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Questions 1 to 7 are based on the following information given below.

ROSE ORPHANGE MONTHLY INCOMEEXPENDITURE PATTERN
ROSE ORPHANGE ONTHLY INCO E -EXPENDITURE PATTERN

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7% 4% FOOD BOOKS STATIONERY CLOTHES SALARIES TRANSPORT
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TOTAL AMOUNT OF INCOME RECEIVED FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE 2007: RM10 000 NO. OF PRIMARY SCHOOL CHILDREN (AGE RANGE 7-11 YEARS) AT THE ORPHANAGE : 20 DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EXPENDITURE FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE 2007 BOOKS CLOTHES SALARIES STATIONERY TRANSPORT OUTINGS - Revision - T-shirt - RM2.5 - Pens - School bus for - Visit to books - Shorts 0 for - Pencils all the children the Forest - Exercise each reserve books staff Institute of Malaysia to study the different types of tropical trees

FOOD - Basic meals - Snacks

1 The chart indicates the monthly income -expenditure pattern of Rose Orphanage for the month of June 2007. A True B False C Not stated
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2 According to the chart, the amount spent on food for the month of June was RM3 900. A True B False C Not stated 3 The orphanage is managed by five staff members. A True B False C Not stated 4 The orphanage purchased primary school revision and exercise books for the children. A True B False C Not stated 5 All the children go to school by bus. A True B False C Not stated 6 The visit to the forest Research Institute of Malaysia cost RM300. A True B False C Not stated 7 The outing organised by the orphanage in June 2007 was an educational trip. A True B False C Not stated

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Questions 8 to 14 are based on the following passage.

Parents who want their children to be fit and active should be encouraging them to go out and play rather than telling them to exercise, a study of more than 200 children aged 4 to 12 years shows. The researchers found that advertising campaigns using words 2 such as µphysical activity¶ and µexercise¶ to encourage young people to be active would have little meaning for them. Children do not have an interest in or understanding of the health benefits of physical activity, according to a study by Professor W. Schiller and Dr MacDougall from the University of South Australia. The South Australia Department of Human Services 3 commissioned the research concerns about the increasing levels of obesity, diabetes and physical inactivity in children. µOur aim was to gain a deeper unders tanding of children¶s 4 ideas about physical activity, exercise, fitness, sports and play,¶ Professor Schiller said. µWhat came through very strongly in the study was that 5 physical activity was an adult concept and most children only identified with play. It was the only activity that they thought they had ownership of, and had freedom in.¶ µWhat is different about this study is that, rather than have 6 adults make decisions on behalf of children, we arranged to have children¶s voice heard by involving them in the research process,¶ 7 Professor Schiller said. µWhat we discover during our research was not to mix play and sport. Play is kids-led, where children make, change and modify the 8 rules. Sports is adult-led with rules that do not change,¶ Dr MacDougall said. µSports was seen as being only for extremely talented children 9 who had parental backing to drive them to sporting venues, and attend coaching clinics and auditions. That was a real surprise! Dr MacDougall said. Other negatives for sports included bullying and gender issues, 10 with girls indicating that boys ganged up on them. The fear was also a concern, with about eight percent of children saying that injury was a barrier to playing sports. Children said that they wanted adults to spend a lot more time 11 and to be physically active with them. 1 (Adapted from: http://www.news-medical.net

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8 Children¶s concept of physical exercise is different from adults¶ A True B False C Not stated 9 The following are health problems among children except A obesity B diabetes C cardio disease 10 When children play sports such as basketball under their own rules, it is classed as play. A True B False C Not stated 11 Children who play a lot are more independent. A True B False C Not stated 12 The research was most likely conducted by A interviewing parents B interviewing children C observing children and sport teachers 13 Most children identified themselves with play because A they have misconceptions about physical activity to play B they are free to do what they want to do C they do not know the rules for sports 14 Which of the following is false about sports? A Proper training on sports is needed for children. B Sports pose very serious threats to children. C Sports are suitable for children and adults.

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Questions 15 to 21 are based on the following passage.

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What do we mean when we call someone a genius? Is a genius an exceptionally intelligent person? Intelligence has been variously defined as the capacity to learn, the ability to carry out abstract thought, or the possession of great mental ability. A great many people fall into these categories, yet most would generally not be regarded as geniuses. Through the ages, people whom we have considered geniuses are those who have made remarkable advances in science or the arts. Examples of these people are Galileo, Isaac Newton, Beethoven and Albert Einstein. They were not merely endowed with great intelligences, there were creative as well. Creativity involves the ability to see relationships where other people fail to do so. Newton related the force that made other objects fall to earth to that which moves the planets and the stars. Einstein, in pondering time, saw a relationship between time and space when he formulated the t heory of relativity that radically changed the foundations of physics. On Sigmund Freud noticed the connection between his patient¶s dreams and their emotional disturbances. Without creativity, an intelligent man is just that ± intelligent, but incapable of standing out from other intelligent people. A genius usually exhibits remarkable determination. Blaise Pascal, a 17th century mathematician, was determined to study mathematics when his father forbade him to study the subject, forcing him instead to take Greek and Latin. Without the help of books and teachers, he secretly studied mathematics. He discovered the basic concepts of geometry and went on to the thirty -second proposition of Euclid when he was only twelve years old. Determination can al so be translated into hard work. Creative scientists can be extremely hardworking. As Thomas Edison, arguably one of the most prolific inventors of the 20 th century, noted, ³Genius is one percent inspiration and 90% perspiration.´ Another common characteristic of geniuses is their readiness to use and share new ideas. Where would we be if geniuses did not divulge their ideas? This takes immense bravery as new ideas often seem strange, even ridiculous, to many people at first. Galileo, who fought against the church and the philosophers of his time when he proposed that the earth was not the centre of the universe, stands as a symbol of the battle against authority and freedom of inquiry. Beethoven¶s first symphony was derided by the public for its revolutionary musical ideas. Today, he is regarded as, indisputably, one of the greatest composers who has ever lived.

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A genius must also be able to harness his subconscious thought because creativity, an essential prerequisite of genius, is subconscious. Subconscious thought is unlike our everyday thinking, which is logical and rational. Subconscious thought is more like a dream: strange and illogical. There is a fine line between genius and madness. Einstein was able to use his subconscious thoug ht creativity. Who in their right mind but a genius like Einstein would have even conceived of the idea that the pace of time could alter for persons travelling at different speeds? A person who cannot harness the subconscious thinking to use it creatively crosses the line from genius to madness, like Vincent van Gogh. Van Gogh, who claimed that pictures came to him ³as if in a dream´, was able to produce more than 800 canvases ± many of them masterpieces ± for as long as he could harness his inspiration, passions and emotions. Once he lost control of them, he entered a nightmare of insanity, eventually shooting himself in the chest and taking his life. In a nutshell, a genius is someone who has all the following: exceptionally intelligence, determina tion, a high degree of creativity, the readiness to use and share new ideas, and the ability to utilize them to good purpose. Having understood this, was can perhaps try to develop the potential in each person to bring out the genius in him.

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15 Why does the writer define ³intelligence´ in three ways in the first paragraph? A He is not sure of the meaning. B People cannot agree on its definition. C These are the three prerequisite of intelligence 16 The writer states that a genius is I exceptionally intelligent II creative III mad IV determined A I, II and III B I, II and IV C II, III and IV

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17 The thirty-second proposition of Euclid is related to A science B geometry C determination 18 Thomas Edison¶s saying ³Genius is one percent inspiration and 99% perspiration´ means A Creativity without hard work is useless B Inspiration and perspiration are elements in the making of a genius C Hard work plays a more important role than creativity in the making of a genius 19 Why do the ideas of genius sometimes seem mad? A Geniuses cannot harness their subconscious thought. B Geniuses cannot separate the lines between madness and genius. C Creative thoughts are subconscious and strange, like our dreams. 20 Each of the following can be inferred from the passage except A Pascal¶s father ill-treated him. B People sometimes do not recognise a genius in their midst. C The church during Galileo¶s time thought the earth was the centre of the universe. 21 All of the following are geniuses in the same field except A Galileo B Beethoven C Isaac Newton

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Questions 22-29 are based on the passage below.

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He has been described as µagile, playful, audacious, inventive¶ ; a man who µleaps across boundaries, making unexpected connections, juggling a dozen trains of thoughts all at once¶. But whatever levels he might get, Prof Allan Synder, one of Australia¶s most creative minds, is indeed unique in the way he puts his message across. The key to his belief is that everyone, irrespective of his or her background and social standing, has that µspecial ingredient ± some might even say magic¶ ± that separates exceptional individuals from others. Yet, despite the capacity of everyone to be creative, he points out quite rightly that creativity is so rare in this world. Provocatively, Synder creates a controversy by suggesting a radical shake-up in educating young people and identifying the essential element of success which, he believes is missing in conventional schools. The simple fact is that relatively few students from many of the great schools in the world have gone on to become greatness themselves. Why? To Synder who is director of the Centre for the Mind, a joint venture of the Australian National University and the University of Sydney, there is too much conservative pressure on people to follow in the footsteps of others, ³We are taught to learn what other people know, and to think as other people think, ³he says seriously. ³So, it is one thing to have original ideas and quite another to have the courage to broadcast them to the world.´ Then, with what seems to be a touch of cynicism, Synder throws in a punchline that is as unconventional as his unorthodox ideology: ³Creativity is an act of rebellion; it¶s downright subversive to be creative.´ But bespectacled Synder, who often wears his cap front to back and has the funny look of an eccentric, is a man who believes in taking risks ± a sort of challenge that drives and motivates him to discover the genius gene in an individual. Surprisingly, many people are prepared to take that risk by becoming the subject of his curiosity to detect hidden talent that they themselves didn¶t know they possessed. They come to his laboratory and put on a specially-designed headpiece that zaps their brains with magnetic pulses and sends signals to his computer screen from which he makes his study. He is more interested in studying autistic savants ± people who are severely impaired yet have amazing mental skills such as drawing, music, sculpture or even language. People like specially -gifted child artist Yeak Ping Lian of Malaysia, whose colourful artwork Ubudiah Mosque 1 was sold for RM1000 000 to an anonymous bidder at an

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auction of the RDA Charity Ball in aid of the Riding for the Disabled Association in 2004. 7 Ping Lian¶s impressive artworks have been highly praised by American psychiatrist, Dr Darold Treffert as ³demonstrating a remarkable ability in an 11 -year-old boy whose skills are a striking contrast to limitations in autism and other disabilities´. This is especially true because autistic savants are supposedly people whose intelligence is considered very limited. Yet they are able to come up with remarkable skills that surprise many talented ordinary people. 8 Synder, however, believes that everyone can develop these islands of genius by tapping that special gene hidden in their subconscious mind. The unconscious mind takes everything that a person sees or reads and µsimplifies and categorises¶ the information into µmanageable and useful packages¶. 9 ³Where it sees lines and patterns of dark and shade, our conscious mind might know it is a horse,´ he once explained to New Scientist magazine. ³We know that beca use our brain has learned all about horses, has experienced what makes something a horse rather than a dog or a table, and has formed a concept and mental image.´ 10 ³It¶s a very difficult way for our minds to work. It allows us to spot things quickly, to na me them and communicate the ideas. The mind also learns how these things might behave so that we can make predictions about the world and devise rules about how to act appropriately.´ (Adapted from The Controversial Professor by Jeffery Francis, The Star, 5 February, 2006)

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22 The phrase µspecial ingredient ± some might even say magic¶ (line 7) refers to A creativity B unique mind C human capacity 23 Professor Allan Synder is said to create controversy because A he proposed a revolution in educating young people and determining factors of success B he advocated that graduates are mere followers of the thoughts of others C he tarnished the image of academicians by wearing his cap front to back
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24 According to Professor Allan Synder, many graduates are unable to perform up to standard despite graduating from distinguished universities because A they are unable to generate new ideas B they merely learn what they already know C they do not have the courage to put forward their own ideas 25 ³Creativity is an act of rebellion; it¶s downright subversive to be creative.´ (lines 25-26) suggest that Synder thinks A creative people dare to take risks B creative people are up to no good C people are creative to cause trouble to others 26 Intelligence in the eyes of Professor Allan Synder A is hidden in the unconscious mind B is developed through everything that we see and read C can be aroused through a particular gene in the subconscious mind 27 From the passage we learn about all of the following except A everyone has the hidden capacity to be creative B The centre for the Mind is a collaborative project C Professor Allan Synder discovered the artist talent Yeak Ping Lian 28 According to the passage, we can tell the difference between a horse and a dog because of all the following except A we have learned all about them B we have seen them many times C we have real-life experience about them 29 Which of the statement below is not true? A Autistic savants are seen as those with limited intelligence. B Autistic savants also have remarkable skills despite their limited abilities. C Autistic savants are able to develop mental skills through training and obsessive practice.

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Questions 30-37 are based on the passage below.

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For many years, futurists have envisaged a future where telephone conversations will take place just like actual face -to-face encounters, with videos as well as audio output. The reason for this is that sometimes, meeting up in person with two or three people is just not possible or practical. Hence, video conferencing (also known as a video teleconferencing or VTC) is needed to make such meetings possible. Although communication companies have been experimenting with video conferencing technology as early as the late 1950s, it took the arrival of broadband Internet and affordable web cameras in the late 1990s for video conferencing to really take off. It allows users to see and hear each other in a virtual environment that is as close as possible to a real meeting. In other words, it is a communication technology that integrates video and voice to connect remote users with each other as if they were in the same room. All a user needs for participation in video conferencing is a computer, webcam, microphone and broadband Internet connection. In the field of education, video conferencing can present students with the opportunity to learn by participating in a two-way communication platform. Besides, teachers from all over the world can be brought to classes in remote and inaccessible places. On the other hand, students from different communities and backgrounds can come together to learn about one another by discovering, sharing, analysing and communicating information and ideas with one another. Mor eover, students can participate in µvirtual field trips¶ which involve learning through visits to other parts of the world. Such µtrips¶ increase the learning opportunities of students and would be most beneficial for students who are economically disadvantaged or lived in geographically-isolated locations. Many prominent universities have also adopted video conferencing as an educational tool to be used for their online courses. Furthermore, video conferencing is a very valuable technology for telemedicine and tele-nursing applications, such as consultation, diagnosis and the transmission of medical images in real time in countries where there is legal. By using VTC, patients may get in touch with nurses and physicians in emergency or routine situations. Moreover, physicians and other paramedical professionals can discuss across vast distances. Research has also shown that medical personnel in rural areas can use this technology for diagnostic purposes, thus saving lives and making more efficient use of hea lth care money. Another use of video conferencing is to share documents, computer-displayed information and whiteboards. Business leaders

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around the world too use video conferencing to keep in touch with important contacts while on the go. 6 However, present-day applications of video conferencing technology are just the beginning. As video and voice capture 45 technology, software and display technologies continue to improve, video conferencing will soon become a common mode of communication. Ultimately, video conferencing and similar technologies will allow the establishment of µvirtual cities¶, which refers 50 to online spaces where people work together without the limitation of geographic proximity. This would enable skilled workers living in the outskirts of cities to work from home. On top of that, this would help to reduce congestion in cities and preserve the environment.

30 Video conferencing is a A display technology B communication technology C broadband internet connection D video and voice capture technology 31 All of the following are true except A Video conferencing began in the late 1990s B Video conferencing has created virtual cities C Video conferencing is used as an educational tool D Video conferencing is used by doctors for diagnostic purposes 32 Which of the following are features of video conferencing? I Face-to face encounters II Integrates video and audio technology III Involves voice-only communication technology IV Needs computer, web camera, microphone and broadband Internet connection A I, II & III B I, II & IV C I, III & IV D II, III & IV

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33 The writers hopes that A voice and pictures technology will catch on B video conferencing will be used in other fields C video conferencing will improve lifestyles D voice and picture technology software will be easily available 34 The main purpose of paragraph 4 is to A warn B advise C remind D inform 35 The writer mentions virtual field trips and virtual cities to show the concept of A virtual simulation B virtual language C virtual reality D virtual twins 36 In the last paragraph, the writer states that improvements in video conferencing technologies will indirectly result in the A regular use of video conferencing B preservation of the environment C convenience in communication D creation of µvirtual cities¶ 37 We can infer that the writer¶s tone is _______ . A non-committal B pessimistic C optimistic D biased

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Questions 38-45 are based on the passage below.

Harry Houdini who was the entertainment phenomenon of the ragtime died in 1927. His death-defying acts amazed many of his audience. He could escape from chain and padlocks, from ropes and canvas sacks within seconds. He could even untie himself when he was put in a straitjacket and hung upside down from a skyscraper. Another death-defying act was when he was locked in a packing case and sunk in the Liverpool docks. Minutes later, he surfaced smiling. In Moscow, he escaped from a Siberian van. At one point, brewers challenged Houdini to escape from his Milk Can after they filled it with beer, yet he managed to break free. He was put in a coffin with the lid nailed and was buried, but when he was dug up after more than thirty minutes, he was found to be still breathing. The audience was usually allowed to examine his 2 equipment before or during the performance. The chains, locks and the packing cases all seemed perfectly kosher, so it was tempting to imply that Houdini possessed superhuman powers. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of the paragon of analytical thinking Sherlock Holmes, believes that Houdini achieved his tricks through spiritualism. He refused to believe any of Houdini¶s exposes. Doyle actually came to believe that Houdini was a powerful spiritualist medium and had performed many of his stunts by means of paranormal abilities. Indeed, he wrote to the escapologist, imploring him tom use his psychic powers more profitably for the common good instead of prostituting his powers at the Alhambra every night. However, Houdini had repeatedly denounced spiritualism and disclaimed any psychic elements in his acts. Another alternative explanation for his feat of escapism was 3 that Houdini could do unnatural things with his body. It is widely speculated that he could dislocate his shoulders to escape from straitjackets, and that his wrists could contract so that he could free himself from handcuffs. His ability to spend long hours in confined spaces is cited as evidence that he could put his body into suspended animation, as Indian fakirs are supposed to do. However, researchers have dispelled this belief claiming that if a person is tied up in a straitjacket, it is difficult for him to dislocate his shoulder. Contracting the wrists is not helpful either as it is virtually incompressible. As for the principle that Houdini could put himself into 4 suspended animation, the trick is that it relies on the fact that a person can live for a short periods on the air contained in the confined space. The air required by an average person in a day would occupy a cube just eight feet square. The build up of carbon monoxide tends to pollute this supply. However, if a person can relax, the air in a confined space 1
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should be able to keep him going for about thirty minutes. In short, Houdini¶s death-defying acts were not as remarkable as one would have believed then except for his courage, dexterity and fitness. His nerve was so cool that he could relax in a casket buried a few metres underground until he was dug up again. His fingers were so strong that he could unlock a buckle or manipulate keys through the canvas of a straitjacket. He made a comprehensive and detailed study of locks and was able to conceal lock-picks in his body that he could have fooled doctors who examined him. When he was locked in a prison van, he had concealed a hacksaw blade which he used to saw through joints in the metal lining and get access to the planks of the floor. 5 As an entertainer, he combined all his strength and ingenuity with a lot of trickery. An orchestra was playing to disguise the sawing and banging when he staged his escape behind a curtain. The milk churn in which he locked himself in had a double lining so that while the lid was locked onto the rim, the rim was not actually attached to the churn. Hence, all Houdini¶s feats are eminently explicable although to explain them, even now, seems like heresy. Houdini belongs to a band of mythical supermen who, we like to believe, was capable of miracles and would still be alive today if not for some piece of low trickery. The most widespread account is that Houdini¶s ruptured appendix was caused by multiple blows to his abdomen which caused his death. Somehow the myth of the superman has an even greater appeal than the edifice of twentieth ce ntury logic. (Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry Houdini)
38 The writer mentioned Houdini¶s burial alive to show that A his trick could sometimes go awry B he was not always able to do what he claimed C he was capable of remarkable feats of survival D he was not afraid to be locked in a confined space 39 In paragraph 2, it is suggested that Conan Doyle A was less rational and analytical that one might have expected B asked Houdini to work with him to write Sherlock Holmes book C thought that there were scientific explanation for all Houdini¶s feats D felt that Houdini should use his acts to make money in other ways

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40 The word kosher (line 15) can be best replaced with A expensive B complicated C genuine D solid 41 Which of the following statements is true? A Houdini had an unusual bone structure. B Houdini needed less air than most people. C Houdini was able to put himself into trance. D Houdini was not physically and mentally abnormal. 42 How do you think Houdini was able to escape from the straitjacket? A By studying all kinds of locks and keys B By concealing lock-picks in his clothes C By cutting the canvas with a hacksaw D By using keys he had concealed 43 When Houdini escaped from the milk churn A the orchestra was playing to disguise the noise B he used the hacksaw to saw through the joints C the container had been worked on beforehand D it was well hidden behind a curtain 44 According to the writer, many people A want to know the scientific explanation for Houdini¶s achievement B prefer to believe that Houdini had used mystical powers in his feats C Think that Houdini died because of the punching that had caused his appendix to rupture D do not believe that Houdini was a superman who was capable of working miracles 45 From the article above, we can conclude that A no want managed to explain how Houdini did some of his tricks B in the future someone will be able to repeat some of Houdini¶s feats C Houdini could stay in a sealed coffin without breathing for half an hour D Houdini was a charismatic man who dazzled the world with his amazing feats
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