Tropical geometry

Grigory Mikhalkin
Contents
Chapter 1. Introduction 1
1. Overview 1
2. The tropical semifield T 2
3. The affine space T
n
and the torus (T
×
)
n
≈ R
n
3
4. Integer affine structures on smooth manifolds 4
5. Morphisms and isomorphisms of integer affine manifolds 6
6. Examples of integer affine surfaces 8
7. Integer affine manifolds with corners 10
8. Tropical projective spaces 12
Chapter 2. Some (semi-)algebraic notions 15
1. Tropical algebras 15
2. Examples 16
3. Spectra of tropical algebras 17
4. Quotient semifields 20
5. Affine and convex functions in a tropical algebra 22
6. Affine structure resulting from the semialgebraic data 23
7. Regular functions and tropical schemes 25
8. Regular maps 26
Chapter 3. Hypersurfaces and complete intersections in T
n
29
1. Integer affine manifolds as tropical schemes 29
2. Hypersurfaces in T
n
29
3. Lines in the plane 32
4. Curves in the plane 38
5. Surfaces in TP
3
42
6. Complete Intersections 44
7. Balancing condition 44
Chapter 4. Tropical varieties 45
Chapter 5. Tropical equivalence 47
Bibliography 49
iii
CHAPTER 1
Introduction
1. Overview
Algebraic Geometry provides a uniform approach to some topologically
very distinct situations. As an example, let us consider a line in the affine
2-plane. Topologically this set-up only makes sense if we fix the ground field,
i.e. the possible values for the coordinates in the 2-plane. If the ground field
is R we have the “most classical” situation: the plane is indeed a real plane
R
2
and the line is a real line R.
For the other choices of ground fields the topological picture is different,
e.g. the complex plane C
2
is a 4-manifold while over finite fields we do
not have any interesting topology at all. In the same time despite such
differences the behavior of lines remain the same. Namely, via any pair of
distinct points in the plane we can draw a unique line. Also, any pair of
lines intersect in a single point (unless they are parallel). This behavior is
dictated by the algebra of linear equations.
Figure 1. The three new intersection points are collinear
according to the Fano axiom
Some other properties of lines in the plane depend on the choice of the
ground field. A famous example is the Fano axiom. Given any quadruple of
distinct points in the plane we may consider the triple of points obtained as
1
2 1. INTRODUCTION
the intersections of the pairs of lines corresponding to all possible choices of
two disjoint pairs among the four initial points. The Fano axiom states that
the resulting three points are collinear. This axiom clearly does not hold for
C or R, but it holds for the fields of characteristic 2.
When we pass to tropical geometry the ground field gets replaced with
the tropical semifield T (which we introduce in the next section) with limited
arithmetics and algebra. E.g., it becomes no longer clear how to even define
the characteristic of T. Meanwhile, such geometric objects as points, lines,
etc. are perfectly well-defined. In particular, the Fano axiom still holds in
tropical geometry. More general, in tropical geometry we may find reflections
of properties from rather different fields with different algebraic origins.
Most algebraic constructions are obstructed by the absence of subtrac-
tion in T. In the same time, geometry not only remains equally transparent,
but it gets more explicit and visual. The goal of this book is to justify this
statement.
2. The tropical semifield T
Definition 1.1. A commutative semiring is a set equipped with com-
mutative and associative operations of addition and multiplication so that
the distribution law holds while the addition and multiplication operations
both have neutral elements. A commutative semiring R is called a semifield
if the non-zero elements of R form a group (denoted with R
×
) with respect
to multiplication.
Example 1.2. The non-negative numbers R
≥0
equipped with the usual
addition and multiplication form a semifield. Its multiplicative group is the
group of positive numbers R
>0
.
The semifield introduced in the following definition is crucial for this
book.
Definition 1.3. The tropical semifield T is the set R∪{−∞} equipped
with the following two arithmetic operations called tropical addition and
tropical multiplication. If a, b ∈ T we set
“a +b” = max{a, b}
and
“ab” = a +b.
The quotation marks are used to signify that the arithmetic operations
we are referring to are tropical. It is easy to check that the usual commu-
tativity, associativity and the distribution law hold in tropical arithmetics.
Namely, we have “a + b” = “b + a”, “(a + b) + c” = “a + (b + c)”, “ab” =
“ba”, “(ab)c” = “a(bc)” and “a(b + c)” = “ab + ac” for any a, b, c ∈ T. The
element −∞ = 0
T
is the additive zero while 0 = 1
T
is the multiplicative
3. THE AFFINE SPACE T
n
AND THE TORUS (T
×
)
n
≈ R
n
3
unit, “0
T
+ a” = max{−∞, a} = a, “1
T
b” = 0 + b = b, for any a ∈ T,
b ∈ T
×
= T {−∞}. In addition we have “ − ∞a” = −∞ for any a ∈ T.
However, in contrast with the classical addition the tropical addition is idem-
potent:
“x +x” = x.
This property makes tropical subtraction impossible, T is only a semi-
group with respect to addition. On the other hand, the non-zero elements
T
×
= T {−∞} form a group (isomorphic to R) with respect to multipli-
cation and we have tropical division
“a/b” = a −b
as long as b = −∞.
Note that the semifield T has a natural (Euclidean) topology coming
from the identification of T with the half-open infinite interval [−∞, +∞).
This topology is natural from the algebraic point of view. Indeed, the Eu-
clidean topology on [−∞, +∞) is generated by the sets {x ∈ T | x > a} and
{x ∈ T | x < b} for a, b ∈ T
×
= (−∞, +∞).
Each inequality can be rephrased in agrebraic terms. Indeed the inequal-
ity a ≤ b for a, b ∈ T is equivalent to the identity “a+b=b”.
3. The affine space T
n
and the torus (T
×
)
n
≈ R
n
We define the tropical affine n-space as a topological space by
T
n
= [−∞, +∞)
n
.
Accordingly, we define the n-torus there
(T
×
)
n
= (−∞, +∞) = R
n
⊂ T
n
.
This definition immediately gives the topology on T
n
. The algebro-
geometric structure is given by regular functions on T
n
which come from
tropical polynomials.
Definition 1.4. A tropical polynomial f : T
n
→ T is a function given
by
f(x
1
, . . . , x
n
) = “
¸
j
1
,...,jn
a
j
1
...jn
x
j
1
1
. . . x
jn
n
”,
where a
j
1
...jn
∈ T, the indices j
k
are positive integers and the sum is finite.
Let us find the geometric structure on T
n
that would enable us to dis-
tinguish tropical polynomials from other continuous functions without a
reference to arithmetic operations in T. For that we restrict our attention
to the torus (T
×
)
n
.
4 1. INTRODUCTION
Note that if x ∈ T
×
then negative powers “x
−k
” = “
1
x
k
” = −kx also
make sense. Thus we also have the Laurent polynomials (T
×
)
n
→T defined
by

¸
j
1
,...,jn
a
j
1
...jn
x
j
1
1
. . . x
jn
n
”,
where a
j
1
...jn
∈ T, j
k
∈ Z and the sum is still finite.
Each monomial
“a
j
1
...jn
x
j
1
1
. . . x
jn
n
” = j
1
x
1
+· · · +j
n
x
n
is an affine-linear function in (T
×
)
n
= R
n
. Furthermore, the slope of this
function is (j
1
, . . . , j
n
) and thus it is integer. The geometric structure that
underlies such affine-linear functions is the integer affine structure.
4. Integer affine structures on smooth manifolds
Definition 1.5. Let M be a smooth n-dimensional manifold. An integer
affine structure on M consists of an open covering U
α
and charts φ
α
: U
α

R
n
such that for each α, β the overlapping map φ
β
◦ φ
−1
α
can be obtained
as the restrictions of an integer affine-linear transformation Φ
βα
: R
n
→R
n
.
Here a map f : R
n
→R
m
is called integer affine-linear if it is a composition
of a Z-linear map R
n
→R
m
(i.e. a map given by m×n matrix with integer
values) and a translation by an arbitrary vector in R
m
. The map f is called
an integer affine-linear transformation of R
n
if it is invertible in the class of
integer affine-linear maps (note that the invertibility implies that m = n).
The manifold M equipped with such structure is called an integer affine
manifold. As with all geometric structures of such kind we have the devel-
oping map. Namely, if x ∈ U
α
⊂ M, y ∈ U
β
⊂ M and γ : [0, 1] → M is a
continuous path connecting x and y then we have the map Φ
γ
αβ
: R
n
→ R
n
defined as follows.
The path γ([0, 1]) can be covered by a finite number of the charts U
α
j
,
j = 0, . . . k. We can make sure that U
α
j−1
∩ U
α
j
∩ γ([0, 1]) = ∅ for j > 0 so
that α
0
= α and α
k
= β. Then we define
Φ
γ
βα
= Φ
α
k
α
k−1
◦ · · · ◦ Φ
α
1
α
0
.
It is easy to see that Φ
γ
βα
depends only on α, β and γ but not on the choice
of U
α
j
. Furthermore, Φ
γ
βα
depends only on the relative homotopy class of
the path γ.
Recall that if we fix x ∈ M then a point in the total space
˜
M of the
universal covering π :
˜
M → M corresponds to a pair (y, [γ]), where [γ] is
the relative homotopy class of a path from x to y. Thus if we fix x and α
then we get a well-defined map δ :
˜
M →R
n
by setting
δ(y, [γ]) = Φ
γ
βα
◦ Φ
α
,
where U
β
is chart containing y.
4. INTEGER AFFINE STRUCTURES ON SMOOTH MANIFOLDS 5
Definition 1.6. The map δ is called the developing map.
As it is easy to see the value δ(y, [γ]) ∈ R
n
does not depend on the
ambiguity in the choice of β. By construction, the developing map is always
an open embedding.
Definition 1.7. The integer affine structure on a smooth manifold is
called complete if the developing map is proper.
Clearly, the product M × N of two integer affine manifolds M and N
has a natural integer affine structure.
Proposition 1.8. The product M × N is complete if and only if both
M and N are complete.
Proof. The proposition easily follows from the observation that the
universal covering of M × N can be obtained by taking the product of the
universal coverings for M and N.
For R
n
we have a notion of affine-linear functions with integer slopes or
simply integer affine-linear functions. These are the functions obtained from
linear maps R
n
→R defined over Z (i.e. such that the image of the integer
lattice Z
n
⊂ R
n
is integer) after adding an arbitrary constant. Clearly, the
pull-back of an integer affine-linear function under an integer affine-linear
map R
n
→R
n
is another integer affine-linear function on R
n
.
Furthermore, for any open subset U of an integer affine manifold M we
have a well-defined notion of an integer affine-linear function f : U →R. By
definition it is a function that corresponds to an affine-linear function with
integer slope on R
n
in each chart. These functions correspond to tropical
monomials. While the choice of presentation as a tropical monomial depends
on the choice of chart, these functions always correspond to some tropical
monomials in any chart. Taking the maximal value of integer affine-linear
function produces tropical (Laurent) polynomials. Thus geometrically, the
tropical structure on (T
×
)
n
may be rephrased as an integer affine-linear
structure on R
n
.
Recall that the differential of the integer affine-linear transformations
in R
n
is defined over Z. Thus an integer tangent vector is mapped to an
integer tangent vector. Thus for any integer affine (smooth) manifold M
and any point x ∈ M we have a well-defined integer lattice in the tangent
space T
x
M. This lattice varies smoothly from point to point.
Conversely, if we have a smooth manifold with a coherent choice of
integer lattice in the tangent bundle then it does not necessarily come locally
from the tautological integer affine structure on R
n
as this is a subject to
certain integrality condition. Locally such choice of lattice corresponds to
finding n linearly independent vector fields on R
n
. The integrality condition
is the (pairwise) commuting of these vector fields.
6 1. INTRODUCTION
Remark 1.9. We see that integer affine-linear smooth manifolds locally
can be considered as examples of tropical varieties (as they locally coincide
with (T
×
)
n
. Similarly, smooth manifolds with a coherent (but not nec-
essarily integrable) choice of integer lattice in the tangent bundle can be
considered as examples of almost tropical varieties.
5. Morphisms and isomorphisms of integer affine manifolds
Let M and N be integer affine varieties of dimensions m and n. A map
f : M → N is called an integer affine-linear map (or just morphism of integer
affine-linear varieties) if it is smooth and its differential maps any integer
vector tangent to M at any point x to an integer vector (tangent to N at
f(x)).
Consider a morphism f : M → N of integer affine-linear varieties, a
point x ∈ M and any pair of charts U
α
∋ x, V
β
∋ f(x).
Proposition 1.10. The map ψ
−1
β
◦f ◦φ
α
is the restriction to the domain
where it is defined (i.e. to U
α
∩ f
−1
(V
β
)) of an integer affine linear map
R
m
→R
n
.
Proof. It suffices to show that if f : R
m
→ R
n
is a map whose differ-
ential takes integer vectors to integer vectors then f is integer affine linear.
Applying a translation if needed we may assume that f takes the origin of
R
m
to the origin of R
n
.
We claim that the differential (df)
0
of such f at the origin coincides with
the map itself (after the natural identification of R
m
with the tangent space
at its origin). The integrality assumption assures that (df)
0
is defined over
Z. By the continuity argument the integrality assumption also implies that
(df)
x
= (df)
0
for every x ∈ R
m
.
Let v ∈ R
n
be any vector. It can be decomposed into a sum of integer
vectors v
j
, v =
¸
a
j
v
j
with a
j
∈ R. This allows to connect 0 and v with the
broken path such that each of its segment is parallel to one of the integer
vectors v
j
. Therefore, we have
f(v) =
¸
a
j
(df)
0
(v
j
) = (df)
0
(v).

A map f : M → N is called an isomorphism (or a symmetry) of integer
affine manifolds if it is invertible and both f and f
−1
are morphism. Then
we say that M and N are isomorphic as integer affine manifolds.
All isomorphisms of integer affine manifolds M form a group. If the
quotient M/G by a subgroup G of this group is a manifold (which is the
case if this subgroup acts in a properly discontinous fashion, i.e. every point
x admits a neighborhood U ∋ x such that all translates by the elements of
G are disjoint) then it gets a natural integer affine structure from M.
5. MORPHISMS AND ISOMORPHISMS OF INTEGER AFFINE MANIFOLDS 7
Clearly, R
n
is an affine integer manifold tautologically. The group of
its symmetries is the group of all integer affine-linear transformations of
R
n
. The action of the whole group is not properly discontinous, so we need
to restrict to a subgroup. The easiest properly discontinous subgroup is
the lattice generated by translation in linearly independent directions. But
there are other choices of subgroups, also using non-trivial linear parts (from
GL
n
(Z)).
Example 1.11. Consider the following examples of integer affine man-
ifolds obtained as the quotients of R
2
. Let M be the quotient of the plane
R
2
by the subgroup Λ generated by the vectors

a
b

,

c
d

.
For any choice of a, b, c, d ∈ R with ad−bc = 0 the resulting quotients are
integer affine manifolds. All of them are diffeomorphic (and diffeomorphic
to S
1
×S
1
). However they are not all isomorphic as integer affine manifolds.
E.g. if b = 0 then M is foliated by closed “horizontal” circles obtained
as the quotient (t, s), where for each circle s ∈ R is fixed while t ∈ R varies.
The condition b = 0 ensures that the points (t, s) and (t + a, s) coincide so
that we get a closed circle.
closed “horizontal” circles
form a fibration
no rational slope curve
is closed
Figure 2. Different integer affine structures n S
1
×S
1
.
Of course, being “horizontal” is not an intrinsic condition in M and
depends on the choice of chart to R
2
. But there is also an intrinsic property
that holds for these circles.
Definition 1.12. Let C ⊂ M be a curve. We say that it has rational
slope if it is tangent to an integer vector at its every point.
Alternatively we may define such curves as those which have rational
slope in each chart. This property does not depend on the choice of the
charts while being “horizontal” in one chart ensures rational slope in others.
Definition 1.13. Let C ⊂ M be a curve with rational slope and v ∈
T
x
C be a vector tangent to x ∈ C. We say that v is a primitive vector if it
is integer in T
x
M and cannot be presented as a non-trivial positive integer
multiple of another integer tangent vector.
8 1. INTRODUCTION
Proposition 1.14. For any x ∈ C the primitive tangent vector is unique
up to sign.
Proof. All vectors tangent to C form a 1-dimensional real vector space
while the integer vectors form a lattice isomorphic to Z ⊂ R.
With the help of the primitive vectors we may define intrinsic length of
a curve C with rational slope. Indeed, a 1-form α on C that takes value ±1
on primitive vectors is unique up to sign. Let γ ⊂ C be an arc on C.
Definition 1.15. The (intrinsic) length of γ is the integral

γ
|α|.
In charts the intrinsic length can be obtained by taking the Euclidean
length of γ and dividing it by the Euclidean length of a primitive vector
parallel to γ.
We return to Example 1.11. If b = 0 we can measure the length of the
“horizontal” circles. Clearly, all their lengths coincide and equal to |a|. If
they are the only closed curves with rational slope on M then |a| is the
isomorphism invariant.
We may also choose a, b, c, d ∈ R linearly independent over Q. Then no
circle in M can have rational slope. Indeed, suppose that on the contrary
we can find such a circle and it is parallel at its every point (in a chart
obtained by reversing the quotient projection) to an integer vector

m
n


R
2
. Then a multiple of

m
n

is proportional to an integer linear combination
j

a
b

+k

c
d

, j, k ∈ Z. But then n(ja+kc) = m(jb+kd) which contradicts
to the linear independence over Q.
6. Examples of integer affine surfaces
Example 1.16. Let R : R
2
→ R
2
be the gliding reflection obtained by
the composition of the reflection at the x-axis with a translation by

a
0

,
a > 0. Let B be a translation by

0
d

, d > 0.
The quotient of R
2
by the properly discontinous subgroup G of symme-
tries generated by R and B is a Klein bottle. Note that for this example we
have foliations both by horizontal and vertical circles. All of them, except
for two horizontal “core” circles have the same (intrinsic) length, equal to
2a and d respectively. The two horizontal “cores” have lengths equal to a,
see Figure 3 for one of the “cores”, the other is the result of identification
of the horizontal sides of the rectangle.
6. EXAMPLES OF INTEGER AFFINE SURFACES 9
core horizontal cirle of length a
horizontal cirles of length 2a
Figure 3. A Klein bottle with horizontal circles.
Note also that the vertical circles are dual to the first Stiefel-Whitney
class. Therefore d is an isomorphism invariant of M. The manifold M can
be obtained from the a × d rectangle by identifying the oriented opposite
sides, cf. Figure 3. The conjugation of G by an element from GL
2
(Z) results
in replacing the rectangle by a parallelogram, but the slopes of the sides of
this parallelogram will still have rational slope. Of course, such conjugation
does not change the isomorphism type of M.
So far our examples look very similar to examples of surfaces with Eu-
clidean structure (cf. e.g. [49], [67]). Consider now a radically different
example an integer affine structure on a torus. First, we construct a non-
trivial integer affine annulus.
Example 1.17. Let A : R
2
→R
2
be a map obtained as the composition
of a translation by

0
d

, d > 0, and the linear transformation of R
2
defined
by

1 1
0 1

. Let R be the quotient of R
2
by the group generated by A.
The surface R is an integer affine annulus that is different from the
quotient of R
2
by the group generated by any translation. Inside R we have
immersed curves with rational slope that have self-intersections as shown on
Figure 4. We identify the top side of the strip with the bottom so that the
corresponding bases match.
Note that the shear transformation is the only possible linear part for
an orientation-preserving deck transformation R
2
→R
2
corresponding to an
integer affine linear transformation as shown in the following proposition.
Proposition 1.18. If an integer affine linear transformation A : R
2

R
2
is fixed point free and orientation-preserving then its linear part L has
both eigenvalues equal to 1.
Proof. Let λ and µ be the eigenvalues of L. Since L ∈ SL
2
(Z) and
preserves orientation we have λµ = 1. If λ, µ = R then λ = ¯ µ as L is real.
Therefore |λ|
2
= |µ
2
| = 1 and L is an orthogonal matrix in some basis so
that A is a metric preserving transformation. From Euclidean planimetry
we know that A must be a translation.
10 1. INTRODUCTION
Figure 4. An integer affine annulus and two curves with
rational slope there.
If λ, µ ∈ R with µ =
1
λ
= λ then we may choose the coordinates in R
2
so that L is given by (x, y) → (λx,
1
λ
y). Suppose that the translational part
of A is given by

a
b

. It suffices to find (x, y) such that λx − x = a and
1
λ
y −y = b. But these linear equations clearly have solutions if λ = 0.
Example 1.19. Let T be the quotient of R
2
by the group generated by
the transformation A from Example 1.17 and a translation by

a
0

. This
is a compact surface diffeomorphic to the torus but not isomorphic to any
quotient of R
2
by a lattice of translations. Inside T we have immersed curves
with rational slope that have self-intersections as in the case of Example 1.17.
Example 1.20. Let K be the Klein bottle obtained as the quotient of
R
2
by the group generated by the transformation A from Example 1.17 and
the transformation R from Example 1.16. This group also acts in a properly
discontinuous manner so K is an integer affine surface. Just like the torus
T from Example 1.19 the Klein bottle K has immersed curves with rational
slope that have self-intersections.
In fact, Examples 1.19 and 1.20 admit the same tiling by fundamental
domains in R
2
shown in Figure 5.
Remark 1.21. Any integer affine manifold can also be considered as a
real affine manifold as we have embedding GL
n
(Z) ⊂ GL
n
(R). See [5], [36],
[47] for a discussion of real affine structures, particularly on a torus. See
also [16] for a discussion of affine structures with singularities.
7. Integer affine manifolds with corners
While integer affine manifolds are modeled on open sets in R
n
the trop-
ical affine space T
n
has boundary and corners.
7. INTEGER AFFINE MANIFOLDS WITH CORNERS 11
Figure 5. Tiling of R
2
by fundamental domains for Exam-
ples 1.19 and 1.20.
Definition 1.22. Let x = (x
1
, . . . , x
n
) be a point in T
n
= [−∞, +∞)
n
.
We call the sedentarity s(x) of x the number of coordinates x
j
equal to −∞.
The tropical affine space T
n
is a manifold near its point x if and only if
x has sedentarity 0.
Let Φ : R
n
→ R
m
be an integer affine-linear map. Let L be the linear
part of Φ which can be viewed as an (integer) m×n matrix. Let x ∈ T
n
R
n
be a point of positive sedentarity in T
n
. The image Φ(x) still makes sense
as a point in T
m
if whenever x
j
= −∞ the whole jth row of the matrix L
is non-negative. Here we use the convention “a(−∞)” = −∞ if a > 0 and
“0(∞)” = 0.
This gives us partially-defined extensions
¯
Φ : T
n
T
m
of integer affine-linear maps R
n
→ R
m
. The map
¯
Φ is continuous on the
domain of its definition. We treat such maps as integer affine linear maps
between affine tropical spaces. They allow us to extend the notion of integer
affine structure to a larger class of spaces almost by repeating Definition 1.5
Definition 1.23. Let X be a topological space. We say that X is an
integer affine manifold with corners if X is enhanced with an open covering
U
α
and charts φ
α
: U
α
→ T
n
such that for each α, β the overlapping map
φ
β
◦ φ
−1
α
can be obtained as the restrictions of a (partially defined) integer
affine-linear map
¯
Φ
βα
: T
n
T
n
that is defined everywhere of φ
α
(U
α
).
If x ∈ U
α
⊂ X then we define its sedentarity as the sedentarity of its
image φ
α
(x) ∈ T
n
.
Proposition 1.24. The sedentarity s(x) of a point x ∈ X does not
depend on the choice of the chart U
α
.
Proof. Suppose, on the contrary, that s(
¯
Φ
βα
(x)) < s(x) = k for x ∈
T
n
. Without the loss of generality we may assume that x
1
= · · · = x
k
= −∞.
12 1. INTRODUCTION
Then we know that the top k rows of the matrix giving the linear part L of
¯
Φ
βα
must consist of non-negative (integer) numbers. Since L is invertible
we may also assume without the loss of generality that the top k ×k minor
is not degenerate. But then the first k coordinates of
¯
Φ
βα
(x) are all equal
to −∞ and this supplies a contradiction.
Let X
s
be the locus of points of sedentarity s in an n-dimensional integer
affine manifold with corners X.
Proposition 1.25. The space X
s
is a disjoint union of integer affine
manifolds of dimension n −s (without boundary or corners).
Proof. Restrictions of the overlapping maps
¯
Φ
βα
to the coordinate (n−
s)-planes in T
n
(those defined by x
j
1
= · · · = x
js
= −∞) provides the
required integer affine structure.
Definition 1.26. The integer affine structure on a manifold with corners
is called complete if every component of X
s
is a complete integer manifold
for each s = 0, . . . , n.
Let X and Y be two integer affine manifolds with corners.
Definition 1.27. A map f : X → Y is called a morphism if for every
x ∈ X there exists charts U
X
α
∋ x, U
Y
β
∋ f(x) and a map Φ : T
n
→ T
m
,
T
n
⊃ U
X
α
, T
m
⊃ U
Y
β
, such that f(t) = (φ
Y
β
)
−1
◦ Φ ◦ φ
X
α
.
Note that this is a straightforward extension of the definition of mor-
phisms of manifolds without corners.
Clearly, any open subset U of a manifold with corner X is itself a man-
ifold with corners (though not necessarily complete even in the case when
the ambient manifold with corners X is complete).
Definition 1.28. The (tropical) monomial on U is any morphism U →
T.
Proposition 1.29. If U is complete then for any monomial κ : U →T
we have κ(U) ⊃ R.
Proof. The map κ can be lifted to a morphism from the universal
covering
˜
U →T. Its image has to contain R as
˜
U contains R
n
.
Note that T
n
has the tautological structure of an integer affine manifold
with corners. Furthermore, we can glue several copies of T
n
together to get
compact integer affine manifolds with corners. For us the most important
example is that of the tropical projective space.
8. Tropical projective spaces
Consider the set
TP
n
= T
n+1
{0
T
n+1 }/ ∼
8. TROPICAL PROJECTIVE SPACES 13
where 0
T
n+1 = (−∞, . . . , −∞) is the origin in T
n+1
and we set (x
0
, . . . , x
n
) ∼
(y
0
, . . . , y
n
) if there exists λ ∈ T
×
such that x
j
= “λy
j
” = λ + y
j
for any
j = 0, . . . , n. Clearly the set TP
n
gets a natural topology of the quotient.
Furthermore, it admits a natural structure of an integer affine manifold with
corners. As usual, we use the homogeneous coordinate notations x = [x
0
:
· · · : x
n
] ∈ TP
n
to denote the equivalence class of (x
0
, . . . , x
n
).
To see that we cover TP
n
with n + 1 open charts
U
j
= {x ∈ TP
n
| x
j
= 0
T
= −∞},
j = 0, . . . , n, (φ
j
(x))
k
= “
x
k
x
j
” = x
k
− x
l
, k = j.Here (φ
j
(x))
k
denotes the
kth coordinate of the image φ
j
(x) and the target of φ
j
is the hyperplane
T
n
⊂ T
n+1
given by {x ∈ T
n+1
| x
j
= 1
T
= 0}.
The overlapping maps
¯
Φ
jk
: T
n
T
n
, j = k are given by
(
¯
Φ
jk
)
l
= “
x
l
x
k
x
j
” = x
l
+x
k
−x
j
.
Clearly
¯
Φ
jk
is an integer affine map defined on {x
j
= −∞} ⊂ T
n
.
Proposition 1.30. The space TP
n
is homeomorphic to the n-simplex
Σ
n
so that a point inside a k-face of Σ
n
corresponds to a point of sedentarity
n − k. Furthermore, the integer affine structure induced in the interior of
each k-face is isomorphic to the tautological integer affine structure on R
k
.
Proof. The map
x → (
x
1
|x
0
| +· · · +|x
n
|
, . . . ,
x
n
|x
0
| +· · · +|x
n
|
)
provides the required homeomorphism to the standard simplex in R
n
≥0
(cut
by the half-space x
1
+· · · +x
n
≤ 1).
Similarly to Proposition 1.8 we get the following statement.
Proposition 1.31. If X and Y are integer affine manifolds with corners
then X × Y is also an integer affine manifold with corners. Furthermore,
X ×Y is complete if and only if both X and Y are complete.
Remark 1.32. In a similar way we may construct tropical counterparts
of more general toric varieties. A complex smooth toric variety is obtained
by gluing several copies of affine spaces C
n
(or, more generally, products of
affine spaces C
k
with tori (C
×
)
n−k
) by maps such that each coordinate is
given by a monomial.
The tropical counterparts are obtained by gluing copies of T
k
× T
n−k
by the maps given by the corresponding tropical monomials. As in the
case with projective space there is a sedentarity-preserving homeomorphism
with the corresponding polyhedron (see e.g. [15]). E.g. Figure 6 shows the
tropical plane blown up at 6 points which is diffeomorphic (as a manifold
with corners) to a hexagon.
14 1. INTRODUCTION
Figure 6. The tropical projective plane and the tropical
projective plane blown up at three points. Interior of both
polygons are isomorphic to the complete affine space R
2
with
the tautological integer affine structure.
CHAPTER 2
Some (semi-)algebraic notions
1. Tropical algebras
Definition 2.1. A T-cone is a set V with a choice of an element O ∈ V
called the origin equipped with a product operation
T ×V → V, (a, v) → “av”,
a ∈ T, v ∈ V , such that “(ab)v” = “a(bv)” for any a, b ∈ T, v ∈ V ,
“av” = “bv” if a = b and “v0
T
” = O.
Definition 2.2. A tropical algebra A is a semiring (recall according
to Definition 1.1 A has an additive zero 0
A
∈ A and a multiplicative unit
1
A
∈ A) equipped with a T-cone structure compatible with the semiring
operations, i.e. such that “a(fg)” = “(af)g” and O = 0
A
, subject to the
following additional property. For any f, g, h ∈ A if “fg” = “fh” for f, g, h ∈
A then either we have equality g = h or the element f is a zero divisor, i.e.
there exists
˜
f ∈ A such that “f
˜
f” = 0
A
.
Proposition 2.3. There is a natural embedding
ι
A
: T ⊂ A
which respects the semiring addition and multiplication: ι
A
(“a + b”) =
“ι
A
(a) +ι
A
(b)”, ι
A
(“ab”) = “ι
A
(a)ι
A
(b)”, ι
A
(−∞) = 0
A
and ι
A
(0) = 1
B
.
Conversely if A is semiring and ι
A
: T ⊂ A is such an embedding then
A is a tropical algebra as long as “0
A
f” = 0
A
and “ι
A
(a)f” = ι
A
(b)f for
any f ∈ A and a = b ∈ T.
Implicitly using this proposition we identify T with its image in A. In
particular, we have 0
A
= −∞ ∈ A and 1
A
= 0 ∈ A.
Proof. Define ι
A
(a) = “a1
A
”. Note that ι
A
is an embedding since A
is a cone. We have
ι
A
(“a +b”) = “(a +b)1
A
” = “a1
A
+b1
A
” = “ι
A
(a) +ι
A
(b)”
and
ι
A
(“ab”) = “(ab)1
A
” = “a(b1
A
)” = “(a1
A
)(b1
A
)” = “ι
A
(a)ι
A
(b)”.
To check the converse statement we note that ι
A
gives a T-cone structure
on A by “af” = “ι
A
(a)f”.
15
16 2. SOME (SEMI-)ALGEBRAIC NOTIONS
Definition 2.4. Let A and B be two tropical algebras. A map φ : A →
B is called a homomorphism of tropical algebras (or just a T-homomorphism)
if for any a, b ∈ A we have φ(“a+b”) = “φ(a) +φ(b)”, φ(“ab”) = “φ(a)φ(b)”
and, in addition, φ is identity on T, i.e. the diagram
T
ι
A
//
ι
B

?
?
?
?
?
?
?
A
φ

B
is commutative. As usual, an isomorphism is an invertible homomorphism;
an epimorphism is a surjective homomorphism and a monomorphism is an
injective homomorphism.
Definition 2.5. A tropical algebra B is called an integral domain if it
does not have zero divisors, i.e. for any f, g ∈ B such that “fg” = 0
B
we
have either f = 0
B
or g = 0
B
.
2. Examples
Example 2.6. Consider the semiring
T[x] = {“
k
¸
j=0
a
j
x
j
” | a
j
∈ T, k ∈ N ∪ {0}}
of formal tropical polynomials in one variable x. These polynomials can be
added and multiplied according to formal polynomial laws (recall that −∞
is our additive zero) and form The embedding ι : T ⊂ T[x] is tautological
a → a.
Similarly, the semiring T[x
1
, . . . , x
n
] of formal tropical polynomials in n
variables

¸
(j
1
,...,jn)∈J
a
j
1
...jn
x
j
1
1
. . . x
jn
n
”,
where a
j
∈ T and J is a finite subset of (N ∪ {0})
n
, is another example
of tropical algebra. For convenience we will use multi-index notations for
multivariable monomials: if x = (x
1
, . . . , x
n
) ∈ T
n
and j = (j
1
, . . . , j
n
) ∈ Z
n
then
x
j
= x
j
1
1
. . . x
jn
n
.
Example 2.7. Consider the tropical algebra O(T
n
) of functions
T
n
→T, x → f(x),
where f ∈ T[x
1
, . . . , x
n
] and x = (x
1
, . . . , x
n
) ∈ T
n
. The addition and
multiplication on O(T
n
) are pointwise tropical addition and multiplication,
while constant functions give the embedding T → O(T
n
). Elements of O(T
n
)
are called regular functions on T
n
.
3. SPECTRA OF TROPICAL ALGEBRAS 17
The tautological map
τ : T[x
1
, . . . , x
n
] → O(T
n
)
is an epimorphism. Note that τ
−1
(−∞) = {−∞}. Nevertheless, τ is not a
monomorphism (unless n = 0). E.g.
“0x
2
1
+ax
1
+ 0” = “0x
2
1
+ 0”
whenever a ≤ 0 ∈ T. Indeed, in this case we have (depending on x
1
∈ T)
either “ax
1
” = x
1
+a ≤ 2x
1
= “0x
2
1
” or “ax
1
” ≤ 0.
Definition 2.8. A tropical algebra A is called finitely generated if there
exist f
1
, . . . , f
n
∈ A such that any f ∈ A can be presented in the form
f = “
n
¸
j=1
a
j
f
j
”.
The elements f
1
, . . . , f
n
are called generators of A.
Equivalently, A is finitely generated if there exists an epimorphism
T[x
1
, . . . , x
n
] → A
for some n ∈ N.
Example 2.9. Consider the algebra T[x
1
, . . . , x
n
, x
−1
1
, . . . , x
−1
n
] of Lau-
rent polynomials in n variables “
¸
j∈J
a
j
x
j
”, where a
j
∈ T and J is a fi-
nite subset of Z
n
. This algebra is finitely generated by 2n generators
x
1
, . . . , x
n
, x
−1
1
, . . . , x
−1
n
.
3. Spectra of tropical algebras
Let A be a tropical algebra. Let B
1
and B
2
be two other tropical algebras
and φ
j
: A → B
j
be two epimorphisms.
Definition 2.10. The maximal spectrum Spec
m
(A) is the set of all
T-homomorphisms A →T.
The spectrum Spec(A) is the set of all epimorphisms A → B up to the
equivalence above, where B is an integral domain.
Example 2.11. We have
Spec
m
(T) = Spec(T) = {pt},
the only tropical epimorphism of T to another tropical algebra is the identity
T →T.
Definition 2.12. If f ∈ A and x ∈ Spec
m
(A) then we define the value
f(x) ∈ T as the image of f under the epimorphism x : A →T.
If U ⊂ Spec
m
(A) we denote
Funct(U) = {g : U →T | ∃f ∈ A : ∀x ∈ U g(x) = f(x)}.
18 2. SOME (SEMI-)ALGEBRAIC NOTIONS
Pointwise addition and multiplication turn Funct(U) to a tropical algebra.
Clearly we have the natural evaluation epimorphism A → Funct(U).
Proposition 2.13. For any a ∈ T and x ∈ Spec
m
(A) we have
ι
A
(a)(x) = a,
thus the image of ι
A
corresponds to the constant functions on Spec
m
(A).
Proof. Since x : A → T is a homomorphism of tropical algebras it is
identity on T.
Definition 2.14. The evaluation epimorphism A → Funct(Spec
m
(A))
is called the reduction epimorphism. We say that the tropical algebra A is
reduced if the reduction epimorphism is an isomorphism.
Let a : A → B be a homomorphism of tropical algebras.
Definition 2.15. The induced map
a

: Spec
m
(B) → Spec
m
(A)
is the map which takes an epimorphism x : B →T to x ◦ a : A →T.
Since a is an epimorphism of tropical algebras, so is x◦a. In particular,it
implies that x ◦ a maps onto T.
Proposition 2.16. If a : A → B is an epimorphism of tropical algebras
then a

is an injection.
Proof. If x = x

: B → T then there exists f ∈ B such that x(f) =
x

(f). But then x(a(g)) = x

(a(g)) for any g ∈ A such that a(g) = f.
Example 2.17. Any x ∈ Spec
m
(A) is an epimorphism A → T. It
induces an embedding Spec
m
(T) ⊂ Spec
m
(A) (cf. Example 2.11) that cor-
responds to the point x.
More generally, we have the following inclusions corresponding to such
embeddings when we pass to considerations of the full spectrum Spec(A).
Definition 2.18. If x ∈ Spec
m
(A), x : A → T, and F ∈ Spec(A),
F : A → B, we say that x is contained in F if x is contained in the image
F

: Spec
m
(B) → Spec
m
(A). In other words, x is contained in F if there
exists y ∈ Spec
m
(B), y : B →T, such that x = y ◦ F.
Thus F defines a subset of Spec
m
(A). Clearly, this subset can be natu-
rally identified with Spec
m
(B).
Definition 2.19. A subset X ⊂ Spec
m
(A) is called a basic closed set
if every tropical epimorphism Funct(X) → T corresponds to a point of
X. In other words, if x : Funct(X) → T is a tropical epimorphism then
the composition of the evaluation epimorphism A → Funct(X) and x is
contained in Z.
3. SPECTRA OF TROPICAL ALGEBRAS 19
In other words X is closed if the evaluation epimorphism A → Funct(X)
defines X (and not a larger set).
Proposition 2.20. An intersection of basic closed sets in Spec
m
(A) is
a basic closed set.
Proof. Suppose that X =
¸
j
X
j
and all X
j
⊂ Spec
m
(A) are basic
closed sets. Any tropical epimorphism x : Funct(X) → T can be composed
with the restriction epimorphism Funct(X
j
) → Funct(X). Therefore, the
composition of the evaluation epimorphism A → Funct(X) and x belongs
to X
j
for every j.
Recall that any collection of subsets define a topology as a pre-basis. We
apply this construction in the following definition.
Definition 2.21. A set X ⊂ Spec
m
(A) is called closed if it can be
presented in the form
X =
¸
α∈J
X
α
,
where J ∋ α is any parameterizing set and each X
α
is the union of a finite
number of basic closed sets.
It follows immediately from this definition that the intersection of any
number of closed sets is closed and that the union of a finite number of
closed sets is open as well. Furthermore, an empty set is closed as the
parameterizing set J can be empty. The whole set Spec
m
(A) is an example
of a basic open set as it is presented by the identity epimorphism A → A.
Thus Definition 2.21 gives a topology on Spec
m
(A).
A set U ∈ Spec
m
(A) is called open if Spec
m
(A) U is a closed set. We
refer to this topology as the spectrum topology on Spec
m
(A) to distinguish
it from a different topology (the Zariski topology) which we introduce later
on.
Proposition 2.22. The spectrum topology on Spec
m
(T[x
1
, . . . , x
n
]) co-
incides with the Euclidean topology on [−∞, +∞)
n
. Furthermore any closed
set in the Euclidean topology is a basic closed set in the spectrum topology.
Proof. If F ⊂ Spec
m
(T[x
1
, . . . , x
n
]) is a basic closed set then it corre-
sponds to an epimorphism T[x
1
, . . . , x
n
] → A. Consider Spec
m
(A). As each
T-homomorphism A → T also gives a T-homomorphism T[x
1
, . . . , x
n
] → T
by composition we have the identification of Spec
m
(A) and F. Since all
tropical polynomials are continous functions any accumulation point of F
also defines a T-homomorphism A →T. Thus F must be closed.
Conversely, if F ⊂ [−∞, +∞)
n
is closed then we may consider the re-
striction homomorphism T[x
1
, . . . , x
n
] → Funct(F). If y / ∈ F then we may
have two tropical polynomials f, g such that f(y) = g(y) but such that
20 2. SOME (SEMI-)ALGEBRAIC NOTIONS
f(x) = g(x) for any x ∈ F. Thus a point y ∈ [−∞, +∞)
n
does not give a
homomorphism from Funct(F) unless y ∈ F.
Similarly we get the following proposition.
Proposition 2.23. The spectrum topology on Spec
m
(T[x
1
, . . . , x
n
, x
−1
1
, . . . , x
−1
n
])
coincides with the Euclidean topology on R
n
. Furthermore any closed set in
the Euclidean topology is a basic closed set in the spectrum topology.
4. Quotient semifields
As in classical Commutative Algebra if A is a tropical algebra A which
is an integral domain then we can make a semifield Q ⊃ T out of T by
allowing fractions.
Lemma 2.24. If A is a tropical integral domain and f
j
, g
j
∈ A, g
j
=
0
A
, j = 1, 2, 3, are such that “f
1
g
2
” = “f
2
g
1
” and “f
2
g
3
” = “f
3
g

2 then
“f
1
g
3
” = “f
3
g
1
”.
Proof. Take a product of the left-hand and the right-hand sides of our
hypotheses “f
1
g
2
” = “f
2
g
1
” and “f
2
g
3
” = “f
3
g
2
”. We get
“f
1
g
2
f
2
g
3
” = “f
2
g
1
f
3
g
2
”.
Since A is a tropical algebra either the statement of the lemma holds or
“f
2
g
2
” is a zero divisor (cf. Definition 2.2). Since A is an integral domain
and g
2
= 0
A
we have f
2
= 0
A
. Then, in turn, f
1
= 0
A
and f
3
= 0
A
which
also verifies the statement of the lemma.
Definition 2.25. The quotient semifield Q = Rat(A) of a tropical inte-
gral domain A is the set of pairs (f, g), f, g ∈ A, g = 0
A
up to the following
equivalence relation (cf. Lemma 2.24 (f
1
, g
1
) ∼ (f
2
, g
2
) if
f
1
g
2
= f
2
g
1
∈ A.
We equip Q with operations of addition
“(f
1
, g
1
) + (f
2
, g
2
)” = (“f
1
g
2
+f
2
g
1
”, “g
1
g
2
”)
and multiplication
“(f
1
, g
1
)(f
2
, g
2
)” = (“f
1
g
1
”, “f
2
g
2
”).
It is easy to see that the equivalence class of the results of these operations
does not change if we replace (f
j
, g
j
), j = 1, 2, with an equivalent pair.
In accordance with the classical case we denote (f, g) ∈ Q with “
f
g
”.
Elements of the semifield Q are called rational functions associated with A.
From now on we suppose that a tropical algebra A is an integral domain
and Q = Rat(A) is its quotient semifield.
4. QUOTIENT SEMIFIELDS 21
Proposition 2.26. Q is a semifield that contains A as a subsemiring.
The embedding T ⊂ A ⊂ Q makes Q into a tropical algebra. The map
q : A → Q, q(f) = “
f
1
A
” is a monomorphism of tropical algebras.
Proof. Clearly, Q is a semiring since A is a semiring. Since we have
the inversion operation

1
f/g
” = “
g
f

Q is a semifield. If “
a
1
A
” is equivalent to “
b
1
A
”, a, b ∈ A then, by definition,
a = b. In particular, this gives an embedding T ⊂ Q which makes Q a
tropical algebra and q a tropical algebra monomorphism.
Proposition 2.27. Any homomorphism h : A → B of tropical algebras
naturally extends to a homomorphism H : Rat(A) → Rat(B).
Proof. We set H(“
f
g
”) = “
h(f)
h(g)
”.
The homomorphism q from Proposition 2.26 defines a map
q

: Spec
m
(Q) → Spec
m
(A)
by taking x : Q →T to x ◦ q : A →T.
Definition 2.28. A point x ∈ Spec
m
(A) is called finite if x ∈ q

(Spec
m
(A)).
We denote the set of all finite points in Spec
m
(A) with (Spec
m
(A))

.
Proposition 2.29. Non-zero elements of A have finite values at finite
points of the spectrum. I.e. if x ∈ Spec
m
(A) is finite and f = −∞∈ A then
f(x) = −∞ ∈ T.
Proof. Since a homomorphism x : A → T can be factorized through
q : A → Q it can be extended to “
1
A
f
”. We have “
1
A
f
”(x) = “
1
T
f(x)
” ∈ T,
therefore f(x) ∈ T
×
.
Example 2.30. Consider the tropical algebra T[x
1
, . . . , x
n
] from Exam-
ple 2.7. Its quotient semifield coincides with the quotient semifield of the
algebra T[x
1
, . . . , x
n
, x
−1
1
, . . . , x
−1
n
] as “
x
−1
j
1
T
” ∼ “
1
T
x
j
” (recall that 1
T
= 0). We
denote the resulting semifield in these cases with T(x
1
, . . . , x
n
) and call its
elements tropical rational functions in n variables.
Proposition 2.31. If Φ : A → B is a homomorphism then
Φ

((Spec
m
(B))

) ⊂ (Spec
m
(A))

.
Proof. By Proposition 2.27 we have the induced map of the spectra
of Q
A
and Q
A
Spec
m
(B)

→ Spec
m
(A)

that agrees with Φ

since H is an
extension of h. The required map is induced by the composition A → Q
A

Q
B
.
22 2. SOME (SEMI-)ALGEBRAIC NOTIONS
5. Affine and convex functions in a tropical algebra
Definition 2.32. An element f in a tropical algebra A ⊃ T is called
a primitive affine function if f = −∞ and whenever we have f = a + b,
a, b ∈ A, and we have either f = a or f = b.
Recall that Q

= Q {0} is an abelian group with respect to tropical
multiplication. Denote with Aff(A) the subgroup of Q

generated by all
primitive affine functions in A ⊂ Q.
Definition 2.33. Elements of Aff(A) are called affine functions associ-
ated with A.
An element of Q is called convex if it is a tropical sum of elements from
Aff(A) ⊂ Q. All convex functions form a semiring Conv(A) ⊂ Q.
Proposition 2.34. If f ∈ Aff(A) and a, b ∈ Conv(A) are such that
f = a +b then either f = a or f = b.
Proof. There exists a primitive affine functions h ∈ A such that “f +
h” ∈ A is a primitive affine function while “a + h”, “b + h” ∈ A. We have
“a+h+b +h” = “a+b +h” = “f +h” which contradicts to the primitivity
of “f +h”.
Definition 2.35. We say that a tropical algebra A is tame if the fol-
lowing conditions hold:
• for every c ∈ T

the image ι
A
(c) ∈ A is a primitive affine function
(we call such functions constant) so that T

⊂ Aff(A) is a subgroup;
• the quotient group Aff(A)/T

is a free abelian group of finite rank;
• the subset Aff(A) generates Q
A
in the semifield sense.
Proposition 2.36. If A is tame then for any f ∈ Q
A
there exist func-
tions g, h ∈ Conv(A) such that f = “
g
h
”.
Proof. Since Aff(A) provides a set of generators for the semifield Q
A
any element in Q
A
can be written as a ratio of two polynomial functions
from the elements of Aff(A).
Corollary 2.37. If A is tame then Spec
m
(Conv(A)) = Spec
m
(Q).
Proof. Since we have the inclusion Conv(A) ⊂ Q any epimorphism
Q → T determines an epimorphism Conv(A) → T by taking restriction.
Since Conv(A) generates the semifield Qthis gives an embedding Spec
m
(Q) ⊂
Spec
m
(Conv(A)).
To finish the proof we need to show that any epimorphismx : Conv(A) →
T can be extended to Q. This follows from Proposition 2.29 and Corollary
2.36.
Example 2.38. The free tropical algebra A = T[x
1
, . . . , x
n
] is tame.
The group Aff(A) corresponds to the group of all affine-linear functions
6. AFFINE STRUCTURE RESULTING FROM THE SEMIALGEBRAIC DATA 23
f : R
n
→R whose slope is integer:
f(x) =< s, x > +t,
s = (s
1
, . . . , s
n
) ∈ Z
n
, t ∈ R. The function f is primitive affine for A if
s
j
≥ 0, j = 1, . . . , n. Convex functions are finite tropical sums of elements
of Aff(A).
The tropical algebra A

= T[x
1
, . . . , x
n
, x
−1
1
, . . . , x
−1
n
] is also tame. We
have A

⊃ A and Aff(A

) = Aff(A) ⊂ A

. All elements of Aff(A

) are
primitive affine for A

.
The tropical semifield Rat(A) = Rat(A

) is itself a tropical algebra.
However, it is not tame as Aff(Rat(A)) is empty. E.g. both “
1
T
1
T
+x
1
” and

1
T
1
T
+x
−1
1
” are elements of Rat(A). However, we have the following expression
for the tropical sum of these elements

1
T
1
T
+x
1
+
1
T
1
T
+x
−1
1
” = “
1
T
+x
−1
1
+ 1
T
+x
1
1
T
+x
1
+x
−1
1
+ 1
T
” = “
1
T
+x
−1
1
+x
1
1
T
+x
1
+x
−1
1
” = 1
T
.
Thus 1
T
is not a primitive-affine function in Q.
6. Affine structure resulting from the semialgebraic data
If A is tame then Aff(A)/T

is a free finitely generated Abelian group.
Consider
T = Hom(Aff(A)/T

, R) ≈ R
n
.
This is an affine space with the tautological integer affine structure.
Proposition 2.39. If A is tame then we have a natural embedding
(Spec
m
)

֒→ T.
Proof. The embedding Aff(A) ⊂ A generates a homomorphism
(1) T[x
1
, . . . , x
n
, x
−1
1
, . . . , x
−1
n
] → Q
A
.
This gives a map (Spec
m
)

→ T. We need to show injectivity of this map.
Suppose that s
1
, s
2
∈ (Spec
m
)

, s
1
, s
2
: Q
A
→ T are distinct, but they
produce the same homomorphism after the composition with (1). But any el-
ement of Q
A
can be expressed in terms of the elements fromT[x
1
, . . . , x
n
, x
−1
1
, . . . , x
−1
n
]
(using addition, multiplication and division) since A is tame. As the values
of the functions fromT[x
1
, . . . , x
n
, x
−1
1
, . . . , x
−1
n
] at s
1
and s
2
are all the same
we get that the values of all the functions from Q
A
at s
1
and s
2
are also the
same which leads us to a contradiction.
Thus we may treat the finite part of the maximal spectrum of a tame
tropical algebra A as certain (sedentarity 0) points in the affine space asso-
ciated to Aff(A). This gives us a way to consider topological spaces much
more general than integer affine manifolds with corners. Unfortunately, most
of them won’t be useful for us as they’ll be rather far from being a manifold.
24 2. SOME (SEMI-)ALGEBRAIC NOTIONS
Example 2.40. Let K ⊂ [0, 1] ⊂ R be the Cantor set and let A be
the space of all functions A → T that can be obtained as a restriction of a
tropical polynomial f ∈ T[x], f : T →T, to K.
Then Spec
m
(A) = K as we can evaluate any f ∈ A on any point
y ∈ K. Conversely, if y : A → T is a T-homomorphism then it gives a T-
homomorphismT[x] →T (as the restriction to T produces a T-homomorphism
T[x] → A) and thus corresponds to a point y ∈ T. If y / ∈ K then the ho-
momorphism y : T[x] →T cannot factor through A as the value of f at y is
not determined by the values at K.
Note that Aff(A) = Aff(T[x]), so the tropical algebra A is still tame, so
in a sense we are considering the Cantor set enhanced with an integer affine
structure.
In the following chapters we introduce tropical n-dimensional varieties.
Locally they may look like either T
n
or some more general polyhedral n-
dimensional complexes in T
N
, N > n. They will never look like the Cantor
set from Example 2.40. The next example provides a tropical algebra whose
spectrum is a tropical variety (as we’ll see later).
Example 2.41. Let A be the algebra obtained by restriction of tropical
polynomials in two variables to the tripod Y ⊂ T
2
defined by
Y = [(−∞, 0), (0, 0)] ∪ [(0, −∞), (0, 0)] ∪ [(0, 0), (+∞, +∞)],
see Figure 1. The projection (x, y) → x gives a map π : Y → T that
induces a homomorphism π

: T[x] → A. Furthermore, the map σ : T → Y ,
x → (x, “x + 0”) also induces a homomorphism σ

: A → T[x] that is right
inverse to π

, i.e. π

◦ σ

= Id. The map σ

◦ π

gives a retraction of A to
the subalgebra of functions constant on the ray [(0, −∞), (0, 0)]
Figure 1. A planar tropical line and its retractions.
7. REGULAR FUNCTIONS AND TROPICAL SCHEMES 25
Note that Y is symmetric with respect to permutation of x and y. Thus
we also have a right inverse to the projection homomorphism T[y] → A. We
have Spec
m
(A) = Y , the space Y is called the planar tropical line.
7. Regular functions and tropical schemes
Let f ∈ Q and x ∈ Spec
m
(A). We say that the value of f at x is f(x) if
the epimorphism x : A → T extends to an epimorphism ¯ x :
¯
A → T, where
¯
A ⊂ Q is a subalgebra such that
¯
A ⊃ A ∪ {f} and ¯ x(f) = f(x). Since A
generates Q as a semifield the value f(x) ∈ T is unique (if it exists). Note
that for any f ∈ Q and x ∈ Spec
m
(A)

the value f(x) exists (and not equal
to −∞ ∈ T).
A point x ∈ Spec
m
(A) is called regular for f ∈ Q if there exists an open
neighborhood U ∋ x, U ⊂ Spec
m
(A), and an element g ∈ Conv(A) such that
the values g(y) and f(y) exist and g(y) = f(y) for any y ∈ U.
Let U ⊂ Spec
m
(A) be any subset.
Definition 2.42. The tropical algebra
˜
O(U) associated to a subset U
consists of all elements of Q that are regular at every point of U.
The tropical algebra O(U) consists of functions f : U → T such that
there exists an element
˜
f ∈
˜
O(U) ⊂ Q such that
˜
f(x) = f(x) for any x ∈ U.
An element of O(U) is called a regular function on U.
Note that O(U) is a quotient of
˜
O(U) as we have the evaluation epimor-
phism
ev
U
O
:
˜
O(U) → O(U),
see Definition 2.14.
Definition 2.43. A point x ∈ Spec
m
(A) is called a pole for f ∈ Q if f
is not regular at x. A point x ∈ Spec
m
(A) is called a zero of f ∈ Q if f is
regular at x, but “
1
f
” has a pole at x.
Definition 2.44. Each element f ∈ A defines a set V
f
⊂ Spec
m
(A) of
its zeroes. This set is called a hypersurface defined by f.
Proposition 2.45. The union of finite number of hypersurfaces is a
hypersurface.
Proof. We claim that
n
¸
j=1
V
f
j
is a hypersurface defined by
n
¸
j=1
f
j
. Clearly
all points of Spec
m
(A) are regular for any f ∈ A. Suppose that x ∈
Spec
m
(A) is regular for “
1
n
¸
j=1
f
j
”. Then x is also regular for “
1
f
j
” as it can be
obtained from “
1
n
¸
j=1
f
j
” by taking a product with all f
j
′ , j

= j.
26 2. SOME (SEMI-)ALGEBRAIC NOTIONS
Definition 2.46. A tropical scheme is a pair consisting of a topological
space X and a sheaf
˜
O
X
of tropical algebras on X such that for every point
x ∈ X there is an open neighborhood U ∋ x, a tropical integral domain A
and an open set U
A
⊂ Spec
m
(A) such that the pair (U,
˜
O
X
|
U
) is isomorphic
to the pair (U
A
,
˜
O
Spec
m
(A)
|
U
A
).
The scheme is called reduced if for any U the tropical algebra
˜
O
X
(U) is
reduced. In such case we set O
X
(U) =
˜
O
X
(U).
Since the restriction of a sheaf to an open set is a sheaf the tropical
integral domain A has to be such that
˜
O
A
|
U
A
form a sheaf. Note that clearly
we always have the required restriction homomorphisms ρ
V
U
:
˜
O
A
(V ) →
˜
O
A
(U) for V ⊃ U that are also always monomorphisms as we just take an
embedding of the elements of Q
A
that are regular on V in the larger set
of those elements which are regular on U. From now on we restrict our
attention to reduced schemes X. The sheaf O
X
is called the structure sheaf
of X.
Let f ∈ O
X
(V ) and x ∈ V for an open V ⊂ X Choose an open neighbor-
hood U ∋ x, U ⊂ Spec
m
(A). Thus x corresponds to a tropical epimorphism
x
A
: A →T. The value of f(x) is x
A

V
U∩V
(f)) ∈ T.
Proposition 2.47. The value f(x) does not depend on the choice of the
affine neighborhood U.
Proof. Suppose that x corresponds to a tropical epimorphism x
A
′ :
A

→ T another affine neighborhood U

∋ x with U

= Spec
m
(A

). Since
x ∈ U∩U

∩V both epimorphisms have to factor through the tropical algebra
O(U ∩U

∩V ) where both x
A

V
U∩V
(f)) and x
A
′ (ρ
V
U

∩V
(f)) have a common
lift ρ
V
U∩U

∩V
(f).
Definition 2.48. Let Z ⊂ X be any subset and f : Z → T be a
function. The function f is called regular if for any x ∈ Z there exists an
open neighborhood U ∋ x and g ∈ O
X
(U) such that f(y) = g(y) for any
y ∈ Z ∩ U.
Once again, all regular functions on Z together with pointwise addition
and multiplication form a tropical algebra which we denote Funct(Z).
8. Regular maps
Definition 2.49. A regular map between tropical schemes
Φ : (X, O
X
) → (Y, O
Y
)
is a pair consisting of a continuous map
f : X → Y
and a collection of tropical algebra homomorphisms
Φ

: O
Y
(U) → O
X

−1
(U))
8. REGULAR MAPS 27
for any open set U ⊂ Y that is consistent with the restriction homomor-
phisms of the sheaves O
X
and O
Y
, i.e. such that for any pair of open sets
V ⊂ U ⊂ Y the diagram
O
Y
(U)
ρ
U
V
//
Φ

O
Y
(V )
Φ

O
X

−1
(U))
ρ
Φ
−1
(U)
Φ
−1
(V )
//
O
Y

−1
(V ))
is commutative. Here ρ
U
V
are the corresponding restriction homomorphisms
for regular functions.
For simplicity of notations we will often suppress the symbols O
X
and
O
Y
and write a regular map just as Φ : X → Y .
Definition 2.50. A regular map Φ : X → Y is called a scheme embed-
ding if Φ is a set-theoretical embedding and for all open U ⊂ Y the homo-
morphisms Φ

: O
Y
(U) → O
X

−1
(U)) is an epimorphism. In this case X
is called a closed subscheme of Y , once we identify X with Φ(X) ⊂ Y .
Let V ⊂ Y be any set and W = Φ
−1
(V ). Suppose that f ∈ Funct(V )
and Φ : X → Y is a regular map. As usual, we have a set-theoretical
pullback of the function f, namely Φ

(f) : W →T, x → f(Φ(x)).
Proposition 2.51. The function Φ

(f) is regular in U, i.e. Φ

(f) ∈
Funct(W).
Proof. Since f ∈ Funct(V ) for every x ∈ V there exists an open neigh-
borhood U ∋ x and g ∈ O
Y
(U) such that g(y) = f(y) for every y ∈ U ∩ V .
We have Φ

(g) ∈ O
X

−1
(U)) by definition of the tropical map and, clearly,
Φ

(g)(z) = f(Φ(z)) for every z ∈ Φ
−1
(U) ∩ W.
CHAPTER 3
Hypersurfaces and complete intersections in T
n
1. Integer affine manifolds as tropical schemes
After a bit of algebraic formalism we return to our geometric objects:
integer affine manifolds.
Theorem 3.1. Any integer affine manifold X with corners can be nat-
urally considered as a reduced tropical scheme.
Proof. Locally X is modeled on an open set in T
n
= Spec
m
(T[x
1
, . . . , x
n
])
so that regular functions correspond to monomials, cf. Definition 1.28.
In particular, we may characterize the regular functions in terms of
integer-affine structure. Recall that a monomial is just a affine-linear mor-
phism to T.
Let U ⊂ X be an open set and f : U →T be a continuous function.
Proposition 3.2. A function f : U →T is regular at x ∈ U if and only
if there exist an open subset W ⊂ U and a finite collection of monomials
κ
1
, . . . , κ
l
: W →T such that f|
W
= max{κ
1
, . . . , κ
l
}.
Proof. We may choose W so that it is contained in a single chart φ
α
:
U
α
→T
n
. Then the second characterization coincides with the definition of
a tropical polynomial.
Also we may speak about tropical hypersurfaces in integer affine man-
ifolds with corners. A subspace V ⊂ X is called a hypersurface if for
any x ∈ V there exists a chart φ
α
: U
α
→ T
n
and a tropical polynomial
f
α
: T
n
→ T. such that V ∩ U
α
= φ
−1
α
(V

), where V

is the hypersurface
associated to f
α
. Thus to see the structure of hypersurfaces in X it suffices
to look carefully at the structure of hypersurfaces in T
n
.
2. Hypersurfaces in T
n
Let f : T
n
→T be a tropical polynomial
(2) f(x) = “
¸
j∈Z
n
a
j
κ
j
(x)” = max
j
a
j
+κ(x),
x = (x
1
, . . . , x
n
) ∈ T
n
. Here the some is taken over the finite number
of multi-indexes j, a
j
∈ T and κ
j
(x) = “x
j
1
1
. . . x
jn
n
”, so that “a
j
κ
j
” are
29
30 3. HYPERSURFACES AND COMPLETE INTERSECTIONS IN T
n
monomials. Recall that the hypersurface V
f
is the locus of all points x ∈ T
n
such that “
1
T
f
” is not regular at x.
Proposition 3.3. The hypersurface V
f
is the locus of points x ∈ T
n
where the maximal value in (2) is attained by more than one monomial
a
j
κ
j
.
Proof. If more than one monomial assumes the maximum at x then f
is strictly convex at x and thus “
1
T
f
” = −f cannot be convex. If only one
monomial is maximal at x then f is locally linear at x and thus −f is also
regular at x.
The monomials a
j
κ
j
naturally define a stratification of V
f
. Let J = {j ∈
Z
n
| a
j
= 0
T
} be the indices parameterizing the monomials that appear in
f. The set J is finite since f is a polynomial. For each x ∈ T
n
we define
K
f
(x) = {j ∈ J | f(x) = “a
j
κ
j
”,
in other words K
f
(x) is the set of the indices of the monomials where f(x)
assumes its maximum. Vice versa, for a subset K ⊂ J of cardinality greater
than one we may define the stratum V
K
f
⊂ V
f
by
V
K
f
= {x ∈ T
n
| K
f
(X) = K.
Note that V
K
f
is defined by a system of linear inequalities in T
n
⊃ R
n
and thus is a convex polyhedron (possibly unbounded) in T
n
. This means
that it is the closure in T
n
of a convex polyhedral domain in R
n
.
Proposition 3.4. We have T
n
=
¸
K⊂J
V
K
f
and
V
f
=
¸
|K|>1
V
K
f
.
Each component of T
n
V
f
naturally corresponds to a point j ∈ J, such
that “a
j
κ
j
” is maximal in this component.
Proof. this proposition is the direct corollary of Proposition 3.3.
For many subsets of J we have V
K
f
= ∅. If V
K
f
= ∅ we say that K ∈
Subdiv
f
and denote with ∆
K
the convex hull of K in R
n
⊃ K. Denote with

f
the Newton polyhedron of f, i.e. the convex hull of J in R
n
. Each ∆
K
is contained in a minimal affine-linear subspace in R
n
. Denote with ∆

K
the
relative interior of ∆
K
, i.e. the interior in the corresponding affine-linear
space.
Theorem 3.5. The polyhedra ∆
K
form a subdivision of the polyhedron

f
which is dual to the corresponding strata V
K
f
. Namely, we have the
following properties.
• If K
1
, K
2
∈ Subdiv
f
and K
1
∩K
2
= ∅ then K
1
∩K
2
∈ Subdiv
f
and

K
1
∩ ∆
K
2
= ∆
K
1
∩K
2
.
2. HYPERSURFACES IN T
n
31
• The (relatively) open polyhedra ∆

K
are disjoint: for any K
1
, K
2

Subdiv
f
, K
1
= K
2
we have ∆

K
1
∩ ∆

K
2
= ∅.
• ∆
f
=
¸
K∈Subdiv
f


K
.
• For any K ∈ Subdiv
f
we have dimV
K
f
+dim∆
K
= n. Furthermore
the affine-linear subspaces in R
n
generated by V
K
f
∩ R
n
and ∆
K
are orthogonal. (More rigorously, the Newton polygon ∆
f
and the
hypersurface V
f
∩ R
n
belong to dual vector spaces R
n
, but we may
identify them by introducing a scalar product to R
n
.)
• If ∆
K
1
⊂ ∆
K
2
then V
K
1
f
⊃ V
K
2
f
.
In particular, to each facet (i.e. an (n − 1)-dimensional face of V
f
) we
may associate a positive integer number equal to the integer length of the
corresponding interval in Subdiv
f
. Here the integer length of an interval
I ⊂ R
n
with ∂I ∈ Z
n
is the total number of integer subintervals in it (i.e.
#(I ∩ Z
n
) −1).
Proof. The last two properties come as straightforward applications of
Linear Algebra.
Note that for every j ∈ J the locus “a
j
κ
j
(x)” = f(x) is defined with
a system of linear inequalities and therefore is convex. Suppose that K ∈
Subdiv
f
and k ∈ ∆

K
. Then, by convexity, “a
k
κ
j
(k)” = f(x) exactly on
V
K
f
. Thus without loss of generality we may assume that K coincides with

K
∩ Z
n
.
Thus ∆

K
are disjoint and form a subdivision of ∆
f
. Suppose that K
1

K
2
= ∅. Then a generic point x of the convex hull of V
K
1
f
∪ V
K
2
f
must
correspond to K
1
∪ K
2
.
Remark 3.6. Subdivisions that appear in Theorem 3.5 are called con-
vex, regular or, sometimes, coherent lattice subdivisions of the polyhedron

f
, cf. e.g. [15]. The function j → a
j
is called the height function of the
subdivision. In real algebraic geometry such subdivisions appeared after the
discovery of the patchworking technique by Viro [68]. These subdivisions
come as projections of the top faces of the polyhedral domain in R
n
× R
obtained as the convex hull of the undergraph of j → a
j
, see [15].
Not all subdivisions are convex. Figure 1 depicts a classical example of
a non-convex lattice subdivision (see e.g. [68], [15]). To see non-existence
of the height function it suffices to look at the attachments of the would-be
faces around the inner square.
Remark 3.7. Theorem 3.5 gave a description of hypersurfaces in T
n
.
However, the same construction works also for hypersurfaces V in (T
×
)
n
,
TP
n
and other toric varieties as long as every component of V (its subset that
constitute a hypersurface itself) has non-empty intersection with the torus
(T
×
)
n
. Then the hypersurface V is still given by a tropical polynomial f in
32 3. HYPERSURFACES AND COMPLETE INTERSECTIONS IN T
n
Figure 1. A non-convex lattice subdivision.
n variables and can be obtained by taking the closure in the corresponding
toric variety of the toric part V
f
∩(T
×
)
n
of the affine hypersurface V
f
⊂ T
n
.
We often will use the same notation V
f
for a hypersurface in other toric
varieties.
3. Lines in the plane
The easiest examples to visualize are planar curves, i.e. hypersurfaces
in T
2
. Note that Y from Example 2.41 is an example of a tropical line in
the plane. Indeed, it is the hypersurface of f(x, y) = “x + y + 1
T
”. All
three monomials are equal at the origin while everywhere on the three rays
two of the three monomials are equal, but greater then the third remaining
monomial.
A general polynomial of degree 1 in two variables is of the form
f(x, y) = “ax +by +c”.
Thus a line in T
2
is the hypersurface associated to this tropical polynomial.
Note that as long as a, b, c = 0
T
any tropical line can be obtained from Y
by a translation in R
2
. More precisely, we have to take Y ∩ R
2
, apply the
translation and take the closure in T
2
again.
Indeed, the hypersurface, associated to “
f(x,y)
c
′′
= f(x, y)−c = max{(x+
a−c, y+b−c, 0} coincides with V
f
. But max{(x+a−c, y+b−c, 0} corresponds
to max{x, y, 0} under the translational change of coordinates x → x+a−c,
y → y +b −c. Note that the horizontal and vertical rays of Y end with an
infinite point (as the axes {y = −∞} and {x = −∞} are included in T
2
),
but the diagonal ray is open.
3. LINES IN THE PLANE 33
If one of the coefficients of f assumes the value 0
T
= −∞ then the
corresponding monomial is never maximal in f. Thus the corresponding hy-
persurface is the closure of the straight line which maybe horizontal, vertical
or diagonal, depending on which monomial disappears, see Figure 2.
Figure 2. Five lines in T
2
.
Consider now the case when two of the coefficients of f assume the value
−∞. If f(x, y) = c, c ∈ T
×
, then “
1
T
f
” = −c is regular everywhere on T
2
, so
V
f
= ∅. If f(x, y) = “ax” = x +a, a ∈ T
×
, then “
1
T
f
” = −x−a is regular as
long as x = infty, but not defined at the coordinate y-axis {x = −∞} of T
2
.
Thus in this case V
f
coincides with the y-axis. Similarly the hypersurface
of f(x, y) = “ax” = x +b, b ∈ T
×
, is the x-axis of T
2
.
The projective space TP
2
provides a compactification of T
2
by attaching
an extra line (called the infinite line). When we consider, e.g. a family
(3) f
t
= “ty +c”, t → −∞
the corresponding horizontal line moves to infinity and coincides with that
infinite line in the limit.
We may draw the corresponding deformation on the (finite) triangle.
For that we need to reparameterize R
2
to the interior of a finite triangle.
34 3. HYPERSURFACES AND COMPLETE INTERSECTIONS IN T
n
One of the most natural ways (along with the map provided by Proposition
1.30 to do that is via the combination of the logarithmic moment map
Log : (C
×
)
2
→R
2
, Log(z, w) = (log |z|, log |w|),
which is the moment map for the (C
×
)
2
-invariant form
dz
z

d¯ z
¯ z
+
dw
w

d ¯ w
¯ w
and the Fubini-Study moment map for CP
2
µ : (C
×
)
2
→R
2
, µ(z, w) = (
|z|
2
1 +|z|
2
+|w|
2
,
|w|
2
1 +|z|
2
+|w|
2
).
Note that the image µ(R
2
) is the interior of the triangle T = {(x, y) ∈
R
2
| x ≥ 0, y ≥ 0, x +y ≤ 1}. Both maps Log and µ have the same fibers,
so we have a well-defined map µ ◦ Log
−1
: R
2
→ Int(T), which is a diffeo-
morphism. Furthermore, this diffeomorphism extends to a diffeomorphism
TP
2
→ T. When we need to speak about the infinite points of varieties in
TP
2
it is more convenient to draw their images under this reparameteriza-
tion. Note though that the image of a straight line in R
2
is (in general) no
longer straight in T.
Figure 3. The image of a complex projective lines under
µ ◦ Log
−1
is an inscribed ellipse in T.
Remark 3.8. one of the advantages of the parameterization µ ◦ Log
−1
with respect to the parameterization provided by Proposition 1.30 is that
the image of a line in RP
2
is an ellipse that is tangent to the three sides of the
triangle T, see Figure 3. The points of tangency with the sides corresponds
to the points of intersection with the three coordinate axes (the x-axis, the
y-axis and the infinite line). These tangencies divide the circle into three
arcs, each corresponding to the real points of a line in a quadrant of (R
×
)
2
.
Note that a generic line in R
2
intersects three out of four quadrants.
The imaginary points of a line L ⊂ CP
2
that is real (i.e. invariant with
respect to the complex conjugation) are mapped inside this ellipse in the
3. LINES IN THE PLANE 35
2-1 fashion so that the the inverse image of a point inside the ellipse under
Log |
L
consists of a pair of complex conjugate points.
Furthermore, the image of any (not necessarily real) line in CP
2
is the
region in T
2
that is encompassed by an ellipse tangent to the sides of T.
Indeed, any line in CP
2
can be made real after the multiplication in (C
×
)
2
by a suitable pair (a, b), a, b ∈ C
×
. Note that the family of ellipses in R
2
is
5-dimensional and each tangency gives a condition of codimension 1. Thus
we have a 2-dimensional family of suitable ellipses and this corresponds to
the dimension of the space of lines in the projective plane.
The lines given by a binomial equation pass through an intersection point
of the coordinate axes (recall that we treat the infinite line as one of the
coordinate axes!) and correspond to the degeneration of ellipses to intervals
passing through a vertex of the triangle. The lines given by a monomial
coincide with one of the coordinate axes and correspond to a side of the
triangle.
The same parameterization works well for images of tropical lines. In-
deed, a generic line is made of three segment, where each segment is a
subinterval of a line passing through a vertex of T, see the first part of Fig-
ure 4. The second part of this figure shows how generic lines degenerate to a
binomial line. The last part of Figure 4 depicts the family (3) and its limit.
Figure 4. Images of tropical lines in T and their degenerations.
Thus we see that any line in TP
2
is either an R
2
-translate of the tripod Y
from Example 1 or a degeneration of such translates. Note that two generic
lines in TP
2
intersect in a unique point: e.g. any pair of lines in Figure 2
has such “transverse” intersection. In the same time we may find two lines
that have a whole ray in common, see Figure 5.
Later in this book we develop the tropical intersection theory which
allows to associate the cycle of the right dimension even for non-transverse
cycles A, B. This intersection cycle will be supported on the skeleton of the
set-theoretical intersection of the expected dimension. Each facet F of this
skeleton will be included to the cycle with an integer (possibly negative)
coefficient that depends only on the local structure of A and B near E.
36 3. HYPERSURFACES AND COMPLETE INTERSECTIONS IN T
n
stable intersection point
Figure 5. Non-transverse intersection of two lines in T
2
.
In particular, even though the lines from Figure 5 intersect along a ray,
their intersection cycle is the (sedentarity 0) endpoint of this ray. This
agrees with the notion of the stable intersection from [56] in the case when
the ambient space is an (integer affine) smooth variety.
Proposition 3.9. Any pair of points p
1
, p
2
∈ TP
2
can be joined with a
line. Furthermore, this line is unique unless this pair of line and one of the
intersection points of the coordinate axes (the points of sedentarity 2) are
collinear.
Proof. Applying a translation in R
2
to the tripod Y from Example 1
we may find a line L ∈ TP
2
such that its 3-valent vertices coincide with p
1
.
If the sedentarity of p
1
is positive then we may find a line L ∋ p
1
and a
family of non-degenerate lines L
t
so that the the trivalent point of L
t
tends
to p
1
. Generically, the line L separates TP
2
into three sectors, see Figure
6. If p
2
/ ∈ L then it is inside one of these sector. We can move L into this
sector so that p
2
is remained on L by a translation antiparallel to the ray
opposite to the sector of p
2
.
Theorem 3.10. Lines in TP
2
form themselves an integer affine manifold
with corners isomorphic to TP
2
.
This manifold is called the dual projective plane and denoted with
(TP
2
)

.
Proof. Note that from the algebraic point of view the statement is
trivial. Indeed, any line is given by a polynomial “ax+by+c”, a, b, c ∈ T
up to the simultaneous multiplication of the coefficients a, b, c by the same
3. LINES IN THE PLANE 37
move into
this sector
Figure 6. Finding a line passing via two points in TP
2
.
scalar λ ∈ T
×
. These triples of coefficients up to such rescaling form TP
2
by the very definition. Nevertheless, it is useful to look at the space of lines
from a geometric point of view. A chart near a line with the 3-valent vertex
in R
2
is given by that 3-valent vertex itself.
Consider now those degenerate lines that do not coincide with a coor-
dinate axes (those given by a binomial). These lines pass through a vertex
of the triangle T and a point on its side. We still have such a distinguished
point by tracing the limit of the 3-valent vertex under its approximation
by non-degenerate lines, but this point is the vertex of T, so it does no
longer determine the position of the line. Nevertheless, in the complement
of the three points corresponding to the coordinate lines we may identify the
space of all lines in TP
2
with the space of lines together with a distinguished
point (a 3-valent vertex in the case of non-degenerate line and a vertex of T
otherwise). Furthermore, via this distinguished point we may identify the
nondegenerate lines with the points of R
2
.
Consider the inversion σ : R
2
→ R
2
, (x, y) → (“
1
x
”, “
1
y
”) = (−x, −y).
This inversion does not extend to the vertices of TP
2
, but does extend to the
vertices of TP
2
enhanced with lines passing through them. This extension
gives a chart to T × T
×
in a neighborhood of non-coordinate lines passing
via the vertex of TP
2
. Note that we may easily describe the same chart in
coordinates. Finally, a coordinate line L is mapped to the opposite vertex
of T by the inversion while choosing a nearby point in the image completely
determines the line nearby to L. This gives a chart to T
2
.
Remark 3.11. Because of the inversion σ from the proof of Theorem
3.10 it is convenient to depict the dual plane with the inverted triangle, see
Figure 7. As a map (TP
2
)

TP
2
the inversion σ is only partially defined.
However, replacing of the vertex of TP
2
with all lines passing through this
vertex is the tropical counterpart of the blowing up of this vertex. It allows
one to define a new manifold X (that is the result of blowing up of TP
2
in
38 3. HYPERSURFACES AND COMPLETE INTERSECTIONS IN T
n
all three vertices) and everywhere defined maps X →TP
2
and X → (TP
2
)

,
see Figure 7.
blow down three sides
blow down 3 other sides
Figure 7. Passing from the projective plane to the dual
projective plane.
Note that X is an integer affine manifold with corners as tropical blowups
come with natural charts to T
2
. Furthermore, it is one of the toric varieties
from Remark 1.32, the one depicted on Figure 6.
4. Curves in the plane
Let us look at the conics in TP
2
. These are the hypersurfaces given by
quadratic polynomials
f(x, y) = “ax
2
+bxy +cy
2
+dx +ey +f”,
a, b, c, d, e, f ∈ T. We have six monomials and each can dominate the
polynomial f in a certain region in the plane (possibly empty).
The Newton polygon of f is the triangle ∆
f
with vertices (0, 0), (2, 0) and
(0, 2) or its subpolygon (in the case when some of the coefficients vanish, i.e.
assume the value 0
T
= −∞). By Theorem 3.5 there is a lattice subdivision
of ∆
f
for each conic C ⊂ TP
2
and, conversely, each coherent subdivision of

f
corresponds to a conic in TP
2
.
The smallest possible convex polygon with vertices in Z
2
is a triangle of
area
1
2
. Such triangles are called em the primitive triangles.
Definition 3.12. Curves dual to subdivision into primitive triangles are
called smooth planar tropical curves.
Primitive triangles do not contain lattice point other than their vertices.
Therefore, primitive triangulations (i.e. lattice decompositions of a Newton
polygon into primitive triangles) contain all lattice points of the polygon
among their vertices.
Consider a smooth conic V
f
⊂ TP
2
, see e.g. Figure 8. Because of the
smoothness condition each monomial m ∈ ∆
f
∩ Z
2
corresponds to a non-
empty region in TP
2
. Furthermore, all the edges of V
f
has weight 1. Let us
deform just one of the coefficients of f. It is easy to see that the resulting
deformation will leave the strata of V
f
disjoint from m invariant. In the
same time the edges of V
f
corresponding to the edges of Subdiv
f
adjacent
4. CURVES IN THE PLANE 39
the resulting region
Figure 8. Deforming one coefficient.
to m will move enlarging or diminishing the corresponding region depending
on whether we increase or decrease the coefficient of the monomial m.
Figure 10 shows some smooth conics together with the corresponding
subdivisions. It is easy to see that the figure exhaust all possible combina-
torial types of smooth conics.
Figure 9. Smooth planar conics.
It is instructive to look at the possible degenerations of smooth conics.
The simplest degeneration correspond to a coarser subdivision of ∆
f
when
we take into Subdiv
f
the union of two nearby primitive triangles instead of
taking each one individually. We have two combinatorially different cases:
the union of two could be a parallegram or it could be a triangle of area
1, see Figure ??. Note that the first case corresponds to a reducible conic
that decomposes to the union of two lines. The second degeneration can be
interpreted as a smooth conic that is tangent to a coordinate axis in TP
2
as
we shall see later.
The higher is the degree the more possibilities we have for the com-
binatorial type of the curve. List all combinatorial types would take too
40 3. HYPERSURFACES AND COMPLETE INTERSECTIONS IN T
n
weight 2 edge
Figure 10. Singular planar conics.
long already for the case of planar cubic. Figure 11 depicts a smooth and a
singular cubic.
Figure 11. Planar cubics.
The following two examples list two particularly simple combinatorial
types of smooth tropical curves of arbitrary degree. Note to specify a com-
binatorial type of a planar tropical curve of degree d we need to produce a
lattice subdivision of the triangle ∆
d
⊂ R
2
with vertices (0, 0), (d, 0) and
(0, d) (or a subpolygon of this triangle).
Example 3.13. Consider the square lattice in Z
2
. If we subdivide each
square into two triangles by the diagonal parallel to the line x + y = 0 we
get a subdivision of R
2
that is compatible with ∆
d
for any d. The resulting
4. CURVES IN THE PLANE 41
subdivision and the tropical curve in the corresponding combinatorial type
are pictured on Figure 12. The tropical curves in this combinatorial type
(as well as all their degenerations) are called honeycombs. They proved to
be useful for a range of problems related to the Horn problem, see [32].
Figure 12. Honeycombs.
Note that the honeycomb triangulation of ∆
d
is symmetric with respect
to the exchange of the x and y coordinates. Furthermore, it is symmetric
with respect to the action of the symmetric group S
3
that interchanges these
two axes and the infinite axis.
Our next example is not as symmetric.
Example 3.14. Let us subdivide ∆
d
⊂ R
2
into “floors” by the lines
y = 1, . . . , d−1. Each floor is a trapezoid that can be further subdivided into
the primitive triangles as shown on Figure 13. These subdivisions appeared
in [23] as coherent subdivisions of higher-dimensional simplices.
Figure 13. The Itenberg-Viro subdivision in dimension 2.
42 3. HYPERSURFACES AND COMPLETE INTERSECTIONS IN T
n
Remark 3.15. The coherence of the subdivisions in Examples 3.13 and
3.14 are verified by existence of the corresponding tropical curves. To check
the latter we may note that because the lines y = 1, . . . , d−1 are compatible
with both types of subdivision our tropical curves are glued from the curves
dual to trapezoids of height 1 as shown on Figure 14. These curves are
called floors. The kth floor has d − k vertical rays pointing up, d − k + 1
rays pointing down and no other vertical edges.
Furthermore, we may fix any positions (i.e. the x-coordinates) for the
vertical rays pointing down and find a smooth tropical curve in the needed
combinatorial type with such rays. Because of that we may inductively stack
a k+1th floor on top of the kth floor. In particular we may combine the floors
of different combinatorial types. Note also that any lattice subdivision of a
the Newton polygon of a floor (i.e. a subpolygon of the strip k −1 ≤ y ≤ k)
is coherent.
Figure 14. Floors and stacking them on top of each other.
Example 3.16. As our last example of a planar tropical curve we con-
sider a rather involved example of a curve of degree 10. It appeared in the
work of Itenberg [21] disproving the Ragsdale conjecture (a conjecture on
topology of plane real curves that appeared in 1905 in [55] and was finally
disproved only in 1992 [21]). The counterexample is provided by this very
curve once we equip it with the suitable real phases, see Figure 15.
5. Surfaces in TP
3
We start by looking at the hyperplane in TP
3
, i.e. the hypersurface given
by the tropical polynomial “ax + by + cz + d”. Similarly to the case with
the lines in TP
2
it is easy to show that any hyperplane with a, b, c, d = 0
T
is the result of translation of the (standard) hyperplane of “x +y +z +1
T

by a vector in R
3
. Again if some (but not all) of the coefficients a, b, c, d
assume the value 0
T
then we can interpret the corresponding hyperplane as
the limiting set of a family of translations of V
“x+y+z+1
T

in R
3
.
5. SURFACES IN TP
3
43
Figure 15. The Itenberg-Ragsdale curve of degree 10.
Figure 16 depicts a generic hyperplane H ⊂ TP
2
. It consists of 6 sectors,
all of them have a common vertex v ∈ R
3
. There are 4 outgoing rays from
v, in the direction (−1, 0, 0), (0, −1, 0), (0, 0, −1) and (1, 1, 1). Any pair of
these rays span a sector in R
3
diffeomorphic to the positive quadrant R
2
≥0
.
To get H we take the closure in TP
3
⊃ R
3
of the union of the 6 sectors.
vertex v
Figure 16. A tropical plane in the 3-space.
44 3. HYPERSURFACES AND COMPLETE INTERSECTIONS IN T
n
The position of the vertex v ∈ R
3
completely determines a tropical
hyperplane V
“ax+by+cz+d”
with a, b, c, d = 0
T
. Similarly to the case with lines
in TP
2
all hyperplanes are parameterized by the dual space (TP
3
)

⊃ R
3
.
More generally we have the following statement generalizing Theorem 3.10.
Theorem 3.17. The space of all hyperplanes (hypersurfaces given by
tropical polynomials of degree 1) in TP
n
forms an integer affine manifold
with corners isomorphic to TP
n
.
Proof. Let us first note that the Theorem is trivial if n = 1. Indeed a
hyperplane in TP
1
is given by a polynomial “ax + b” = max a +x, b in one
variable x, a, b ∈ T, “ab” = 0
T
. The corresponding hypersurface always just
the single point x = b −a ∈ TP
1
. Thus the set of such hyperplanes coincides
with the set of points in TP
1
.
To prove the theorem in general it suffices to prove show that if f is
a polynomial of degree 1 in n variables then the set V
f
determines the
coefficients of f up to their simultaneous tropical multiplication by a non-
zero constant. Indeed, once we prove this we can identify the space of
hyperplanes with the space of all coefficients up to the simultaneous rescaling
which is the tropical projective n-space by definition.
Recall that TP
n
is topologically a simplex. Each edge of this simplex
corresponds to a tropical line TP
1
obtained as the intersection of (n − 1)
coordinate planes. The hyperplane V
f
cuts a point on each such TP
1
unless
this TP
1
is contained in V
f
. Each such point is a hyperplane in TP
1
and
determines two coefficients of f up to scaling. If the line TP
1
is contained
in V
f
then both corresponding coefficients must be equal to 0
T
.
We call this space of hyperplanes the dual projective space and denote
with (TP
n
)

.
To understand the geometry of higher-degree surfaces in TP
3
(and more
generally the geometry of higher-dimensional tropical varieties) it is conve-
nient to introduce the notion of floor decomposition.
...
(TO BE CONTINUED)
...
6. Complete Intersections
7. Balancing condition
CHAPTER 4
Tropical varieties
45
CHAPTER 5
Tropical equivalence
47
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Contents
Chapter 1. Introduction 1. Overview 2. The tropical semifield T 3. The affine space Tn and the torus (T× )n ≈ Rn 4. Integer affine structures on smooth manifolds 5. Morphisms and isomorphisms of integer affine manifolds 6. Examples of integer affine surfaces 7. Integer affine manifolds with corners 8. Tropical projective spaces Chapter 2. Some (semi-)algebraic notions 1. Tropical algebras 2. Examples 3. Spectra of tropical algebras 4. Quotient semifields 5. Affine and convex functions in a tropical algebra 6. Affine structure resulting from the semialgebraic data 7. Regular functions and tropical schemes 8. Regular maps Chapter 3. Hypersurfaces and complete intersections in Tn 1. Integer affine manifolds as tropical schemes 2. Hypersurfaces in Tn 3. Lines in the plane 4. Curves in the plane 5. Surfaces in TP3 6. Complete Intersections 7. Balancing condition Chapter 4. Chapter 5. Bibliography Tropical varieties Tropical equivalence 1 1 2 3 4 6 8 10 12 15 15 16 17 20 22 23 25 26 29 29 29 32 38 42 44 44 45 47 49

iii

CHAPTER 1

Introduction
1. Overview Algebraic Geometry provides a uniform approach to some topologically very distinct situations. As an example, let us consider a line in the affine 2-plane. Topologically this set-up only makes sense if we fix the ground field, i.e. the possible values for the coordinates in the 2-plane. If the ground field is R we have the “most classical” situation: the plane is indeed a real plane R2 and the line is a real line R. For the other choices of ground fields the topological picture is different, e.g. the complex plane C2 is a 4-manifold while over finite fields we do not have any interesting topology at all. In the same time despite such differences the behavior of lines remain the same. Namely, via any pair of distinct points in the plane we can draw a unique line. Also, any pair of lines intersect in a single point (unless they are parallel). This behavior is dictated by the algebra of linear equations.

Figure 1. The three new intersection points are collinear according to the Fano axiom Some other properties of lines in the plane depend on the choice of the ground field. A famous example is the Fano axiom. Given any quadruple of distinct points in the plane we may consider the triple of points obtained as
1

“(ab)c” = “a(bc)” and “a(b + c)” = “ab + ac” for any a.. The quotation marks are used to signify that the arithmetic operations we are referring to are tropical. A commutative semiring R is called a semifield if the non-zero elements of R form a group (denoted with R× ) with respect to multiplication. b. E. Meanwhile. “ab” = “ba”.2 1. More general. c ∈ T.3. the Fano axiom still holds in tropical geometry. The semifield introduced in the following definition is crucial for this book. In particular. It is easy to check that the usual commutativity. associativity and the distribution law hold in tropical arithmetics. such geometric objects as points. geometry not only remains equally transparent. The Fano axiom states that the resulting three points are collinear. The tropical semifield T Definition 1. Its multiplicative group is the group of positive numbers R>0 .1. but it gets more explicit and visual. lines. Most algebraic constructions are obstructed by the absence of subtraction in T.2. When we pass to tropical geometry the ground field gets replaced with the tropical semifield T (which we introduce in the next section) with limited arithmetics and algebra. If a. 2. in tropical geometry we may find reflections of properties from rather different fields with different algebraic origins. Example 1. Namely. This axiom clearly does not hold for C or R. but it holds for the fields of characteristic 2. In the same time. The element −∞ = 0T is the additive zero while 0 = 1T is the multiplicative . The tropical semifield T is the set R ∪ {−∞} equipped with the following two arithmetic operations called tropical addition and tropical multiplication. “(a + b) + c” = “a + (b + c)”. INTRODUCTION the intersections of the pairs of lines corresponding to all possible choices of two disjoint pairs among the four initial points. are perfectly well-defined. The non-negative numbers R≥0 equipped with the usual addition and multiplication form a semifield. The goal of this book is to justify this statement. etc. it becomes no longer clear how to even define the characteristic of T. A commutative semiring is a set equipped with commutative and associative operations of addition and multiplication so that the distribution law holds while the addition and multiplication operations both have neutral elements.g. we have “a + b” = “b + a”. b ∈ T we set “a + b” = max{a. Definition 1. b} and “ab” = a + b.

Note that the semifield T has a natural (Euclidean) topology coming from the identification of T with the half-open infinite interval [−∞. Indeed the inequality a ≤ b for a.jn j j aj1 .. we define the n-torus there (T× )n = (−∞. .3. . In addition we have “ − ∞a” = −∞ for any a ∈ T. the Euclidean topology on [−∞. This definition immediately gives the topology on Tn . xn ) = “ j1 . +∞) = Rn ⊂ Tn . On the other hand. b ∈ T× = T {−∞}. b ∈ T is equivalent to the identity “a+b=b”. 3. THE AFFINE SPACE Tn AND THE TORUS (T× )n ≈ Rn 3 unit. This property makes tropical subtraction impossible.. b ∈ T× = (−∞. +∞)n .jn ∈ T. for any a ∈ T. . The affine space Tn and the torus (T× )n ≈ Rn We define the tropical affine n-space as a topological space by Tn = [−∞.. T is only a semigroup with respect to addition. xnn ”.jn x11 . where aj1 . Accordingly.4... . in contrast with the classical addition the tropical addition is idempotent: “x + x” = x. the indices jk are positive integers and the sum is finite. The algebrogeometric structure is given by regular functions on Tn which come from tropical polynomials. Indeed. a} = a.. “0T + a” = max{−∞. . For that we restrict our attention to the torus (T× )n .. . +∞). A tropical polynomial f : Tn → T is a function given by f (x1 .. the non-zero elements T× = T {−∞} form a group (isomorphic to R) with respect to multiplication and we have tropical division “a/b” = a − b as long as b = −∞. +∞) is generated by the sets {x ∈ T | x > a} and {x ∈ T | x < b} for a. Definition 1. “1T b” = 0 + b = b. Each inequality can be rephrased in agrebraic terms. Let us find the geometric structure on Tn that would enable us to distinguish tropical polynomials from other continuous functions without a reference to arithmetic operations in T. This topology is natural from the algebraic point of view. However. . +∞).

. 4.. 1] → M is a continuous path connecting x and y then we have the map Φγ : Rn → Rn αβ defined as follows. The map f is called an integer affine-linear transformation of Rn if it is invertible in the class of integer affine-linear maps (note that the invertibility implies that m = n). . jk ∈ Z and the sum is still finite. Thus if we fix x and α ˜ then we get a well-defined map δ : M → Rn by setting δ(y. n 1 j1 . 1]) = ∅ for j > 0 so that α0 = α and αk = β. . . [γ]) = Φγ ◦ Φα .jn xj1 . .jn where aj1 . Let M be a smooth n-dimensional manifold.. xjn ” = j1 x1 + · · · + jn xn n 1 is an affine-linear function in (T× )n = Rn . . Here a map f : Rn → Rm is called integer affine-linear if it is a composition of a Z-linear map Rn → Rm (i. a map given by m × n matrix with integer values) and a translation by an arbitrary vector in Rm . ˜ Recall that if we fix x ∈ M then a point in the total space M of the ˜ → M corresponds to a pair (y. β and γ but not on the choice βα of Uαj ..jn xj1 . jn ) and thus it is integer. where [γ] is universal covering π : M the relative homotopy class of a path from x to y... k. y ∈ Uβ ⊂ M and γ : [0.jn ∈ T.. β the overlapping map φβ ◦ φ−1 can be obtained α as the restrictions of an integer affine-linear transformation Φβα : Rn → Rn . Thus we also have the Laurent polynomials (T× )n → T defined by “ aj1 . 1]) can be covered by a finite number of the charts Uαj . Integer affine structures on smooth manifolds Definition 1. Φγ depends only on the relative homotopy class of βα the path γ. .. . . Then we define Φγ = Φαk αk−1 ◦ · · · ◦ Φα1 α0 . . Furthermore.. The path γ([0. j = 0. [γ]).. We can make sure that Uαj−1 ∩ Uαj ∩ γ([0. . the slope of this function is (j1 . The manifold M equipped with such structure is called an integer affine manifold. Namely. Each monomial “aj1 . INTRODUCTION Note that if x ∈ T× then negative powers “x−k ” = “ x1k ” = −kx also make sense. .5. Furthermore.e.4 1. The geometric structure that underlies such affine-linear functions is the integer affine structure. xjn ”. As with all geometric structures of such kind we have the developing map. if x ∈ Uα ⊂ M. βα where Uβ is chart containing y.. βα It is easy to see that Φγ depends only on α. An integer affine structure on M consists of an open covering Uα and charts φα : Uα → Rn such that for each α.

Thus an integer tangent vector is mapped to an integer tangent vector. such that the image of the integer lattice Zn ⊂ Rn is integer) after adding an arbitrary constant. Recall that the differential of the integer affine-linear transformations in Rn is defined over Z. The proposition easily follows from the observation that the universal covering of M × N can be obtained by taking the product of the universal coverings for M and N . the product M × N of two integer affine manifolds M and N has a natural integer affine structure. the developing map is always an open embedding. For Rn we have a notion of affine-linear functions with integer slopes or simply integer affine-linear functions. While the choice of presentation as a tropical monomial depends on the choice of chart. Furthermore. By definition it is a function that corresponds to an affine-linear function with integer slope on Rn in each chart. Thus for any integer affine (smooth) manifold M and any point x ∈ M we have a well-defined integer lattice in the tangent space Tx M . the pull-back of an integer affine-linear function under an integer affine-linear map Rn → Rn is another integer affine-linear function on Rn . This lattice varies smoothly from point to point. Taking the maximal value of integer affine-linear function produces tropical (Laurent) polynomials. Locally such choice of lattice corresponds to finding n linearly independent vector fields on Rn . if we have a smooth manifold with a coherent choice of integer lattice in the tangent bundle then it does not necessarily come locally from the tautological integer affine structure on Rn as this is a subject to certain integrality condition. The integrality condition is the (pairwise) commuting of these vector fields. As it is easy to see the value δ(y. Definition 1. Thus geometrically.8. Conversely. The product M × N is complete if and only if both M and N are complete. these functions always correspond to some tropical monomials in any chart. the tropical structure on (T× )n may be rephrased as an integer affine-linear structure on Rn . The integer affine structure on a smooth manifold is called complete if the developing map is proper.e. . Clearly.4.7.6. INTEGER AFFINE STRUCTURES ON SMOOTH MANIFOLDS 5 Definition 1. These are the functions obtained from linear maps Rn → R defined over Z (i. The map δ is called the developing map. These functions correspond to tropical monomials. for any open subset U of an integer affine manifold M we have a well-defined notion of an integer affine-linear function f : U → R. [γ]) ∈ Rn does not depend on the ambiguity in the choice of β. Proof. Proposition 1. By construction. Clearly.

9. 5. Therefore. It suffices to show that if f : Rm → Rn is a map whose differential takes integer vectors to integer vectors then f is integer affine linear. A map f : M → N is called an isomorphism (or a symmetry) of integer affine manifolds if it is invertible and both f and f −1 are morphism. Applying a translation if needed we may assume that f takes the origin of Rm to the origin of Rn . We claim that the differential (df )0 of such f at the origin coincides with the map itself (after the natural identification of Rm with the tangent space at its origin). All isomorphisms of integer affine manifolds M form a group.e. The map ψβ ◦f ◦φα is the restriction to the domain where it is defined (i. to Uα ∩ f −1 (Vβ )) of an integer affine linear map Rm → Rn . −1 Proposition 1. . v = aj vj with aj ∈ R. We see that integer affine-linear smooth manifolds locally can be considered as examples of tropical varieties (as they locally coincide with (T× )n . If the quotient M/G by a subgroup G of this group is a manifold (which is the case if this subgroup acts in a properly discontinous fashion. a point x ∈ M and any pair of charts Uα ∋ x. It can be decomposed into a sum of integer vectors vj . every point x admits a neighborhood U ∋ x such that all translates by the elements of G are disjoint) then it gets a natural integer affine structure from M . The integrality assumption assures that (df )0 is defined over Z. Proof. INTRODUCTION Remark 1. Consider a morphism f : M → N of integer affine-linear varieties. smooth manifolds with a coherent (but not necessarily integrable) choice of integer lattice in the tangent bundle can be considered as examples of almost tropical varieties. Morphisms and isomorphisms of integer affine manifolds Let M and N be integer affine varieties of dimensions m and n. Then we say that M and N are isomorphic as integer affine manifolds.10. By the continuity argument the integrality assumption also implies that (df )x = (df )0 for every x ∈ Rm .6 1. we have f (v) = aj (df )0 (vj ) = (df )0 (v). Let v ∈ Rn be any vector. A map f : M → N is called an integer affine-linear map (or just morphism of integer affine-linear varieties) if it is smooth and its differential maps any integer vector tangent to M at any point x to an integer vector (tangent to N at f (x)).e. This allows to connect 0 and v with the broken path such that each of its segment is parallel to one of the integer vectors vj . Similarly. Vβ ∋ f (x). i.

E. Consider the following examples of integer affine manifolds obtained as the quotients of R2 . if b = 0 then M is foliated by closed “horizontal” circles obtained as the quotient (t. Let C ⊂ M be a curve with rational slope and v ∈ Tx C be a vector tangent to x ∈ C. The easiest properly discontinous subgroup is the lattice generated by translation in linearly independent directions.11. where for each circle s ∈ R is fixed while t ∈ R varies. b d For any choice of a. so we need to restrict to a subgroup. Rn is an affine integer manifold tautologically.12. We say that it has rational slope if it is tangent to an integer vector at its every point. s). being “horizontal” is not an intrinsic condition in M and depends on the choice of chart to R2 . We say that v is a primitive vector if it is integer in Tx M and cannot be presented as a non-trivial positive integer multiple of another integer tangent vector. s) coincide so that we get a closed circle. MORPHISMS AND ISOMORPHISMS OF INTEGER AFFINE MANIFOLDS 7 Clearly. Definition 1. Let M be the quotient of the plane a c R2 by the subgroup Λ generated by the vectors . But there is also an intrinsic property that holds for these circles. Let C ⊂ M be a curve. b. c. d ∈ R with ad−bc = 0 the resulting quotients are integer affine manifolds. Alternatively we may define such curves as those which have rational slope in each chart. The condition b = 0 ensures that the points (t. Of course. closed “horizontal” circles form a fibration no rational slope curve is closed Figure 2. . The group of its symmetries is the group of all integer affine-linear transformations of Rn . also using non-trivial linear parts (from GLn (Z)).13. The action of the whole group is not properly discontinous. . But there are other choices of subgroups.g. s) and (t + a. Definition 1. However they are not all isomorphic as integer affine manifolds.5. Different integer affine structures n S 1 × S 1 . All of them are diffeomorphic (and diffeomorphic to S 1 × S 1 ). Example 1. This property does not depend on the choice of the charts while being “horizontal” in one chart ensures rational slope in others.

d ∈ R linearly independent over Q. Definition 1. We may also choose a. b. see Figure 3 for one of the “cores”. All of them.15. If they are the only closed curves with rational slope on M then |a| is the isomorphism invariant.8 1. 6. Then no circle in M can have rational slope. All vectors tangent to C form a 1-dimensional real vector space while the integer vectors form a lattice isomorphic to Z ⊂ R. Let R : R2 → R2 be the gliding reflection obtained by a .16. With the help of the primitive vectors we may define intrinsic length of a curve C with rational slope. k ∈ Z. Examples of integer affine surfaces Example 1. Note that for this example we have foliations both by horizontal and vertical circles. We return to Example 1. Let γ ⊂ C be an arc on C. If b = 0 we can measure the length of the “horizontal” circles. the composition of the reflection at the x-axis with a translation by 0 0 . For any x ∈ C the primitive tangent vector is unique up to sign. suppose that on the contrary we can find such a circle and it is parallel at its every point (in a chart m ∈ obtained by reversing the quotient projection) to an integer vector n m is proportional to an integer linear combination R2 . all their lengths coincide and equal to |a|. equal to 2a and d respectively. d > 0. The two horizontal “cores” have lengths equal to a. In charts the intrinsic length can be obtained by taking the Euclidean length of γ and dividing it by the Euclidean length of a primitive vector parallel to γ. Then a multiple of n c a . INTRODUCTION Proposition 1. But then n(ja+kc) = m(jb+kd) which contradicts +k j d b to the linear independence over Q. except for two horizontal “core” circles have the same (intrinsic) length. c. a 1-form α on C that takes value ±1 on primitive vectors is unique up to sign. Indeed. Clearly. Indeed. Let B be a translation by d The quotient of R2 by the properly discontinous subgroup G of symmetries generated by R and B is a Klein bottle. the other is the result of identification of the horizontal sides of the rectangle. . Proof.14.11. j. a > 0. The (intrinsic) length of γ is the integral γ |α|.

Inside R we have immersed curves with rational slope that have self-intersections as shown on Figure 4. Therefore d is an isomorphism invariant of M . First.g. and the linear transformation of R2 defined of a translation by d 1 1 . ¯ Therefore |λ|2 = |µ2 | = 1 and L is an orthogonal matrix in some basis so that A is a metric preserving transformation. µ = R then λ = µ as L is real. So far our examples look very similar to examples of surfaces with Euclidean structure (cf. Of course. The manifold M can be obtained from the a × d rectangle by identifying the oriented opposite sides. The conjugation of G by an element from GL2 (Z) results in replacing the rectangle by a parallelogram.6. Proposition 1. but the slopes of the sides of this parallelogram will still have rational slope.17. If λ. Note that the shear transformation is the only possible linear part for an orientation-preserving deck transformation R2 → R2 corresponding to an integer affine linear transformation as shown in the following proposition. e. Proof.18. If an integer affine linear transformation A : R2 → R2 is fixed point free and orientation-preserving then its linear part L has both eigenvalues equal to 1. EXAMPLES OF INTEGER AFFINE SURFACES 9 horizontal cirles of length 2a core horizontal cirle of length a Figure 3. A Klein bottle with horizontal circles. [49]. Figure 3. Let A : R2 → R2 be a map obtained as the composition 0 . . Let λ and µ be the eigenvalues of L. Let R be the quotient of R2 by the group generated by A. Since L ∈ SL2 (Z) and preserves orientation we have λµ = 1. such conjugation does not change the isomorphism type of M . Example 1. Note also that the vertical circles are dual to the first Stiefel-Whitney class. From Euclidean planimetry we know that A must be a translation. cf. d > 0. Consider now a radically different example an integer affine structure on a torus. [67]). We identify the top side of the strip with the bottom so that the corresponding bases match. we construct a nontrivial integer affine annulus. by 0 1 The surface R is an integer affine annulus that is different from the quotient of R2 by the group generated by any translation.

17 and the transformation R from Example 1. It suffices to find (x.17 and a translation by 0 is a compact surface diffeomorphic to the torus but not isomorphic to any quotient of R2 by a lattice of translations.10 1. See also [16] for a discussion of affine structures with singularities.19. This group also acts in a properly discontinuous manner so K is an integer affine surface. Suppose that the translational part a of A is given by . y) such that λx − x = a and b 1 λ y − y = b. An integer affine annulus and two curves with rational slope there. µ ∈ R with µ = λ = λ then we may choose the coordinates in R2 1 so that L is given by (x.21. Let K be the Klein bottle obtained as the quotient of R2 by the group generated by the transformation A from Example 1. See [5]. But these linear equations clearly have solutions if λ = 0. In fact. Remark 1. [36].19 and 1. Example 1.19 the Klein bottle K has immersed curves with rational slope that have self-intersections. This the transformation A from Example 1. Examples 1.20 admit the same tiling by fundamental domains in R2 shown in Figure 5. [47] for a discussion of real affine structures.16. particularly on a torus.17. Let T be the quotient of R2 by the group generated by a . . 1 If λ. Inside T we have immersed curves with rational slope that have self-intersections as in the case of Example 1. Example 1. Any integer affine manifold can also be considered as a real affine manifold as we have embedding GLn (Z) ⊂ GLn (R). Just like the torus T from Example 1.20. λ y). Integer affine manifolds with corners While integer affine manifolds are modeled on open sets in Rn the tropical affine space Tn has boundary and corners. 7. y) → (λx. INTRODUCTION Figure 4.

Let Φ : Rn → Rm be an integer affine-linear map.19 and 1.23. This gives us partially-defined extensions ¯ Φ : Tn Tm ¯ of integer affine-linear maps Rn → Rm . The map Φ is continuous on the domain of its definition. xn ) be a point in Tn = [−∞. Let X be a topological space. .22. The tropical affine space Tn is a manifold near its point x if and only if x has sedentarity 0. ¯ Proof. INTEGER AFFINE MANIFOLDS WITH CORNERS 11 Figure 5. +∞)n . If x ∈ Uα ⊂ X then we define its sedentarity as the sedentarity of its image φα (x) ∈ Tn . . . Let L be the linear part of Φ which can be viewed as an (integer) m×n matrix.20. Tn . We say that X is an integer affine manifold with corners if X is enhanced with an open covering Uα and charts φα : Uα → Tn such that for each α.7.5 Definition 1. Proposition 1. that s(Φβα (x)) < s(x) = k for x ∈ Without the loss of generality we may assume that x1 = · · · = xk = −∞.24. Suppose. Let x = (x1 . The image Φ(x) still makes sense as a point in Tm if whenever xj = −∞ the whole jth row of the matrix L is non-negative. Tiling of R2 by fundamental domains for Examples 1. Let x ∈ Tn Rn be a point of positive sedentarity in Tn . β the overlapping map φβ ◦ φ−1 can be obtained as the restrictions of a (partially defined) integer α ¯ affine-linear map Φβα : Tn Tn that is defined everywhere of φα (Uα ). We treat such maps as integer affine linear maps between affine tropical spaces. on the contrary. The sedentarity s(x) of a point x ∈ X does not depend on the choice of the chart Uα . We call the sedentarity s(x) of x the number of coordinates xj equal to −∞. Here we use the convention “a(−∞)” = −∞ if a > 0 and “0(∞)” = 0. . Definition 1. . They allow us to extend the notion of integer affine structure to a larger class of spaces almost by repeating Definition 1.

Proof.12 1. If U is complete then for any monomial κ : U → T we have κ(U ) ⊃ R. Since L is invertible we may also assume without the loss of generality that the top k × k minor ¯ is not degenerate.28. The map κ can be lifted to a morphism from the universal ˜ ˜ covering U → T. Let Xs be the locus of points of sedentarity s in an n-dimensional integer affine manifold with corners X. The (tropical) monomial on U is any morphism U → T. Proposition 1. Definition 1. α β Note that this is a straightforward extension of the definition of morphisms of manifolds without corners. But then the first k coordinates of Φβα (x) are all equal to −∞ and this supplies a contradiction. Clearly. Definition 1. Furthermore.26. INTRODUCTION Then we know that the top k rows of the matrix giving the linear part L of ¯ Φβα must consist of non-negative (integer) numbers. . .25. .27.29. such that f (t) = (φY )−1 ◦ Φ ◦ φX . n. Restrictions of the overlapping maps Φβα to the coordinate (n− n (those defined by x s)-planes in T j1 = · · · = xjs = −∞) provides the required integer affine structure. 8. Tm ⊃ Uβ . Uβ ∋ f (x) and a map Φ : Tn → Tm . . ¯ Proof. we can glue several copies of Tn together to get compact integer affine manifolds with corners. A map f : X → Y is called a morphism if for every Y X x ∈ X there exists charts Uα ∋ x. Note that Tn has the tautological structure of an integer affine manifold with corners. Let X and Y be two integer affine manifolds with corners. Y X Tn ⊃ Uα . any open subset U of a manifold with corner X is itself a manifold with corners (though not necessarily complete even in the case when the ambient manifold with corners X is complete). For us the most important example is that of the tropical projective space. Tropical projective spaces Consider the set TPn = Tn+1 {0Tn+1 }/ ∼ . Its image has to contain R as U contains Rn . Definition 1. The space Xs is a disjoint union of integer affine manifolds of dimension n − s (without boundary or corners). Proposition 1. The integer affine structure on a manifold with corners is called complete if every component of Xs is a complete integer manifold for each s = 0.

.. The map x→( x1 xn . X × Y is complete if and only if both X and Y are complete. k = j. . it admits a natural structure of an integer affine manifold with corners. . .8.8 we get the following statement. . Furthermore. Figure 6 shows the tropical plane blown up at 6 points which is diffeomorphic (as a manifold with corners) to a hexagon. To see that we cover TPn with n + 1 open charts Uj = {x ∈ TPn | xj = 0T = −∞}. . yn ) if there exists λ ∈ T× such that xj = “λyj ” = λ + yj for any j = 0. Similarly to Proposition 1. . Furthermore. . . . . The tropical counterparts are obtained by gluing copies of Tk × Tn−k by the maps given by the corresponding tropical monomials. . As usual. (φj (x))k = “ xk ” = xk − xl . TROPICAL PROJECTIVE SPACES 13 where 0Tn+1 = (−∞. As in the case with projective space there is a sedentarity-preserving homeomorphism with the corresponding polyhedron (see e. [15]). . Proof. Proposition 1. .g. Remark 1. we use the homogeneous coordinate notations x = [x0 : · · · : xn ] ∈ TPn to denote the equivalence class of (x0 . A complex smooth toric variety is obtained by gluing several copies of affine spaces Cn (or. ) |x0 | + · · · + |xn | |x0 | + · · · + |xn | provides the required homeomorphism to the standard simplex in Rn (cut ≥0 by the half-space x1 + · · · + xn ≤ 1).32. . . products of affine spaces Ck with tori (C× )n−k ) by maps such that each coordinate is given by a monomial. In a similar way we may construct tropical counterparts of more general toric varieties. . If X and Y are integer affine manifolds with corners then X × Y is also an integer affine manifold with corners. . The space TPn is homeomorphic to the n-simplex Σn so that a point inside a k-face of Σn corresponds to a point of sedentarity n − k. n.. Clearly the set TPn gets a natural topology of the quotient. . E. the integer affine structure induced in the interior of each k-face is isomorphic to the tautological integer affine structure on Rk . . j = 0. . n..30. xn ) ∼ (y0 .Here (φj (x))k denotes the xj kth coordinate of the image φj (x) and the target of φj is the hyperplane Tn ⊂ Tn+1 given by {x ∈ Tn+1 | xj = 1T = 0}. . . ¯ The overlapping maps Φjk : Tn Tn . j = k are given by xl xk ¯ ” = xl + xk − xj . . Furthermore. . −∞) is the origin in Tn+1 and we set (x0 . . more generally. (Φjk )l = “ xj ¯ Clearly Φjk is an integer affine map defined on {xj = −∞} ⊂ Tn . xn ). Proposition 1.31.g.

The tropical projective plane and the tropical projective plane blown up at three points.14 1. . INTRODUCTION Figure 6. Interior of both polygons are isomorphic to the complete affine space R2 with the tautological integer affine structure.

Proof.e. ˜ ˜ there exists f ∈ A such that “f f ” = 0A . v) → “av”. h ∈ A then either we have equality g = h or the element f is a zero divisor. a ∈ T. In particular. A T-cone is a set V with a choice of an element O ∈ V called the origin equipped with a product operation T × V → V. b ∈ T. ιA (−∞) = 0A and ιA (0) = 1B . Conversely if A is semiring and ιA : T ⊂ A is such an embedding then A is a tropical algebra as long as “0A f ” = 0A and “ιA (a)f ” = ιA (b)f for any f ∈ A and a = b ∈ T. h ∈ A if “f g” = “f h” for f. i. For any f. g. we have 0A = −∞ ∈ A and 1A = 0 ∈ A. A tropical algebra A is a semiring (recall according to Definition 1. such that “(ab)v” = “a(bv)” for any a.1 A has an additive zero 0A ∈ A and a multiplicative unit 1A ∈ A) equipped with a T-cone structure compatible with the semiring operations. Note that ιA is an embedding since A is a cone. Implicitly using this proposition we identify T with its image in A. 15 .1. Tropical algebras Definition 2.e. such that “a(f g)” = “(af )g” and O = 0A . Define ιA (a) = “a1A ”. We have ιA (“a + b”) = “(a + b)1A ” = “a1A + b1A ” = “ιA (a) + ιA (b)” and ιA (“ab”) = “(ab)1A ” = “a(b1A )” = “(a1A )(b1A )” = “ιA (a)ιA (b)”. g. Definition 2. i. Proposition 2. There is a natural embedding ιA : T ⊂ A which respects the semiring addition and multiplication: ιA (“a + b”) = “ιA (a) + ιA (b)”. (a. subject to the following additional property. “av” = “bv” if a = b and “v0T ” = O.2. v ∈ V .3. v ∈ V . ιA (“ab”) = “ιA (a)ιA (b)”.CHAPTER 2 Some (semi-)algebraic notions 1. To check the converse statement we note that ιA gives a T-cone structure on A by “af ” = “ιA (a)f ”.

SOME (SEMI-)ALGEBRAIC NOTIONS Definition 2. A tropical algebra B is called an integral domain if it does not have zero divisors.jn xj1 . .. k ∈ N ∪ {0}} of formal tropical polynomials in one variable x. 2. i. g ∈ B such that “f g” = 0B we have either f = 0B or g = 0B . xn ) ∈ Tn and j = (j1 . For convenience we will use multi-index notations for multivariable monomials: if x = (x1 . Let A and B be two tropical algebras. x → f (x). . .. .e. xn ] and x = (x1 . φ is identity on T...jn )∈J where aj ∈ T and J is a finite subset of (N ∪ {0})n . . .. n 1 (j1 . xn ] of formal tropical polynomials in n variables “ aj1 . Consider the semiring k T[x] = {“ j=0 aj xj ” | aj ∈ T.6. .e. . while constant functions give the embedding T → O(Tn ). . . These polynomials can be added and multiplied according to formal polynomial laws (recall that −∞ is our additive zero) and form The embedding ι : T ⊂ T[x] is tautological a → a. i. where f ∈ T[x1 . xjn . . .. A map φ : A → B is called a homomorphism of tropical algebras (or just a T-homomorphism) if for any a. for any f. . . Examples Example 2. Definition 2. is another example of tropical algebra.7. . Consider the tropical algebra O(Tn ) of functions Tn → T. the semiring T[x1 . . . As usual. xjn ”. . an epimorphism is a surjective homomorphism and a monomorphism is an injective homomorphism. n 1 Example 2. . in addition. .4.5. Similarly. . xn ) ∈ Tn . . b ∈ A we have φ(“a + b”) = “φ(a) + φ(b)”. jn ) ∈ Zn then xj = xj1 .16 2. φ(“ab”) = “φ(a)φ(b)” and. Elements of O(Tn ) are called regular functions on Tn . . The addition and multiplication on O(Tn ) are pointwise tropical addition and multiplication. . the diagram T? ? /A ??ιB ?? φ ?  ιA B is commutative. . an isomorphism is an invertible homomorphism.

E. . Indeed. j∈J . xn ] → O(Tn ) is an epimorphism. fn ∈ A such that any f ∈ A can be presented in the form n f =“ j=1 aj fj ”. Let B1 and B2 be two other tropical algebras and φj : A → Bj be two epimorphisms. x−1 . This algebra is finitely generated by 2n generators x1 . . “0x2 + ax1 + 0” = “0x2 + 0” 1 1 whenever a ≤ 0 ∈ T. xn . . . . . where aj ∈ T and J is a firent polynomials in n variables “ nite subset of Zn . n 1 3. Definition 2.9. in this case we have (depending on x1 ∈ T) either “ax1 ” = x1 + a ≤ 2x1 = “0x2 ” or “ax1 ” ≤ 0. x−1 ] of Laun 1 aj xj ”. If U ⊂ Specm (A) we denote Funct(U ) = {g : U → T | ∃f ∈ A : ∀x ∈ U g(x) = f (x)}. Definition 2. . A tropical algebra A is called finitely generated if there exist f1 . Consider the algebra T[x1 . . . . the only tropical epimorphism of T to another tropical algebra is the identity T → T. . . . Note that τ −1 (−∞) = {−∞}.g. . Nevertheless. Equivalently. where B is an integral domain. . xn ] → A for some n ∈ N. If f ∈ A and x ∈ Specm (A) then we define the value f (x) ∈ T as the image of f under the epimorphism x : A → T. Spectra of tropical algebras Let A be a tropical algebra. . . x−1 . The elements f1 . . . The maximal spectrum Specm (A) is the set of all T-homomorphisms A → T. . . . . 1 Definition 2. . A is finitely generated if there exists an epimorphism T[x1 . . . τ is not a monomorphism (unless n = 0). x−1 .11. fn are called generators of A. We have Specm (T) = Spec(T) = {pt}. . . Example 2.8.10. Example 2. .12. . . SPECTRA OF TROPICAL ALGEBRAS 17 The tautological map τ : T[x1 . xn . The spectrum Spec(A) is the set of all epimorphisms A → B up to the equivalence above.3. .

if x : Funct(X) → T is a tropical epimorphism then the composition of the evaluation epimorphism A → Funct(X) and x is contained in Z. Proof. Clearly we have the natural evaluation epimorphism A → Funct(U ).13. In particular. F : A → B.it implies that x ◦ a maps onto T. Definition 2. In other words. Definition 2. so is x◦a. Let a : A → B be a homomorphism of tropical algebras. this subset can be naturally identified with Specm (B). . Definition 2. Proposition 2.16. In other words. It induces an embedding Specm (T) ⊂ Specm (A) (cf. y : B → T. If x = x′ : B → T then there exists f ∈ B such that x(f ) = But then x(a(g)) = x′ (a(g)) for any g ∈ A such that a(g) = f . Thus F defines a subset of Specm (A). Example 2. The evaluation epimorphism A → Funct(Specm (A)) is called the reduction epimorphism. and F ∈ Spec(A). Proof. we say that x is contained in F if x is contained in the image F ∗ : Specm (B) → Specm (A). x : A → T. we have the following inclusions corresponding to such embeddings when we pass to considerations of the full spectrum Spec(A). Definition 2. A subset X ⊂ Specm (A) is called a basic closed set if every tropical epimorphism Funct(X) → T corresponds to a point of X. Proposition 2.17.11) that corresponds to the point x.18 2. Any x ∈ Specm (A) is an epimorphism A → T.14. More generally. For any a ∈ T and x ∈ Specm (A) we have ιA (a)(x) = a.15. Example 2. such that x = y ◦ F . x is contained in F if there exists y ∈ Specm (B).18. Since a is an epimorphism of tropical algebras. Since x : A → T is a homomorphism of tropical algebras it is identity on T. We say that the tropical algebra A is reduced if the reduction epimorphism is an isomorphism. thus the image of ιA corresponds to the constant functions on Specm (A). Clearly. The induced map a∗ : Specm (B) → Specm (A) is the map which takes an epimorphism x : B → T to x ◦ a : A → T. SOME (SEMI-)ALGEBRAIC NOTIONS Pointwise addition and multiplication turn Funct(U ) to a tropical algebra. If x ∈ Specm (A). x′ (f ). If a : A → B is an epimorphism of tropical algebras then a∗ is an injection.19.

. Definition 2. An intersection of basic closed sets in Specm (A) is a basic closed set. . We apply this construction in the following definition. Suppose that X = j Xj and all Xj ⊂ Specm (A) are basic closed sets. Recall that any collection of subsets define a topology as a pre-basis. . . +∞)n . xn ] → T by composition we have the identification of Specm (A) and F . . The spectrum topology on Specm (T[x1 .21 gives a topology on Specm (A). xn ] → Funct(F ). the composition of the evaluation epimorphism A → Funct(X) and x belongs to Xj for every j. Furthermore. xn ]) coincides with the Euclidean topology on [−∞.22. Therefore. . Conversely. Furthermore any closed set in the Euclidean topology is a basic closed set in the spectrum topology. . Proposition 2. . xn ] → A. . . We refer to this topology as the spectrum topology on Specm (A) to distinguish it from a different topology (the Zariski topology) which we introduce later on. Thus Definition 2. Proof. α∈J where J ∋ α is any parameterizing set and each Xα is the union of a finite number of basic closed sets. g such that f (y) = g(y) but such that . if F ⊂ [−∞. A set X ⊂ Specm (A) is called closed if it can be presented in the form X= Xα . If y ∈ F then we may / have two tropical polynomials f. . Consider Specm (A). SPECTRA OF TROPICAL ALGEBRAS 19 In other words X is closed if the evaluation epimorphism A → Funct(X) defines X (and not a larger set). . It follows immediately from this definition that the intersection of any number of closed sets is closed and that the union of a finite number of closed sets is open as well. . Proposition 2. Since all tropical polynomials are continous functions any accumulation point of F also defines a T-homomorphism A → T. As each T-homomorphism A → T also gives a T-homomorphism T[x1 . Thus F must be closed. . Any tropical epimorphism x : Funct(X) → T can be composed with the restriction epimorphism Funct(Xj ) → Funct(X). +∞)n is closed then we may consider the restriction homomorphism T[x1 .3. . an empty set is closed as the parameterizing set J can be empty. Proof.20. . . A set U ∈ Specm (A) is called open if Specm (A) U is a closed set. . . . xn ]) is a basic closed set then it corresponds to an epimorphism T[x1 .21. The whole set Specm (A) is an example of a basic open set as it is presented by the identity epimorphism A → A. If F ⊂ Specm (T[x1 .

g = 0A up to the following equivalence relation (cf. Since A is a tropical algebra either the statement of the lemma holds or “f2 g2 ” is a zero divisor (cf. gj ). It is easy to see that the equivalence class of the results of these operations does not change if we replace (fj . . g ∈ A. Thus a point y ∈ [−∞. f. Similarly we get the following proposition. . f1 = 0A and f3 = 0A which also verifies the statement of the lemma.24 (f1 . g1 ) + (f2 . xn . Then.23.24. 2. x−1 ]) n 1 coincides with the Euclidean topology on Rn . The quotient semifield Q = Rat(A) of a tropical integral domain A is the set of pairs (f. We get “f1 g2 f2 g3 ” = “f2 g1 f3 g2 ”. g). Proof. g) ∈ Q with “ f ”. Furthermore any closed set in the Euclidean topology is a basic closed set in the spectrum topology. j = 1. Lemma 2.2). . Proposition 2. From now on we suppose that a tropical algebra A is an integral domain and Q = Rat(A) is its quotient semifield. j = 1. Take a product of the left-hand and the right-hand sides of our hypotheses “f1 g2 ” = “f2 g1 ” and “f2 g3 ” = “f3 g2 ”. Definition 2. gj ∈ A. gj = 0A . . g1 )(f2 . 4. 3. Lemma 2. g2 ) if f1 g2 = f2 g1 ∈ A. . with an equivalent pair. 2. In accordance with the classical case we denote (f. The spectrum topology on Specm (T[x1 . “f2 g2 ”). in turn. We equip Q with operations of addition “(f1 . are such that “f1 g2 ” = “f2 g1 ” and “f2 g3 ” = “f3 g” 2 then “f1 g3 ” = “f3 g1 ”. If A is a tropical integral domain and fj .20 2. x−1 . +∞)n does not give a homomorphism from Funct(F ) unless y ∈ F . g2 )” = (“f1 g1 ”. “g1 g2 ”) and multiplication “(f1 . . g Elements of the semifield Q are called rational functions associated with A. Quotient semifields As in classical Commutative Algebra if A is a tropical algebra A which is an integral domain then we can make a semifield Q ⊃ T out of T by allowing fractions. g2 )” = (“f1 g2 + f2 g1 ”. . Definition 2. Since A is an integral domain and g2 = 0A we have f2 = 0A . SOME (SEMI-)ALGEBRAIC NOTIONS f (x) = g(x) for any x ∈ F . g1 ) ∼ (f2 .25. . .

26. Its quotient semifield coincides with the quotient semifield of the j −1 algebra T[x1 . We set H(“ f ”) = “ h(f ) ”. If Φ : A → B is a homomorphism then Φ∗ ((Specm (B))◦ ) ⊂ (Specm (A))◦ . b ∈ A then. Consider the tropical algebra T[x1 . The embedding T ⊂ A ⊂ Q makes Q into a tropical algebra. Definition 2. xn .31. x−1 Proposition 2. q(f ) = “ 1f ” is a monomorphism of tropical algebras. Any homomorphism h : A → B of tropical algebras naturally extends to a homomorphism H : Rat(A) → Rat(B). . Q is a semifield that contains A as a subsemiring. if x ∈ Specm (A) is finite and f = −∞ ∈ A then f (x) = −∞ ∈ T. A Proof. Example 2. Proof. Non-zero elements of A have finite values at finite points of the spectrum. . A A a = b. xn ] from Example 2. . A point x ∈ Specm (A) is called finite if x ∈ q ∗ (Specm (A)).7. . . xn ] as “ 1T ” ∼ “ 1T ” (recall that 1T = 0).27. .27 we have the induced map of the spectra of QA and QA Specm (B)◦ → Specm (A)◦ that agrees with Φ∗ since H is an extension of h. . . We 1 xj denote the resulting semifield in these cases with T(x1 . If “ 1a ” is equivalent to “ 1b ”. . Proof. Q is a semiring since A is a semiring. Proof. Since we have the inversion operation g 1 ”=“ ” “ f /g f Q is a semifield. . . . Clearly. In particular. I.29. . xn ) and call its elements tropical rational functions in n variables. . Proposition 2. By Proposition 2. . this gives an embedding T ⊂ Q which makes Q a tropical algebra and q a tropical algebra monomorphism. . a.4. (x) therefore f (x) ∈ T× . We have “ 1f ”(x) = “ f1T ” ∈ T. QUOTIENT SEMIFIELDS 21 Proposition 2.30. We denote the set of all finite points in Specm (A) with (Specm (A))◦ .e. by definition. Proposition 2. Since a homomorphism x : A → T can be factorized through A A q : A → Q it can be extended to “ 1f ”.28. The map q : A → Q. x−1 . . The required map is induced by the composition A → QA → QB .26 defines a map q ∗ : Specm (Q) → Specm (A) by taking x : Q → T to x ◦ q : A → T. g h(g) The homomorphism q from Proposition 2.

If A is tame then for any f ∈ QA there exist funcg tions g. xn ] is tame. Proof. Corollary 2. b ∈ A. and we have either f = a or f = b. We say that a tropical algebra A is tame if the following conditions hold: • for every c ∈ T∗ the image ιA (c) ∈ A is a primitive affine function (we call such functions constant) so that T∗ ⊂ Aff(A) is a subgroup.32. An element f in a tropical algebra A ⊃ T is called a primitive affine function if f = −∞ and whenever we have f = a + b. Proof. “b + h” ∈ A.37. SOME (SEMI-)ALGEBRAIC NOTIONS 5. Example 2.22 2. b ∈ Conv(A) are such that f = a + b then either f = a or f = b. . Elements of Aff(A) are called affine functions associated with A.38. Proposition 2. • the quotient group Aff(A)/T∗ is a free abelian group of finite rank.36.34. Since Conv(A) generates the semifield Q this gives an embedding Specm (Q) ⊂ Specm (Conv(A)). Affine and convex functions in a tropical algebra Definition 2.35. Since we have the inclusion Conv(A) ⊂ Q any epimorphism Q → T determines an epimorphism Conv(A) → T by taking restriction. Definition 2. An element of Q is called convex if it is a tropical sum of elements from Aff(A) ⊂ Q. The free tropical algebra A = T[x1 . Proposition 2. The group Aff(A) corresponds to the group of all affine-linear functions . If A is tame then Specm (Conv(A)) = Specm (Q). h ∈ Conv(A) such that f = “ h ”. a.33. There exists a primitive affine functions h ∈ A such that “f + h” ∈ A is a primitive affine function while “a + h”.36. Denote with Aff(A) the subgroup of Q∗ generated by all primitive affine functions in A ⊂ Q.29 and Corollary 2. Recall that Q∗ = Q {0} is an abelian group with respect to tropical multiplication. To finish the proof we need to show that any epimorphism x : Conv(A) → T can be extended to Q. Since Aff(A) provides a set of generators for the semifield QA any element in QA can be written as a ratio of two polynomial functions from the elements of Aff(A). All convex functions form a semiring Conv(A) ⊂ Q. If f ∈ Aff(A) and a. . . • the subset Aff(A) generates QA in the semifield sense. Proof. . Definition 2. We have “a + h + b + h” = “a + b + h” = “f + h” which contradicts to the primitivity of “f + h”. This follows from Proposition 2.

but they produce the same homomorphism after the composition with (1). . The tropical algebra A′ = T[x1 . . We n 1 have A′ ⊃ A and Aff(A′ ) = Aff(A) ⊂ A′ . it is not tame as Aff(Rat(A)) is empty. t ∈ R. . multiplication and division) since A is tame. 1T + x1 1T + x−1 1T + x1 + x−1 + 1T 1T + x1 + x−1 1 1 1 T 1 Thus 1T is not a primitive-affine function in Q. . s = (s1 . We need to show injectivity of this map. xn . All elements of Aff(A′ ) are primitive affine for A′ . AFFINE STRUCTURE RESULTING FROM THE SEMIALGEBRAIC DATA 23 f : Rn → R whose slope is integer: f (x) =< s. 6. most of them won’t be useful for us as they’ll be rather far from being a manifold. . x−1 ] n 1 (using addition. The embedding Aff(A) ⊂ A generates a homomorphism (1) T[x1 . . n. Proof. x−1 ] is also tame. Unfortunately. . . . But any element of QA can be expressed in terms of the elements from T[x1 . R) ≈ Rn . . . . However. . s2 ∈ (Specm )◦ . n 1 This gives a map (Specm )◦ → T . . . xn . . xn . . . If A is tame then we have a natural embedding (Specm )◦ ֒→ T . . . . . . . s2 : QA → T are distinct. . x−1 . . Consider T = Hom(Aff(A)/T∗ . This is an affine space with the tautological integer affine structure. . x−1 . x−1 . . . However. . . x−1 ] at s1 and s2 are all the same n 1 we get that the values of all the functions from QA at s1 and s2 are also the same which leads us to a contradiction. sn ) ∈ Zn . . Thus we may treat the finite part of the maximal spectrum of a tame tropical algebra A as certain (sedentarity 0) points in the affine space associated to Aff(A). E. Proposition 2. . The function f is primitive affine for A if sj ≥ 0. we have the following expression for the tropical sum of these elements “ 1T 1T 1T + x−1 + x1 1T + x−1 + 1T + x1 1 1 + ”=“ ”=“ ” = 1T . The tropical semifield Rat(A) = Rat(A′ ) is itself a tropical algebra. . . . both “ 1T1T 1 ” and +x 1T “ 1 +x−1 ” are elements of Rat(A). x > +t. Suppose that s1 . Convex functions are finite tropical sums of elements of Aff(A). . . x−1 . xn . .39. j = 1. This gives us a way to consider topological spaces much more general than integer affine manifolds with corners. As the values of the functions from T[x1 . . . Affine structure resulting from the semialgebraic data If A is tame then Aff(A)/T∗ is a free finitely generated Abelian group.g. x−1 ] → QA .6. s1 .

0)] Figure 1. (0. i. (+∞. SOME (SEMI-)ALGEBRAIC NOTIONS Example 2. +∞)]. A planar tropical line and its retractions. In the following chapters we introduce tropical n-dimensional varieties. so in a sense we are considering the Cantor set enhanced with an integer affine structure. Conversely. to K. Let A be the algebra obtained by restriction of tropical polynomials in two variables to the tripod Y ⊂ T2 defined by Y = [(−∞. 1] ⊂ R be the Cantor set and let A be the space of all functions A → T that can be obtained as a restriction of a tropical polynomial f ∈ T[x]. They will never look like the Cantor set from Example 2. π ∗ ◦ σ ∗ = Id. −∞). f : T → T. The map σ ∗ ◦ π ∗ gives a retraction of A to the subalgebra of functions constant on the ray [(0. the map σ : T → Y .e. (0.24 2. so the tropical algebra A is still tame. (0. −∞). “x + 0”) also induces a homomorphism σ ∗ : A → T[x] that is right inverse to π ∗ . Example 2. If y ∈ K then the ho/ momorphism y : T[x] → T cannot factor through A as the value of f at y is not determined by the values at K. if y : A → T is a T-homomorphism then it gives a Thomomorphism T[x] → T (as the restriction to T produces a T-homomorphism T[x] → A) and thus corresponds to a point y ∈ T. N > n. . Let K ⊂ [0. 0)] ∪ [(0. y) → x gives a map π : Y → T that induces a homomorphism π ∗ : T[x] → A. 0). The projection (x.40. 0)] ∪ [(0. Furthermore. The next example provides a tropical algebra whose spectrum is a tropical variety (as we’ll see later). Note that Aff(A) = Aff(T[x]). Then Specm (A) = K as we can evaluate any f ∈ A on any point y ∈ K.41. 0).40. see Figure 1. x → (x. Locally they may look like either Tn or some more general polyhedral ndimensional complexes in TN .

7. the space Y is called the planar tropical line. A point x ∈ Specm (A) is called a pole for f ∈ Q if f is not regular at x. Definition 2. A point x ∈ Specm (A) is called regular for f ∈ Q if there exists an open neighborhood U ∋ x. Since A ¯ A ¯ generates Q as a semifield the value f (x) ∈ T is unique (if it exists). 7. This set is called a hypersurface defined by f . Each element f ∈ A defines a set Vf ⊂ Specm (A) of its zeroes. We say that the value of f at x is f (x) if the epimorphism x : A → T extends to an epimorphism x : A → T. Regular functions and tropical schemes Let f ∈ Q and x ∈ Specm (A).14. Then x is also regular for “ f1j ” as it can be fj j=1 obtained from “ n 1 fj ” by taking a product with all fj ′ . Suppose that x ∈ Specm (A) is regular for “ n1 ”. O see Definition 2. The tropical algebra O(U ) associated to a subset U consists of all elements of Q that are regular at every point of U . The tropical algebra O(U ) consists of functions f : U → T such that ˜ ˜ ˜ there exists an element f ∈ O(U ) ⊂ Q such that f (x) = f (x) for any x ∈ U . j ′ = j. Let U ⊂ Specm (A) be any subset.42. n n Proof.45. and an element g ∈ Conv(A) such that the values g(y) and f (y) exist and g(y) = f (y) for any y ∈ U . We have Specm (A) = Y . The union of finite number of hypersurfaces is a hypersurface. j=1 . but “ f ” has a pole at x. Note that for any f ∈ Q and x ∈ Specm (A)◦ the value f (x) exists (and not equal to −∞ ∈ T). A point x ∈ Specm (A) is called a zero of f ∈ Q if f is 1 regular at x. ˜ Definition 2. Thus we also have a right inverse to the projection homomorphism T[y] → A. An element of O(U ) is called a regular function on U . Proposition 2. REGULAR FUNCTIONS AND TROPICAL SCHEMES 25 Note that Y is symmetric with respect to permutation of x and y.44.43. Definition 2. U ⊂ Specm (A). where ¯ ¯ ¯ ⊂ Q is a subalgebra such that A ⊃ A ∪ {f } and x(f ) = f (x). We claim that j=1 Vfj is a hypersurface defined by fj . ˜ Note that O(U ) is a quotient of O(U ) as we have the evaluation epimorphism ˜ evU : O(U ) → O(U ). Clearly j=1 all points of Specm (A) are regular for any f ∈ A.

Let Z ⊂ X be any subset and f : Z → T be a function. Suppose that x corresponds to a tropical epimorphism xA′ : A′ → T another affine neighborhood U ′ ∋ x with U ′ = Specm (A′ ). In such case we set OX (U ) = O Since the restriction of a sheaf to an open set is a sheaf the tropical ˜ integral domain A has to be such that OA |UA form a sheaf. SOME (SEMI-)ALGEBRAIC NOTIONS Definition 2. a tropical integral domain A ˜ and an open set UA ⊂ Specm (A) such that the pair (U. Let f ∈ OX (V ) and x ∈ V for an open V ⊂ X Choose an open neighborhood U ∋ x.46. all regular functions on Z together with pointwise addition and multiplication form a tropical algebra which we denote Funct(Z). Once again. A tropical scheme is a pair consisting of a topological ˜ space X and a sheaf OX of tropical algebras on X such that for every point x ∈ X there is an open neighborhood U ∋ x. The value f (x) does not depend on the choice of the affine neighborhood U . Proof. Note that clearly ˜ we always have the required restriction homomorphisms ρV : OA (V ) → U ˜A (U ) for V ⊃ U that are also always monomorphisms as we just take an O embedding of the elements of QA that are regular on V in the larger set of those elements which are regular on U . The sheaf OX is called the structure sheaf of X. OX |U ) is isomorphic ˜ to the pair (UA . The function f is called regular if for any x ∈ Z there exists an open neighborhood U ∋ x and g ∈ OX (U ) such that f (y) = g(y) for any y ∈ Z ∩ U. U Definition 2. A regular map between tropical schemes Φ : (X. OX ) → (Y. The value of f (x) is xA (ρV ∩V (f )) ∈ T. Since x ∈ U ∩U ′ ∩V both epimorphisms have to factor through the tropical algebra O(U ∩ U ′ ∩ V ) where both xA (ρV ∩V (f )) and xA′ (ρV ′ ∩V (f )) have a common U U lift ρV ∩U ′ ∩V (f ). U ⊂ Specm (A). 8.49.26 2. OY ) is a pair consisting of a continuous map f :X→Y and a collection of tropical algebra homomorphisms Φ∗ : OY (U ) → OX (Φ−1 (U )) . Regular maps Definition 2. From now on we restrict our attention to reduced schemes X. Thus x corresponds to a tropical epimorphism xA : A → T. U Proposition 2.47. reduced.48. ˜ The scheme is called reduced if for any U the tropical algebra OX (U ) is ˜X (U ). OSpecm (A) |UA ).

Φ∗ (f ) ∈ Funct(W ). i. i. Definition 2. Φ∗ (g)(z) = f (Φ(z)) for every z ∈ Φ−1 (U ) ∩ W . Here ρU are the corresponding restriction homomorphisms V for regular functions. A regular map Φ : X → Y is called a scheme embedding if Φ is a set-theoretical embedding and for all open U ⊂ Y the homomorphisms Φ∗ : OY (U ) → OX (Φ−1 (U )) is an epimorphism. x → f (Φ(x)).e. clearly. Suppose that f ∈ Funct(V ) and Φ : X → Y is a regular map. once we identify X with Φ(X) ⊂ Y . Proposition 2. we have a set-theoretical pullback of the function f . REGULAR MAPS 27 for any open set U ⊂ Y that is consistent with the restriction homomorphisms of the sheaves OX and OY . namely Φ∗ (f ) : W → T.8. In this case X is called a closed subscheme of Y .50.e. For simplicity of notations we will often suppress the symbols OX and OY and write a regular map just as Φ : X → Y . Let V ⊂ Y be any set and W = Φ−1 (V ). As usual. Since f ∈ Funct(V ) for every x ∈ V there exists an open neighborhood U ∋ x and g ∈ OY (U ) such that g(y) = f (y) for every y ∈ U ∩ V . The function Φ∗ (f ) is regular in U . We have Φ∗ (g) ∈ OX (Φ−1 (U )) by definition of the tropical map and. . such that for any pair of open sets V ⊂ U ⊂ Y the diagram OY (U ) Φ∗ ρU V / OY (V ) Φ∗  ρ OX (Φ−1 (U )) Φ−1 (U ) Φ−1 (V )  / OY (Φ−1 (V )) is commutative. Proof.51.

.

. Locally X is modeled on an open set in Tn = Specm (T[x1 . xn ) ∈ Tn . Thus to see the structure of hypersurfaces in X it suffices to look carefully at the structure of hypersurfaces in Tn . . .28. Let U ⊂ X be an open set and f : U → T be a continuous function. Any integer affine manifold X with corners can be naturally considered as a reduced tropical scheme. 2. A subspace V ⊂ X is called a hypersurface if for any x ∈ V there exists a chart φα : Uα → Tn and a tropical polynomial fα : Tn → T.2. . . Proof.1. We may choose W so that it is contained in a single chart φα : Uα → Tn . In particular.CHAPTER 3 Hypersurfaces and complete intersections in Tn 1. cf. Proposition 3. . such that V ∩ Uα = φ−1 (Vfα ). where Vfα is the hypersurface α associated to fα . xjn ”. . . . . κl }. Recall that a monomial is just a affine-linear morphism to T. Integer affine manifolds as tropical schemes After a bit of algebraic formalism we return to our geometric objects: integer affine manifolds. . . . Proof. Definition 1. κl : W → T such that f |W = max{κ1 . Hypersurfaces in Tn Let f : Tn → T be a tropical polynomial (2) f (x) = “ j∈Zn aj κj (x)” = max aj + κ(x). . aj ∈ T and κj (x) = “xj1 . Also we may speak about tropical hypersurfaces in integer affine manifolds with corners. Then the second characterization coincides with the definition of a tropical polynomial. xn ]) so that regular functions correspond to monomials. Theorem 3. . . so that “aj κj ” are n 1 29 . A function f : U → T is regular at x ∈ U if and only if there exist an open subset W ⊂ U and a finite collection of monomials κ1 . Here the some is taken over the finite number of multi-indexes j. . j x = (x1 . . we may characterize the regular functions in terms of integer-affine structure.

If more than one monomial assumes the maximum at x then f is strictly convex at x and thus “ 1T ” = −f cannot be convex. K2 ∈ Subdivf and K1 ∩ K2 = ∅ then K1 ∩ K2 ∈ Subdivf and ∆K1 ∩ ∆K2 = ∆K1 ∩K2 . Tn . Note that VfK is defined by a system of linear inequalities in Tn ⊃ Rn and thus is a convex polyhedron (possibly unbounded) in Tn . For many subsets of J we have VfK = ∅. This means that it is the closure in Tn of a convex polyhedral domain in Rn . The hypersurface Vf is the locus of points x ∈ Tn where the maximal value in (2) is attained by more than one monomial aj κj .e. Vice versa. Namely. Each ∆K is contained in a minimal affine-linear subspace in Rn . Each component of Vf naturally corresponds to a point j ∈ J.30 3. We have Tn = K⊂J VfK and Vf = |K|>1 VfK . Proof. For each x ∈ Tn we define Zn Kf (x) = {j ∈ J | f (x) = “aj κj ”. such that “aj κj ” is maximal in this component. the convex hull of J in Rn . If VfK = ∅ we say that K ∈ Subdivf and denote with ∆K the convex hull of K in Rn ⊃ K. i. for a subset K ⊂ J of cardinality greater than one we may define the stratum VfK ⊂ Vf by VfK = {x ∈ Tn | Kf (X) = K. The monomials aj κj naturally define a stratification of Vf . The set J is finite since f is a polynomial. Denote with ∆f the Newton polyhedron of f . in other words Kf (x) is the set of the indices of the monomials where f (x) assumes its maximum.3. the interior in the corresponding affine-linear space. Proposition 3. Recall that the hypersurface Vf is the locus of all points x ∈ Tn such that “ 1T ” is not regular at x. i. we have the following properties.5. • If K1 . If only one f monomial is maximal at x then f is locally linear at x and thus −f is also regular at x. HYPERSURFACES AND COMPLETE INTERSECTIONS IN Tn monomials. The polyhedra ∆K form a subdivision of the polyhedron ∆f which is dual to the corresponding strata VfK . this proposition is the direct corollary of Proposition 3. Denote with ∆◦ the K relative interior of ∆K .4. f Proposition 3. Proof.3. Theorem 3.e. Let J = {j ∈ | aj = 0T } be the indices parameterizing the monomials that appear in f .

Then a generic point x of the convex hull of VfK1 ∪ VfK2 must correspond to K1 ∪ K2 .5 gave a description of hypersurfaces in Tn . Here the integer length of an interval I ⊂ Rn with ∂I ∈ Zn is the total number of integer subintervals in it (i. Suppose that K ∈ Subdivf and k ∈ ∆◦ . Furthermore the affine-linear subspaces in Rn generated by VfK ∩ Rn and ∆K are orthogonal. see [15]. K1 = K2 we have ∆◦ 1 ∩ ∆◦ 2 = ∅. the Newton polygon ∆f and the hypersurface Vf ∩ Rn belong to dual vector spaces Rn . an (n − 1)-dimensional face of Vf ) we may associate a positive integer number equal to the integer length of the corresponding interval in Subdivf .6. sometimes. Not all subdivisions are convex. However. [15]. but we may identify them by introducing a scalar product to Rn . regular or. (More rigorously.2. “ak κj (k)” = f (x) exactly on K VfK . Then. by convexity. In particular. cf. K2 ∈ K Subdivf . TPn and other toric varieties as long as every component of V (its subset that constitute a hypersurface itself) has non-empty intersection with the torus (T× )n . HYPERSURFACES IN Tn 31 • The (relatively) open polyhedra ∆◦ are disjoint: for any K1 .5 are called convex. To see non-existence of the height function it suffices to look at the attachments of the would-be faces around the inner square. #(I ∩ Zn ) − 1). Subdivisions that appear in Theorem 3. Suppose that K1 ∩ K K2 = ∅. Figure 1 depicts a classical example of a non-convex lattice subdivision (see e.7. • ∆f = K K∈Subdivf • For any K ∈ Subdivf we have dim VfK +dim ∆K = n. K K ∆◦ . The function j → aj is called the height function of the subdivision. Then the hypersurface V is still given by a tropical polynomial f in . These subdivisions come as projections of the top faces of the polyhedral domain in Rn × R obtained as the convex hull of the undergraph of j → aj . to each facet (i. [68].) • If ∆K1 ⊂ ∆K2 then VfK1 ⊃ VfK2 . The last two properties come as straightforward applications of Linear Algebra. [15]). e. the same construction works also for hypersurfaces V in (T× )n .g.e. Proof. In real algebraic geometry such subdivisions appeared after the discovery of the patchworking technique by Viro [68]. Theorem 3. Note that for every j ∈ J the locus “aj κj (x)” = f (x) is defined with a system of linear inequalities and therefore is convex.e. Thus ∆◦ are disjoint and form a subdivision of ∆f . Remark 3. Remark 3. coherent lattice subdivisions of the polyhedron ∆f . Thus without loss of generality we may assume that K coincides with ∆K ∩ Z n .g.

0} coincides with Vf . associated to “ f (x. y) = “ax + by + c”. we have to take Y ∩ R2 .41 is an example of a tropical line in the plane.32 3. We often will use the same notation Vf for a hypersurface in other toric varieties. b. A general polynomial of degree 1 in two variables is of the form f (x. 0} corresponds to max{x. y. . y) = “x + y + 1T ”. Thus a line in T2 is the hypersurface associated to this tropical polynomial. but the diagonal ray is open. 3. More precisely. 0} under the translational change of coordinates x → x + a − c.e. y → y + b − c. A non-convex lattice subdivision. Note that the horizontal and vertical rays of Y end with an infinite point (as the axes {y = −∞} and {x = −∞} are included in T2 ). i. c = 0T any tropical line can be obtained from Y by a translation in R2 . Lines in the plane The easiest examples to visualize are planar curves. y+b−c. HYPERSURFACES AND COMPLETE INTERSECTIONS IN Tn Figure 1.y) = f (x. but greater then the third remaining monomial. But max{(x+a−c. n variables and can be obtained by taking the closure in the corresponding toric variety of the toric part Vf ∩ (T× )n of the affine hypersurface Vf ⊂ Tn . apply the translation and take the closure in T2 again. Note that Y from Example 2. the hypersurface. Indeed. All three monomials are equal at the origin while everywhere on the three rays two of the three monomials are equal. it is the hypersurface of f (x. ′′ Indeed. hypersurfaces in T2 . Note that as long as a. y+b−c. y)−c = max{(x+ c a−c.

Similarly the hypersurface of f (x. If f (x.g. b ∈ T× . Thus in this case Vf coincides with the y-axis. Figure 2. y) = “ax” = x + b. LINES IN THE PLANE 33 If one of the coefficients of f assumes the value 0T = −∞ then the corresponding monomial is never maximal in f . vertical or diagonal. When we consider. c ∈ T× . If f (x. but not defined at the coordinate y-axis {x = −∞} of T2 . Consider now the case when two of the coefficients of f assume the value −∞. For that we need to reparameterize R2 to the interior of a finite triangle. depending on which monomial disappears. then “ 1T ” = −x − a is regular as f long as x = inf ty. t → −∞ the corresponding horizontal line moves to infinity and coincides with that infinite line in the limit.3. Thus the corresponding hypersurface is the closure of the straight line which maybe horizontal. a family (3) ft = “ty + c”. The projective space TP2 provides a compactification of T2 by attaching an extra line (called the infinite line). a ∈ T× . y) = “ax” = x + a. . We may draw the corresponding deformation on the (finite) triangle. so f Vf = ∅. is the x-axis of T2 . y) = c. then “ 1T ” = −c is regular everywhere on T2 . Five lines in T2 . see Figure 2. e.

30 to do that is via the combination of the logarithmic moment map Log : (C× )2 → R2 . which is a diffeomorphism. x + y ≤ 1}. Remark 3. Note though that the image of a straight line in R2 is (in general) no longer straight in T . Note that a generic line in R2 intersects three out of four quadrants. y) ∈ | x ≥ 0. Furthermore. each corresponding to the real points of a line in a quadrant of (R× )2 . so we have a well-defined map µ ◦ Log−1 : R2 → Int(T ). HYPERSURFACES AND COMPLETE INTERSECTIONS IN Tn One of the most natural ways (along with the map provided by Proposition 1. The points of tangency with the sides corresponds to the points of intersection with the three coordinate axes (the x-axis. These tangencies divide the circle into three arcs. The imaginary points of a line L ⊂ CP2 that is real (i. see Figure 3. log |w|). Log(z. invariant with respect to the complex conjugation) are mapped inside this ellipse in the . ). y ≥ 0. When we need to speak about the infinite points of varieties in TP2 it is more convenient to draw their images under this reparameterization. the y-axis and the infinite line). 1 + |z|2 + |w|2 1 + |z|2 + |w|2 Note that the image µ(R2 ) is the interior of the triangle T = {(x. R2 Figure 3.30 is that the image of a line in RP2 is an ellipse that is tangent to the three sides of the triangle T . The image of a complex projective lines under µ ◦ Log−1 is an inscribed ellipse in T . this diffeomorphism extends to a diffeomorphism TP2 → T . w) = ( dz z ∧ d¯ z z ¯ + dw w ∧ dw ¯ w ¯ |z|2 |w|2 . µ(z.34 3. one of the advantages of the parameterization µ ◦ Log−1 with respect to the parameterization provided by Proposition 1. w) = (log |z|.8.e. which is the moment map for the (C× )2 -invariant form and the Fubini-Study moment map for CP2 µ : (C× )2 → R2 . Both maps Log and µ have the same fibers.

a generic line is made of three segment. B. Images of tropical lines in T and their degenerations. any line in CP2 can be made real after the multiplication in (C× )2 by a suitable pair (a. a. LINES IN THE PLANE 35 2-1 fashion so that the the inverse image of a point inside the ellipse under Log |L consists of a pair of complex conjugate points.g. Indeed. Note that two generic lines in TP2 intersect in a unique point: e. The same parameterization works well for images of tropical lines. Thus we see that any line in TP2 is either an R2 -translate of the tripod Y from Example 1 or a degeneration of such translates. Thus we have a 2-dimensional family of suitable ellipses and this corresponds to the dimension of the space of lines in the projective plane. the image of any (not necessarily real) line in CP2 is the region in T2 that is encompassed by an ellipse tangent to the sides of T . The last part of Figure 4 depicts the family (3) and its limit. any pair of lines in Figure 2 has such “transverse” intersection. Note that the family of ellipses in R2 is 5-dimensional and each tangency gives a condition of codimension 1. The second part of this figure shows how generic lines degenerate to a binomial line. b ∈ C× . Later in this book we develop the tropical intersection theory which allows to associate the cycle of the right dimension even for non-transverse cycles A. The lines given by a binomial equation pass through an intersection point of the coordinate axes (recall that we treat the infinite line as one of the coordinate axes!) and correspond to the degeneration of ellipses to intervals passing through a vertex of the triangle. . b). Furthermore. see Figure 5. In the same time we may find two lines that have a whole ray in common. Figure 4. This intersection cycle will be supported on the skeleton of the set-theoretical intersection of the expected dimension. see the first part of Figure 4. where each segment is a subinterval of a line passing through a vertex of T . The lines given by a monomial coincide with one of the coordinate axes and correspond to a side of the triangle.3. Indeed. Each facet F of this skeleton will be included to the cycle with an integer (possibly negative) coefficient that depends only on the local structure of A and B near E.

If the sedentarity of p1 is positive then we may find a line L ∋ p1 and a family of non-degenerate lines Lt so that the the trivalent point of Lt tends to p1 . p2 ∈ TP2 can be joined with a line. This agrees with the notion of the stable intersection from [56] in the case when the ambient space is an (integer affine) smooth variety. b. Note that from the algebraic point of view the statement is trivial.36 3. HYPERSURFACES AND COMPLETE INTERSECTIONS IN Tn stable intersection point Figure 5. c ∈ T up to the simultaneous multiplication of the coefficients a. We can move L into this / sector so that p2 is remained on L by a translation antiparallel to the ray opposite to the sector of p2 . Any pair of points p1 .10. This manifold is called the dual projective plane and denoted with (TP2 )∗ . even though the lines from Figure 5 intersect along a ray. the line L separates TP2 into three sectors. Theorem 3. In particular. Non-transverse intersection of two lines in T2 . see Figure 6. b. Generically.9. c by the same . this line is unique unless this pair of line and one of the intersection points of the coordinate axes (the points of sedentarity 2) are collinear. their intersection cycle is the (sedentarity 0) endpoint of this ray. Proof. Proof. Applying a translation in R2 to the tripod Y from Example 1 we may find a line L ∈ TP2 such that its 3-valent vertices coincide with p1 . Lines in TP2 form themselves an integer affine manifold with corners isomorphic to TP2 . Indeed. If p2 ∈ L then it is inside one of these sector. Furthermore. any line is given by a polynomial “ax+by+c”. a. Proposition 3.

It allows one to define a new manifold X (that is the result of blowing up of TP2 in . These triples of coefficients up to such rescaling form TP2 by the very definition.11. y) → (“ x ”. As a map (TP2 )∗ TP2 the inversion σ is only partially defined. 1 1 Consider the inversion σ : R2 → R2 . but this point is the vertex of T . Nevertheless. but does extend to the vertices of TP2 enhanced with lines passing through them. This inversion does not extend to the vertices of TP2 . Because of the inversion σ from the proof of Theorem 3. it is useful to look at the space of lines from a geometric point of view. “ y ”) = (−x. We still have such a distinguished point by tracing the limit of the 3-valent vertex under its approximation by non-degenerate lines. Finally. scalar λ ∈ T× . Note that we may easily describe the same chart in coordinates. so it does no longer determine the position of the line. LINES IN THE PLANE 37 move into this sector Figure 6.10 it is convenient to depict the dual plane with the inverted triangle. However. see Figure 7. A chart near a line with the 3-valent vertex in R2 is given by that 3-valent vertex itself. a coordinate line L is mapped to the opposite vertex of T by the inversion while choosing a nearby point in the image completely determines the line nearby to L. This gives a chart to T2 . via this distinguished point we may identify the nondegenerate lines with the points of R2 .3. Furthermore. (x. Consider now those degenerate lines that do not coincide with a coordinate axes (those given by a binomial). Finding a line passing via two points in TP2 . Remark 3. Nevertheless. in the complement of the three points corresponding to the coordinate lines we may identify the space of all lines in TP2 with the space of lines together with a distinguished point (a 3-valent vertex in the case of non-degenerate line and a vertex of T otherwise). These lines pass through a vertex of the triangle T and a point on its side. −y). replacing of the vertex of TP2 with all lines passing through this vertex is the tropical counterpart of the blowing up of this vertex. This extension gives a chart to T × T× in a neighborhood of non-coordinate lines passing via the vertex of TP2 .

f ∈ T. These are the hypersurfaces given by quadratic polynomials f (x. conversely. see e. see Figure 7. Note that X is an integer affine manifold with corners as tropical blowups come with natural charts to T2 . By Theorem 3. Furthermore. all the edges of Vf has weight 1. 0). e. Let us deform just one of the coefficients of f . Consider a smooth conic Vf ⊂ TP2 . It is easy to see that the resulting deformation will leave the strata of Vf disjoint from m invariant. blow down three sides blow down 3 other sides Figure 7. Passing from the projective plane to the dual projective plane. Curves in the plane Let us look at the conics in TP2 .38 3.5 there is a lattice subdivision of ∆f for each conic C ⊂ TP2 and.e. each coherent subdivision of ∆f corresponds to a conic in TP2 . the one depicted on Figure 6. b. Furthermore. The smallest possible convex polygon with vertices in Z2 is a triangle of area 1 . 2 Definition 3. HYPERSURFACES AND COMPLETE INTERSECTIONS IN Tn all three vertices) and everywhere defined maps X → TP2 and X → (TP2 )∗ .12. Curves dual to subdivision into primitive triangles are called smooth planar tropical curves. Primitive triangles do not contain lattice point other than their vertices. The Newton polygon of f is the triangle ∆f with vertices (0. 2) or its subpolygon (in the case when some of the coefficients vanish. primitive triangulations (i. Therefore. it is one of the toric varieties from Remark 1. We have six monomials and each can dominate the polynomial f in a certain region in the plane (possibly empty). (2.g. 4. i. assume the value 0T = −∞).32. c. d. Such triangles are called em the primitive triangles.e. 0) and (0. y) = “ax2 + bxy + cy 2 + dx + ey + f ”. Figure 8. Because of the smoothness condition each monomial m ∈ ∆f ∩ Z2 corresponds to a nonempty region in TP2 . a. lattice decompositions of a Newton polygon into primitive triangles) contain all lattice points of the polygon among their vertices. In the same time the edges of Vf corresponding to the edges of Subdivf adjacent .

The higher is the degree the more possibilities we have for the combinatorial type of the curve. List all combinatorial types would take too . to m will move enlarging or diminishing the corresponding region depending on whether we increase or decrease the coefficient of the monomial m. The simplest degeneration correspond to a coarser subdivision of ∆f when we take into Subdivf the union of two nearby primitive triangles instead of taking each one individually. The second degeneration can be interpreted as a smooth conic that is tangent to a coordinate axis in TP2 as we shall see later. Deforming one coefficient. see Figure ??. It is easy to see that the figure exhaust all possible combinatorial types of smooth conics. Note that the first case corresponds to a reducible conic that decomposes to the union of two lines. Smooth planar conics. Figure 10 shows some smooth conics together with the corresponding subdivisions. CURVES IN THE PLANE 39 the resulting region Figure 8. It is instructive to look at the possible degenerations of smooth conics. We have two combinatorially different cases: the union of two could be a parallegram or it could be a triangle of area 1. Figure 9.4.

HYPERSURFACES AND COMPLETE INTERSECTIONS IN Tn weight 2 edge Figure 10. Planar cubics. long already for the case of planar cubic. If we subdivide each square into two triangles by the diagonal parallel to the line x + y = 0 we get a subdivision of R2 that is compatible with ∆d for any d. Figure 11 depicts a smooth and a singular cubic. Example 3. Note to specify a combinatorial type of a planar tropical curve of degree d we need to produce a lattice subdivision of the triangle ∆d ⊂ R2 with vertices (0.13.40 3. d) (or a subpolygon of this triangle). Singular planar conics. 0). Consider the square lattice in Z2 . The resulting . The following two examples list two particularly simple combinatorial types of smooth tropical curves of arbitrary degree. Figure 11. (d. 0) and (0.

CURVES IN THE PLANE 41 subdivision and the tropical curve in the corresponding combinatorial type are pictured on Figure 12. . Let us subdivide ∆d ⊂ R2 into “floors” by the lines y = 1. Each floor is a trapezoid that can be further subdivided into the primitive triangles as shown on Figure 13. d−1. Example 3. The Itenberg-Viro subdivision in dimension 2.4. . Figure 12. They proved to be useful for a range of problems related to the Horn problem. Furthermore. Our next example is not as symmetric. see [32]. The tropical curves in this combinatorial type (as well as all their degenerations) are called honeycombs. Honeycombs. Figure 13.14. . . These subdivisions appeared in [23] as coherent subdivisions of higher-dimensional simplices. Note that the honeycomb triangulation of ∆d is symmetric with respect to the exchange of the x and y coordinates. . it is symmetric with respect to the action of the symmetric group S3 that interchanges these two axes and the infinite axis.

Furthermore. c. d− 1 are compatible with both types of subdivision our tropical curves are glued from the curves dual to trapezoids of height 1 as shown on Figure 14. HYPERSURFACES AND COMPLETE INTERSECTIONS IN Tn Remark 3. . .e. Floors and stacking them on top of each other. The counterexample is provided by this very curve once we equip it with the suitable real phases. In particular we may combine the floors of different combinatorial types. see Figure 15. It appeared in the work of Itenberg [21] disproving the Ragsdale conjecture (a conjecture on topology of plane real curves that appeared in 1905 in [55] and was finally disproved only in 1992 [21]). the x-coordinates) for the vertical rays pointing down and find a smooth tropical curve in the needed combinatorial type with such rays.15. we may fix any positions (i. . . The coherence of the subdivisions in Examples 3.14 are verified by existence of the corresponding tropical curves. Surfaces in TP3 We start by looking at the hyperplane in TP3 . Because of that we may inductively stack a k+1th floor on top of the kth floor. d = 0T is the result of translation of the (standard) hyperplane of “x + y + z + 1T ” by a vector in R3 . c.e. b. Similarly to the case with the lines in TP2 it is easy to show that any hyperplane with a. i. As our last example of a planar tropical curve we consider a rather involved example of a curve of degree 10. Again if some (but not all) of the coefficients a.42 3. To check the latter we may note that because the lines y = 1.e. d − k + 1 rays pointing down and no other vertical edges. the hypersurface given by the tropical polynomial “ax + by + cz + d”. Note also that any lattice subdivision of a the Newton polygon of a floor (i. d assume the value 0T then we can interpret the corresponding hyperplane as the limiting set of a family of translations of V“x+y+z+1T ” in R3 .16. b. Figure 14. . a subpolygon of the strip k − 1 ≤ y ≤ k) is coherent. These curves are called floors. 5. The kth floor has d − k vertical rays pointing up. Example 3.13 and 3.

≥0 To get H we take the closure in TP3 ⊃ R3 of the union of the 6 sectors. 1. Figure 16 depicts a generic hyperplane H ⊂ TP2 . A tropical plane in the 3-space. in the direction (−1. The Itenberg-Ragsdale curve of degree 10. all of them have a common vertex v ∈ R3 . (0. −1) and (1. 0. 1). 0). vertex v Figure 16. It consists of 6 sectors. . Any pair of these rays span a sector in R3 diffeomorphic to the positive quadrant R2 . 0). 0. (0. −1.5. SURFACES IN TP3 43 Figure 15. There are 4 outgoing rays from v.

To prove the theorem in general it suffices to prove show that if f is a polynomial of degree 1 in n variables then the set Vf determines the coefficients of f up to their simultaneous tropical multiplication by a nonzero constant. To understand the geometry of higher-degree surfaces in TP3 (and more generally the geometry of higher-dimensional tropical varieties) it is convenient to introduce the notion of floor decomposition. The space of all hyperplanes (hypersurfaces given by tropical polynomials of degree 1) in TPn forms an integer affine manifold with corners isomorphic to TPn . b in one variable x. Thus the set of such hyperplanes coincides with the set of points in TP1 . Indeed.17. Similarly to the case with lines in TP2 all hyperplanes are parameterized by the dual space (TP3 )∗ ⊃ R3 . Recall that TPn is topologically a simplex..10. (TO BE CONTINUED) . More generally we have the following statement generalizing Theorem 3.44 3. If the line TP1 is contained in Vf then both corresponding coefficients must be equal to 0T .. once we prove this we can identify the space of hyperplanes with the space of all coefficients up to the simultaneous rescaling which is the tropical projective n-space by definition. HYPERSURFACES AND COMPLETE INTERSECTIONS IN Tn The position of the vertex v ∈ R3 completely determines a tropical hyperplane V“ax+by+cz+d” with a. c. We call this space of hyperplanes the dual projective space and denote with (TPn )∗ . The corresponding hypersurface always just the single point x = b − a ∈ TP1 . Each edge of this simplex corresponds to a tropical line TP1 obtained as the intersection of (n − 1) coordinate planes.. Balancing condition . 6. The hyperplane Vf cuts a point on each such TP1 unless this TP1 is contained in Vf . Proof. “ab” = 0T . Indeed a hyperplane in TP1 is given by a polynomial “ax + b” = max a + x. Let us first note that the Theorem is trivial if n = 1.. b ∈ T. Theorem 3. b. . Complete Intersections 7. a. d = 0T . Each such point is a hyperplane in TP1 and determines two coefficients of f up to scaling.

CHAPTER 4 Tropical varieties 45 .

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CHAPTER 5 Tropical equivalence 47 .

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