug @ Halterman’s Toyota
The Used Car Supercenter
(570) 421-6930
HUGE SAVINGS at
www.haltermans.com
The Used Car Superstore!
570-421-6930
Main Street, White Haven
-Second Floor, office
space, 450 sq. ft.,
2 rooms, plus restroom.
For details call
570-443-8885 after
10 a.m. or 443-7384
Your ad can go
here. Call
443-9131 xt300
Place your Journal classified on-line at www.pocononewspapers.com
—follow the CoolerAds link on the right side of the page.
Blood donors encouraged
to ‘Warm Your Heart,
Heat Your Home’
Since 1970, January has been
recognized by presidential decree
as National Volunteer Blood Donor
Month. To help ensure an adequate
blood supply, the American Red
Cross Blood Services, Northeastern
Pennsylvania Region is proud to
take this opportunity to thank those
dedicated individuals who donate
blood throughout Pennsylvania.
In northeastern Pennsylvania,
blood inventories are of great con-
cern, particularly in the winter
months when winter storms, icy
roads and illness can have a detri-
mental effect on community blood
supplies, which is already just days
ahead of demand. January is an
excellent time to publicly thank
those Silent Heroes who help save
lives every day and issue a call to
action for those who have never
given blood or have not donated
recently
Eligible volunteer blood donors
are asked to call 1-800-RED
CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit
redcrossblood.org to find a blood
drive and to make appointments.
Individuals who are 17 years of age
(16 with parental permission), meet
weight and height requirements
(110 pounds or more, depending on
their height) and are in generally
good health may be eligible to give
blood. Positive identification is
required at the time of donation.
Throughout the month of Jan -
uary, the American Red Cross Blood
Services, Northeastern Pennsyl -
vania Region is encouraging people
to give ʻWarm Your Heart, Heat Your
Homeʼ and donate blood or plate -
lets. Each week, daily presenting
donors can enter to win a $200 Visa
gift card to be used towards their
winter home heating bills.
Every two seconds, someone in
the United States needs blood. The
Red Cross Blood Services North -
eastern Pennsylvania Region pro-
vides lifesaving blood to 29 hospi-
tals and must have 351 people give
blood and platelets each weekday
to meet hospital demand. Accident
victims as well as patients with can-
cer, sickle cell disease, blood disor-
ders and other illnesses receive life-
saving transfusions every day.
There is no substitute for blood and
volunteer donors are the only
source.
About the American Red Cross:
Governed by volunteers and sup-
ported by giving individuals and
communities, the American Red
Cross has been the single largest
supplier of blood products to hospi-
tals throughout the United States for
more than 50 years. While local
hospital needs are always met first,
the Red Cross also helps ensure
that no patient goes without blood
no matter where or when they need
it. The American Red Cross Blood
Services - Northeast Division must
distribute approximately 3,000 units
of blood each day just to meet the
basic needs of area patients. In
addition to providing nearly half of
the nationʼs blood supply, the Red
Cross provides relief to victims of
disaster, trains millions in lifesaving
skills, serves as a communication
link between U.S. military members
and their families, and assists vic-
tims of international disasters or
Don’t
miss it!
Minnick and Chyko to wed
Carbon County Law Office for 20 Years
Carbon, Luzerne & Schuylkill
121 Carbon St. Weatherly
Atty. Cindy Ray
427-9817
• Family Law • Real Estate
• Civil Law • Criminal Defense
PTA plans
third meeting
of school year
The Weatherly Area PTA
will hold its third meeting for
the 2010-2011 school year
on Wednesday, January 19,
at 7 p.m. in the Elementary/
Middle School Cafeteria.
Topics of discussion will be
Valentine activities, Winter -
fest outcome, upcoming
PowerWalk as well as other
business items.
There will be a guest
speaker for the evening.
Door prizes by Stampin’ Up
will be given out and refresh-
ments will be served.
PTA meetings are held on
the third Wednesday of every
month unless otherwise
noted. Getting involved in
PTA is a great way to have
your ideas heard and your
concerns addressed. Call
PTA president Tara Bresnak
with any questions or com-
ments at 443-5726. You may
also visit the PTA website at
https://sites.google.com/a/w
eatherlysd.org/pta/ for more
information.
Journal deadline is always
5 p.m. Monday.
The Weatherly Area Com -
munity Library recently drew
winners for three holiday raf-
fles. The Chicken Soup bas-
ket was won by Don Hartzel.
Evelyn Ehrenfried won the
Christmas wrap, and Alison
Franklin won the Christmas
basket.
The winner of the watercol-
or by Violet Eggert that was
raffled off by the Trainworks
group was also selected. The
painting of a hummingbird
was won by the Rev. Don
Adams.
The Trainworks will soon be
holding another raffle for sev-
eral model train sets and
cars, currently on display at
the Library at 20 Carbon
Street. Tickets can be pur-
chased at the Library at 20
Carbon Street.
Raffle winners chosen by
WACL and Trainworks
The American Legion Auxi -
liary Unit 360 in Weatherly
will hold its monthly meeting
on Monday, January 17 at the
Legion building, scheduled to
start at 7 p.m. All auxiliary
members are urged to
attend.
Legion Auxiliary meets Monday
Weatherly Area High
School Alumni Association
members are reminded that
2011 dues are now being col-
lected. Dues are only $10 per
year, and the WAHSAA
needs everyone’s support.
Checks should b sent to Jack
Koehler, 108 Hudsondale
Street, Weatherly PA 18255.
Newsletters will be out next
month.
WAHSAA dues now due
Salem UCC plans
congregational meeting
A Congregational Meeting will be held at Salem United
Church of Christ on Sunday, January 30 following the worship
service. Worship begins at 9:30 a.m. each Sunday. The snow
date for the meeting is Sunday, February 6
by Gail Martinchek
The January 6 meeting of
the White Haven Area Senior
Ci ti zens was brought to
order by Presi dent Mar y
Falcone at 1 p.m. The Pledge
of Al l egi ance fol l owed.
Chaplain Josephine Scaffidi
read from the gospel of
Luke, Chapter 8. The gospel
song “Come Thou Almighty
King” and the “Lord’s Prayer”
ended devotions.
Outreach (443-9259)
reported no cards sent this
period. Call if you know of
any member who is ill or in
the hospital.
Birthdays for the month of
January are Mildred Travis,
Peter Herbener, Jr,. Harriet
Berish, Mary Lou Bruzgulis,
Maria Yackiel, Mary Falcone,
Frank Falcone, Rick Hartley,
Mary Fineran, Marian
Michaels, Evelyn Erath, Mary
Toft, Frank Martino, Albert
Schofield and Karl Sharples.
“Senior Happenings” gives
you the events and dates for
the coming year.
Refreshments included a
bi r thday cake cel ebrati ng
the birthdays of all Seniors
members for this year!
2011 is shaping up to be an
exciting year with 27 mem-
bers and a surprise guest
attending “Everybody’s Birth -
day Party” on January 6. It’s
always good to see Bobby
Maso and he’ll be back to
guest judge our second
annual bake off in February,
but first we’ll enjoy Ann Marie
O’Neil on January 20 with
important information for all
seniors.
February 3 we’ll enjoy the
voice of Betty Carpenter and
have a Valentine exchange.
(Don’t forget your cards.)
February 17 is that oh so
delicious, bake off and en -
trants and judges are being
signed up at our very next
meeting.
March 3 we’ll have a Mardi
Gras party and play “In It to
Win It” based on the televi-
sion show, featuring teams of
our seniors competing for
fabulous prizes. (This should
be great fun.) We’ll close the
first quarter with a very spe-
cial presentation by cast
members from the Pennsy -
lvania Theatre of Performing
Arts treating us to some top
shelf singing and dancing
from a few of their past shows
and their upcoming perform-
ance of, “Singing in the Rain,”
which begins on their Hazle -
ton stage on March 24. This
is a not to be missed line up.
All area seniors are wel-
come to join us. Dues of only
$10 per year, due and pay -
able now, which make you a
member and entitle you to do
all that we do. Meetings are
always at the White Haven
VFW Post 6615, normally at
1 p.m. on the first and third
Thursday of each month.
Make this the year you join a
fun group of lively seniors
and add some spice to your
life.
conflicts.
Winter and Spring Activities at
The Corning Museum of Glass
The Corning Museum of Glass
turns 60 in 2011, sparking a yearʼs
worth of special programs and
activities, and a full list of winter and
spring calendar items included
below.
The Museum is open daily 9:00
a.m. – 5:00 p.m. (and open until
8:00 p.m. Memorial Day weekend to
Labor Day).Adult admission to The
Corning Museum of Glass is $14.00
for adults (and only $6 for residents
in the ZIP code starting with 148,
149, and 169). Kids and teens 19
and under, receive free admission.
Winter/Spring Activities
Families Explore: Space

January 16, 12-4 p.m.
Learn how glass makes space
exploration and discoveries possi-
ble. See historic photographs of
Corning and the Museumʼs 200-
inch disk, and get your collectable
trading card when you visit Rakow
Research Libraryʼs exhibition, Mir -
ror to Discovery. Enjoy a special
2:00 p.m. Space Science Spec -
tacular laser performance by Pris -
matic Magic. Make a model of the
night sky, create your own constel-
lation light show, and much more!
Included in Museum admission.
Registration not required. Drop-in
activities throughout the day. Con -
tact familiesexplore@cmog.org or
call (607) 937-5371 for more infor-
mation.

Studio Faculty Presentations

January 18, 7:30 p.m.
Hear from some of the best-
known glassmakers in the world,
through free, informal public lec-
tures by Studio faculty: Bruce Fer -
guson, Paul Stankard, Lucio Bu -
bacco, and Miriam Di Fiore. Free
ad mission. Registration is not re -
quired. Call (607) 937-5371 to con-
firm speakersʼ dates, which are sub-
ject to change.

2300°: 1951

January 20, 5:30 p.m.
Glass gets interesting at 2300°
and so things at The Corning Mu -
seum of Glass. Celebrate the kick-
off to our 60th anniversary year—
1950s style! Music by Djug Django,
glassmaking by Annette Sheppard,
wine samplings, and a Celebrity
Cruise giveaway! 5:30 p.m. – 7:30
p.m. Free admission; some addi-
tional cost for food and drink.
Registration is not required. Call
(607) 937-5371 for more informa-
tion.

Studio Faculty Presentations

January 25, 7:30 p.m.
Hear from some of the best-
known glassmakers in the world,
through free, informal public lec-
tures by Studio faculty: Jeremy
Burdge, Dan Schreiber, Suellen
Fowler, Mark Ditzler, Harry Sea -
man, and Jayne Persico. Free ad -
mission. Registration is not re -
quired. Call (607) 937-5371 to con-
firm speakersʼ dates, which are sub-
ject to change.
Studio Faculty Presentations

February 1, 7:30 p.m.
Hear from some of the best-
known glassmakers in the world,
through free, informal public lec-
tures by Studio faculty: Alex Brand,
Don’t
miss it!
Continues on page B4
THE JOURNAL-HERALD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 2011—PAGE B3
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SELL/RENT YOUR TIME-
SHARE FOR CASH!!! Our
Guaranteed Services will Sell/
Rent Your Unused Timeshare
for CASH! Over $78 Million
Dollars offered in 2009!
www.sellatimeshare.com Call
(877) 554-2431
Vacation Properties
A GREAT VACATION VALUE!!
Clean, Safe, & only a tank
away. Americaʼs Greatest FAM-
ILY Resort Ocean City, NJ
(800)786-8684 or visit our web
site www.Acade-
myRealEstate.com
Vans
1999 CHEVROLET Astro LT,
89K miles, V6, auto, leather,
$5,900. Call 1-888-218-8099
Wanted to Buy
Sell your diabetes test strips
any kind/brand unexpired
$16.00 box shipping paid 1-
800-266-0702 www.selldiabet-
icstrips.com
SELL YOUR DIABETES TEST
STRIPS. We buy Any Kind/Any
Brand Unexpired. Pay up to
$16.00 per box. Shipping Paid.
Call 1-800-267-9895 or
www.SellDiabeticstrips.com
Drivers: Local Hazleton
Van Runs!
Great Pay, Benefits!
CDL-A, 1yr. Exp. Req.
Estenson Logistics.
Apply:
www.goelc.com
866-336-9642
Your ad can
go here. Call
443-9131
xt300
For Sale—Prime Acreage
in Weatherly Area School
District. 19+ acres of clear
& wooded land, large stand
of mature timber, 2 pole
buildings, 3 phase power, 5
minutes from Weatherly &
White Haven on N. Lehigh
Gorge Dr. Excellent site for
primary or vacation home.
$275,000
Call 570-578-6400
Large Storage Bldg.
White Haven
Approx. 3,200 Sq. Ft.
Plus 480 Sq. Ft. Finished
Rooms (3) with sink & toilet.
Double Plank Construction.
$25,000
Call (570) 656-1080
Place your Journal classified on-line at
www.pocononewspapers.com
—follow the CoolerAds link on the right side of the page.
SCHOCH
Harley-Davidson/Buell
Corner of Rt. 209 & 33
Snydersville, PA
570-992-7500
Mon.-Fri. 8-8 • Sat. 8-5 • Sun. 10-4
Closed Holidays
Disability Group, Inc. is a private law firm. Its principal office is in Los Angeles,
California, 6033 Century Blvd. Managing partner, Ronald Miller, Esq. is admitted only
in California and Michigan. Not certified by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization.
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written
information about the lawyer’s qualifications and experience. Prior results cannot and
do not guarantee or predict a similar outcome with respect to any future matter,
including yours, in which a lawyer or law firm may be retained. No representation is
made that the quality of the legal services to be performed is greater than the quality
of legal services performed by other lawyers.
Social Security
Disability Benefits
We Wrote
“The Book On Social
Security Disability”
‹ You win or you pay us NOTHING.
‹ We handle new applications, appeals, and hearings for you.
‹ We assist in gathering required medical records and
legal evidence.
Disability Law
FREE Consultation
1-888-752-5355
Classified
deadline is always
noon Monday.
WH Senior Happenings
White Haven Seniors
The Presbyterian Church
of White Haven has sched-
uled the following special
events to be held this year:
Sunday, February 13 –
Valentine Luncheon following
church service.
Thursday, March 17 – Ham
& Cabbage Supper.
Thursday, April 14 –
Spaghetti Supper.
Friday & Saturday, May 27
& 28 – Flea Market.
Thursday, September 15 –
Chicken & Waffle Supper.
Thursday, October 13 –
Pork & Sauerkraut Supper.
Saturday, November 5 –
Holiday Bazaar.
Sunday, November 13 –
Thanksgiving Dinner at 1
p.m.
HE A RT WI T H
INS P I R E Y OU R
T HE ART S !
Saturday, January 15 • 2:00 - 3:00 pm
Admire artwork by the students of Weatherly Area High School and
indulge in a variety of teas, coffee and danishes. Free admission.
Snow date: January 22
RESI DENTI AL CARE & MEMORY CARE
800 Sixth Street • Weatherly, PA 18255
www.heritagehillsenior.com • 570-427-4500
N I
H



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W T R A E H



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January 15 • 2:0 rdayy
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W T R A E H



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ariety of teas, coffee and dani a v va
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, January 15 • 2:0 rdayy,
570-427-4500 m • .co rr. enio s l l hi e
A 18255 , PPA yy, l er h t aa e et • WWe e r t S
E R A C Y R O M E M & E R A C L A




ee admission. r ishes. F
igh School and ea H y Ar
00 - 3:00 pm




Special events slated by Presbyterian Church
Visit our Facebook page if you have a
great story idea for this year!
We’ve got a Discussion Board set up for
your ideas for feature stories.
Cardinals
Pretty red male Northern
Cardinals probably catch the
eye of more folks whose
backyards have winter bird
feeders than any other bird.
Even though they don’t
migrate and are in our area
all year long, there’s just
something special about see-
ing cardinals in winter against
a new fallen snow.
Only the male is bright red.
The female is brownish-gray
with tinges of red, but both
have the tufted headdress. In
winter cardinals will be seen
in flocks but as soon as the
breeding season begins in
spring they will pair up and
stay together until their 3 –5
eggs hatch.
A cardinal’s nest is unique
in that the first or outer layer
is made of twigs that the
female crushes with her beak
to make them form a round,
soft and pliable base. The
next inside layer is usually
softer grapevine bark, then
some leaves and finally some
soft grasses. It’s common that
cardinals use their nest only
once.
Cardinals are unusual in
that both the male and the
female sing. In many species
only the male bird sings.
Cardinals have several songs
they sing, and if you listen
closely in the morning, they
are usually the first birds
you’ll hear. The female has
more and longer tunes than
the male.
I began putting more black
oil sunflower seeds in one of
my feeders and it seemed to
attract more cardinals. They,
and other bird species, now
fly in and pick a sunflower
seed and fly to a nearby
branch and open and eat the
seed. They do that routine all
day long. At another feeder I
have a seed mixture. There
the other birds seem to perch
on the feeder and pick and
eat the smaller seeds without
leaving.
Both male and female car-
dinals will defend their nest-
ing area against the intrusion
of other cardinals. It’s not
unusual to see a cardinal
fighting for hours with his own
reflection in a windowpane or
pecking at a car mirror or
even a shiny car or truck
bumper. Occasionally they
will fly into a window “charg-
ing” their own reflection think-
ing it’s an intruding cardinal.
This action subsides when
mating season is over and
the baby birds leave the nest.
Northern Cardinals are
great to have around your
yard. While they mostly eat
seeds and fruit they feed their
young mostly insects. As I
mentioned, black oil sun-
flower seeds seem to be a
favorite but they also eat a lot
of beetles, crickets, flies, cen-
tipedes, spiders, moths and
other insects when they are
available.
PAGE B4—THE JOURNAL-HERALD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 2011
Out in the Open by Alex Zidock
Photo by Alex Zidock
MENGLE
FUEL CO.
247 Hudsondale Street
Weatherly
427-4261
MENGLE FUEL CO.
Heating Oil • Anthracite
Coal by the Bag—Rice, Pea, Nut
Hauling
Mushroom Soil • Topsoil • Stone
Sand • Sea Rocks
Nancy Tobey, Anna Boothe, and
Denise Stillwaggon Leone. Free
admission. Registration is not
required. Call (607) 937-5371 to
confirm speakersʼ dates, which are
subject to change.
Studio Faculty Presentations

February 8, 7:30 p.m.
Hear from some of the best-
known glassmakers in the world,
through free, informal public lec-
tures by Studio faculty: Mark Mat -
thews, Jim Byrnes, Cappy Thomp -
son, and William Gudenrath. Free
admission. Registration is not re -
quired. Call (607) 937-5371 to con-
firm speakersʼ dates, which are sub-
ject to change.

Meet the Artist: Susan Plum

February 10, 6 p.m.
For Susan Plum, glass is a
metaphor for light and a way to
“concretize the invisible.” Her work,
Woven Heaven, Tangled Earth, in -
spired by her research into ancient
Mesoamerican cosmological sys-
tems, is a favorite of visitors. Free,
but registration is requested by con-
tacting rsvp@cmog.org. Call (607)
937-5371 for more information.

2300°: Blue Sky

February 17, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Glass gets interesting at 2300°
and so things at The Corning Mu -
seum of Glass. Enjoy music by
zydeco/soulgrass band, Blue Sky
Mission Club, and live glassmaking
by artist Therman Statom. Free ad -
mission; some additional cost for
food and drink. Registration is not
required. Call (607) 937-5371 for
more information.

Winter Break at the Museum

February 18 – 27
Schoolʼs out! Bring the kids to the
Museum and enjoy special activities
including extended Make Your Own
Glass hours, unique Hot Glass
Show, Family Hidden Treasures
Tours, and from noon until 4:00
p.m., hands-on activity tables.
Included in Museum admission.
Call (607) 937-5371 for more infor-
mation.

Families Explore: Austria

February 20, 12-4 p.m.
Explore Austrian culture through
traditional music, crafts, and other
activities and experience the cul-
tures, ideas, and stories surround-
ing objects in the Museumʼs collec-
tion. Discover hidden details in the
masterpieces of Austrian glass dur-
ing a family-friendly tour. Children
and adults alike will enjoy the music
of Mozart, Haydn, and other great
composers. Taste Austrian food
and, learn traditional dances, and
try hands-on craft activities. Includ -
ed in Museum admission. Regi -
stration not required. Drop-in activi-
ties throughout the day. Contact
familiesexplore@cmog.org or call
(607) 937-5371 for more informa-
tion.
Family Night 

March 11, 6-8 p.m.
Enjoy a free night at the Museum
with the whole family, including live
entertainment, glassmaking, crafts,
and more! Small fee for some craft
activities. Contact publicpro-
grams@cmog.orgor call (607) 937-
Don’t
miss it!
HOMES FOR SALE
Dallas
First Floor Condo, completely
redecorated and nicely fur-
nished. 2 BR, 1 3/4 BA, Sitting
RM, Cedar closet, Loads of
storage, patio, tennis, golf,
pool. Move right in. Priced for
quick sale $115,000.
Go to the top call
Jane Kopp Real Estate
288-7481
938-940 North St,
Freeland #07-2330
Country charmer with in town
conveniences. Currently used
as an adult care facility. Huge
income potential. 5 BR, 2 1/2
BA, full basement, master
suite, and low taxes. Additional
land available. $249,000.
Aim High Realty, Inc
570-443-7860
Hickory Hills
White Haven
Custom built in ’04, bi-level, 3+BR,
1.5 BA, Fam Rm, 1 car garage,
energy eff., private gated com-
munity w/pool, lake and security.
Haz. SD, close to I-80, shopping
and Pocono Resorts. Owner relo-
cation. Sacrifice at $149,900.
Call Owner (570) 579-6411
or (570) 956-2594
NEW CONSTRUCTION
By Butler Valley Blders. 3
BR/2 Bath Ranch in Beau-
tiful Breezy Acres Drums
Area. Includes public Sewer
on 1 Acre. $329,900
Call LORI COOK
at 788-7503 or 788-1999
LEWITH & FREEMAN R.E.
Addt’l Lots Avbl. for Custom Homes!
Quiet Neighborhood
Imagine 1.5 acres in Strouds-
burg, tucked away on a hidden
driveway and just two blocks
from 9th Street and the Mall. The
cozy family room has a great
wood stove. The garage has an
enclosed breezeway to the
house–never get wet or cold!
Call today 09-2361 $189,900
CENTURY 21 Select Group
570-643-2100 ask for Betty
House For Sale
Gorgeous & immaculate
house for sale, 3 bed-
room, 1
1
/
2
bath in private
setting in A Pocono
Country Place.
Price Reduced
Asking price $80,000
Call 203 262-8419
White Haven
2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Ranch home with large
deck. Set on 4 acres.
Asking $295,000.
Call Valerie
at (718) 217-8875
407 Luzerne St., Freeland
List # 07-2311
Well maintained 1/2 double with
newer windows. All appliances stay!
Included is a 1,000 sq. ft. ranch with
2BR, 1BA, custom kitch. and LR.
Ideal for rental or relatives. Lot 14,
block 4 off of Juniper St must be
included in sale $106,000
Century 21 Select Group
Call Brian McCardle at
800.779.2584 (x 23)
ARROWHEAD LAKES
Cozy Ranch, close to beach,
private pool and clubhouse.
4 BR, sunroom, 2 full BA,
large LR with fireplace, din-
ing area. All appliances! Pri-
vate, gated community. Price
Reduced–Asking $158,500
Call Colleen
(570) 239-8862
White Haven
3BR/2.5BA House on 1.08
Acres in a private lake commu-
nity. Close to parks, gamelands,
white water rafting, ski resorts,
and casino. Minutes to Poco-
nos, Hazleton and Wilkes-Barre.
Only $189,000.
Gordon & Long
Real Estate LLC
Cindy King
570.675.4400 Office
570.690.2689 Direct
www.cindykingre.com
Arrowhead Lakes
New 3 BR, 2
1
/
2
BA Colonial
in amenity filled community.
Eat-in-kitchen w/oak cabi-
nets, Dining Room, Living
Room, 1870 sq. ft. Near
beach. Seller will assist
w/mtge. $219,000
Call Paul Weaver (owner)
(570) 269-1773
Coolbaugh Township
WOW - NOT IN A
COMMUNITY
1.81 acres, 4 BR/ 3 full BA, garage,
3,000 sq. ft., two fireplaces, 16x25
master, newly remodeled, extra liv-
ing area for big family. One year
warranty on elec, plumb, heat.
$189,000
Call (570) 350-2245
Mt. Pocono Summit
Pointe Community
Brick Ranch w/Heated Gar,
3BR, 2BA, LR, DR, new Kitch-
en, Computer Rm, Sun Rm, Lg.
Generator, Central AC, Full
Basement & Deck. Handi-
capped access. Minutes to bus,
shopping, & casino. $202,000.
Call Vincent at
570-839-1393 or 801-2943
Towamensing Trails
Cozy 3 BR, 2 BA, LR, FP, eat
in kitchen w/ breakfast bar. 2
decks. Newer windows, slid-
ing doors and Carpet. Sold
fully Furnished. Asking
$174,900.
Call 215-997-9249
View pics at www.forsaleby
owner.com/20918798
Falls, PA
Ranch on 1+ Acre Lot! 2
Car garage, 3 BR 2 full
baths. Two Tier Deck!
SHARP!
Ed Beckendorff
888-774-8488
Rhodo Mountain Estates
Looking for seclusion? Mag-
nificent country post & beam
home, cedar siding & decks,
cherry cabinets, stone fire-
place, & full finished base-
ment. For 24 hour recorded
information & address, call
1-800-722-1389 and enter
code 2476.
Mary Enck Realty, Inc.
Lake Ariel - Extra Lot!
Furnished 4 BR home boasts
finished lower level w/ built in
bar, woodstove, Vaulted Ceil-
ing Living room has stone fire-
place, loft, deck $251,092
Alyce Lentz
888-774-8488
East Stroudsburg -
MUST SEE!
Gorgeous! 2 Decks, Hot Tub, 1+
Acre lot, Front porch, master
suite w/fireplace, living room w/
brick fireplace, crown molding,
Eat in kitchen w/ island! $249,450
Liz Robbins
888-774-8488
185 Birch Knoll Dr., Hazleton
List # 08-65
Newer pre-manufactured home
with many upgrades. Walk-in
closets in all BRs, MBR has gar-
den tub. Natural gas heat with
custom stone FP. Lg open kitch-
en. On leased property.$53,900.
Century 21 Select Group
Call Brian McCardle at
800.779.2584 (x 23)
401 Pohopoco Road
Albrightsville
List #07-10738
MBR suite, 3BR, 2BA, stone FP,
big deck, tile foyer, 1.13 acre cor-
ner lot. House is eligible for 100%
financing through the PHFA/
RURAL Housing Programs. Fur-
niture negotiable. $244,900
Pocono Resorts Realty
Sandra Ortiz
(570) 443-9555 x19
(570) 233-7670
www.prr1.com
Lake Naomi
32 Split Rock Lane
Pocono Pines
4 BR, 2 BA, Gas and Elec heat
Furnished, 2 large decks, close
to lake, pool and club. Ex. cond.
Inspected. $239,900
Lake Naomi Real Estate
Justin Higgins
570-646-2222
800-537-1479
Advertise your home
for sale for $99
unt i l i t s e l l s ! unt i l i t s e l l s !
Ad must include a picture
of the house and a price.
One change is fixed free during the first four weeks.
Further changes cost $20 each.
Call Seth at
443-9131, ext. 302
for more details
$99
$99
Special Special
Drums, PA Price - $249,900
2500 Sq. Foot 2 Story - 4 Bdrm/3 Bath
Home - Great Area - 100 X 200 Very
Nice Yard. Rear Deck / 2 Car Garage -
Spacious Rms Throughout w/ New
Hardwood Floors/Carpet &Tile. Formal
Dining Room and Ceramic Tiled
Kitchen w/ breakfast area, Family Rm
w/ Full Stone FP. Master Bedrmw/ large
WIC & 3/4 Private Bath - A Must See!
Call 570-236-0145 for more info.
Pocono Summit (Emerald Lakes).
Brand new, 4 brs, 2 -1/2 baths,
garage, new appliances, carpet,
fixtures, low dues, lakes,
clubhouse, pools etc.
Must See, asking
$195,000 by owner.
570-355-5366
Pocono Farms East -
3817 Norfolk Rd, Tobyhanna
3 BR 1.5 BA
1905 sf well maintained
single family home built 2002
approx 0.29ac.
Close to I 80, whitewater
rafting, casino and ski resort
Only $169,700
Call Aggie (609) 213-3332
3-bedroom, 2 bath ranch home
in Pocono Mountain Lake com-
munity, Kidder Township.
Weatherly Area School District.
Near Turnpike & I-80. 2-car
garage.
$109,900.
Peters Real Estate
Route 940, White Haven
570-443-8882
R
E
D
U
C
E
D
380 W. Ridge St., Lansford
Immaculate townhome. Nice
neighborhood, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath.
Sunroom off large kitchen with
fireplace, fened backyard, front
porch, big living room, vinyl siding,
asphalt roof, basement, all
appliances and furniture.
$36,000
Call Marie, 570-972-8715
Nestled on side street in down-
town Mt. Pocono, 2-bedroom
with cute little yard. Hardwood
floors, very clean. Nice front
porch. Ready to move in.
$85,000
Keller Williams Real Estate
Ask for Dorothy Gross
570-421-2890 or
direct 570-620-6549.
One acre wooded lot with
1 bedroom cottage,
just off Route 115 in
Blakeslee. 1 bedroom
1 bath, kitchen/living
room. Great investment;
possible owner financing.
$55,000. Call Gary at
352-229-3111
Holiday Pocono Well-maintained, 3-
bdrm. home on quiet, wooded lot in
friendly, secure community. Easy
walk to pristine lakes for swimming/
boating/fishing. Large screened
porch, sunny lawns, pellet stove.
REASONABLE OFFERS
WILL BE CONSIDERED.
MLS #10-5186
Asking $129,000
DIETER METZGER
917-913-7873
Beautiful contemporary with
4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, formal
dining room with see through
fireplace into the great room,
hardwood floors, backs up to
gamelands, close to school.
$247,000. For 24 hour
recorded information &
address, call 1-800-722-1389
and enter code 2776.
Mary Enck Realty, Inc.
Beautiful expanded Cape Cod
features 4 bedrooms, 3 baths,
and sit on 33+acres, granite
countertops, family room,
oversized 2-car garage, pond,
water garden & orchard.
$598,750. For 24 hour
recorded information &
address, call 1-800-722-1389
and enter code 2836.
Mary Enck Realty, Inc.
Must see! Lakefront raised chalet
with 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, family
room, laundry, new kitchen &
much more! Situated on 1.16 acres
with 115 ft lake frontage.
$489,000. For 24 hour recorded
information & address, call
1-800-722-1389 and enter code
2766. Mary Enck Realty, Inc.
Lakefront contemporary,
1 acre wooded lot, large deck
overlooks the lake, 3 bedrooms,
1.5 baths, full basement with 1-car
garage, front & rear decks.
$475,000.
For 24 hour recorded information &
address, call 1-800-722-1389 and
enter code 2416.
Mary Enck Realty, Inc.
Pocono Lake, Stoney Hollow Rd.
Fully remodeled Dutch Cape w/new
roof. 3 bdrm, 1.5 ba w/tiles,
laundry room, tiled eat-in kitchen.
New well pump. 1.5 acre lot/
1
⁄2 wooded. Adjoins state land.
No development. 15x20 shed.
For sale by owner.
Forsalebyowner.com Listing #22463365
Reduced to $165,000
Call owner Bobby
1-347-248-7207
Skiers—Ski Lift is across the
street from this 4 Bdr, 2 Bth
home. Fireplace, loft, fully fur-
nished and located on 1 acre.
Great first time home buyer or
investor home. $89,900.
Keller Williams Real Estate
Call Dorothy Gross
570-421-2890 Office
570-620-6549 Direct
This Cape Cod features 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, den, full base-
ment & 2-car garage. Beautiful
cherry cabinets, formal dining
room, & propane fireplace.
$179,900. For 24 hour
recorded information &
address, call 1-800-722-1389
and enter code 2366.
Mary Enck Realty, Inc.
Ranch home on approx.
.5 acre, Central air, l.p. gas
heat, 3 bedrooms, 2 tiled
baths-1 with jetted tub,
2 car garage, 12’x24’ sun
room. Very quiet and
peaceful section of
Charlwood Estates.
$195,000.
570-636-1471
Become a fan on
Facebook at
www.facebook.com/
pages/White-Haven-PA/
The-Journal-Herald
Foster Recycling
center open Saturday
The Foster Township Supervisors remind residents that the
recycling center at the township municipal building will be
open on Saturday, January 15 from 10 a.m. to noon.
Applications for dog licenses and order forms for reflective
address markers can also be picked up at the municipal build-
ing during regular business hours.
Amateur Radio Club
monthly meeting
The Delaware-Lehigh Ama teur Radio Club meeting will be
held Thursday, Feb ruary 3, at 7:30 p.m. in the Nancy Run Fire
Company Hall, 3564 Easton Ave., Bethlehem.
Program will be “Com puters in the Radio Shack” presented
by Jeff Welsh/ N3QO.
Members and interested public are welcome. For more infor-
mation: www.dlarc.org, KE3AW@ARRL.NET, or 610-432-
8286.
THE JOURNAL-HERALD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 2011—PAGE B5
The USS Liberty was an
Intelligence Ship. Its largest
weapons to defend itself was
50 Cals and small arms. On
the fourth day of the 1967
Arab Israeli War, USS Liberty
was steaming slowly in inter-
national waters, 14 miles off
the Sinai Peninsula. Israeli
arm ored forces were racing
deep into Sinai in hot pursuit
of the retreating Egyptian
army.
The Liberty, a World War II
freighter, was converted into
an intelligence vessel by the
top-secret US National
Security Agency, and was
packed with the latest signal
and electronic interception
equipment. The ship bristled
with antennas and electronic
‘ears’ including TRSSCOMM,
a system that delivered real-
time intercepts to Washington
by bouncing a stream of
microwaves off the moon.
The Liberty had been
rushed to the area to monitor
communications of Israel and
her foes, Egypt, Syria, and
Jordan. At 0800 hrs, 8 June,
1967, eight Israeli recon
flights flew over the Liberty,
which was flying a large
American flag. At 1400 hrs,
waves of low-flying Israeli
Mystere and Mirage-III fight-
er-bombers attacked the ves-
sel with rockets, napalm, and
cannon for 20 minutes, con-
centrating on the ship’s elec-
tronic an tennas and dishes.
The Liberty was left afire, list-
ing sharply. Eight of her crew
lay dead, a hundred seriously
wounded, including the cap-
tain, Commander William
McGonagle.
At 1424 hrs, three Israeli
torpedo boats attacked, rak-
ing the burning ship with
20mm and 40mm shells. At
1431 hrs a torpedo hit mid-
ship, precisely where the
intelligence systems were
located. Twenty-five more
men died.
The gunboats fired at crew-
men trying to fight the fires.
At 1515, the crew was
ordered to abandon ship. The
gunboat crews then poured
ma chine gun fire into the life
rafts, sinking two.
A rescue mission by US
Sixth Fleet was mysteriously
aborted on orders from the
White House. An hour after
the attack, Israeli warships
and planes returned. Com -
mander McGonagle gave the
order, “Prepare to repel
boarders,” but the Israelis,
probably fearful of interven-
tion by the US Sixth Fleet,
departed. The Liberty was left
shattered but still defiant, her
flag flying.
The attacks killed 34 and
wounded 171 out of a crew of
297, the worst loss of
American naval personnel
from hostile action since
World War II.
Described as “an accident”
instead of an attack, most of
the crew was denied even
hostile fire pay. The Presi -
dential Unit Citation was
awarded in secret and most
of the crew members are still
unaware of the award. In
addition the following medals
were awarded: The Captain:
Medal of Honor; The Exe -
cutive Officer: Navy Cross
Posthu mously; Several Crew:
Silver Star, most Posthu -
mously; Several Crew:
Bronze Star, some Posthu -
mously; 205 men: Purple
Heart, 34 Posthu mously; All
Crew Members: Combat
Action Ribbon; All Crew:
Presidential Unit Ci tation; All
Crew: National Defense
Ribbon. Many of the purple
hearts remain un-awarded
due to the secrecy. Only the
dead and wounded were
authorized hostile fire pay.
70% of the crew received
purple hearts.
Re member, Israeli forces
were on our side.
MEMORIAL DAY 2011,
THINKING AHEAD: Monday,
May 30, is Memorial Day this
year. Consider attending a
Memorial Day parade. Follow
up by attending an Ameri can
Legion, Veterans of Foreign
Wars or other Vet eran’s
organization ceremony after
the parade. Non-vets – try
and attend a simple ceremo-
ny.
Most communities have a
wall with names of those KIA
on it; White Haven does not.
The KIAs of all the wars
should be remembered and
honored. Though we do not
have a KIA wall, we have a
veterans’ wall. The names of
White Haven’s KIA are read
annually at the Laurel
Cemetery ceremony.
Remember also – young
Americans of all types will
always step forward and
defend the United States of
America – as they have
always done. Sure, the holi-
day is months away. Many
Vets, however, think about
why the holiday exists every
day and night – and will do so
for the rest of their lives. To
veterans, every day is memo-
rial day.
Veterans’ Corner
by John Kearns
Send information about your organization’s events to:
journalnews@pa.metrocast.net or call 443-9131 xt304 for the editor.
The Journal-Herald
SERVICE DIRECTORY
MURPHY LUMBER
Known for Quality Building Products & Personalized Service
Complete line of building products for the
contractor, as well as the DO-IT-YOURSELFER
WE DELIVER!!!
Route 437 North, White Haven
443-8292 • Fax: 443-9765
NOTARY PUBLIC
REALTOR
Lehigh Gorge
Notary Public
Title Transfers & Registration • Boats
Snowmobiles • ATVs • Cars • Trucks
Trailers • Motorcycles • All Services • Living Wills
Elizabeth Berger, Notary/Card Agent
(570) 443-9191 • Fax: (570) 443-7643
— Evening Appointments Available —
PHARMACY
Medicines, Cards
Health & Beauty Supplies,
School Items and More
at Competitive Prices
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Delivery
STORE HOURS &
PHARMACY HOURS
Mon.-Fri. 9-7 • Sat. 9-3
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Since 1984
202 Carbon Plaza
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ELECTRICAL
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PLUMBING, HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING
312 WINDY OAKS LANE
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(570) 427-8971 PAGER 598-1694
LUMBER & BUILDING SUPPLIES
FUEL SERVICE
MENGLE
Fuel Co.
• Heating Oil •
• Anthracite •
Coal by the Bag
Rice • Pea • Nut
427-4261
NOTARY
Buck Mtn. Tag-n-Title
at Traver’s old Garage, intersection of Buck Mountain Road & Lehigh Gorge Drive
• Title Transfers • Car, Truck & Trailer Plates
• Motorcycle & ATV Plates • In-Transit Plates
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427-8195 427-2117
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Specializing in All Aspects
of Residential Electric
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Anything you need we can do it!
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e-mail: jpeters@pa.metrocast.net
www.jamesspetersre.com
HAULING-CLEANUPS
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Attics, Basements,
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HOME IMPROVEMENT
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Lawn Care • Snow Plowing
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License #PA011896
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CALL A JOURNAL AD REP TO
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443-7757 • 578-9478
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Specialize in rewiring older homes!
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ELECTRICAL/PLUMBING
Join us for worship
in a relaxed setting
Sts. Francis & Clare
Anglo-Catholic
Chapel
427-4166 • 1498 Quakake Road,
Packer Township
Sunday worship-10 a.m.
People from all religious
backgrounds are welcome!
Fr. Frank Sefchick
COLONIALAUTOSALES.COM
We’re a REAL dealer
selling REAL cars to
REAL people!
1-800-421-3350
WHY PAY RETAIL?
BRAND NAME ITEMS AT GREAT PRICES!
We carry lots of everyday items
- soap, shampoo, beauty items, cleaners,
furniture, grills & much more!
PVS WHOLESALE
Located on Route 940 in between White Haven & Freeland.
Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. • (570) 636-9878
Look for YELLOW sign!
Blood Drive A Success
This past Saturday, we held a Blood Drive at the White
Haven VFW Memorial Post 6615. I would like to extend my
thanks to the Red Cross members, their volunteers and espe-
cially the individuals who came out to donate blood. We had
over 20 people come out even in the bad weather to give the
gift of life. I cannot express enough of what your gift means to
so many people in need.
The VFW along with the Red Cross have made plans to
hold Blood Drives on a quarterly basis. Please keep a look out
for future dates.
I was recently talking to some people I met about the
Veterans of Foreign Wars. Their immediate reaction was that
the VFW Clubs were just a bunch of veterans sitting around a
bar drinking and telling war stories. I quickly and proudly point-
ed out to them that yes, we have a social club but that is just
a small part of what the Veterans of Foreign Wars was all
about. I explained to them that the VFW Motto was “Honor the
Dead by Helping the Living.” The way we accomplish this is by
holding events such as Blood Drives, fundraisers, having
booths at functions such as the Jam Below the Dam, bake
sales and others. I showed them statistics on the hours we
volunteered, how much we raised and donated to the commu-
nity, youth organizations, hospital and nursing homes, home-
less shelters, wounded warriors, schools, churches, recycling
programs, Americanism Programs and many other organiza-
tions and programs.
Since June of 2010 until December 1 of 2010, the White
Haven VFW Memorial Post 6615 has accumulated 928 hours
of volunteer services, raised and donated $7,571 and traveled
487 mile to accomplish this and that. We are continually
adding to these totals. If you multiply these figures by the thou-
sands of other VFW organizations, you can only imagine the
total amount of good we do. I then asked them that if they hear
rumors that Veterans of Foreign Wars are just a bunch of vet-
erans sitting around a bar telling war stories, please tell them
what we actually do and what we stand for.
Sock Drive For Homeless Veterans: VFW Post 6615 and
Antonio’s Pizza Team Up For Homeless Vets: Once again,
this coming Saturday, the 15th of January we are holding a
“Sock Drive” for homeless veterans in shelters and in the VA
Hospitals. It is being held in front of Antonio’s Pizzeria located
near the White Haven Market, between 12 and 5 p.m. We are
asking everyone who is able to bring a new pack of white
socks for both men and women.
Anyone dropping off a pack of white socks will be given a
ticket for a free slice of Antonio’s fresh-baked pizza! For more
information you may call 443-3333. I extend my thanks in
advance to all who donate.
To all our Veterans and their families, I want to say thank you
for your service and your sacrifices. Remember to keep our
military men and women who are in harm’s way and through-
out the world in your thoughts and prayers. May God bless
them and may God Bless America.
VFW Commander’s Corner
by Cdr Robert Drury
S & T Coombe, Inc.
Stove & Fireplace Specialists
Over 70 units on display and 10 operating.
Coal, Gas, Pellet & Wood Stoves, Outdoor Furnaces
FREE DELIVERY
within 50 miles
(with purchase of any new stove.)
O N E S T O P S H O P
Showroom Location:
Route 940
(4/10 mile west of Route 115)
(570) 646-8254 • Mon. - Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
FREE REMOVAL
of old stove
(with purchase of any new stove.)
PAGE B6—THE JOURNAL-HERALD, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 2011
Visit our Facebook page for our new Lost &
Found pets section. And upload your own shots;
share them with the Journal-Herald community!
by Steve Stallone
Sports Editor
After Monday nightʼs game
between Crestwood and
Hazle ton Area, the visiting
Lady Comets posed at center
court as parents and other
fans snap ped off photos of
their team.
The scene was not some-
thing you normally see at the
midway point of a basketball
season. Then again, this was
no ordinary basketball game.
For the first time in the 20-
year history of Hazleton Area
High School, the Crestwood
girls beat the Lady Cougars –
on their home court no less.
Senior standout Chelsea
Cor nelius poured in a season-
high 22 points and grabbed 19
rebounds, and the Lady
Comets repelled every Lady
Cougar rally to hold on for the
milestone 60-50 victory.
The win pushed the Lady
Comets to 4-4 overall, and
more importantly 2-1 in the
Wyoming Valley Conference
Division I first half standings.
The Lady Cougars fell to 4-
7 overall and 1-2 in league
play.
“Itʼs a real, real, really big
win,” beamed third-year head
coach Isiah Walker. “Itʼs the
first time Crestwood High
School has beaten Hazleton
Area High School in varsity
girls basketball, so thatʼs why
itʼs so important to the girls.
We finally got past that
ʻalmostʼ point. Iʼm really proud
of the girls.
“Weʼre 2-1 in the league,
and thatʼs something positive,”
Walker continued. “I donʼt
think weʼve been 2-1 in the
conference in a while now. Itʼs
always been 0-3 to start, and
in the second half we make a
run. Hopefully my group of
girls can start something dif-
ferent.”
The Lady Comets grabbed
a quick 4-0 lead on a
Cornelius putback and two
Sara Andrews free throws
before Hazleton Area pulled
into a 4-4 tie with Alison
Schuetzʼs corner jumper and a
putback from Taylor Can non
midway through the first quar-
ter.
From there, Crestwood
began to assert itself. A
Rachel Ritz putback, a long
three-pointer from Cornelius
and her free throw capped a 6-
0 run that made it 10-4, a lead
the Lady Comets would never
relinquish.
Crestwood upped their 12-8
first-quarter advantage to 14-8
when Carina Mazzoni fed
freshman Rebecca Rutkowski
for an easy deuce early in the
second.
Hazleton Area pulled back
within two (14-12) thanks to
Annie Bonoʼs runner in the
lane and two Keanna
Schoennagle free throws, but
as they would do all night long,
the Lady Comets answered
with a run of their own. Amy
Jesikiewicz buried a three-
pointer as part of a 8-0 spurt
that pushed the lead back to
10 (22-12). Late in the quarter,
Rutkowski scored on a
rebound basket and then
Cornelius drove in for two
more to make it a 27-15 game
at intermission.
Hazleton Areaʼs inside tan-
dem of Taylor Cannon and
Cassie Sereta continued to
assert themselves in the sec-
ond half, when two Sereta
baskets and a Cannon bucket
capped an 8-2 Lady Cougar
run that cut the lead to five
(28-23) midway through the
third quarter.
But Crestwood responded
with 10-2 burst - keyed by four
points from Rutkowski - to
build a 13-point cushion that
remained 11 (40-29) at quar-
terʼs end.
The Lady Cometsʼ lead
grew to 16 as Kayla Gegaris
fed Rut kowski on the break,
Jesi kiewicz hit her second
triple of the game, and
Gegaris finished off a fast
break with a layup to make it
47-31 with 5:47 remaining.
Still, the Lady Cougars had
plenty of fight left. Cannon,
who finished with career highs
of 19 points and 21 rebounds,
scored four points during a 14-
5 spurt that moved Hazleton
Area back within seven (52-
45) with 57 seconds left.
“Taylor played great, she
really did,” Hazleton Area
head coach Joe Gavio said.
“She got a lot of offensive
rebounds, and thatʼs what we
need.”
From there, however, Crest -
wood closed things out at the
free throw line. The Lady
Comets went 13-for-18 in the
fourth quarter, including 11-
for-14 in the final 2:20, to wrap
up the historic win.
Walker said his teamʼs abili-
ty to handle the vaunted
Hazleton Area press, and hit-
ting its free throws, were keys
to the victory.
“I told them if we allow them
to press us, weʼre gonna lose.
If we can beat the press, I
guarantee weʼll win,” noted
Walker, whose Lady Comets
turned it over 25 times, but
broke the pressure with ease
at times to score easy bas-
kets.
In addition to Corneliusʼ big
game, which included three
steals and two blocks, the six-
foot Rutkowski came off the
bench to score 10 points, Ritz
had nine points and Andrews
went 7-for-8 at the line to back
her strong floor game (five
rebounds, two steals).
“With the loss of Alex
Plaviak (to a season-ending
injury), who was a big part of
our team, now the freshmen
and sophomores have to con-
tribute, and thatʼs what theyʼre
doing,” Walker said. “Iʼve got
stats filled by everybody all the
way through. Weʼre playing
great team basketball.”
“We had a lot of good looks,
the ball just wouldnʼt go in. It
almost looks like weʼre snake
bitten,” stated Gavio, whose
Lady Cougars got 87 shots but
made just 21 (24.1 percent).
“Until you start making some
shots, you canʼt win. A couple
of shots have to drop to get a
little confidence going.”
Afterward, Gavio lauded the
play of the Lady Comets.
“Crestwood did a nice job.
They crumbled a little bit in the
end, but they didnʼt break.
Theyʼve been waiting for this.
The bottom line is sometimes
you lose. Sometimes the other
team plays better than you
and you lose the game.”
NOTEWORTHY
- Crestwood shot 35.5 per-
cent (16-for-45), and HAHS
had a 52-46 edge off the
boards ... Hazleton Area
starter Caroline Schuetz was
injured early in the game and
was helped off the court. She
did not return ... In the junior
varsity game, Hazle ton Area
improved to 4-3 with a 52-39
win behind Taylor Cart erʼs 15
points. Rutkowski had 10 for
Crestwood.
CRESTWOOD (60)
Cornelius 5 11-16 22, Lutz 0
0-0 0, Andrews 0 7-8 7,
Mazzoni 0 0-0 0, Rutkowski 4
2-2 10, Gegaris 2 1-2 5, Ritz 3
3-4 9, Jesikiewicz 2 0-0 6,
Ciaverella 0 0-0 0, Cronauer 0
1-2 1, Sipple 0 0-0 0, Wojnar 0
0-0 0. Totals: 16 25-34 60.
HAZLETON AREA (50)
Bono 2 0-1 4, Schoennagle
1 2-2 4, A. Schuetz 1 0-0 2,
Pfeil 0 0-0 0, Ziminski 3 0-0 6,
Bach man 0 0-0 0, Sereta 5 0-
0 11, Cannon 8 3-4 19,
Zamonas 1 2-3 4, C. Schuetz
0 0-0 0. Totals: 21 7-10 50.
Crestwood........12 15 13 20 - 60
Hazleton Area.....8 7 14 21 - 50
Three-pointers: Jesikiewicz
2, Cornelius. Sereta.
Crestwood girls beat Hazleton Area, end 20-year drought
The Weatherly Area girls
basketball team snapped a
seven-game slide in a big way
Monday evening, beating
Williams Valley 50-36 on the
road in Tower City.
Three players spearheaded
Weatherlyʼs balanced attack,
with Alicia Panzarella showing
the way with 17 points, includ-
ing three three-pointers. Sara
Heister followed with a career-
best 12 points, and Tracy
Galada joined them in doubles
with 11 points.
With the win, Weatherly
improves to 2-7 overall and 1-
2 in Schuylkill League play.
Randi-Lyn Kolva paced the
Lady Vikings with 17 points
and Kayla Dietrich scored 13.
Weatherly also won the JV
contest, 44-38, behind Erin
Doughertyʼs 13 points.
WEATHERLY (50)
Panzarella 7 0-0 17, Heister
6 0-1 12, Galada 4 2-2 11, J.
Dougherty 1 0-0 2, E.
Dougherty 1 0-0 2, Hinkle 1 0-
0 2, Adamczyk 1 0-0 2,
Boyarski 1 0-0 2, Bizarre 0 0-0
0. Totals 22 2-3 50.
WILLIAMS VALLEY (36)
Kolva 7 3-6 17, Dietrich 3 7-
7 13, Miller 1 0-0 2, Pichorski
1 0-0 2, Shutt 1 0-0 2,
Merwine 0 0-0 0, Bixler 0 0-0
0, Thomas 0 0-0 0, Copper 0
0-0 0. Totals 13 10- 13 30.
Weatherly.............17 15 11 7 - 50
Williams Vy..........10 7 9 10 - 36
Three-pointers: Panzarella
3, Galada.
Lady Wreckers end slide at Williams Valley
Jonathan Wojnar poured in
a career-high 32 points and
six three-pointers Saturday,
leading the Crestwood boys
basketball team to a 69-58 vic-
tory over Pittston Area.
Alex Culver had 13 points
and Dave Piavis contributed
12 points for the Comets, who
led 35-28 at halftime and held
on with a 22-point fourth quar-
ter.
Three players hit doubles
for Pittston Area, led by Steve
Sklankaʼs 21. Joe Coyne
added 16 points and Steve
Stravinski had 15.
PITTSTON AREA (58)
Sklanka 6 8-10 21, Coyne 5
6-6 16, Stravinski 6 2-2 15,
Houseman 1 0-2 2, Emmett 0
2-2 2, Kovalski 1 0-0 2, Ro -
man 0 0-0 0, Schwab 0 0-0 0,
McDermott 0 0-0 0, Dimaggio
0 0-0 0, Ardoline 0 0-0 0.
Totals 19 18-22 58.
CRESTWOOD (69)
Wojnar 7 12-16 32, Culver 4
4-8 13, Piavis 5 1-3 12, J.
Fazzini 3 0-3 6, Pickett 1 0-0
2, Powell 1 0-0 2, C. Fazzini 0
2-2 2, Judge 0 0-0 0. Totals 21
19-32 69.
Pittston Area......15 13 14 16 - 58
Crestwood..........16 19 12 22 - 69
Three-pointers: Wejnar 6,
Culver, Piavis, Sklanka. Stra -
vinski.
JOURNAL SPORTS
Two Comets
bring home
WVC titles
Crestwoodʼs Matt Ritz
and Kyle Hankinson won
titles at the Wyoming Valley
Confer ence Wrestling
Cham pion ships on Sunday
at Lake-Lehman, but it was
the 189-pound champi-
onship bout between
Cough linʼs Josh Pop ple and
the Cometsʼ Mike Mirra that
had everybody talking.
The most anticipated
match of the night pitted two
of the conferenceʼs top
wrest l ers, and they didnʼt
disappoint. It took three full
periods and a pair
of overtime sessions before
Popple scor ed a reverse in
the second overtime and
rode out Mirra to win 4-2.
It was the first time
Popple had wrestled past
the first period all season,
as all of his matches ended
in pinfalls.
But Mirra, a state qualifier
last season, pushed him to
the limit before settling for
the silver.
The Comets did claim
back-to-back titles at 140
and 145 with identical 11-2
major decision victories.
Matt Ritz won his second
consecutive title by defeat-
ing Meyersʼ Darren Stucker,
while Kyle Hankinson beat
Coughlinʼs Steve Turner to
join him on the medal stand.
Crestwoodʼs Bob Gray
(112) also reached the
championship round, falling
to Hanover Areaʼs Justin
Elick by a 5-4 decision to
place second.
The Cometsʼ Matt Ham -
mer stone, just a sopho-
more, also enjoyed a solid
tournament, finishing third
at 152 pounds by defeating
Hanover Areaʼs Kurt Pericci
by major decision (9-1) in
the consolation finals.
Comets top Pittston Area
Shenandoah Valley outscor -
ed visiting Weatherly Area 18-
2 in the second quarter and
never looked back en route to
a 57-24 victory in Schuylkill
League boys basketball action
Friday night.
Josh Dombrosky led the
Blue Devilsʼ balanced scoring
attack with 14 points, Blaise
Breslosky added 12 and Jor -
dan Mays tallied 11 points.
Cory Rowan, Joe Haganey
and Kyle Harris all scored five
points for Weatherly (1-9).
Shenandoah Valley also
won the junior varsity game,
60-55. Storm had a game-high
21 points for Shenandoah
Valley. Brett Stallone led the
Wreckers with 16 points and
Josh Reiner followed with 14
points.
WEATHERLY (24)
Rowan 2 0-0 5, Coll 0 1-2 1,
Weichman 0 0-0 0, Ormiston 0
0-0 0, Lash 0 0-0 0, Hollrigl 1
0-2 2, Reiner 0 0-0 0, Hag -
aney 2 1-2 5, Stallone 0 0-0 0,
Walton 0 0-0 0, G. Wallish 2 0-
2 4, C. Wallish 1 0-0 2, Pal -
ermo 0 0-0 0, Harris 2 1-1 5.
Totals 10 3-9 24.
SHENANDOAH
VALLEY (57)
Dombrosky 6 2-2 14, Merva
0 1-2 1, Twardzik 2 0-0 4,
Breslosky 4 0-0 12, Savakinas
1 1-2 4, Marnell 1 0-0 2, Foy 0
0-0 0, Lewis 1 1-2 3, Mays 5 1-
4 11, Karahuta 1 0-0 2,
Marconi 1 0-0 2, Herb 1 0-0 2,
Riser 0 0-0 0, Storm 0 0-0 0.
Totals 23 6-12 57.
Weatherly............. 5 2 9 8 - 24
Shenandoah Vy..10 18 11 18 - 57
Three-pointers: Rowan.
Bres losky 4, Savakinas.
© 2 0 0 9 H o m e t o w n C o n t e n t
S u d o k u S o l u t i o n # 2 0 5 3 - M
6 1 8 7 2 4 3 5 9
4 3 9 5 8 1 6 2 7
2 7 5 9 6 3 4 8 1
7 4 3 2 5 9 8 1 6
9 5 6 1 3 8 2 7 4
8 2 1 6 4 7 9 3 5
3 9 4 8 7 5 1 6 2
5 8 2 4 1 6 7 9 3
1 6 7 3 9 2 5 4 8
© 2 0 0 9 H o m e t o w n C o n t e n t
S u d o k u S o l u t i o n # 2 0 5 3 - D
9 5 4 1 2 7 6 8 3
3 8 1 9 6 4 2 5 7
6 2 7 8 3 5 4 1 9
7 1 2 3 5 6 8 9 4
5 9 3 2 4 8 1 7 6
4 6 8 7 1 9 3 2 5
1 4 5 6 7 2 9 3 8
8 3 6 5 9 1 7 4 2
2 7 9 4 8 3 5 6 1
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THIS WEEK’S ANSWERS - page A4
Mountain Speedway in St.
Johnʼs was the scene for the
first race of the 2011 Moun tain
Madness Enduro series on
Saturday, January 8. The
Frostbite 5 was run on a snow-
covered track with snow still
falling from the sky. White
Haven was well represented
with two first place winners.
The first race of the day was
the 4-cylinder cars, won by
White Havenʼs own Sam
Ryan. Ryan started in the 12th
position with a 1991 Mazda
MX-6. After a slow start and a
long race on the snow-cov-
ered track, Ryan managed to
take first place and hang on to
the end. While not his first win,
it is the first win of the 2011
season.
By the time the 6/8-cylinder
race started, the flurries had
stopped, but the track was just
as snow covered. The S & M
Motorsports car started in the
6th position on the track with a
1978 Chevy Impala. Owner/
driver Tom Szoke, White
Haven, wasted no time mov-
ing to the head of the pack. By
lap five he was in the lead and
never looked back. 100 laps
later he made his way to
Victory Lane. With 14 top ten
finishes and two top fives, this
is the first win for the S & M
Motorsports #50 car.
The 2011 season will see
Szoke not only in the Enduro
car, but also in the #50 Fac tory
Stock car. This will be the first
year in the Factory Stock
series. Szoke has been racing
since 2006.

Both drivers are looking for
a successful year and can be
seen racing throughout the
season at Mountain Speed -
way. The #50 Factory Stock
car can be seen at the Laurel
Mall Racecar Show in
Hazleton March 2-6.
White Haven wins twice
at Mountain Speedway
SPORTS BRIEF
Barna helps L-CCC to basketball victories
Weatherly Area High School graduate Keith Barna was
instrumental in Lehigh Carbon Community Collegeʼs 81-78 win
over Sussex County Community College in menʼs basketball
action last Thursday.
With L-CCC trailing 78-76 and 24.9 seconds remaining, the
freshman guard went coast to coast for a layup and subse-
quent three-point play to put his team in the lead for good.
Barna finished with 14 points, six rebounds and five assists.
His L-CCC teammate, former Mahanoy Area High School
standout Mike Conley, scored 19 points and grabbed six
rebounds.
On Saturday, Barna scored 10 points and made seven steals
as L-CCC beat Luzerne County Community College 74-53.
Plaksa captures gymnastic title
Gianna Plaksa, 13, of Mountain Top, recently won the Level
9 All-Around title at the 2010 Christmas City Classic gymnas-
tics meet at Freedom High School in Bethlehem.
Plaksa competed against nine other gymnasts in the 14-and-
under division from top gyms along the east coast. She posted
a 35.550 score, which was the highest total for both her age
level as well as the 20 competitors from the Level 9 15-and-up
division.
Along with the overall title, Plaksa finished first on uneven
bars (8.675), second on floor (8.950), fourth on balance beam
(9.000) and fifth in vault (8.925).
Plaksa is an eighth grade student at Wyoming Seminary and
trains at the Northeast Gymnastics Complex under the guid-
ance of Lori Dexter. She is the daughter of Edward and Anne
Plaksa and the granddaughter of Michael and Anna Plaksa, of
the Woodside section of Foster Township/Freeland.
She will compete at the Hills Classic in Gaithersburg,
Maryland this weekend.
WHASA LL signups begin this month
White Haven Area Sports Association will begin Little League
Baseball registration this month.
All children ages 4 through 15
by May 1 are eligible to play. White Haven area includes all of
White Haven, Dennison Township, East Side, Kidder Township,
Penn Lake, and portions of Foster Township up to and includ-
ing Agmar Estates and Hickory Hill Developments and also the
eastern portion of Sandy Valley Road.
Sign-ups will be held at
the Parrish Center behind Saint Patrickʼs Church on Route 940.
Along with a registraion fee there may be an additional fee
assessed for concession or fundraising. No child will be turned
away for the inablility to pay. A payment plan or other arrange-
ments can be made.
The dates and times are as follows:
Saturday, Jan. 15, noon-2 p.m.; Tuesday, Jan. 18, 7-9 p.m.;
Saturday, Jan. 22, 2-4 p.m.; Tuesday, Jan. 25, 7-9 p.m.;
Saturday, Jan. 29, 10 a.m.-noon.
If you need assistance or have
any other questions you can contact Frank at 947-4745.
Tom Szoke and daughter Shelby Szoke.
SV boys upend Weatherly
Weatherly
frosh roll
Tyler Sipler scored 18
points as Weatherly defeated
Ma hanoy Area 61-47 in fresh-
man boys basketball action
Monday. Teammate Nick
Miller added 14 points for the
Wreckers.
Brian Miller had a game-
high 19 points for Mahanoy
Area.
In the seventh-eighth grade
game, Tyler Sipler rimmed 12
points to lead Weatherly to a
42-37 victory.
Brian Miller had 12 points
for Mahanoy Area.
CRESTWOOD
WRESTLING

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