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Universitatea Babeş–Bolyai, Cluj–Napoca

Facultatea de Litere
Anul universitar 2009-2010
Semestrul II

I. Informaţii generale despre CURS (anul I, Engleza B)

Titlul disciplinei: THE HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE


(THE RESTORATION & THE ENLIGHTENMENT)
Codul: LE 12261
Numărul de credite: 5

Locul de desfăşurare: FACULTY OF LETTERS


Programarea în orar a activităţilor: curs saptamanal

II. Informaţii despre titularul de curs, seminar, lucrare practică sau laborator

Nume, titlul ştiinţific: CARMEN BORBÉLY, LECTURER, PHD.


Informaţii de contact : carmenborbely@yahoo.com
Ore de audienţă: 2

III. Descrierea disciplinei:


[Obiectivele cursului/disciplinei, conţinutul acestuia, competenţele dobândite prin absolvirea
disciplinei, metodele utilizate în cazul predării, al seminarului sau al lucrărilor practice – 10-20 de
rînduri].

Course Description & Objectives


This course aims:
1. to provide the students with a general outline of the literature produced in the British Isles
throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, with particular emphasis on authors,
patterns and trends of the Restoration and the Enlightenment;
2. to familiarise the students with the social, political, religious, economic and cultural
transformations that shaped the seventeenth- and eighteenth-century aesthetics and literary
production (dramatic, lyrical, fictional);
3. to develop the students’ awareness and critical understanding of the various theories and
debates surrounding key Enlightenment cultural and literary epiphenomena, such as, for
instance, the rise of the novel, or the issue of (professional) authorship.
4. to encourage the students’ reflexive learning through engagement in productive discussion and
analysis of a range of topics (seventeenth- and eighteenth-century authors, works, genres and
debates) that pertain to the course syllabus

The course will be conducted through an interactive, combined strategy, mixing lecture and
discussion on the principal reading assignments for each class. The seminar will encourage students

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to give brief individual or collaborative reports, charting very punctually the literary and theoretical
readings assigned (students should convene with the teacher on the major issues of their
presentations several weeks ahead of each class). All required reading (marked as ‘compulsory’)
should be completed before class, with the possibility of covering supplementary reading material
for the written reports, should the students’ interests require this.

IV. Bibliografia obligatorie:

Compulsory Bibliography
Under COMPULSORY BIBLIOGRAPHY are listed the literary works that are considered to be
representative for the period of literature covered by this course. These works are ranked as
obligatory for all the students attending this course. In the case of the seminars, all required readings
should be completed prior to attending each class.
All the works included in the list of Compulsory Bibliography can be found at the English Library,
Faculty of Letters, Cluj-Napoca, either as separate items, as copies provided by the teacher, or
included in the following anthologies:
- DeMaria, Robert (ed) (1996) British Literature 1640-1789. An Anthology Oxford:
Blackwell -- Engl. 18644
- The Norton Anthology of English Literature (revised ed) (1968) New York: W W
Norton & Co. (Vol. I) Central Library – 659269; This can also be found at the
Faculty of Letters, English Library
Alternatively, students can also consult these works at the internet addresses mentioned below:

1. John Webster: The Duchess of Malfi (c. 1613) -- Engl. 21571 ; Engl. 16151
(http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext00/malfi10.txt)
2. Ben Jonson: Volpone; or, The Fox -- Engl. 20156 ; BI 29634 ; J. 1584
(http://www.planbpublishers.com/downloads/html/volpone.htm)
3. John Milton: Paradise Lost (Books I & II) -- Engl. 14597 ; Central Library LC.674/1997
(http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/MilPL67.html)
4. Alexander Pope: The Rape of the Lock -- Engl. 19577 (http://www-
unix.oit.umass.edu/~sconstan/poemlink.html)
5. Jonathan Swift: Gulliver’s Travels -- Engl. 21574 ; Central Library LC.2979/1996
(http://www.jaffebros.com/lee/gulliver/contents.html)
6. Samuel Richardson: Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded
(http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext04/pam1w10.txt)
7. Daniel Defoe: Moll Flanders -- Engl. 21572
(http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext95/mollf11.txt)
8. Henry Fielding: The History of Tom Jones. A Foundling -- Engl. 21311 ; Central Library 675730
(http://www.bartleby.com/301/)
9. M. G. Lewis: The Monk Engl. 20209 ; Engl. 16060 ; Engl. 20150
(http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext96/tmonk10.txt)
10. Tobias Smollett: The Expedition of Humphry Clinker -- Engl. 21573 ; Engl. 21310 Engl. 19833
(http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext00/txohc10.txt)
11. Laurence Sterne: The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy -- Engl. 16059
12. (http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext97/shndy10.txt)
13. Jane Austen: Sense and Sensibility -- Engl. 21039 ; Central Library 675692
(http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext94/sense11.txt)

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14. Lady Mary Wortley Montagu: The Turkish Embassy Letters in Montagu M W (1992) Letters
David Campbell Publ. -- Central Library 676259. There are also 3 copies provided by the teacher at
the English Library, Faculty of Letters, Cluj-Napoca.

V. Materiale folosite în cadrul procesului educaţional specific disciplinei:

1. Lectures will be delivered using an overhead projector (supplied by the Faculty of Letters). This
will provide the students with an outline of each session structure and with a clear signposting of the
major theoretical issues covered.
2. Each lecture/seminar will have an accompanying handout, charting the fundamental concepts or
key points to be discussed, as well as specifying the (suggested) amount of time allotted for each
activity, such as teacher input, student presentation, debate, etc. After the completion of each
seminar/lecture, these serial handouts will be placed in a special folder at English Library, Faculty of
Letters, Cluj-Napoca.
3. The secondary/optional reading material for each lecture/seminar has been assembled by the
teacher in a special Reading Packet (Reader), which includes the Course Outline and the suggested
chapters and studies for the students to consult.

VI. Planificarea /Calendarul întâlnirilor şi a verificărilor/examinărilor intermediare:

COURSE OUTLINE
WEEK 1: INTRODUCTORY LECTURE.
Course introduction. Presentation of the course outline, objectives and
requirements. Reader information pack. Introduction to literature in history.
Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century cultural, social and historical
backgrounds. A survey of British literature, Restoration through
Enlightenment.

WEEK 2: JACOBEAN AND CAROLINE DRAMA (1605-1640) I

1. Court Masques. Court entertainments: origins; ceremonial contexts.


political & religious significance. Inigo Jones and the ephemeral
extravagance of an aristocratic art-form. Allegorical and spectacular
characteristics. Baroque illusionism. The structure of court masques. Ben
Jonson and the anti-masque

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Optional:
▪ Lindley, David (ed) (1995) Court Masques. Jacobean & Caroline Entertainments 1605-1640
Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press (pp. ix-xvii)

WEEK 3: JACOBEAN AND CAROLINE DRAMA (1605-1640) II

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Topics:
Ben Jonson and the Comedy of Humours. Comedy and the medieval medical
theory of humours. Grotesque eccentricities and polemical/satirical intents.
The neoclassicism of Jonsonian comedy. Volpone, or the Fox: Latin
antecedents; the medieval beast fable; imbalanced humour and Venetian
artifice.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Compulsory:
Ben Jonson: Volpone; or, The Fox
Optional:
▪ Loxley, James (2002) The Complete Critical Guide to Ben Jonson London & New York: Routledge
(pp. 69-73)

WEEK 4: JACOBEAN AND CAROLINE DRAMA (1605-1640) III


Topics:
John Webster and the Jacobean Revenge Tragedy. The revenge play as a
species of tragedy. Brief historical outline. Late-Elizabethan and Jacobean
socio-historical context. Stock ingredients of the ‘tragedy of blood and terror’.
Sources, influences & characteristics of the Jacobean revenge play. John
Webster’s The Duchess of Malfi.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Compulsory:
John Webster: The Duchess of Malfi
Optional:
▪ Katherine Rowe (1999) Dead Hands: Fictions of Agency, Renaissance to Modern, Stanford
University Press (pp. 86-110)

WEEK 5: METAPHYSICAL POETRY

Topics: Seventeenth-century metaphysical poetry & the Baroque. Definitions,


terminological evolution, critical appraisal (from Dryden to Eliot & beyond).
The metaphysical conceit (discordia concors; antimimetic logic; ‘unified’ v.
‘dissociated’ sensibility). Beyond Elizabethan mellifluousness: metaphysical
‘strong lines’; metaphysical wit (‘passionate ratiocination’). Dramatic
strategies of address. John Donne’s secular and religious poetry: between
hedonism and devotional mysticism.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Compulsory:
▪ John Donne: Holy Sonnet XIV: ‘Batter my heart, three person’d God; for you’
▪ Andrew Marvell: To His Coy Mistress
Optional:
▪ Eliot, T. S. (1932) “The Metaphysical Poets” in Selected Essays London: Faber & Faber Limited
▪ Hammond, Gerald (ed) (1974) The Metaphysical Poets McMillan (pp. 1-29)

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▪ Bloom, Harold (ed) (1986) John Donne and the Seventeenth-Century Metaphysical Poets New
York & Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publ. (pp. 27-32; 37-44)

WEEK 6: PURITANISM.

Topics: 1. The Puritan Revolution: political radicalism, republicanism, and the


Commonwealth. The Protestant ethic and the rise of capitalism. Main
theological issues in the English Reformation. The culture of religious dissent.
2. Puritan autobiographies and the motif of spiritual pilgrimage. Puritan
allegories: John Bunyan and Agnes Beaumont. Mapping the inner quest: The
Pilgrim’s Progress.
3. John Milton’s revolutions: reinventing mid-seventeenth-century poetics.
Poetic beginnings: Lycidas and classical elegiac poetry. Political pamphlets:
reclaiming the public space in Areopagitica. Advocating ‘a Free
Commonwealth’: tracts on political and religious freedoms. The Christian epic
of humanity: Paradise Lost. Milton’s theodicy and the Fall. Rebellious angels
and satanic over-reachers: aftermath and influence. Making ‘darkness visible’:
between blindness and insight in the critical reception of Milton’s epic. Re-
establishing the ‘classical’ pattern of tragedy: Samson Agonistes.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Compulsory :
John Milton, Paradise Lost (minimum requirement: Books I-II)
Optional:
▪ Weber, Max (2003, orig. 1958) The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (Transl. by
Talcott Parsons) Mineola, New York: Dover Publ. Inc (pp. 35-78)
▪ Mullett, Michael A. (1996) John Bunyan in Context. Keele, Staffordshire Edinburgh University
Press (pp. 191-209)
▪ Rogers, John (1996) The Matter of Revolution. Science, Poetry, and Politics in the Age of Milton
Ithaca & London: Cornell University Press (pp. 103-129)
▪ McMahon, Robert (1998) The Two Poets of Paradise Lost Baton Rouge: Louisiana State
University Press (pp. 1-22)
▪ Kolbrener, William (1997) Milton’s Warring Angels. A Study of Critical Engagements
Cambridge University Press (pp. 133-157)

WEEK 7: ORIENTALISM AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY TRAVELOGUES

Topics: Constructing ‘knowledge(s)’ of the West’s Other: Orientalism and Eighteenth-


Century Travellers. Epistolary travel narratives. Forging national/imperial
identity. Collections and cabinets of curiosities. Feminist inflections of
Orientalist rhetoric. (Un)veiling the Oriental(ist) woman: Montagu’s Turkish
Embassy Letters. Levantinisation & the ‘mystique of reciprocity’.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Compulsory:

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▪ Lady Mary Wortley Montagu: The Turkish Embassy Letters in Montagu M W (1992) Letters
David Campbell Publ.
Optional:
▪ Said, Edward (1979) Orientalism New York: Vintage Books (pp. 49-53; 73-77)
▪ Kietzman, Mary Jo ‘Montagu's 'Turkish Embassy Letters' and cultural dislocation’ in Studies in
English Literature 1500-1900 Vol. 38 3/1998
▪ Uphaus, Robert W. & Gretchen M. Foster (eds) (1991) The "Other" Eighteenth Century:
English Women of Letters 1660-1800 East Lansing: Colleagues Press (pp. 247-248; 1-16)

WEEK 8: ‘WHAT IS THE ENLIGHTENMENT?’

Topics: 1. Background & Basic Tenets of the Enlightenment. Cultural, scientific,


political and socio-economic contexts. The ‘grand narrative’ of the
Enlightenment: Reason, Progress, Perfectibility through emancipation. Natural
law and universal order. The secularisation of European thought. Twentieth-
century interrogations of the Enlightenment Project.
2. The Augustan Vision. Eighteenth-century Britain and historical antecedents
of European transformations in political, religious, and personal freedom.
Lockean ‘blueprints’ for the enlightened society. Neoclassicism: deference to
classical precedents in literary theory and practice. Rationality, restraint, clarity,
order, and decorum.
3. Epitomising Augustanism: Samuel Johnson’s centrality in the eighteenth-
century literary establishment. Foreshadowing Romantic aesthetics: Rasselas,
Prince of Abissinia (1759).
4. Alexander Pope and neoclassical aesthetics. The arbiter of taste in Essay on
Criticism (1711). Mock-heroic burlesque in The Rape of the Lock (1712):
zeugma and its ‘cosm(et)ic powers’. The ‘skeptical sublime’: the Scriblerians’
aesthetic ideology. Pope’s poetic theodicy: An Essay on Man (1732).

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Compulsory :
▪ Alexander Pope: The Rape of the Lock (1712)
Optional:
▪ Foucault, Michel ‘What is the Enlightenment?’ in Rabinow, Paul (ed) (1984) The Foucault
Reader New York: Pantheon Books (pp. 32-50)
▪ Cassirer, Ernst (1932) The Philosophy of the Enlightenment (tr. 1951, repr. 1955) Princeton
University Press (pp. 3-36)
▪ Schmidt, James (ed) (1996) What is the Enlightenment? Eighteenth-Century Answers and
Twentieth-Century Questions Berkeley & Los Angeles: University of California Press, (pp. 1; 15-
21)
▪ Noggle, James (2001) The Skeptical Sublime: Aesthetic Ideology in Pope and the Tory Satirists
Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press (pp. 3-10)

WEEK 9: THE RISE OF THE NOVEL


Topics: 1. The origins of the English novel. Formalist and historicist genealogical
surveys. Generic ancestors. Social, economic and political contexts. The rise of

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the bourgeoisie. The development of commercial book trading. Patterns of the
novel (gothic, picaresque, sentimental, etc.).
2. ‘Fathering’ the English novel: Daniel Defoe’s ‘formal realism’. The primacy
of individual experience and perception: seventeenth-century philosophical
backgrounds. Laying the foundations of modern journalism. Defoe’s self-
reflexive obsession with History: legitimising fictional narrative.
Verisimilitude, authenticity, credibility. The Life and Strange Surprising
Adventures of Robinson Crusoe of York, Mariner (1719): grafting travel
narratives on spiritual autobiography. The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the
Famous Moll Flanders (1722): modifying the picaresque pattern.
3. Scriblerian irony: Jonathan Swift. Satires on false learning and religious
abuse. Championing Enlightenment ideals? Swiftian satire in Gulliver’s Travels
(1726). Parodying the traveller’s tale: the (dis)belief in rationality, progress,
human perfectibility. The parallax of perspectives as a vehicle for satire.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Compulsory
▪ Daniel Defoe: Moll Flanders (1722)
▪ Jonathan Swift: Gulliver’s Travels (1726)
Optional:
▪ Watt, Ian (1957) The Rise of the Novel. Studies in Defoe, Richardson and Fielding
Hammondsworth (pp. 1-34)
▪ McKeon, Michael (2002) The Origins of the English Novel, 1600-1740. Baltimore Johns
Hopkins University Press, (pp.1-22)
Richetti, John (ed) (1996) The Cambridge Companion to the Eighteenth-Century Novel Cambridge
University Press (pp. 41-87)

WEEK 10: THE GOTHIC ROMANCE

Topics: Gothic fiction in the eighteenth century: (re)producing the ideology of the modern bourgeois
subject. ‘Gothic’: range of meanings in the eighteenth century. Gothic origins:
Richard Hurd’s Letters on Chivalry and Romance (1762). The gothic aesthetic
of ‘unreason’: imagination, originality, terror and the supernatural. The Burkean
sublime: A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime
and the Beautiful (1757). Ann Radcliffe and the terror-horror divide: On the
Supernatural in Poetry (1826). Gothic manifestos: Horace Walpole’s blend of
ancient and modern romance. Counternarratives of the Gothic: the ‘dark
underside’ of Enlightenment rationality. Gothic stock features. Revolutionary
Gothic: M. G. Lewis’s The Monk (1796). Contaminated genealogies and
dislocated origins. Techniques of narrative and psychological fragmentation.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Compulsory:
M. G. Lewis: The Monk
Optional:
▪ Miles, Robert (1993) Gothic Writing 1750-1820. A Genealogy London & New York: Routledge
(pp. 10-29)
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▪ Napier, Elizabeth (1987) The Failure of Gothic: Problems of Disjunction in an Eighteenth-
century Literary Form Oxford: Clarendon Press (pp. 112-132)
▪ Watt, James (1999) Contesting the Gothic: Fiction, Genre and Cultural Conflict, 1764-1832
Cambridge University Press (pp. 1-11)

WEEK 11: THE SENTIMENTAL NOVEL

Topics: The novel of sentiment in English fiction. The mid eighteenth-century cult of
sensibility. The decline of neo-classical reason; the eruption of Romantic
sensibility. David Hume’s Treatise of Human Nature (1738). Adam Smith’s
Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759). Away from the Hobbesian state of nature:
the (wo)man of feeling; avatars. Techniques and prescriptions of
sentimentalism. Permeations into Gothic fiction and romantic poetry.
Exemplary emotions and pedagogical assumptions. Jane Austen’s Sense and
Sensibility (1811) and the ‘successful resolution’ of the eighteenth-century
novel. Austen’s refusal to romanticize: irony, mordant wit and excessive
sensibility.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Compulsory:
Jane Austen: Sense and Sensibility
Optional:
▪ Waldron, Mary (1999) Jane Austen and the Fiction of Her Time Cambridge & New York:
Cambridge University Press (pp. 62-83)
▪ Todd, Janet (ed) (1983) Jane Austen: New Perspectives New York: Holmes & Meier (pp. 39-48)
▪ Richetti, John (ed) (1996) The Cambridge Companion to the Eighteenth-Century Novel
Cambridge University Press (pp. 236-253)

WEEK 12: PERFORMING THE NARRATIVE: STERNE’S


‘AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL’ SUBJECT

Topics: Eighteenth-century fictions of identity. Laurence Sterne’s novel without a


pattern. Performative narrative: the publicly oriented narrator. Writing over
exigencies of plot: Sterne and the art of digression. Sterne and the tradition of
learned wit. Meaning embodied in the pattern: humours and hobby horses.
Parodic strategies in Tristram Shandy: Lockean duration and association. The
modernity of Sterne. Formal self-reflexivity. Defamiliarising strategies of
narration. Tristram Shandy as the parodic ‘anti-novel’ that legitimated the
normative realist canon.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Compulsory:
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Laurence Sterne: The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy (1759-1766)
Optional:
▪ Womersley, David (ed) (2000) A Companion to Literature from Milton to Blake Oxford:
Blackwell (pp. 371-379)
▪ Richetti, John (ed) (1996) The Cambridge Companion to the Eighteenth-Century Novel
Cambridge University Press (pp. 153-173)
▪ Watts, Carol ‘The Modernity of Sterne’ in Pierce, David & Peter De Voogd (eds) (1996)
Laurence Sterne in Modernism and Postmodernism Amsterdam: Rodopi (pp. 19-38)

WEEK 13: LAYING DOWN THE RULES FOR A NEW PROVINCE OF WRITING:
SAMUEL RICHARDSON V. HENRY FIELDING

Topics: 1. The new school of novel writing in eighteenth-century Britain. The


controversial Richardson-Fielding debate. Domestic interiors and public spaces.
2. Samuel Richardson and the novel of sensibility. Formal and psychological
complexity. Didactic intent: inculcating morality in Pamela, or Virtue
Rewarded (1740). Origins: scandal narratives and cautionary tales. ‘Writing to
the moment’: Richardson and the epistolary technique. The complexity of
psychological motivation in Clarissa; Or, the History of a Young Lady (1747-
8).
3. Henry Fielding and the ‘heroic, historical, prosaic poem’. Fielding’s
backgrounds as playwright and political journalist. Rewriting Pamela: parodies
of ‘virtue’ in Shamela and Joseph Andrews. Theorising fiction: finding a new
formula for the novel. The ‘comic epic poem in prose’: The History of Tom
Jones. A Foundling (1749). The Bill of Fare and the digressive prefatory
chapters. The ‘founder of a new province of writing’: Henry Fielding and
neoclassical discipline.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Compulsory
▪ Samuel Richardson: Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded (1740)
▪ Henry Fielding: The History of Tom Jones. A Foundling (1749)
Optional:
▪ Watt, Ian (1968) The Rise of the Novel. Studies in Defoe, Richardson and Fielding
Hammondsworth (pp. 174-207; 239-259)
▪ Keymer, Thomas & Jon Mee (eds) (2004) The Cambridge Companion to English Literature
1740-1830 Cambridge University Press (pp. 139-149)

WEEK 14: PICARESQUE AND EPISTOLARY PATTERNS IN EIGHTEENTH-


CENTURY FICTION: TOBIAS SMOLLETT’S THE EXPEDITION OF
HUMPHRY CLINKER (1771)

Topics: Patterns of the picaresque in English literature. The countergenre of fastidious


courtly literature. Origins and distinct characteristics of the picaresque. Loose,
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episodic first-person narratives. Corrupt, disintegrating world background. On
the move: fixity and change with the rogue hero(ine). Bildungsroman affinities:
from social anonymity to social recognition. Inflections of the picaresque in the
English fiction of the eighteenth century. Tobias Smollett’s satiric drive.
Picaresque realism and the grotesque worldview in The Expedition of Humphry
Clinker (1771). Challenging readerly expectations: Smollett’s unconventional
approach to the picaresque. Granting ‘an uniform plan’ to a ‘large diffused
picture’: the epistolary structure of the narrative. In usum publicum: the
epistolary novel’s dynamics of collaboration. Idiosyncratic styles, relativity of
viewpoints.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Compulsory:
Tobias Smollett: The Expedition of Humphry Clinker (1771)

Optional:
▪ Richetti, John (ed) (1996) The Cambridge Companion to the Eighteenth-Century Novel
Cambridge University Press (pp. 174-197)
▪ Heckendorn Cook, Elizabeth (ed) (1996) Epistolary Bodies. Gender and Genre in The
Eighteenth-Century Republic of Letters Stanford University Press (pp. 5-29).

VII. Modul de evaluare:


Assessment Guidelines:

LEADING CLASS DISCUSSION: 10%. Students may sign up individually or in pairs to give
presentations of a particular topic and to initiate discussion for one of the seminar-oriented sessions.
Students leading discussion will be directed in advance as to the focus of their discussion questions.
Individual or group discussions in class will not only help consolidate the theoretical grounds of the
topics under debate, but will also foster an interdisciplinary exchange of ideas to be reinforced in the
analysis of the works examined proper.

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS: 30%

1. 10% - REVIEW: The first will consist in a review/response to any of the theoretical or critical
articles included in the Reader (to be handed in by the end of May). Your review should
comprise brief (one-page long, i.e. 200-word) commentaries on ONE of those studies,
highlighting its relevance for you as a student of the particular writer or work it refers to.

2. 20% - HOME ASSIGNMENT: The second written assignment represents a more academic
research paper on a topic of your choice – to be convened with the teacher shortly after the
Easter holiday (a list of possible topics will be made available to you in due time). Use of
secondary bibliographical resources is highly recommended. Electronic resources may be used,
provided that you resort to proper citation styles and avoid plagiarism at all costs. This final
paper should not exceed 5 pages in length and should be typed or word-processed with standard
double-spacing. Late papers will be penalized one grade for each missed deadline. Suggested
date for handing in your final research papers: the last week in the semester.

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WRITTEN EXAM: 60% A substantial percentage of your final overall grade will come from the
written exam, which will comprise two compulsory subjects, one from the course topics and one
from the seminar topics. A minimum grade of 5 for both subjects is required for passing this final
examination. The final grades will be posted within one week of the final examination date.

GRADING: The final grade for this course will be derived from the following sources:

COURSE GRADING:

10% class contributions


10% review
20% home assignment
60% written exam

!!! The final grade will be computed as follows:


2 thirds – the course grade
1 third – the seminar grade (seminar on the Restoration theatre)

VIII. Detalii organizatorice, gestionarea situaţiilor excepţionale:


Plagiarism will incur failure of the course examination.

NOTA BENE: Exceptional seminar contributions and presentations may exempt you from
having to write the Home assignment.

IX. Bibliografia opţională:

Optional Reading Material


The Reader (specially designed for this course) contains, as you will notice, OPTIONAL/SECONDARY
reading material – book chapters and articles – which provide background and explication for the topics
analysed. These bibliographical references are detailed in the Course Outline above. I shall therefore not
reiterate the list in this section. Important notice: You do NOT have to read the Optional texts. However, you
may choose to do so, since they give you relevant material for preparing your presentations, seminar
discussions and for writing your essays. For those students who feel they need further investigation of
particular topics, I can make supplementary secondary bibliography (literary criticism and theory) available
to them on request (on a short-term loan basis).

Apart from the Optional Bibliography included in the Reader, in the list below you can find further solid and
reliable surveys of the seventeenth- and eighteenth-century English literature covered by this course. These
books are available at the English Library of the Faculty of Letters. Students are warmly encouraged to
consult such alternative bibliographical sources, which can also be found at the British Council Library or in
the Online Databases of the Central University Library in Cluj-Napoca (for instance, Literature Online,
www.chadwyck-healey.org).

1. Allen, Walter (1967) The English Novel. A Short Critical History Penguin Books
2. Clifford, James L (1959) Eighteenth-Century English Literature. Modern Essays in Criticism Oxford
University Press
3. Cockshut, A O J (1980) The Novel to 1900 London: McMillan
4. Daiches, David (1960) A Critical History of English Literature London: Secker & Warburg
5. Day, Martin S. (1963) History of English Literature 1660-1837 New York: Doubleday & Co.

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6. Galea, Ileana, Virgil Stanciu & Liviu Cotrau (eds) (1986) Studies in the Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-
Century English Novel Cluj-Napoca
7. Lindley, David (ed) (1995) Court Masques. Jacobean & Caroline Entertainments 1605-1640 Oxford & New
York: Oxford University Press
8. Mudure, Mihaela (2001) Istorie si literatura Dacia: Napoca Star
9. Vovelle, Michel (ed) (2000) Omul luminilor (transl. By Ingrid Ilinca) Iasi: Polirom
10. Watt, Ian (1968) The Rise of the Novel. Studies in Defoe, Richardson and Fielding
Hammondsworth

Decan, Sef de catedra, Titular curs,


Prof. dr. Corin Braga Prof.dr. Mihai Zdrenghea Lect. Dr. Carmen Borbely

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