24 | Drainage | Energy And Resource

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 2 AUG.

1, 2008
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VOL. 4, NO. 16 AUG. 1, 2008 THE RANCH’S BEST SOURCE FOR AREA NEWS
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H2O NO!
The historic La Flecha
house is threatened
by water damage 3
RANCHO
SFNEWS
.com
TEEN QUEEN
A local teen qualifies
for the Miss
California Pageant 22
ITALIAN
ADVENTURE
A local travel writer
reveals that a trip to
Abruzzo has
everything Tuscany
does, but costs less
money 13
Right, Anna Mackin
of Rancho Santa Fe
wears an intricately
designed hat on Opening
Day at the Del Mar
Races on July 16.
Below, Jockey Tyler Baze
rides “I’m in the Mood,”
and the duo wins the
fourth race.
Photos by Daniel Knighton
HATS
ON,
HORSES
OFF!
By David Wiemers
RANCHO SANTA FE —“The
Association is always looking to
purchase more open space,” said
Tim Moore, chairman of the Parks
and Recreation Committee, dur-
ing an update to the Association
board at the meeting July 17.
The committee’s goal is to pro-
tect and maintain the common
areas owned by the Covenant.
There are currently 56 properties
owned by the Association, which
include the Arroyo property,
Richardson Park Picnic Area and
other park and recreational sites
around the Covenant. The acquisi-
tion of more open space was con-
firmed by Association Manager
Pete Smith. “We’re always trying
to seek out new opportunities,”
Smith said.
The Parks and Recreation
Committee is an outgrowth of the
Open Space Committee, which
was formed by the Association
board in 1985. The idea was to
acquire as much green around the
Covenant as possible to create an
insular effect for the community.
With development deals in place
and parcels of land difficult to
acquire, there is only so much the
Ranch
seeks more
open space
By David Wiemers
RANCHO SANTA FE — For
the past six years, the California
Highway Patrol has sought to
increase its level of service and
enforcement in Rancho Santa Fe.
The Senior Volunteer and
Explorers programs have stepped
up to the plate to help achieve
these goals.
Both programs consist of vol-
unteers who donate time and even
provide their own uniforms to
help serve as a visual enforcement
deterrence, issue warnings and
assist in traffic control along with
other services. To show support
and help fund these programs, on
July 17 the Association donated
$3,000 to the Senior Volunteer
Program and $1,000 to the
Explorers program.
The Senior Volunteer
Program, or SVP, is headquartered
at the Rancho Santa Fe Patrol’s
office in the fire station on El
Fuego and is actively supervised
by the Oceanside California
Highway Patrol. The program con-
sists primarily of retired individu-
als who want to serve their com-
munity by periodically directing
morning and afternoon school
traffic during drop-off and pick-up
hours; issuing warnings to parking
Senior citizen
patrol helps
enforce law
TURNTO SPACE ON 27
TURNTO PATROL ON 26
Art Guild celebrates ‘Summer in the Ranch’
By David Wiemers
RANCHO SANTA FE —
Dozens of art lovers and artists
gathered recently to celebrate
“Summer in the Ranch,” the
new show on display at the
Rancho Santa Fe Art Guild.
A wine and hors d’oeuvres
reception was held July 17, dis-
playing artwork at both the Art
Guild and across the street at an
escrow office.
Oil paintings, watercolors
and other mixed media includ-
ing tile works are on display and
available for purchase. The
“Summer in the Ranch” theme
was well-represented as many of
the art pieces reflected sum-
mertime activities, such as time
spent on the beach, surfing and
summer travel.
The exhibit will run through
Aug. 30 and the gallery is open
Tuesday through Saturday 11
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Rancho
Santa Fe Art Guild is a nonprof-
it organization and is always
welcoming new members and
donations for supporting the
arts.
For more information, visit
www.ranchosantafeartguild.org.
NEW EXHIBIT The Rancho Santa Fe Art Guild hosts a wine reception July 17 for the
new “Summer in the Ranch” exhibit. Photo by David Weimers
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 3 AUG. 1, 2008
ODD
FILES
by CHUCK
SHEPHERD
Congressional hopefuls divided on drilling question
By Wehtahnah Tucker
ENCINITAS — The two can-
didates vying to represent the
50th Congressional district are at
odds over a federal proposal to
allow offshore drilling.
Democrat Nick Leibham, a
former criminal prosecutor and
teacher, is challenging
Republican Brian Bilbray who
defeated Democrat Francine
Busby in a special election in
June 2006, after longtime repre-
sentative Randy “Duke”
Cunningham resigned amid
bribery allegations. He defeated
Busby again by a wider margin in
the regular election in November
of the same year.
Leibham said he takes issue
with Bilbray’s opposition to a
decades-old moratorium on off-
shore drilling. In fact, Bilbray
voted to lift the ban in June 2006
and recently said he supports
President Bush’s position on
allowing states to drill off their
coasts. However, he does not sup-
port drilling off the coast of
California.
“Alabama and Mississippi
want to drill in the Gulf Coast,”
Bilbray said in an interview. “To
have the federal government tell
them no when Texas and
Louisiana have been doing it for
years is ridiculous.”
In June 1990, President
George H. W. Bush responded to
concerns about preserving the
ocean and coastal environment
with a directive ordering the
Department of Interior not to
conduct leasing or preleasing
activity in places other than
Texas, Louisiana and limited
parts of Alaska offshore until
2000. The moratorium affected
virtually all of the country’s other
coasts.
Bush’s directive expanded a
moratorium Congress imposed in
1982 that removed 736,000 acres
off the coast of Northern and
Central California from leasing
for oil and gas exploration and
production.The concern for possi-
ble environmental damage and
social disruption caused by both
routine activities and accidents,
such as oil spills, resulted in local
pressure to prevent these possibil-
ities by removing areas from the
lease schedule. In 1998, President
Clinton extended Bush’s
Executive Order until June 2012.
Yet, with gas prices continu-
ing to rise and the price of oil sky-
rocketing, Congress is feeling the
pressure from constituents to
ease the financial pain of the situ-
ation. Bilbray said he views open-
ing up offshore drilling as a piece
of the energy puzzle. “What I fear
is that we have a blanket abolition
on oil exploration,” he said.
Leibham said he supports
the moratorium.“We’re not going
to drill our way out of this crisis,”
he said. Instead, he said he would
work to develop a comprehensive
energy policy. “We will work to
solve our energy crisis and
reduce our gas prices. I will be a
vote to strip oil companies of the
millions of dollars they currently
receive in tax breaks and reinvest
that money into in clean, renew-
able energy and foster innovation
to decrease dependency on for-
eign oil,” Leibham said.
David Wilmot, president of
Santa Cruz-based Ocean
Champions, a group that focuses
on ocean users to help preserve
the ocean, said his organization
supports a more comprehensive
approach to crafting national
energy policy. “We are strongly
opposed to ending the moratori-
um and against any new (oil)
leases,” he said.
“We know this problem is
hurting a lot of us,” Wilmot said.
“It’s a complex problem, with
complex solutions but those are
known.”Wilmot said new drilling
sites would not yield oil reserves
for up to seven to 10 years, which
would have no immediate impact
on gas prices. “Offshore drilling
simply will not solve that prob-
lem,” he said. “The risks to our
coastal economies are just to
great.”
The bipartisan group has not
endorsed a candidate yet for the
50th Congressional race, but
Wilmot says he agrees with much
of what Leibham has said.
Water damage threatens first Ranch residence
By David Wiemers
RANCHO SANTA FE — La
Flecha House, the first house
built in Rancho Santa Fe and
currently home to the Rancho
Santa Fe Historical Society, is
threatened by underground
water that is being absorbed
into the structural walls of the
historic house. Costly repair
work is under way to repair
damage and install a “French”
drain that will divert water
from the structure and prevent
damage in the future.
Gene Magre, a Rancho
Santa Fe Historical Society
board member, is in charge of
the repair project and Flor
Landscaping is doing the work.
“We deduced it was under-
ground water that was doing
the damage,” Magre said. “It’s a
common problem in the Ranch
and even irrigation water runs
downhill, collects here and
seeps into the La Flecha
house.”
Magre explained that La
Flecha House, designed by
Lilian Rice in 1924, was made
of adobe, a very porous materi-
al. “When water is underneath
the house, the walls act like a
sponge, soaking up the water
and causing damage,” Magre
said.
To remedy the problem, the
French drain, a ditch filled with
gravel rock that redirects sur-
face and ground water away
from an area, is being installed.
All repair work is being done
by hand — no heavy equipment
is being used — as a precau-
tionary measure to ensure the
integrity of the historic struc-
ture. A 2-foot ditch has been
dug around the perimeter of
the La Flecha house, and in sev-
eral places the ditch is as deep
as five feet. The drain is placed
at the bottom with a 4-inch per-
forated PVC pipe wrapped in
special porous cloth and sur-
rounded by loose gravel. The
drain then strains and absorbs
water before directing it into
the street below where proper
drainage is already in place.
There are also surface drains
being placed around the
perimeter of the house to help
direct rainwater.
In the patio area behind
the residence, Mexican adobe
tiles have been torn up to make
way for the new drain.
Replacing the tiles has not
been easy. “These are custom
tiles and are being handmade
by a manufacturer in Tecate,
Mexico,” Galo Flor, who is
supervising the restoration,
said. “These adobe tiles are
one-and-a-half inches thick, and
a new mold had to be made to
replicate the originals. But we
wanted to keep the integrity of
the original La Flecha House.
It’s been a very tedious
process.” Work began June 26
and will not be completed until
mid-August when the custom
tiles will be ready.
Priced at $60,000, the
restoration has been a costly
endeavor and the French drain
is taxing the reserves of the
RSF Historical Society. Magre
has asked residents of Rancho
Santa Fe for their support.
“Anybody who is interest-
ed in helping to preserve our
first residence, the home that
gave us our starting point, a
donation would be greatly
appreciated,” Magre said. “It’s
the home that helped make our
community such a magnificent
and romantic place.”
To make donations to La
Flecha House, contact Sharon
Fabry, administrator for the
Rancho Santa Fe Historical
Society, at (858) 456-9291.
Water district takes measures to prepare for anticipated drought
ENCINITAS — The
Olivenhain Municipal Water
District board of directors
adopted a Drought Response
Conservation Ordinance at its last
board meeting.
The general manager simul-
taneously declared a Level 1
Drought Watch for the district’s
service area effective immediate-
ly. The board also ruled that new
service connections will be
frozen, if Level 2 is reached.
The district is continuing to
pursue additional recycled water
delivery options in addition to
already providing recycled water
for homeowners associations, golf
courses and other such common
areas. In August, the district will
begin delivery of recycled water
to the northwest quadrant
of its service area which includes
portions of Carlsbad and
Encinitas.
“The district is focusing its
efforts on conservation, recycled
water and desalination,”
Kimberly Thorner, district gener-
al manager, said. “As a partner
with the eight other local water
agencies currently contracted
with Poseidon Resources to
receive desalinated water from
the Carlsbad Desalination Plant,
we cannot stress the importance
of the permitting and construc-
tion of this plant enough. We
need to get this desalination plant
online.” Customers can show
their support for the desalination
project by sending a letter or
appearing at the next Coastal
Commission hearing Aug. 6
at the Oceanside City Hall.
Meetings are subject to change.
Visit www.coastal.ca.gov for
updates.
Meanwhile, a Level 1 condi-
tion calls out six voluntary use
restrictions. These same restric-
tions become mandatory and will
incur penalties if the district
moves to Level 2. Level 1 restric-
tions include not washing off
paved surfaces, not allowing
runoff from irrigation, watering
before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m., using
a shut-off nozzle on hoses and
repairing all leaks promptly. If 10
percent water reduction goals are
not accomplished in Level 1, a
Level 2 Drought Alert could be
declared.
In a Level 2 Drought Alert
(up to 20 percent reduction
required) all water reduction
measures in Level 1 will become
mandatory and will incur penal-
ties. The district board decided to
diverge from the Regional
Ordinance by providing that no
new potable water service con-
nections will be allowed in Level
2.
“The Regional Ordinance
did not call for the discontinua-
tion of new service connections
until Level 3; however, the district
felt that we owed a duty to our
existing customers to take this
step earlier,” Mark Muir, the dis-
trict board’s treasurer and the dis-
trict’s representative to the San
Diego County Water Authority,
said. “If we start telling our exist-
ing customers they have manda-
tory restrictions and penalties, we
didn’t feel it was right to keep set-
ting new meters.” In response to
Gov. Schwarzenegger’s declara-
tion of a statewide drought,
Metropolitan Water District
declared a Water Supply Alert
throughout its six-county service
area to help preserve water stor-
age reserves.
“The plain and simple of it is
that the entire state is in a
drought and we are drawing down
storage at an alarming rate in
order to meet demands,”Thorner
said. “We do not have the ability
to replenish those supplies as we
did in the past due to court
ordered restrictions on pumping
from the Delta.”
California is experiencing a
drought due to two consecutive
years of below-average rainfall,
very low snowmelt runoff and the
largest court-ordered water trans-
fer restrictions in state history.
The water transfer restrictions
have been placed on the
Sacramento-San Joaquin Bay-
Delta pumps on the State Water
Project pipelines that provide
water to most of Southern
California including San Diego
County. The district receives 40
percent of its water supply from
TURNTO DROUGHT ON 26
LA FLECHA HOUSE Underground water damage threatens Rancho Santa Fe’s
first home, La Flecha House. Photo by David Wiemers
LEAD STORY
Among President
Sarkozy’s recent moves to
trim the size of the French
government was the layoff of
half of the 165 physiothera-
pists at the taxpayer-funded
National Baths of Aix-les-
Bains. The pink-slipped
masseurs warn that the coun-
try’s health will be at risk if
people are unable to get the
mud wraps, thermal baths
and deep-tissue massages
covered by national health
insurance (along with subsi-
dized transportation and
lodging for the visits). In
fact, 27 of the physiothera-
pists immediately went on
sick leave for depression.
Among Sarkozy’s other tar-
gets of government bloat,
according to a July Wall
Street Journal dispatch: fig-
uring out why France
employs 271 diplomats in
India but more than 700 in
Senegal.
Compelling Explanations
Edward Defreitas, 36,
was arrested in Toms River,
N.J., in June and accused of
causing a three-vehicle colli-
sion that injured two men in
a car and sent two others
(paramedics riding in an
ambulance) to the hospital.
Defreitas told police that he
had been drinking and had
decided to drive around until
he sobered up: “He (said he)
was afraid to go home and
his mother finding alcohol
on his breath.”
The Litigious Society
— School custodian
Anthony Gower-Smith, 73,
was awarded the equivalent
of about $75,000 in June in
London’s High Court after
suing Britain’s Hampshire
County government when he
hurt himself falling off a 6-
foot stepladder. Gower-Smith
claimed that he had not been
properly “trained” on how to
use it, despite his long-time
experience with such lad-
ders, and despite his signed
acknowledgment that he had
indeed received training,
and despite his having
blamed himself just after he
fell. (He disavowed the self-
blame by saying that, at the
time, he was woozy and did-
n’t remember what he said.)
— Shannon Hyman, now
24, filed a lawsuit in July
against the Green Iguana
Bar & Grill in St. Petersburg,
Fla., for medical bills and
lost wages when she was
badly burned four years ago
drinking a “flaming shot” of
Bacardi 151-proof rum
(which normally is consumed
without incident, but Hyman
had spit out the drink,
spreading flames to her head
and upper torso). Hyman
told the Tampa Tribune: “I’m
suing because I should not
have been let in (because she
was under 21 at the time). If
I weren’t let in, none of the
events would have hap-
pened.”
Ironies
— In July, the new smok-
ing ban for bars and restau-
rants in the Netherlands
took effect, but it won’t cur-
tail patrons’ right to smoke
TURNTO ODDFILES ON 18
&
OPINION EDITORIAL
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS
4 AUG. 1, 2008
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters to the Editor and reader feedback are welcome. Views expressed in
letters do not necessarily reflect the views of Rancho Santa Fe News. Letters
are subject to editing for length and clarity. Unsigned letters and letters
without city of residence will not be published. Letters should be no longer
than 300 words and include a contact telephone number. Submission does not
guarantee publication. Send letters via e-mail to letters@coastnewsgroup.com.
Views expressed in Opinion &
Editorial do not necessarily reflect the
views of Rancho Santa Fe News.
It’s safe to say Southern
Californians take the ecosys-
tems and environments of
California for granted. How
else would you explain Los
Angeles and San Bernardino
county? Removed from their
very nature by a century of
growth and greed, human
populations have pushed
native habitats to the edge of
collapse, if not extinction, to
make more room for more
people willing to risk it all in
pursuit of the highly fabled
California dream.
Usually when talk turns
to endangered habitats and
the species that depend on
them for survival, people are
talking about coastal sage
scrub and the corresponding
riparian species. Native ter-
restrial species are rare in
coastal Southern California,
and have been for several
decades. Gnatcatchers, moun-
tain lions, lynx, mule deer,
horned lizards and all others
that predate Western civiliza-
tions are hard-pressed for sur-
vival because humans aren’t
big on sharing space or place.
Unfortunately, but not
surprisingly, coastal marine
ecosystems have been equally
degraded by the hand of man.
Out of sight and out of
mind, the coastal habitat
known as the California kelp
forest is perhaps California’s
most endangered ecosystem.
Diminished by hundreds of
human-induced impacts,
1,000 other species live
among the fronds of
Macrocystis pyrifera, the 200-
foot-tall “sequoia of the sea.”
Or used to.
Pollution, climate change
and coastal groins and jetties
contribute to the unrelenting
destruction brought about
by industrial deforestation.
Richer in minerals than any
known land crop, kelp is har-
vested for consumer products
including baby formula, salad
dressing, ice cream, Jell-O pud-
ding, cosmetics and beer. Kelp
products are also used in the
manufacture of livestock and
poultry feed, pharmaceuticals,
cosmetics and fertilizers.
Restoration of California
kelp forests is key to efforts to
restore coastal ecology and
natural sand flow along the
North County coast. Re-estab-
lishing a healthy kelp commu-
nity will contribute signifi-
cantly to shoreline preserva-
tion and stabilization.
The interplay of sand and
kelp, beach and bluff are con-
nected at bedrock level hav-
ing evolved over several mil-
lennium. Over the last centu-
ry, starting with roads and
railways being built across
estuaries, and the beginning
of the industrial kelp harvest
around 1911 for use in gun-
powder production and fertil-
izer during World War I,
and the construction of
further impediments to
sand mid-century, combined
with unchecked population
increases, coastal habitats are
lucky to have survived at all.
Harvesting kelp does not
benefit the local economy, nor
does dredging estuaries to put
sand on the beach, or allowing
detrimental infrastructure to
remain in place. This is not
the answer. Costly, and ulti-
mately futile, sand replenish-
ment does nothing to restore
the processes that would
negate the need for costly
replenishment and shoreline
preservation boondoggles.
Coastal restoration will
happen when mistakes of the
past are undone.
Kelp reforestation is pos-
sible. Science and sensibility
suggest it can be done with
conservative restraint and a
commitment to restoring the
ecological processes of coastal
geology, hydrology and biolo-
gy. A restored kelp forest from
La Jolla to Leucadia will con-
tribute considerably to a
localized ecotourism econo-
my.
Kelp reforestation is the
answer.
Restore the kelp,
restore the coast
Observations from the Edge
BOB
NANNINGA
Bob Nanninga is a freelance writer, producer
and environmental journalist. For more, go
to www.bobservations.com, or e-mail him at
bnanninga@coastnewsgroup.com.
Mutt fee?
Like all cities that are on the
shorts financially, the Surfside
City is mulling the possibility of
a canine license fee after noting
the large number of canines that
romp and play at Dog Beach. Not
at all enthused about the idea,
resident Peter Matthews has
suggested tacking a fee on cats.
Another thought is a bike
license like San Diego has/had.
Sales tax benefit
Cost of a new Vista city hall
has been plugged at $55.2 mil.
According to reports, it will be
financed by a sales tax approved
by voters in 2006. Completion of
the showpiece is slated for 2010.
It will include a 4,000-square-
foot community room in a three-
story building that will also
house the council chambers and
assorted city offices. Will be a
vast improvement over the
remodeled junior high school
building now serving as the city
hall. Overall, it will rival the
plush San Marcos layout.
C’bad looking ahead
City electeds have estab-
lished a Citizens Envision
Carlsbad Committee to develop a
futuristic plan. Department reps
will interact with residents on
potential revisions to the General
Plan, zoning, and Local Coastal
Commission guidelines. The
entire process is expected to take
several years.
Election deadline
In most cities, the deadline
for filing election nomination
forms is 5 p.m. Aug. 8, but if an
incumbent does not file the
deadline is extended for a week.
City clerks suggest you check
with their department to avoid
confusion and to obtain perti-
nent info.
Another massive
development
Saxony Road residents in
the Flower Capital will in the
near future have a 71 single-fam-
ily layout to consider. Developer
Dave Meyer has advised the
planning department of the plan
on 21 acres. Likely to be a high
profile campaign issue.
Racetrack investments
Cardiffian Don Barth, retired
pari-mutuel clerk who fills in
behind the wickets at the race-
track on weekends, sez there are
10 exciting ways to invest at the
seaside course in addition to the
standard win, place and show.
These include Quinella, Rolling
Double, Super High Five, Place
Pick All, Pick Six, Pick Four,
Rolling Pick Three, Exacta,
Trifecta, and Super Trifecta.
There’s also discretionary wager-
ing like on gray horses, horses that
are snorting or sweating, jockeys,
or the longest price on the tote
board. All have better financial
returns than investing in Freddie
Mac or Fannie Mae.
Olympics-bound
Haley Ishimatsu, 15, great
niece of Frank Kawasaki of the
Surfside City, will be competing
in the USA Olympics Aquatic
team. She is entered in the 10-
meter diving event and the syn-
chronized 10-meter diving event.
The teen has only been seriously
swimming for three years.
Parking dilemma
More folks are using muni
transportation from the
Solbeach train station and leav-
ing their wheels parked in front
of commercial businesses, some-
times all day. Merchants are
wondering why parking time
limits aren’t being enforced. In
the Surfside City, fees for over-
time parking are a major source
of revenue. How cum Solbeach
izzn’t tapping into this revenue
source while at the same time
providing more parking for
shoppers?
Longevity
In C’bad longevity is the key.
Council lady Ann Kuchin has
announced she will seek her
eighth term.Two seats are up.The
one held by Julie Nygaard is wide
open. She was appointed to com-
plete the term of Norine Sigafoose
who resigned. Nygaard promised
not to be a candidate.
Raiding the
transportation funds
State legislature electeds
have suggested pilfering
approved transportation funds
to help balance the out-of-kilter
budget they are responsible for
with promise to return these
funds with “substantial inter-
est.” Anyone who believes the
Easter bunny lays colored eggs
will believe these reckless tax
spenders will deliver on this
promise. Will critical transporta-
tion projects be delayed because
of a cash shortage? Better idea is
to have these electeds pool their
personal resources and loan
them to the state to reduce the
deficit they created. They will be
getting a great return on their
loan with “substantial interest.”
Underground ped
walkways
In the Flower Capital,
Solana Beach considers dog license fee
Eye on the Coast
BILL
ARBALLO
P.O. Box 232550, Encinitas, CA 92023-2550 • 760-436-9737
www.ranchosfnews.com • Fax: 760-943-0850
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GENERAL MANAGER GLENAS ORCUTT
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MANAGING EDITOR LAURIE SUTTON
COMMUNITY NEWS EDITOR JEAN GILLETTE
ASSISTANT EDITOR ERIC MURTAUGH
PRODUCTION MANAGER SANDRA POWERS
GRAPHIC ARTIST PHYLLIS MITCHELL
PRODUCTION EDITOR CHUCK STEINMAN
ADVERTISING SALES TONY BARRYMORE
CHRIS KYDD
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BRIAN RIBBEY
JENAI WYATT
CLASSIFIED SALES BRITTNEY MIHALJEVICH
RECEPTIONIST CHERYL PLONTUS
TURNTO EYE ON THE COAST ON 20
COAST CITIES — There is
a new support network for
North County mothers who are
starting businesses from home.
Mom Business Associates
North County Networking
Group is a professional net-
working, educational and sup-
portive group of women balanc-
ing the pressures of being busi-
ness owners as well as chief
executive officers of their
homes, children and personal
lives.
Mom Business Associates
North County meets at 11:30
a.m. the second and fourth
Wednesday of the month at
Simply Ambrosia, 577 S.
Rancho Santa Fe Road in San
Marcos. The next meeting will
be Aug. 13 and guests are wel-
come.
Mom Business Associates
was created by founder Sherry
Nouraini in an effort to grow
her home-based business while
maintaining a balanced work/
family life. Recognizing the
importance of building relation-
ships, Nouraini joined business
networking groups, only to be
disappointed by the lack of
teamwork and leadership, and
the demands attending after-
hour networking events placed
on her family life.
Mom Business Associates is
a business networking group
that is committed to building
teamwork and generating busi-
ness opportunities for members.
All networking meetings occur
during the day, allowing moms to
spend quality evening time with
their families. The group works
to build businesses around fami-
lies and not the other way
around, its Web site said.
In addition to providing
business networking, Mom
Business Associates works to
help members with seminars on
various business topics as well
as on issues related to child-
development, nutrition and
health.
It aims to provide a venue
for business networking and
educational enhancement for
business owners mothers while
giving back to the community.
In order to meet this goal, it
established strategic partner-
ships with various nonprofit
organizations, which it calls
Community Partners, all over
the United States. The details
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 5 AUG. 1, 2008
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RANCHO SANTA FE — The
Crystal Ball planning committee
began meetings recently to start
work on the annual fundraiser for
Casa de Amparo.
“Last year this event netted
nearly $475,000 for our Casa
Kids,” Sharon Delphenich, execu-
tive director for Casa de Amparo,
said. “Planning committee mem-
bers take on a significant responsi-
bility when they get involved in
this event, and it grows in popular-
ity and success every year.” The
first Crystal Ball in 1999 earned
about $60,000, Delphenich said.
One of the planning commit-
tee’s biggest challenges this year
will be obtaining auction items
and sponsorships in the current
downturn economy, according to
Co-Chairwoman Judy Keys of
Rancho Santa Fe. “We’re keeping
our nose to the grindstone and
finding people willing to help
Casa Kids in spite of difficult
financial times,” Keys said.
This is the second year Keys
has served on the Crystal Ball
committee. “It’s hard not to want
to make a commitment to helping
Casa de Amparo once you’ve seen
the children there, who need all
the help they can get.”
Casa de Amparo has served
abused and neglected children
and their families throughout San
Diego County since 1978.
“As always, our goal is to
raise the most we possibly can for
Casa Kids,” Co-Chairwoman Jan
Reital, also a resident of Rancho
Santa Fe, said. “We want to make
sure our sponsors, patrons and
attendees have a memorable
evening and walk away wanting
to continue to support Casa.”
Reital pointed out that atten-
dance at the ball is limited to
maintain its traditional flavor of
intimacy. “We’re sold out yearly
because it’s such a superb event,
and because the community is
becoming more and more aware
of Casa de Amparo’s impact on
the critical issue of child abuse
and neglect. The Crystal Ball has
become one of the most sought-
after San Diego events to attend.”
This year’s gala will be hosted
by Fairbanks Ranch Country
Club in Rancho Santa Fe on Nov.
1. The evening will include cock-
tails and hors d’oeuvres, dinner
by Jeffrey Strauss of
Pamplemousse Grille, dancing,
live and silent auctions, a keynote
address by a recipient of Casa’s
services and birthday festivities
for Casa de Amparo, which cele-
brates 30 years of service to the
community this year.
The annual patron pre-party
will be hosted again this year by
Kerman Beriker, general manag-
er for the Inn at Rancho Santa Fe.
For information on tickets,
sponsorship, or how to donate
auction items, contact Keely
Tidrow at (760) 754-5500, ext. 28.
Plans begin for Casa deAmparo fundraising gala
Work-at-home mothers have new support group
BELLES OF THE BALL The planning committee for the annual Casa de Amparo fundraiser, the Crystal Ball, includes, back
row, from left, Honorary Chairwoman Patricia Hayward, Charlene Hooker, Jeri Rovsek and Shari Lurie along with, front row, from
left, Dawn Leeds, Barbara Gentzkow, Chairwoman Jan Reital, Judy Keys, Chairwoman Karen Kogut and Carolyn Schaer. The
women have begun plans for the event to be held at Fairbanks Ranch Country Club in Rancho Santa Fe on Nov. 1.Courtesy photo
TURNTO MOMS ON 20
RANCHO SANTA FE —
The first three custom home
sites have been sold at
Montagna at Cielo, the newest
enclave of ocean-view lots in the
hillside village. Released for
sale in limited quantities, Cielo
is a collection of 112 estate and
single-family custom home sites
as high as 1,400 feet above sea
level.
“To the west, these rare
ridgeline properties showcase
miles of ocean views from
Coronado to San Clemente
Island,” Christine Castaneda,
vice president of project admin-
istration for Rancho Cielo
Estates, Ltd., the developer of
Cielo, said. “To the east,
Montagna at Cielo overlooks
the Olivenhain Dam and Lake
Hodges.”
“We are extremely excited
by the response of our very first
limited selection of custom
home sites,”Donna Medrea, list-
ing agent with Prudential
California Realty and Rancho
Cielo Realty, said. “Out of the
first five home sites, three sold
immediately. Two of Montagna
at Cielo’s first owners are fami-
lies with teenagers planning to
build dream homes within the
gated community. The other
new owner is a retired couple
ready to downsize. All are mov-
ing from within the San Diego
area.”
Developed by Rancho
Cielo Estates, Ltd., Montagna at
Cielo is within Cielo, a Tuscan-
themed, 528-home, gated hill-
side community. The estate and
single-family home sites at
Montagna at Cielo range from
approximately one-half acre to
more than two acres, with pad
sizes from approximately 9,000
square feet to more than 20,000
square feet. Current prices
range from the high $500,000s
to more than $1 million.
Cielo offers numerous com-
munity amenities for its resi-
dents. The Gate House at the
entrance to Cielo provides 24-
hour guarded entry and securi-
ty. In addition, Cielo is a shelter-
in-place community, with all
Custom
home sites
sell at Cielo
development
TURNTO HOME ON 20
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 6 AUG. 1, 2008
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DEL SUR — Fred Maas,
president of Black Mountain
Ranch LLC, developer of the
master-planned community of
Del Sur north-
east of Santa
Luz, has been
named the
Smart Growth
Champion of
the Year by the
Urban Land
Institute, San
Diego/Tijuana
chapter.
The Smart
Growth Champion of the Year
honor has never been previous-
ly bestowed by the institute,
but was deemed the most fit-
ting to recognize Maas’ many
contributions, according to
organizers. Nearly two decades
before green building strate-
gies and sustainable design
gained widespread attention,
Maas began planning Del Sur,
which has become the most
environmentally conscious
community of its kind in San
Diego.
“Smart growth incorporat-
ing sustainability, mixed use
and mass transit have been
guiding Maas for years,” said
San Diego architect Mark
Steele, chair of the ULI award
program. “Maas not only pro-
motes smart growth, he invests
in smart growth and builds
smart. He is a true champion of
smart growth.”
Located on 1,800 acres of
long-vacant, historic ranch
lands just north of SR 56, Del
Sur eventually will include
2,500 market-rate homes, 469
low-income affordable housing
units, nearly 1,100 acres of ded-
icated open space, a town cen-
ter with business and retail
space, two schools and a fire
station. It is the final phase of
the 4,600-acre Black Mountain
Ranch property, which Maas’
group purchased in 1988.
“I am deeply honored by
the ULI’s award, and I share it
with the dedicated design
team of planners, environmen-
tal consultants and community
groups that have participated
in making Del Sur an environ-
mental asset to the region,”
Maas said. “We’ve demonstrat-
ed that green building prac-
tices and sustainability not
only make environmental
sense, they make economic
sense, and they are the only
sensible course for the future
of housing.”
Under Maas’ require-
ments for builders, Del Sur
incorporates some of the most
progressive applications of sus-
tainable development avail-
able, including solar energy for
at least 20 percent of homes,
tankless water systems and
water-saving landscape irriga-
tion systems.
A first-of-its-kind plan in
San Diego has recycled more
than 92 percent of construction
waste as part of a community-
wide program.
Based on government,
industry and manufacturer
estimates of average home
energy and water use, and par-
ticular savings estimates of
specific types of sustainable
products used as part of Del
Sur’s core set of green features,
the community at build-out
will save more than 100 million
gallons of water each year; and
more than 5 million kWh of
energy each year, the equiva-
lent of nearly 9,000 barrels of
oil.
Maas also is the founder of
the Del Sur Ranch House, the
community’s information
center, which is San Diego’s
only Leadership in Energy
and Environmental Design
Platinum certified building,
the highest ranking possible
from the U.S. Green Building
Council. The Ranch House is
actively promoted as an educa-
tional resource to encourage
prospective homebuyers and
the public to commit to envi-
ronmental responsibility.
Under Maas’ leadership,
Black Mountain Ranch was one
of the first and largest private
contributors to the Multiple
Species Conservation Program,
with more than 1,900 acres set
aside to support threatened
habitat and endangered
species. This has created an
open-space buffer larger than
Balboa Park. Del Sur, along
with its sister community
Santaluz, also incorporates an
18-mile network of trails for
hiking, recreation and wildlife
viewing.
Maas helped lead the
coalition that resulted in the
completion of SR 56, and BMR
was one of the first private
projects in California to con-
tribute millions of dollars to
interstate freeways 15 and 5.
He also has contributed
$500,000 toward a mass-transit
education program.
Del Sur has been honored
with numerous awards, includ-
ing California’s highest envi-
ronmental recognition, the
Governor’s Environmental &
Economic Leadership Award,
presented in 2007 for compre-
hensive land use planning. The
community also was named
Mixed-use Development of the
Year at the 2008 National
Green Building Awards pro-
gram of the National
Association of Home Builders.
The Smart Growth
Champion award was present-
ed to Maas on June 26 during
the ULI’s fourth annual Smart
Growth Awards.
The ULI promotes creation
of sustainable, thriving com-
munities worldwide.
The ULI San Diego/
Tijuana District Council facili-
tates local discussion of public
policy issues and best practices
related to real estate develop-
ment, city building and land
RANCHO SANTA FE —
Classical guitar and fine art
will make a refreshing event as
the Rancho Santa Fe Art Guild
presents 20 plein air artists
along with The Peter Pupping
Band for its second annual “Art
& Music on the Lawn” from 4
to 7 p.m. Aug. 10 on the
grounds of the Inn at Rancho
Santa Fe.
The event, cosponsored by
The Inn, will feature Pupping’s
instrumental jazz, flamenco,
Latin and calypso tunes from
the group’s new CD "Sea
Journey.”
“This is a great opportuni-
ty for guests to interact with
local demonstrating artists
while enjoying wonderful
music on the beautiful grounds
RANCHO SANTA FE — The
San Diego County Fire Prevention
Officers honored Rancho Santa Fe
Fire Protection District Fire
Marshal Cliff Hunter as the Fire
Prevention Officer of the Year.
H u n t e r
received this
honor from his
peers for selfless
dedication to fire
prevention and
fire safety in San
Diego County.
He was instru-
mental in the
development of
the county’s con-
solidated fire code and the adop-
tion of the International Codes.
He is a Wildland Urban
Interface expert who has made
notable contributions to WUI
code development and public
education efforts in San Diego
and across the country. Hunter’s
expertise includes shelter-in-place
communities and strict code
requirements to mitigate the
threat of wildfires.
The mission of the Rancho
Santa Fe Fire Protection District is
“To protect life, property, and
environment through prevention,
preparedness, education and
emergency response.” Formed in
1946, the Fire District now spans
approximately 42 square miles
and protects over 26,500 resi-
dents. The Fire District currently
operates out of four full-time fire
stations and serves the communi-
ties within and surrounding
Rancho Santa Fe and 4S Ranch.
Developer praised for smart growth
FRED MAAS
CLIFF HUNTER
ART IN PERSON Artists will demonstrate their skills as part of the Rancho Santa
Fe Art Guild second annual “Art & Music on the Lawn” from 4 to 7 p.m. Aug. 10 at the
Inn at Rancho Santa Fe. Courtesy photo
Guild invites outdoor artists,
musicians to entertain guests
Rancho Santa Fe fire marshal
awarded year’s highest honor
TURNTO GUILD ON 24
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 7 AUG. 1, 2008
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money. Bring your electricity bill and see just how valuable solar can be for you.
Get all of your questions answered at our FREE solar education workshops, held
Saturdays at 10 AM, 11 AM, 12 PM, and 1 PM.
TO RSVP: email Chris at cwillemin@sequoiasolar.com or
858-259-SOLAR (7652). Walk-ins welcome.
*For a typical 5 kW residential solar system
No matter what your energy needs, powering your home with solar is a better, brighter option. In the
face of volatile electricity rates and an unpredictable energy market, you can’t afford not to go solar.
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RANCHO SANTA FE —
San Diego Medical Services
Enterprise, a local 911 ambu-
lance provider, recently donated
an Automated External
Defibrillator, or AED, and free
cardio-pulmonary resusucita-
tion/AED training to the staff of
the Rancho Santa Fe
Community Center.
“Our goal is to make these
AEDs as accessible as fire extin-
guishers and to provide proper
CPR/AED training,” Loralee
Olejnik, an SDMSE outreach
and education coordinator, said.
“Basically, these devices should
be everywhere people gather.
We’re happy to provide this safe-
ty enhancement to the center,
and, really, the entire Rancho
Santa Fe community.”
In a sudden cardiac arrest
emergency, minutes matter.
Research suggests that with
each passing minute in sudden
cardiac arrest, a person’s chance
of survival decreases about 10
percent. Immediate access to
AEDs and CPR can mean the
difference between life and
death.
The community center hosts
a variety of classes for all ages,
including several summer pro-
grams for children. SDMSE
worked with representatives
from the Rancho Santa Fe Fire
Protection District to identify
the site as a good candidate for
AED placement.
The community center
donation was one of 12 AEDs
placed throughout the North
County territories that SDMSE
serves as a bonus when it
received the county contract to
provide emergency medical
services. An AED was also donat-
ed to the 4S Ranch Boys and
Girls Club and 4S Ranch sher-
iff’s substation, among others.
SDMSE is active with outreach
year-round in the Rancho
Santa Fe community, including
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 8 AUG. 1, 2008
“THE LIGHTING ADVANTAGE”™
20% Off 10% Off
In Stock Items All Ceiling Fans
Orders
Store Hours: Mon-Fri 9-6 • Sat 10-4
Available by Appt. Outside Regular Business Hours
*Some restrictions may apply
The Delano
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purchase, red tag items or any
other offer or discount.
Offer expires 9-1-08
Bring in the Breeze....
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• Table & Floor Lamps
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GALLERYplus
Prix Fixe Business Lunch
Your choice of Two Appetizers and an Entree
Wine Flight Nights
Tuesday & Wednesday
10436 Craftsman Way, Ste. 120
4S Commons Town Center
I-15 Fwy to Camino Del Norte West
(1 blk past Dove Canyon, 1st right near World Mkt.)
858.673.5100
Live Jazz, Bossa Nova and More
Thursday, Friday & Saturday
1/2 Price Bottles of Wine
Sunday & Monday
Italian Bistro & Wine Bar
Upscale Private
Room Available
15% OFF
Total Bill
Excluding Alcohol. Not valid Fri & Sat. Max value $30.
Dine in only. One coupon per table
Community Center receives donated defibrillator
TURNTO DEFIBRILLATOR ON 26
AUGUST 1
AND JUSTICE FOR ALL The
EcoJustice Retreat will take place
from 6 p.m. Aug 1 to noon Aug. 3,
Mission San Luis Rey Retreat
Center, Oceanside. Explore faith
and environment issues with spiri-
tuality and experiential activities.
Visit www.sanluisrey.org, contact
Brother Mark at brothermark@att
.net or call (760) 757-3659 for
details.
CURTAIN UP North Coast
Repertory Theatre’s West Coast pre-
miere of J.T. Rogers’ “Madagascar”
is on stage at 8 p.m. Aug. 1 and Aug.
2, and 2 p.m. Aug. 3, 987 Lomas
Santa Fe Drive, Solana Beach.
Tickets are $35. Discounts apply for
all students, military and seniors
with valid ID.
AUGUST 2
GARDEN OASISCreate a garden
oasis from 9:30 a.m. to noon Aug. 2,
Quail Botanical Gardens. Ed
Simpson, owner of Santa Fe
Nursery, which specializes in water
gardens, will show students how to
create a simple water garden that
will serve as an oasis in your
drought tolerant landscape.
Advance registration is required.
Call (760) 436–3036, ext. 206 for
details.
PET SITTING Learn how to start
your own pet-sitting business in a
one-day workshop from 9 a.m. to
noon, Aug. 2, at MiraCosta College’s
San Elijo Campus, 3333 Manchester
Avenue, Cardiff-by-the-Sea. Topics
will also include start-up costs for
developing your own business, what
pet owners are looking for in a pro-
fessional pet sitter, the legalities of
a home-based pet-sitting business
and how much you can expect to
earn. Fee is $37. Register online at
(760) 795-6820.
AUGUST 3
HANDS-ON HEALING Learn
Reiki, a gentle, noninvasive, hands-
on healing method from 1 to 6 p.m.
Aug. 3. This five-hour class includes
hands-on training and certification
as a Reiki 1 Practitioner upon com-
pletion. Cost is $150. Call (760) 822-
1348 to register.
THE BEAT The Encinitas Library
presents a Taiko performance from
2 to 3 p.m., Aug. 3, at 540 Cornish
Drive in the community room. Taiko
(“drum”in Japanese) combines ele-
ments of dance, music and theater.
Call (760) 753-7376 for details.
AUGUST 4
FORE FOR FUNDS The 2008
Carlsbad Chamber of Commerce
Golf Tournament will take place
Aug. 4, at 5800 The Crossings Drive,
Carlsbad. The annual fundraiser
will include contests, opportunity
drawings, a live and silent auction,
an awards banquet and a gourmet
dinner. Business, foursome and indi-
vidual golf packages, as well as tee,
hole and other sponsorships, are
still available. For details, call Lisa
Manemann at (760) 931-8400 or
visit www.carlsbad.org.
GET HEALTHY Joe Voss will host
“Three Solutions to your Health
Problems” from 7 to 8 p.m. Aug. 4.
Topics include cumulative and long-
lasting effects of untreated physical
traumas and nutrition. Call (760)
822-1348 for details.
HORSEHIDE CAMP Peak
Performance Baseball offers an
August baseball camp at the Wells
Fargo field in the 4S Ranch from 9
a.m. to noon, Aug. 4 to Aug. 8 for
ages 7 through 12. Instruction will
be given by Dave Bagley and Chris
Hom. Visit www.peakperformance-
baseball.com for details.
AUGUST 5
FINE FASHIONThe fourth annu-
al “Circle of Life 100 Luncheon and
Fashion Show” will take place on
Aug. 5, Four Seasons Resort Aviara,
Carlsbad. The luncheon will feature
a live auction and a fashion show
presented by Peaches En Regalia
and Ryan’s Collection. Tickets are
$130 per person or $1,300 for a table
community
CALENDAR
Got an item for the calendar?
Send the details via e-mail to
calendar@coastnewsgroup.com.
TURNTO CALENDAR ON 27
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 9 AUG. 1, 2008
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RANCHO SANTA FE — At
San Diego Regional Aviation
Association’s July board meeting,
Rancho Santa Fe resident Grant
Wright, chief executive officer and
managing partner of (W)right On
Communications, Inc. was elected
president, taking over from past-
president David Richter who has
relocated to Boston and will
remain on the board as a director-
at-large.
“I am pleased to lead this ter-
rific organization and build on the
m o m e n t u m
we’ve created,”
said Wright, who
previously served
as SDRAA’s vice
p r e s i d e n t .
“Aviation is a
vital and growing
asset to the
greater San Diego region, and
SDRAA will continue to advance
the interests of its members and
support the community we are so
proud to be part of.”
Wright, former vice president
of Canada’s largest flight training
center, was recently named mar-
keting chair of the National
Business Aircraft Association’s
Light Business Airplane
Exhibition & Conference being
held in San Diego in spring 2009.
He has held a commercial pilot
license in both Canada and the
U.S. for more than 20 years and
holds an undergraduate degree in
science and MBA in marketing
and finance.
Additional board appoint-
ments include:
— Vice President Steve
Nielsen, director of aviation at
Avalon Capital
— Secretary Austin Blue, pres-
ident of Spectrum Aeronautics
— Treasurer Chris Nielsen,
chief pilot at VC Jets
Directors-at-Large:
— James Kidrick, president
and CEO of San Diego Air and
Space Museum
— Gary Bosstick, president of
G&G Aviation
— Fred Gammon, senior
director of Aviation at Qualcomm
— David Richter, sales associ-
ate at Bloomer deVere Group Avia.
Comprised of members from
the general and business aviation
sectors, the rapidly growing
SDRAA’s mission is to represent
and foster aviation interests in the
region; research, develop and
advance balanced positions relat-
ing to aviation issues and their
impact on regional economic
development and community
needs; and provide a centralized
venue for sharing information
with those in the regional aviation
community and the public in gen-
eral.
The San Diego Regional
Aviation Association, a nonprofit
organization, brings together
members of the aviation communi-
ty from across San Diego County
to address the many issues evolv-
ing in San Diego aviation.
SDRAA’s scholarship fundraising
raises thousands of dollars each
year for deserving students train-
ing in the aviation industry. More
SDRAA information can be found
at www.sdraa.org.
Aviation Association names
Ranch resident as president
GRANT WRIGHT
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 10 AUG. 1, 2008
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 11 AUG. 1, 2008
&
Feature of the Week
Health
Fitness
Ginger Marable, PhD, CHt
In the past decade, more than 100,000 smokers have suc-
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Hypnosis is a natural state that we enjoy throughout the
day-from the minute we wake up relaxed and carefree, to
daydreaming, to becoming engrossed in a book or movie, to
“zoning out” to music. Hypnotic moments are relaxing and
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quit, as no one can force a person in hypnosis to do anything
against his or her will.
Smoking is the number one preventable cause of prema-
ture death worldwide. And most smokers know that they
would save thousands of dollars a year, would add many
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We are currently in the sev-
enth version of a remodel on our
home. My wife, who spent many
years running her commercial
design business before joining
our firm years ago, is focused on
the aesthetics. While I have
spent my life in financial servic-
es, I have always been good with
tools and handy around the
house. Thus, the conflict; she
wants things to look one way,
while I say they have to be built
a different way. As we toss back
and forth the reminder that
“form follows function,” our
poor contractor waits to see if he
can continue or start over.
This is very similar to what
we see when it comes to
the management of money.
Frequently, one spouse is very
conservative and risk-adverse
while the other wants to aggres-
sively take risks even though
they may not comprehend the
consequences. For both, their
focus becomes the character of
the investment rather than the
purpose of the investment.
In our wealth planning
process, I often compare money
to a tool. Tools help you do
things. A sharp saw makes cut-
ting wood easier and results in a
better cut. Money, properly
applied, results in a more suc-
cessful wealth plan. Yet, too
often, the discussion starts with
how one uses the tool. For exam-
ple: “What return have you got-
ten on your portfolio over the
last five years?” While results
are important, they are only
meaningful in context.
What is the function to
which your money tool is to
be applied? Our conversation
always starts with developing
our client’s dreams. Once we
understand where we need to
be, when we need to get there,
and where we are starting from,
it is easy to select the right mix
of tools to get there. Money is
just one of those tools. Tax plan-
ning, business growth, business
succession, family and risk man-
agement issues will require
other tools.
Years ago, we had an elderly
client who was quite aggressive
with his investments. His wife
received a substantial income
from a trust fund, and they want-
ed for nothing. He said he was
“investing his grandchildren’s
money.” Over the years, we grew
the grandchildren’s money from
$6 million to $20 million. He did-
n’t need the money, so he could
afford to risk it. More recently,
we worked with a retiree who
had enough money to be com-
fortable for the rest of his life. In
spite of the bad markets, he
thought that he needed to dou-
ble his millions over the next
three years. Fortunately, we
were able to convince him that
his money would work just fine
to meet his dreams once we
defined what his dreams were.
As form follows function in
architecture and design, so does
it in wealth management.
Define your dreams first: for
you, your family and community
Form
follows
function
It’s Not About The Money
PETE
WHEELER
TURNTO MONEY ON 27
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 12 AUG. 1, 2008
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Reported for the week of July 15 to
July 22, 2008
RESIDENCE RANSACKED An
Encinitas residence in the 2100 block
of Mountain Vista Drive was reported-
ly burglarized around 8:50 p.m. July
18.
GANG VANDALISM A gang-relat-
ed vandalism reportedly occurred in
the 700 block of Valley Avenue in
Solana Beach sometime after 9 p.m.
July 17.
FLAWED DESIGN Designcorp in
the 400 block of Cedros Avenue in
Solana Beach was reportedly burglar-
ized around 5:30 p.m. July 18.
WWJD Horizon Christian School in
the 6300 block of El Apajo in Rancho
Santa Fe was reportedly vandalized
after midnight July 16.
BIKE STOLEN A Grizzly midnight
blue bicycle worth $2,000 was report-
edly stolen from the 3000 block of
Mission Avenue in Oceanside some-
time after 9:20 a.m. July 17.
SUSPECT NABBED A 23-year-old
man was arrested around 3:15 a.m.
July 20 at Lake Boulevard and
Madison School in Oceanside on suspi-
cion of a robbery a few hours earlier.
HOME ROBBED A San Marcos res-
idence in the 2300 block of Peet Lane
was reportedly burglarized sometime
between 10 a.m. and 8:45 p.m. July 16.
AND AGAIN Someone reportedly
burglarized a residence in the 200
block of Gail Drive in Vista sometime
between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. July 16.
Saul Aguilar Jr. is
wanted for his
alleged involvement
in the murder of his
ex-girlfriend in Los
Angeles, Calif.
In December of
1997, the victim was
found in her home
with a shotgun wound to her
upper torso. A state arrest
warrant was issued on Jan. 5,
1998, by the Los Angeles
County, California Superior
Court, after Aguilar was
charged with murder. Aguilar
was charged with unlawful
flight to avoid prosecution
and a federal arrest warrant
was issued by the United
States District Court, Central
District of California, on June
23, 1998.
Aguilar was born in 1970,
is 5’8” or 5’9” and weighs
between 170 and 185
pounds. He has black
hair, brown eyes and is
Hispanic, though born
in the U.S. Aguilar has
the following tattoos:
the name "Surenos", a
man and a woman, and
an Aztec warrior on his
back; the name "Saul" on his
chest; and the name
"Aguilar" on his stomach.
He has been known to go
by Marcelo Aguilar Garcia,
Sal Aguilar, Saul Aguilar, Saul
Avila, Sal Fernando Avila, and
Saul.
Aguilar reportedly is a
heavy methamphetamine
user, and has ties to Mexicali,
Mexico.
The FBI is offering a
reward of up to $5,000 for
information leading to the
arrest of Saul Aguilar Jr.
crime
REPORT
A weekly log of
neighborhood crime.
Compiled by Randy Kalp
Never attempt to arrest a fugitive yourself. These files should not be relied upon for any type of legal
action. If the subject is a fugitive from our 10 Most Wanted page, e-mail San Diego Crime Stoppers
or call their hot line at 888-580-TIPS 24 hours a day. For details, log on to www.sdsheriff.net/tmw.
For warrant inquiries, information or to pass along a tip, use the sheriff’s online Tip Form (anonymous;
no e-mail address needed) or call the area office.
10 MOST WANTED
San Diego County’s
MOST WANTED
FBI’s
SAUL AGUILAR
JR.
Seyyed Nasser Alavi
Loftabad
Battery, Unlawful
Penetration, 2005
Elio Sosa
Murder
Kidnapping
Bonsall, 1995
Gerardo M. Gomez
Attempted Murder
December 2004
Jose A. Lopez
Attempted Murder
December 2004
Julio Romero
Child Molestation
Ramona, 2005
Ricardo Reyes
Attempted Murder
2001
Jose Jimenez
Alfredo
Child Molestation
October 2004
Imeldo Molina
Laureli
Murder
December 2005
Ricardo Persona
Rape, Child
Molestation
San Diego, Jan. 1997
Arturo G. Gomez
Rape with Force
San Diego, May 2007
CRIME LOG
Compiled by Randy Kalp
The following information
was gathered from law
enforcement’s most available
records for the week of July 15 to
July 22, 2008
ENCINITAS Petty Theft 0, Burglary
4, Vandalism 0, Assault 0, Grand
Theft 4, Robbery 0
DEL MAR Petty Theft 0, Burglary 0,
Vandalism 2, Assault 0, Grand Theft
1, Robbery 0
RANCHO SANTA FE Petty Theft 0,
Burglary 0, Vandalism 1, Assault 0,
Grand Theft 0, Robbery 0
SOLANA BEACH Petty Theft 0,
Burglary 1, Vandalism 3, Assault 0,
Grand Theft 1, Robbery 0
CARLSBAD Petty Theft 0, Burglary
0, Vandalism 1, Assault 0, Grand
Theft 3, Robbery 0
SAN MARCOS Petty Theft 0,
Burglary 4, Vandalism 0, Assault 0,
Grand Theft 4, Robbery 0
ESCONDIDO Petty Theft 0,
Burglary 1, Vandalism 0, Assault 0,
Grand Theft 1, Robbery 1
OCEANSIDE Petty Theft 7, Burglary
13, Vandalism 13, Assault 1, Grand
Theft 0, Robbery 0
VISTA Petty Theft 3, Burglary 9,
Vandalism 5, Assault 0, Grand Theft
4, Robbery
ON A QUEST A 2005 Nissan Quest
with Utah plates was reportedly stolen
around 12:30 a.m. July 16 from the
3700 block of Linda Vista Drive in San
Marcos.
TAG TEAM A 22-year-old man was
reportedly robbed by two suspects—
Corey F. Walker and Steven J. Sass—
around 3 p.m. July 15 in the 1600 block
of Silver Tree Lane in Escondido.
PARTY’S OVER La Fiesta del
Jarepeo in the 1900 block of South
Santa Fe Avenue in Vista was report-
edly burglarized around 9 a.m. July 15.
RESIDENCE BURGLARIZED A
residence in the 900 block of Barsby
Street in Vista was reportedly burglar-
ized around 1 a.m. July 21.
CAR LOOTED A vehicle parked in the
100 block of Durian Street in Vista was
reportedly burglarized sometime
between 2 a.m. and 8 a.m. July 19.
FREE
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RANCHO SANTA FE —
After the Finish Line is proudly
holding its first fundraiser Aug. 19
at The Inn at Rancho Santa Fe. A
luncheon, speakers and silent and
live auctions will fill the day.
After the Finish Line is a San
Diego-based funding nonprofit for
Thoroughbred horses that can no
longer race or breed.
“For almost a decade I have
been volunteering my time to help
rescue organizations across the
United States save Thoroughbred
racehorses and broodmares from
slaughter,” President of After the
Finish Line Dawn Mellen said. “I
quickly learned that funding was
the common problem for the res-
cues. I believe people want to help
the thoroughbreds, yet they don’t
know how or who to donate to.The
donations given to After the Finish
Line enables us to provide yearly
grants and monthly emergency
funds to thoroughbred rescue
organizations in California and
across the United States.The fund-
ing we give to the rescues can be
used to save horses at auction from
going to slaughter, pay for surgery
or medical expenses, provide hay
and feed, pay boarding expenses
or transport a thoroughbred to
safety.”
The monthly newsletters on
www.afterthefinishline.org tell
about the rescues After the Finish
Line has funded. The nonprofit’s
volunteers are dedicated to help-
ing race horses transition into sec-
ond careers such as hunter/
jumpers,dressage,trail or compan-
ion horses.
Contact Dawn at dawn@
afterthefinishline.org or (858) 945-
1371 for more information.
COAST CITIES — The
Library Friends of San Diego
County have launched its annual
countywide essay contest, which
will run through Sept. 10. This
year’s theme is “Libraries, Loud or
Quiet?”
Entry forms are available at
the 33 county library branches and
two mobile libraries, as well as
LFSDC’s site, http://lfsdc.org and
the library’s site, www.sdcl.org.
Age divisions in the contest
are students through grade 12, and
adult. Entries must be 500 words
or less, typed, preferably double-
spaced and single-sided. Prizes in
each division are first place, $100;
second place, $50 and third place,
$25. One entry per person will be
accepted. Essays can be submitted
at any county library branch or
mailed to LFSDC Essay Contest,
Ramona Branch Library, 1406
Montecito Road, Ramona, CA
92065.
“Libraries used to be reposito-
ries for books, places of silent con-
templation, but not these days,”
LFSDC President Dick Wayman
said. “In addition to quiet reading,
libraries feature story times, pup-
pet shows, magicians, musical per-
formances, craft classes, lively
book discussion groups and a vari-
ety of teen programs. We want to
hear how the public feels about
libraries as community centers.”
For further information, e-
mail lfsdcessay@yahoo.com or call
Dick Wayman at (760) 788-7908 or
Katie Harte at (760) 436-9421.
Racehorse
rescue looks
for funding
Contest asks
how people
like library
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 13 AUG. 1, 2008
858.726.1051
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Two downtown news organi-
zations seem to be headed in total-
ly different directions.
First, we have the San Diego
Union-Tribune putting itself up
for sale, apparently believing that
the state of the newspaper busi-
ness here can only get worse. On
the other hand, we have
VoiceofSanDiego.org, (where I am
a member of its board of direc-
tors), a nonprofit news-gathering
group which in its short three and
a half years of existence has
become an investigative power-
house.
The Union Tribune’s circula-
tion has fallen off the precipice,
with its five-day daily average now
well under 300,000 and its Sunday
paper below 400,000. How is it
that the flagship print product in
the eighth-largest city in the
United States in a county of 2.5
million has between 20 and 25
newspapers in the country ahead
of it with greater readership?
The Internet is always cited as
the prevailing culprit, but what
about publishers who dilute their
content by getting rid of more and
more writers and editors either
via buyouts or dismissals or read-
ers finding what is left to read of
little relevance?
It’s not an easy road to walk,
but slashing your house of content
providers is a sure road to disaster.
The newspaper industry has
always been robust with profit
margins of 20 to 30 percent not at
all unusual. The industry survived
the arrival of radio and television
in decades past and when its pri-
vately held publishing companies,
who in an earlier time were not
slaves to Wall Street analysts or
quarterly earnings reports, simply
got in the game and began to clus-
ter their own group of broadcast
licenses.
Now, of course, the daily
newspaper business is mainly in
the hands of publicly traded com-
panies, a fact which makes the
Union-Tribune’s surrender all the
more perplexing.
It’s hard to imagine that Col.
Ira Copley, who founded the
Copley Press, or his son, Jim
Copley, are caving in without a
fight. But Jim’s adopted son,
David Copley, either has no stom-
ach for the long haul ahead or he
simply prefers to take the cash
and let someone else deal with the
unknown atmosphere of tomor-
row.
Ironically, the Union-Tribune
has a very credible Web site,
SignOnSanDiego.com, which gen-
erates $18 million in annual
income, a figure which is said to
represent about 8 percent of the
company’s total revenues.
Maybe putting the newspa-
per up for sale should not be taken
as a great surprise. Copley has
sold all of his remaining print
assets over the past few years. He
ditched newspapers in Illinois and
Ohio, the Daily Breeze in Torrance
and its news service.
The question now is will he
find a buyer and at what price? As
a general rule, newspapers fetch
price multiples of between five
and eight times cash flow. SignOn,
its Spanish language newspaper
in San Diego and Today’s Local
News as well as some real estate
properties in La Jolla could con-
ceivably add to Copley’s value.
Five years ago, according to
John Morton, a respected newspa-
per analyst, the average newspa-
per was worth $2,500 for every
paper sold. That could put a price
tag of $750 million on the Union-
Tribune, a number which in
today’s economic environment
would seem difficult to achieve.
There is no doubt that the
Union-Tribune has done solid
reporting, won three Pulitzers
over its lifetime and been a huge
factor in the life of San Diego. But
its owner seems disinterested in
sticking around so on to the sales
block it goes.
It’ll be interesting to see
where the investment bankers
hired to represent Copley will find
a pool of potential buyers. What
with the major newspaper compa-
nies under siege themselves with
falling revenues and declining
stock values, they may have to
look outside the box. Gannett, the
New York Times, Tribune, Belo,
McClatchy, E.W. Scripps and the
Washington Post may step for-
ward but they are publicly traded
companies. The large private
ones, like Hearst or Singleton, also
are not without their problems. It
is rumored that Hearst is losing
$70 million annually at the San
Francisco Chronicle and Singleton
is laden with debt which might
preclude him from being able to
take a serious look.
McClatchy’s income is down
44 percent, Scripps says its news-
paper profits are off 46 percent
and Lee Enterprises, which owns
the North County Times, recently
reported an 84 percent drop in net
income.
Their stock prices are not far-
ing any better. McClatchy’s is at
$4.74, Scripps at $8.51 and Lee is
down to $3.56, all on the Big
Board.
Not to be dismissed, however,
could be a San Diegan or a group
of San Diegans who could step for-
ward, much as Chicagoan Sam
Zell did at the Chicago Tribune,
although the circumstances are
not at all similar.
The best thing which could
happen for readers of the Union-
Tribune would be for Rupert
Murdoch to step in and buy it. But
what with his print attention fully
focused on the Wall Street Journal
and his determination to make it
far more competitive with the
New York Times, that is not likely
to happen.
Meantime, across town at
Voice of San Diego, the upstart
online news operation, ground-
breaking investigative news cover-
age is taking place.
In the 42 months since its
inception in February 2005, Voice
has won numerous awards, been
prominently mentioned in the
New York Times and the
Washington Post and held up as a
model for similar news services
which have been launched in St.
Louis and Minneapolis.
The investigative reporting
by its small staff, which could be
described as operating on a shoe
string in terms of numbers but not
in talent, is mainly responsible
for the firing of the president of
the Southeastern Economic
Development Corporation, or
SEDC, and for the resignation of
the president of the Centre City
Development Corporation, or
CCDC.
Voice broke the story two
weeks ago that Carolyn Y. Smith,
president of SEDC, was at the cen-
ter of a system of hidden bonuses
and extra compensation “under
which she paid herself and her
staff more than $1 million over the
last five years,”Voice reported.
SEDC has been so poorly
managed that Walker’s decisions
were being made without any
intervention by a board of
trustees, a majority of which were
functioning on expired terms.
And now its chairman is himself at
the center of a firestorm over his
ties to a developer.
Nancy Graham resigned last
week as president of CCDC after
being questioned about her
involvement with a developer of a
project at 7th and Market down-
town.
But when “Voice recently
obtained her calendars, which
reveal that she had attended
meetings with the developer, she
claimed she had previously
divulged the meetings to a Voice
reporter. She had not,” Voice
reported.
So now CCDC’s chairman has
called for a “fact finding mission”
to examine the issue.
The daily newspaper busi-
ness is not out of the woods, but if
managed with the understanding
that it cannot slash its way to suc-
cess, don’t believe that the last
light is about to be turned off.
Beautiful mountains.
Vineyards. Ancient ruins.
Delicious food. Mediterranean
climate.
If you were told all of these
features can be found in central
Italy, you’d probably think
Tuscany.
Guess again.
These words describe
Abruzzo, a region in Chieti
Province southeast of Tuscany
and on Italy’s Adriatic coast.
And in the words of travel
writer Jordan Clary of
Encinitas, “Abruzzo has every-
thing Tuscany has to offer but
for less money.”
With the value of the dollar
down against the Euro and costs
of traveling up, that’s what we
like to hear.
“I would say that this is a
part of Italy well-worth visiting
for a number of reasons,” she
said. “One, of course, is econo-
my. It’s more affordable than
some other areas, and it’s a very
authentic experience. I think
the Abruzzo region still feels a
bit like Old Italy.”
Other excuses — um, rea-
sons — to visit this lesser-known
region is its “rich combination
of history, art and stunning nat-
ural wonders,”Clary said.
What made Clary’s October
2007 Abruzzo tour unique was
her mode of travel — a vintage
Fiat 500, which “looks a little
like a brightly colored metal
mouse. It’s a classic icon of
Italy.”
Clary took the trip at the
invitation of a group of Abruzzo
promoters who also have a thing
for the Fiat 500s. She was cho-
sen for the trip because she
writes for several different mag-
azines, including some that
reach Asian audiences.
Any trip to anywhere in
Italy is made with great expec-
tations for a fine gustatory expe-
rience. Was the writer disap-
pointed?
“The food was simply amaz-
ing,”Clary said.
Her favorite discovery?
“That’s hard to say. When
you’re wining and dining
through Italy, what’s not to
like?”
But pressed for an answer,
Clary named Villa Maiella
Ristorante in the town of
Cutting news quality is no way to make more money
A Page from My Book
BOB
PAGE
Bob Page is a Rancho Santa Fe resident and
veteran journalist. Page is the former owner and
publisher of the Rancho Santa Fe Review.
Abruzzo
gives taste of
Italy without
high price
Hit the Road
E’LOUISE
ONDASH
TURNTO HIT THE ROAD ON 27
By Bianca Kaplanek
COAST CITIES — During the
2007 Del Mar race season — the
track’s first with a synthetic sur-
face — fatal injuries were reduced
by more than half. Although
nationwide efforts such as this
continue to make horse racing
safer, it seems inevitable that, like
all sports, it will never be injury-
free.
When a racing horse suffers
an injury, it usually means the end
of their career. Dawn Mellen is
helping to ensure the end of a
Thoroughbred’s racing career
does not mean an inevitable end
to the animal’s life.
In October 2007, Carmel
Valley resident Mellen founded
After the Finish Line, a nonprofit
organization that provides fund-
ing assistance to rescue organiza-
tions which help Thoroughbreds
transition into second careers
once they can no longer race or
breed.
A native of Connecticut,
Mellen describes herself as a
“horse person” who began rid-
ing when she was 5 years old. “I
Group comes to aid of retired Thoroughbreds
TURNTO THOROUGHBREDS ON 27
I am a mother. I think that
most of you who read my column
knows this. With that said, as a
parent, a mother, a friend, and a
responsible citizen here in Rancho
Santa Fe, I find it only right that I
issue this warning:
“Parent’s, do not take your
children to go see ‘The Dark
Knight!’”
Most people know that Heath
Ledger died after he made this
film. Some of you might even
know that this film has grossed
over $158.4 million at the
box office, breaking all other
records.
But what you may not know is
this is one of the most malevolent
films my eyes have ever seen.You
may not know that you are going
to witness an 8-year-old with a gun
to his head by a good guy turned
bad.
You may not know that this
film’s plot has absolutely no pay
off for the viewers who managed
to sit through two and a half hours
of a gruesomely dark movie, filled
with so many twists that they
don’t add up when the credits roll.
You may not know that you
will walk out of the theater literal-
ly feeling “beat up” by one of the
many bad guys that flank the
screen.You may not know that the
hero Batman may not be as
instinctive, clever, and smart as he
should be.
I would never ever let my son
see this movie, except maybe
when he turns 18. I am so sad-
dened by the fact that this is what
draws crowds to the theaters these
days.
I’m more of a PG girl, honest-
ly. I think I’ll stick to Disney
movies. And, even those can be a
bit gruesome at times.
Hollywood may need to re-
think their standards of exactly
what a PG-13 means. If it means
watching a woman be tied up to
barrels of explosions, the good guy
turning bad and an 8-year-old
with a gun being pointed to his
head in front of his mother, count
me out.
Now as a movie viewer who is
supposedly the target audience to
view these types of films, I was
completely disgusted and upset
by all of the cheap twists and turns
in “The Dark Knight.”
I was fortunate enough to
study plot development at UCLA
many eons ago, and one of the
main ingredients is that a twist in
a plot must be justified, plausible
for a reader (a viewer in this case)
to accept the change of sequence
of events. What this movie does is
keeps you feeling “on the edge of
your seat”for all of the wrong rea-
sons. When the lights come up,
you actually feel grateful a bullet
didn’t graze your seat inside the
movie theatre.
When I walked out of the the-
atre I actually felt concerned and
afraid for the future of our coun-
try. Is this what we want to see?
During a time when recession is
being whispered across America,
when gas prices have hit over $4
dollars a gallon and a price of
matinee is $8.50, I am utterly
shocked and ashamed at the lack
of sophistication in the average
movie goers.
You can’t blame Hollywood
for making violent nasty movies
that portray the hero-turn-literal-
ly-gruesome holding an eight year
old hostage if we are willing to pay
for the tickets.
I can’t even imagine how
much worse the next film will be,
but you can bet I won’t be there to
support the Dark Knight’s terror
at the box office next summer cap-
italizing and setting bad examples
for the lives of so many impres-
sionable young adolescents who
are looking for an actual hero to
emerge and save the day. I think I
will stick with the 1980 version of
“Superman,” when heroes really
existed and good always did over-
come evil at the end of your basic
comic book strip movie.
Around Town
On July 13, I jumped out of
an airplane! This is my third time
to try and my second successful
jump. A few months ago I had
gone down to Sky Dive San Diego
with a few of my friends to only
experience a bad case of clouds,
30 minutes of circling and a land-
ing in a small aircraft I would
rather forget. Luckily, I had a
“refund” that day and managed
to drum up some courage this
month and retry skydiving. You
know that saying, “The second
time around it’s always better”?
But after a scary plane landing,
and a third time in the sky, I have
to admit my knuckles were white.
I was the girl who looked pan-
icked sitting next to her instruc-
tor. However, as my feet left the
plane and I fell from the sky the
second time, I can see why people
become skydiving junkies. How
wonderful to find yourself free
falling with the wind echoing in
your ears. This is worth every bit
of the money. For less than $200
you can discover why the view
from the sky is always better than
landing in a small plane. Allison
Lent, Jamie Willson, Jill Drouin
and I were the only ones who
made it from that infamous pic-
ture of the group of skydivers
“bound for the ground.”Fact: It is
more dangerous to drive to the
airport than fall from the sky (of
course, depending on the dis-
tance to the airport).
On July 15, I meandered into
Mille Fleurs, my local hangout,
where I discovered Scott Kaplan
hosting a Pre-Opening Day party
in the courtyard to celebrate his
horse running in the second race
on the most celebrated day in
San Diego. I snapped a quick
photo of him with trainer Doug
O’Neill and Suzie Robinson on
the night of their festive occasion
celebrating their horse Mr.
Chairman racing on Opening
Day.
On July 16, Opening Day
arrived! With a record-breaking
crowd of 43,459 people attend-
ing, it was no wonder Del Mar
was a place you either loved or
hated depending on which direc-
tion you were driving. I happened
to be driving up I-5 for a client of
mine for Kiwi, so I missed the
lovely fanfare that day. However,
my good friend Bianca Smith and
her friend actress and producer
ulie Rubio, arrived in high-style
to the Turn Club to join
other friends who were lucky
enough to snag the soughtafter
tickets.
Later that evening, Bianca
and Julie crammed into the
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 14 AUG. 1, 2008
With This Coupon
662 Encinitas Blvd.
Encinitas 760-436-3244
$
5 OFF
Expires 8-17-08
Any purchase of $25 or more.
Limit 1 per customer
Paul Christenson, P.E.
Tony Lombardi
BOUND FOR THE GROUND From left Jamie Willson, Machel Penn, Jill Drouin,
and Allison Lent pause for a photo recently at Sky Dive San Diego. Courtesy photo
OPENING DAY FESTIVITIES! Maggie and Gary Bobileff at Mille Fleurs after
party on Opening Day of the races. Photo by Machel Penn
FASHION AT MF Nellie Designs is set
to promote Aug. 11 at Mille Fleurs.
Courtesy photo
Machel’s Ranch
MACHEL PENN
Popular ‘PG-13’ movie not suitable for children
TURNTO MACHEL’S RANCH ON 26
By Randy Kalp
OCEANSIDE — A 43-
year-old woman pleaded not
guilty July 18 to her fourth
driving while intoxicated
charge in less than one year.
Tammy Dee Evans is
charged with a felony DUI
after two concerned
teenagers reported her to
Oceanside police on the
evening of June 25.
“They said, ‘She
appeared to be drunk,
smelled of alcohol and didn’t
appear to be acting normal,”’
testified Officer Dana
Darling at the recent prelim-
inary hearing.
In addition, the teens
told police Evans had said
she was going to the beach to
party, Darling said.
Darling testified she con-
tacted Evans approximately
an hour later on the beach
with a cooler filled with dirty
water, shrimp, a bottle of
cranberry juice and a water
bottle full of vodka.
The defendant was
adamant she hadn’t been
drinking on the beach,
Darling said. The officer said
because the water bottle
filled with vodka was still
full and no alcohol had been
added to the juice she felt
Evans’ story checked out.
Evans had a blood alco-
hol content of .21, more than
twice the legal limit, Deputy
District Attorney Nicole
Roth said. She was convicted
in January for three DUIs, in
one of which she had a .32
BAC and in the other she had
a .34 BAC.
In California, a felony
DUI is charged after an indi-
vidual’s third misdemeanor
Woman with
multiple DUIs
charged with
another
By Randy Kalp
SAN MARCOS — A
young man burglarized the
Palomar College Police
Department locker room last
month in part by wearing a
community officer shirt, an
officer with the college testi-
fied last week.
At Carlos Eduardo
Ramirez’s preliminary hearing
July 18, Officer Gerard Perez
testified he believed the
defendant slipped past the
secretary sometime around 2
a.m. June 27. He said Ramirez
was contacted around 6 a.m. in
the locker room and asked to
leave the San Marcos campus.
Several hours later, Perez said
he caught Ramirez back in the
men’s locker room with bat-
teries, shoes and glasses scat-
tered in front of a locker.
“It looked like he was
sorting (the items) out when I
walked up on him,”Perez said.
Ramirez, 22, is charged
with burglary, trespassing,
impersonating an officer and
Man accused
of stealing
from police
locker room
TURNTO POLICE ON 26
TURNTO CHARGED ON 23
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 15 AUG. 1, 2008
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 18 AUG. 1, 2008
Lom
as Santa
Fe
Dr
Lom
as Santa
Fe
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o
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5
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KeepSanDiegoMoving.com
D
r IMPORTANT
FREEWAY
IMPROVEMENTS
Weekend 1
Fri, 7/25/08 – Mon, 7/28/08
Begin Time: 8PM, Fri, 7/25/08
End Time: 5AM, Mon, 7/28/08
During the day, Lomas
Santa Fe Drive will be re-
duced to 1 lane in each di-
rection. At night between
8PM and 5AM, through
traffic will not be allowed
on it. Northbound I-5 on-
ramp may be closed all
weekend.
Week In-Between
Mon, 7/28/08 – Fri, 8/1/08
Lomas Santa Fe Drive will
be 2 lanes each direction,
however, the eastbound
Lomas Santa Fe Drive to
Northbound I-5 traffic will
have to make a U-Turn at
Santa Helena to reach the
northbound I-5 onramp.
Trucks traveling eastbound
Lomas Santa Fe to
Northbound I-5 must
use detours.
Weekend 2
Friday, 8/1/08 – Mon, 8/4/08
Begin Time: 8PM, Fri 8/1/08
End Time: 5AM, Mon, 8/4/08
During the day, Lomas
Santa Fe Drive will be re-
duced to 1 lane in each di-
rection. At night between
8PM and 5AM, through
traffic will not be allowed
on it. Northbound I-5 on-
ramp may be closed all
weekend.
Northbound I-5 On-
ramp May be
Closed
Weekend 1 & 2
For construction updates, log on to:
http://www.keepsandiegomoving.com
For questions, call:
Caltrans Public Affairs: 619-688-6670
ARE PLANNED LATER THIS MONTH THAT WILL LIKELY IMPACT
YOUR TRAVEL AT THE I-5 /LOMAS SANTA FE INTERCHANGE.
Here’s what you need to know:
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PROPERTIES
TEAM
ban became law, the Dutch spe-
cial-effects company Rain
Showtechniek began selling bars
a machine (for the equivalent of
about $900) that, for nostalgia,
replicates the scent of tradition-
al, cigarette-smoked air (but
which does not damage health or
linger in clothing or hair.)
People With Issues
At the time that Alan
Patton, 56, of Columbus, Ohio,
made News of the Weird in 2006,
he had already been consuming
boys’ urine for 40 years, he said,
and a 2007 jail sentence has had
no apparent deterrent effect. He
was arrested in June 2008 (and
twice since then), accused of
turning off the water in a recre-
ation center restroom and plac-
ing plastic wrap inside the bowl
to catch the nectar that, he says,
enables him to “become part of
ODD FILES
CONTINUED FROM3
TURNTO MORE ODD FILES ON 27
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 19 AUG. 1, 2008
Home Delivery
Available!
Call for Details!
Open Daily: 8:00am ‘til 8:00pm
16950 Via de Santa Fe
Rancho Santa Fe
858-756-3726
Certified Angus Prime, roasted in our ovens to a juicy
medium rare. Sliced to order.
Sweet, white corn,fresh picked and delivered daily.
Trimmed or untrimmed, the freshest corn is at Village
Market.Pick up some steaks and corn. It’s barbecue time
Flaky Halibut, coated in a macadamia bread crumb.
A light summer entree.
Prime
Rib
Roast
Macadamia
Halibut
$
20
99
lb.
lb.
Lean Top round, slowly roasted without any additives or
preservatives. Sliced to order.
Angus Beef
Top Round
$
12
49
lb.
A truly gourmet potato. Made with black winter truffle
butter and freshly shaved parmesan. Their earthy
aroma is present in every bite.
Twice-Baked Truffle Parmesan
Potato
$
6
99
lb.
$
24
99
lb.
A mixture of our favorite summer vegetables, tossed
light olive oil, rosemary & garlic mixture.
Roasted
Vegetables
$
5
99
lb.
VILLAGE MARKET IS THE TOP CHOICE FOR FINE WINES AND EXPERT SERVICE
GRGICH HILLS
ESTATE Napa Valley
Zinfandel Estate 2005 Grown
GRGICH HILLS
ESTATE Napa Valley
Chardonnay Estate 2005 Grown
GRGICH HILLS
ESTATE Napa Valley
Merlot Estate 2004 Grown
GRGICH HILLS
$
26
99
We grow our Zinfandel using organic and Biodynamic® farming tech-
niques at our estate vineyard in Calistoga, nestled in the northern tip
of the Napa Valley. This irresistible mix of strawberries and raspber-
ries with a hint of allspice keeps evolving as
the wine sits in the glass. This is a great
match with grilled meats, pizza and pastas
with tomato sauce.
GRGICH HILLS
ESTATE Napa Valley
Fumé Estate 2006 Grown
This is a full-bodied wine with rich aromas
and flavors of ripe cherry and black berries,
hints of cedar and spice
with a silky mouthfeel
and long finish
$
21
99
Cabernet Sauvignon
Napa Valley
Estate 2004 Grown
$
51
99
$
33
99
Fresh White Corn
This is a very unique and long green bean. You can be very
creative with this bean. Twist and turn and bend the bean into
many configurations.
Chinese Long Beans
2
$
1
Baby banana also known as finger bananas. They typically
measure about four inches long. a fun snack and very sweet.
Baby Bananas
for
lb.
$
4
99
$
1
99
The shallot is part of the lilly/onion family and has a mild,
delicate sweet-onion twist.High in iron.
Fresh Shallots
lb.
$
3
99
These are large heads nurtured in a green house. Looks
better, tastes better, stays fresh longer. Pesticide free too!
each
$
2
99
1lb. bag each
Pearl onions are never more than one inch in diameter. They
are sweet and tangy nuggets of taste. To skin pearl onions,
drop them in boiling water. Cook for one minute, drain under
cold water. The skin will slip off easily
Pearl Onions
$
2
99
Hydroponic
Boston Lettuce
93
points
91
points
90
points
90
points
90
points
92
points
Connoisseurs’
Guide to
California Wine
- Aug. 2007
Wine & Spirits
October 2007
Wine Spectator
August 31,2007
Wine News
Aug./Sept. 2007
Wine Advocate
#174
Dec. 2007
The Wine News
Aug/Sept. 2007
91
points
California Grapevine
Feb-March 2008
90
points
The Wine News
March/April/May 2008
####
EXCELLENT
Restaurant Wine
Issues #121-122
$
33
99
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 20 AUG. 1, 2008
I have had the pleasure of
getting to know a few Master
Sommeliers in my world of wine.
It’s like meeting rock stars! I mar-
vel at their vast knowledge of the
“who, what, where and when” of
wines.
The term sommelier is a
French one going back to the
17th century when individuals
were entitled when they stocked
food and wine for trips and kept
these items in a carriage called a
“somme.” They also had to
ensure the condition of these per-
ishables by tasting them before
presenting them to the master of
the house. If they contained poi-
son, they were the first to know
about it!
Todays’ sommeliers achieve
that certification by going
through rigorous training before
they can covet the title. The mod-
ern American version sometimes
prefers to be called a wine stew-
ard. He or she chooses the wines
in the restaurant, stocks the cel-
lar, conducts training for the staff,
works in the dining room and rec-
ommends wines to customers. A
few of these individuals aspire to
attain the title of Master
Sommelier, awarded in the Court
of Master Sommeliers in London.
The process of multi-day tastings
and testings is exhaustive. Only
87 in the U.S. have attained this
highest level of sommelier.
Eddie Osterland fidgeted
with his notes and paced up and
down the presentation area at a
recent Wine 101 Seminar at
Ponte Family Estate Winery in
Temecula Wine Country. This La
Jolla Master Sommelier and a
rapid- fire bundle of wine infor-
mation was about to share his
seven “power wine entertain-
ment tips and the 20/20 rule”to a
full house. What makes him so
special is that he was America’s
first Master Sommelier, and it
was a happy accident! He sort of
backed into the wine education
business when he worked in a
restaurant and noticed the wine
stewards where getting better
tips by romancing certain bottles
to their customers. One thing let
to another and he found a way to
get through the University of
Bordeaux France, majoring in
wine, and eventually became
Director of Trade for the
International Wine Center in
New York.
Eddie’s message was clear:
when it comes to wine, better is
best. Keep foods and wine in per-
spective; never let one over-
whelm the other. Serve two wines
simultaneously. People love to
compare. Smell the wine … if it
has no smell, it’s cheap wine. Oh,
and that 20/20 rule … take whites
out of the refrigerator where it is
likely 48 degrees and wait 20
minutes before serving. With
reds that are stored at room tem-
perature, refrigerate for 20 min-
utes to get it down to about 65
degrees and then serve.
Finally, if you’re really seri-
ous about tasting a wine and get-
ting to your palate before it goes
bad, taste it in the morning.
Pearls of wisdom from the first
Master Sommelier in America …
Eddie Osterland.
California is the Land of
Wine & Food
A new national campaign
was recently launched by the
California Travel and Tourism
Commission in cooperation with
the Wine Institute in the state.
The $10 million campaign stress-
es California and its unique wine
and food offerings showing
celebrities in TV and print ads,
then leading the reader/viewer
to a powerful web site featuring
culinary and wine destinations,
blogs from chefs and winemak-
ers and information about major
events. Check it out … the site is
www.landofwineandfood.com.
The Local Sip
The Oceanaire Seafood
Room, downtown San Diego, is
hosting Hathaway Wines with
their Frogmore Creek and 42
Degrees S brands, on Wednesday
Aug. 6 starting at 7 p.m. These
wines are from Tasmania and
were featured in my column
recently as being great tasting
wines. $125. pp. Call (619) 858-
2277 for an RSVP. Includes a
gourmet dinner.
The next in the series in
downtown Fallbrook called Wine
& A Bite Art Walk is Aug. 16,
from 5 to 7 p.m. Food from
Fallbrook restaurants and wine
from boutique winery, Orfila
Vineyards in the San Pasqual
Valley. Cost is $20 each. Reserve
tickets at www.findfallbrook.com
or call (760) 451-3282.
The Poway Chamber of
Commerce is holding their third
annual Sunset Food and Wine
Expo at Bernardo Winery in
Rancho Bernardo on Thursday
Aug. 21 from 3 to 7 p.m. Premier
restaurants will offer cuisine
tasting along with wines and
microbrews. $35 per person. Call
them at (858) 748-0016.
MASTER SOMMELIER Eddie Osterland of La Jolla, America’s first Master Wine
Sommelier. Photo by Frank Mangio
Taste of Wine
FRANK
MANGIO
Frank Mangio is a renowned wine connoisseur
certified by Wine Spectator. His library can be
viewed at www.tasteofwinetv.com. (Average
Google certified 900 visits per day) He is one of
the top five wine commentators on the Web.
Reach him at mangiompc@aol.com.
Master Sommeliers the rock stars of wine world
of each partnership effort differ
depending on the organization,
but it centers on the premise of
MBA members contributing a
percentage of the sales from their
products or services to the
Community Partner of their
choice. In return, Community
Partners help MBA members
expand their network, gain expo-
sure and participate in fundrais-
ing events as vendors.
In addition, Mom to Mom
Business Coaching program has
been established to help moms
who are looking to start a busi-
ness from home. With all the dif-
ferent opportunities available to
start a home-based business, it
can be overwhelming for moms
(or for anyone) to find an opportu-
nity that is the right fit for them.
It is also important to find a com-
pany that is reputable and pro-
vides enough support for a new
business owner. The Mom to
Mom Business Coaching pro-
gram involves bringing together
mom business owners who are
already working with reputable
successful companies, with moms
that are looking for an opportuni-
ty to start a home-based business.
Moms will be enrolled into our
mentorship program for a period
of 30 days. Upon enrollment in
our program, MBA will set up
appointments between various
mom business owners that have
chosen to participate in our men-
torship program, and moms that
are seeking advice on starting
their own business.
To join the free coaching
program, and receive advice and
information about starting your
own business, call (760) 521-4003
or visit www.mombusinessassoci-
ates.com.
MOMS
CONTINUED FROM5
architecture and landscaping in
accordance with strict fire district
standards that benefit homeown-
ers in the event of a wildfire.
Because of the hard work of local
firefighters and the community’s
adherence to shelter-in-place
guidelines, not one home at Cielo
was compromised by the wildfires
that swept through the area in
Fall 2007.
Recreational amenities at
Cielo include the residents-only
Club Cielo. Located at the heart
of the village, the club’s 8,000
square feet include multiple
entertainment areas with cater-
ing kitchen, fully equipped fitness
center, aerobic studio, shower and
locker rooms, competitive-sized
swimming pool and spa, children’s
pool and play area and two tennis
courts.
Cielo Park also includes a
basketball court, sand volleyball
court, children’s climbing wall,
picnic pavilion and play field.
More than 60 percent of the 1,740
acres that make up Cielo is dedi-
cated open space.
A new mixed-used retail cen-
ter, Cielo Village, is located at the
entrance, offering 50,000 square
feet of office, retail and restau-
rant space. Secure mailbox servic-
es, an espresso bar and retail
shops specializing in designer
shoes and clothing are among the
newest tenants.
Designed by Fehlman
Labarre in the flavor of an old
Italian village, Cielo Village fea-
tures a central gently sloping piaz-
za complete with fountain, out-
door dining and decorative potted
flowers. The professional spaces
are clustered around this central,
European-style plaza, which
serves as a central gathering
place and focal point within the
Rancho Santa Fe community.
Rich in texture, color and land-
scaping, the five commercial
buildings that make up Cielo
Village are simple rectangle
structures with sloped roofs that
overlap each other at different
angles, an architectural style that
is native to northern Italy. Visit
www.cielovillage.com to learn
more.
HOME
CONTINUED FROM5
designing of below-grade cross-
walks beneath the railroad tracks
continues even though discontent
for them is heating up.Alternate of
course is to put the tracks below
grade as was done with over-
whelming success in the much
smaller city of Solbeach. Soon it
will be too late for that.
Tomatoes are OK again
Now that a fed agency has
wrecked the tomato industry to
the tune of more than 100 million
bux, it has decided it wuzzn’t caus-
ing the salmonella outbreak after
all. So it’s OK to eat them. Minor
problem. They are in shorter sup-
ply so they are costing a helluva lot
more.
One liners
Shutterbugs can gain fame if
their work appears on Page 1 of
the Coast News Group by entering
its photo contest not later than
Aug. 31 ... Cardiffian Barbara Cobb
is wondering about the future of
the cherished Cardiff zip code
(92007) if the post office building
is sold when the current lease
expires in 2013 ... Laurie Morvan
Band will present the final sum-
mer concert at Moonlight Beach
Aug. 17 ... Leucadia 101
MainStreet Assn. has scheduled its
popular fourth annual Leucadia
Art Walk Aug. 31 from 10 ayem to
5 p.m .... Former Surfside City
Mayor Lew Hopkins passed away
in San Antonio, Texas, recently
where he and his family have
resided since 1994 ...
Congressional electeds’ approval
rating at 9 percent is 21 percent
lower than the president’s ...
Friday Night Film Festival, featur-
ing classic flicks,is a free attraction
under the stars at Leo Carrillo
Rancho Historic Park in C’bad
through Sept. sponsored by the
Rec. Department ...Tamara Smith,
Surfside City Attny. for a decade,
has retired ... With the resignation
of Steve Aceti, from the recently
formed Flower Capital
Environmental Committee a
replacement now is being sought...
MiraCosta College trustees have
declared remaining palm trees
that caused a major brouhaha the
past year to be surplus ... As pre-
dicted, the mayor’s race in O’side
will be contentious and there’s
already signs of that ... Law
enforcement warns cataltytic con-
verters are being swiped from
Toyota trucks and SUVs; if you
observe this crime being commit-
ted call a deputy ASAP ...
Solbeach Mayor Dave Roberts was
the first in the area to return his
election nomination forms.
EYE ON THE COAST
CONTINUED FROM4
Bill Arballo is an opinionated, retired journalist
in the Flower Capital of the Universe. E-mail
barballo@coastnewsgroup.com.
By Randy Kalp
VISTA — An 18-year-old
Vista resident pleaded not
guilty July 24 to charges relat-
ing to the assault of and theft
of items from an acquain-
tance.
Jon Michael Garcia is
charged with criminal threats,
assault with a deadly weapon
and possession of stolen prop-
erty and a deadly weapon
stemming from a May 30 inci-
dent at the Icebox Deli in the
2200 block of Oakridge Way in
Vista.
If convicted, Garcia faces
up to more than six years in
prison, Deputy District
Attorney Nicole Roth said in
an e-mail.
According to testimony,
Garcia didn’t physically
assault Eric Munoz, however,
Roth said he is charged with
the felony under vicarious lia-
bility theory, which holds one
person responsible for the
actions of another.
Munoz, 19, testified that
as he got out of his car in the
parking lot of the deli he
heard “shoot him, shoot him”
repeatedly and then a man
emerged from Garcia’s vehi-
cle pointing a black handgun
at his head.
“I panicked, so I ran,” tes-
tified Munoz.
Another man followed
him as he ran into the restau-
rant for help, but then fled the
scene without entering the
business, according to Munoz.
Detective Michael Silva
testified officers found sever-
al cell phones, iPods — includ-
ing Munoz’s — and a knife
when Garcia’s car was
searched several weeks later.
Garcia became disgrun-
tled, Munoz said, after he had
posted comments on
MySpace about the defen-
dant’s relationship with his
girlfriend.
Attorney William
Christoph alluded that prior
to the incident at the deli,
Munoz had made threats
toward his client in songs
posted on the victim’s
MySpace page and by flash-
ing a gun at Garcia.
In his testimony, Munoz
denied ever threatening
Garcia in his music or with a
weapon.
Following the hearing,
Garcia denied a request to
comment about the charges
against him.
Garcia, who’s free on
bond, was ordered back to
court Nov. 4 for trial.
Vista man to
stand trial
for ordering
assault
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 21 AUG. 1, 2008
By Randy Kalp
VISTA — The District
Attorney’s office announced
July 24 that four felony arrest
warrants have been issued in
connection with a four-month
undercover investigation into
metal theft named “Operation
Heavy Metal.”
Eduardo Guillen of Lee’s
Iron and Metal in Vista, and
three associates with Ben
Recycling in Oceanside —
James Robinson, Frederick
Fohl and Daniel Kwak — are
wanted for allegedly criminal-
ly receiving metals.
Four individuals have
been arrested as a result of the
operation and charged with
receiving stolen property
and/or failing to obtain identi-
fication from a person selling
scrap metal.
The operation, which
investigated recycling busi-
ness that were operating as
‘fences’ for stolen scrap metal,
arose because of the burgeon-
ing theft of metal, in particular
copper wire, around San Diego
County.
“Just as those of us in law
enforcement attack drug deal-
ers and drug users — we’re
aggressively prosecuting both
the copper thieves and the
recyclers who knowingly buy
from them,” District Attorney
Bonnie Dumanis said in a
press release. “These crime
have a ripple effect, threaten-
ing public safety in our com-
munity by interrupting utili-
ties and the 911 call system.”
County
cracking
down on
metal theft
By Randy Kalp
SAN MARCOS — David
Lovell pleaded guilty July 21,
just a day after his 20th birth-
day, to pimping and human
trafficking charges relating to
his ex-girlfriend and her
friend.
In lieu of his plea, a rape
charge as well as several other
pimping and pandering
charges relating to the girls
were dismissed.
Superior Court Judge
Daniel Goldstein ordered
Man pleads
guilty to human
trafficking,
pimping
TURNTO PIMPING ON 27
The husband-and-wife team
of B. Paul and Diane Welch
autographed copies of their
book “Del Mar Fairgrounds”
during a multiauthor book
signing at Solana Beach
Library on July 26. The
Welches spent three months
looking through 10,000
archived, vintage photo-
graphs for the 125-page pic-
torial. The book features
more than 200 photos with
researched captions depict-
ing the fairgrounds from its
opening in 1936 through the
late 1950s. “Del Mar
Fairgrounds” was released
in June and has already sold
out of its first publication.
The authors are currently
researching a follow-up book
that will feature photographs
from the late ’50s to the
present. Photo by Bianca
Kaplanek
SIGNATURE
EVENT
EXOTIC BLOOMS Orchids are expected from Japan, Australia, New Zealand,
Ecuador and Hawaii along with exotic hybrids at the Palomar Orchid Society’s auction
Aug. 9 at the Carlsbad Women’s Club. Courtesy photo
CARLSBAD — “A dazzling
display of color, scent and tex-
ture,” is how one member
described the Palomar Orchid
Society’s auction last year.
This year’s auction will be
held at 11 a.m. Aug. 9 at the
Carlsbad Women’s Club. The
auction is the society’s main
fundraiser for the year, and will
feature up to 200 orchids from
around the world.
The public will have an
opportunity to bid on and pur-
chase orchids not usually seen in
local nurseries and home
improvement stores. “One of
the things this auction provides
is a chance to own a unique
orchid,” said John Kidwell,
Society member and auctioneer
at this year’s event.
The public will be able
to preview the orchids beginning
at 11 a.m., and the bidding will
begin at noon. Expect to see
orchids from Japan, Australia,
New Zealand, Ecuador and
Hawaii. Hybrid orchids as well
as species will be available.
Kidwell, who was also auction-
eer at last year’s event,
described one particular den-
drobium that stood out from the
rest of the entries. Larger overall
than most specimens, it had long
spikes which bore hundreds of
small white flowers, with a
“heavenly fragrance.”
Society members will be
will be available to answer ques-
tions about orchid culture and
cultivation. With more than 100
members, the Palomar Orchid
Society was created to promote
interest in and appreciation of
orchids, to provide opportunities
to display orchids and to
exchange and disseminate infor-
mation on orchids. POS meets
the first Wednesday of the
month from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at the
Carlsbad Women’s Club, 3320
Monroe Street.
Exotic orchids to be shown at upcoming auction
OCEANSIDE —
Training, Education &
Research Institute’s clients
from the Center for Arts &
Adult Education program pre-
sented “Style,” a look at their
collection of art illustrations
July 24 at Potpourri on the
Coast, 1024 S. Coast Highway.
TERI, based in
Oceanside has served individ-
uals with autism and other
developmental and learning
disabilities since 1980. TERI
adult artists will be onsite
demonstrating their new
designs.
Along with the art show,
Potpourri on the Coast offers
French provincial furniture,
jewelry and other great vin-
tage finds. The resale bou-
tique was established in 1992
as a vocational workplace for
TERI’s adult clients to learn
important life skills and pre-
pare for working opportuni-
ties outside of the agency.The
shop also provides valuable
income to support the pro-
grams that serve these indi-
viduals.
Area boutique
supports
autistic adults
Cutting back spring’s entwin-
ing Jasmine and sprawling gerani-
ums, finding a bare spot for a
sophisticated red penstemon and
Spanish lavender that I couldn’t
resist, checking default sprinklers
and finally hosing down the patio
consumed an entire weekend.
Later, sipping iced tea and survey-
ing my endeavors, I thought the
garden looked pretty good —
maybe not a photo op in a horti-
cultural garden, but personally
pleasing.
Ah, but there is no rest for the
gardener — not even in August!
Iris care
There is still time to dig and
divide tall bearded iris rhizomes
on plants three years or older, or
lift and store the childlike Dutch
iris bulbs in time for fall planting.
Next spring they will reward you
with larger and more abundant
blooms.
Feed acid-loving shrubs
Camellias and azaleas will
benefit from a final dose of a com-
mercial acid plant food as they
are setting buds for next season.
Arching stems can by shaped and
cut back. Shelter plants from dry-
ing winds and strong hot sun-
shine, and give a deep soaking.
Fertilize flowers
Annuals need plant food also
to keep vigorously growing. A
commercial blend or steer
manure — a favorite in my gar-
den, will give them that extra
push to bloom.
Harvest summer vegetables
Tie up and stake heavy limbs
to keep from breaking.
Plant winter veggies
It’s time to start planting cool-
season vegetable seeds in flats or
packs, planting out in September
or October — veggies that grow
underground such as potatoes,
beets, carrots, radishes, turnips —
good soup-making vegetables.
Chrysanthemums
Once considered fall flowers,
many florist mums now bloom
year around. I miss the gorgeous
blooms we called “football
mums” and wore to Thanksgiving
Day ball games — big, yellow
flowers as large as a dessert plate.
Apparently they have outgrown
their presence. To promote extra
large garden mums in the garden
remove all but one or two buds
per stem. Keep feeding plants
until the buds begin to open.
Rose care
Roses always benefit from
TLC and this month they are get-
ting ready for fall blooming. Cut
off faded flower heads down to
the fifth leaf, remove suckers and
unwanted branches. Feed month-
ly until the end of October this
year. This is a good time to buy a
package of epsom salts and sprin-
kle several tablespoons (depend-
ing on the size of the bush)
around the roots and water
into the soil. Epsom salts pro-
vides magnesium sulfate.
Unfortunately our coastal fog can
damage leaves. Use Funginex to
control disease and pests.
Sow perennial seed
Sow seeds of your favorite
perennials in peat pots or flats for
planting next month. Follow
seed package instructions. Good
fall choices include dianthus, gail-
lardia, columbine, Iceland and
Oriental poppies, wallflowers,
primroses, Shasta daisies, geum,
coreopsis, phlox, and alyssum.
Fuchsias
For continued growth cut
back lightly and pinch the tips for
a second round of
blooms this fall. Sun-loving
Marguerites will also benefit with
a light trim and do exceptionally
well in coastal areas.
Oh my, the Naked Ladies!
— One of the most spectacular
and hardy bulbs are Amaryllis’
Gardener’s list of things to do never reaches its end
Friendly Faces & Places
SILVIASHEAFER
TURNTO FRIENDLY FACES ON 24
By Randy Kalp
VISTA — A 19-year-old man
tried to kill another partygoer
after the two men got into a fight
over a broken aquarium, prosecu-
tors said last week.
Deputy District Attorney
Robert Eacret on July 23 argued
that Matthew Alan Leidle’s actions
last month warranted an attempt-
ed murder charge. Leidle had ini-
tially been charged with assault
with a deadly weapon for alleged-
ly stabbing Rafael Guadarrama 11
times with a knife.
Following Superior Court
Judge Timothy Casserly’s decision
to bind over Leidle on the attempt-
ed murder charge, he ordered the
man back to court Aug. 6 for an
arraignment on the new charge. A
trial date may be set at that time.
The incident occurred in the
early evening of June 8 at a house
party in the 500 block of Palm
Drive in Vista after Guadarrama
accidentally broke an aquarium
that was laying in the yard, wit-
nesses testified.
Guadarrama testified the
fight was only between him and
Leidle, and that he never saw a
knife. He suffered 11 wounds to
the left side of his body and spent
eight days in the hospital.
“I felt like all my insides were
going to come out,” Guadarrama
said.
Leidle told authorities
Guadarrama’s girlfriend, who the
defendant dated briefly in middle
school, instigated the fight by
telling the victim Leidle slapped
her, Detective Daniel Roos said.
Initially, Leidle, who was inter-
viewed around 4 a.m. June 9, said
he didn’t carry any weapons
because he’s on probation and said
he didn’t remember stabbing any-
body, Roos said. Though, he later
confessed to the detective he
stabbed Guadarrama because he
felt threatened.
“He said, ‘That’s f—ked up,
what I did to him,’” the detective
said.
Roos said Leidle only had
minor scratches to his arm and
face.
The knife used in the alterca-
tion was found a short distance
from where the fight occurred,
Roos said.
Defense attorney Ann
Chhokar argued that the prosecu-
tion failed to present any signifi-
cant medical evidence, such as
depth, damage and other specifics
of the wounds, by a medical profes-
sional at the preliminary hearing
to justify the attempted murder
charge.
In California, a person can be
charged with attempted murder if
they act “deliberately and inten-
tionally or recklessly with extreme
disregard for human life.”
“Every stab wound equaled
an intent to kill,”Casserly said.
Leidle remains in custody in
lieu of a $1 million bail.
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 22 AUG. 1, 2008
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560 N. Coast Hwy 101
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ATTORNEY
950 Boardwalk, Suite 304, San Marcos
rachel@vranalaw.com
By Shelby Taylor
RANCHO SANTA FE — Let’s
pretend for a moment that you are
in a beauty pageant. Gentlemen, if
you’re uncomfortable with this
exercise, feel free to skim. All
glitzed up, you float down a flight
of stairs,careful to not misstep.You
are Miss
Photogenic ’08,
according to the
master or mis-
tress of cere-
monies, and you
graciously accept
the title. Back up
the stairs you go,
and pageant
hopefuls give you
a look laced with
envy. Then, for
the first time in Miss Teen
California USA history, your name
is called again. Miss Photogenic is
also Miss Best in Gown ’08. This is
only your second pageant.
Seventeen-year-old Jacquelyn
Rafalovich was shocked when the
above scenario played out.
Because Rafalovich was young,
Ted and Janet Rafalovich thought
it would be interesting to have
their daughter go into pageantry.
Rafalovich went into her first pag-
eant, the Miss Greater San Diego
Pageant, thinking there was no
way she would win because it is a
rarity for first-timers to place. She
was fourth runner up, and no train-
er can be credited with the accom-
plishment.
In June, Rafalovich secured
the title of Miss Rancho Santa Fe
Teen USA. Judging was based
upon a photo and a brief blurb on
what the contestant likes to do.
“They sift through the photos and
choose 100 people for a phone
interview,” Rafalovich said. Then
there are the in-person interviews.
“There are so many thing you
can and can’t do (during the inter-
view),” Rafalovich said. Everyone
has their theory as to how to win
over the interviewer, but
Rafalovich advises against walk-
ing in and shaking their hand.
Questions refer to the contestant’s
biography, and Rafalovich has
been asked, “Who is your role
model?” “(Interviewers) are look-
ing for fluidity of sentences and
maturity,”Rafalovich said.
Currently, Rafalovich is
preparing for Miss Teen California
USA 2009 and she plans to,“Come
in there and rock it.”Set for Nov.21
in Palm Springs, the pageant will
be based on swimwear, evening-
wear, an interview and beauty.
“They look at everything, your
sponsor, your attitude, how
involved you are.The inner beauty
speaks for itself,”Rafalovich said.
Rafalovich said she realizes it
is not about winning the crown.
“It’s about winning confidence
and poise,” she said. Should she
win, Rafalovich plans on being an
advocate for change. “I am not a
follower. There is no drinking, no
drugs (for me).”She said she wants
to bring awareness at the high
school level.
Aside from her beauty,
Rafalovich has both brains and
brawn. She spent her freshman
year at Torrey Pines and trans-
ferred to Santa Fe Christian for
her sophomore and junior years.“I
love to be in stress,” Rafalovich
said. In two months, she completed
1.5 years’ worth of school to gradu-
ate early.
This fall she will be attending
Biola University on a cheerleading
scholarship. The competitive gym-
nast took her tumbling and
applied it to the sport of cheer.
Rafalovich was also forward and
goalie for her high school’s varsity
soccer team and has dabbled in
softball and track. She plans on
majoring in broadcast journalism
and plans to become an ESPN
sports broadcaster.
Rafalovich would like to start
a nonprofit organization for teens.
“The second I was done graduat-
ing, I told my dad ‘let’s start one,’”
she said. Rafalovich plans to start
the project next summer.
To help Rafalovich raise
money for her participation in the
Miss California Pageant, e-mail
janetrafal@yahoo.com.
Ranch teen wins two titles in second beauty pageant
JACQUELYN
RAFALOVICH
Whenever I get the chance, I
love having my 17-year-old god-
daughter for a few days. It is
always enlightening in one way or
another.
This time, it involved the
kitchen. First let me say she is an
extraordinary cook and baker and
she always cooks at least one meal
for us when she stays. Taking the
high risk of sounding ungrateful
and never getting another tasty
meal from her, I still have to say
this is a mixed blessing. My
kitchen and I just don’t see that
much action very often.
To me, a clean kitchen says
“This kitchen is relaxed and
peaceful. It’s resting and requires
absolutely nothing of you, thanks
just the same.” For this child, a
clean kitchen is almost an insult
and certainly a challenge. It says
to her, “This kitchen is underuti-
lized. This kitchen needs some
attention and love! This kitchen is
not living up to its potential!”
When she finishes cooking
her always-several-course fare,
complete with dessert, every bowl,
grater, sifter, grinder, mixing
spoon, measuring device, oven
and counter top has been used to
the maximum. Without fail, it
looks like an enormous culinary
bomb exploded. This go-round it
was a vegetarian Indian meal
complete with flatbread, curry, a
yogurt beet sauce and lentil
spread. The beets gave a wonder-
ful purple to the backsplash. The
lentils escaped their bag. The flat-
bread tended to crumble and the
oil to cook them in did all the
naughty things oil will do. The
coconut for the cake kept finding
new corners to hide in.
I am the first to agree that cre-
ativity is never tidy and she does
eventually clean it all up.
Nonetheless, it is always traumatic
for me to see my reasonably order-
ly kitchen in such chaos. The obvi-
ous struck me, belatedly. Do you
think this is one of the many rea-
sons I don’t cook much? Ummm,
yes.
I suddenly realized that hav-
ing a lovely, clean, uncluttered
kitchen is downright therapeutic
for me. It is, it seems, more impor-
tant to me than almost any meal I
can think of. Unless I had several
sous chefs on hand, wiping coun-
ters and washing, drying and
replacing every utensil immedi-
ately after it’s used, I’m going to
chafe. I’m not proud of it, really,
but there you are. And do I really
need to tell you I don’t want to be
that sous chef?
I know I need to just chill and
fully appreciate the mouth-water-
ing delights she turns out when all
is said and done. Perhaps I need to
have several more glasses of wine
before she launches into one of
her complex, floor-crusting, wall-
splattering cooking sessions.
Perhaps I need to meditate.
Perhaps I need to just grow up
and get over it. I believe I’ll consid-
er all of the above.
Meanwhile, before she left,
we had some tasty leftovers sprin-
kled throughout the refrigerator.
Indian food is even better the next
day and the cake didn’t really last
long enough to make a judgment.
I will enjoy my clean, boring,
neglected kitchen until she drops
in again.And I promise I will work
on an attitude adjustment regi-
men. I believe that a clean kitchen
vs. that coconut cake was very
nearly a draw.
RANCHO SANTA FE —
Firefighters from the Rancho
Santa Fe Fire Protection
District responded to a garage
fire in the 18000 block of Via
Catania the evening of July 17.
The garage was equipped
with a sprinkler system, which
activated. While the sprinklers
did not put the fire out, it did
slow the fire down which con-
fined it to the garage.The alarm
from the sprinklers also alerted
the resident of the danger and
allowed him to safely exit the
home and call for help.
Upon arrival they found a
golf cart inside the garage of the
home completely engulfed in
flames. The fire had also begun
to spread to other items in the
garage including the structure
itself.
“The sprinkler system was
definitely a factor in this inci-
dent,”Fire Marshal Cliff Hunter
said. “If there had not been a
properly functioning sprinkler
system in place, the fire could
very easily have spread to the
Vista man faces attempted murder charge for stabbing
Jean Gillette is a freelance writer who needs to
worry less and eat more. Contact her at
jgillette@coastnewsgroup.com.
Small Talk
JEAN
GILLETTE
The real price of a home-cooked meal: cleaning up after
Sprinklers aid
in snuffing
garage fires
By Randy Kalp
SAN MARCOS — A
Superior Court judge granted
a continuance July 16 in the
sentencing of William M. Hall
II, a former Palomar College
student convicted of calling
in multiple bomb threats to
the campus last fall.
“In light of the serious-
ness of the case, I’ll grant the
motion … but it will not be
continued after that,” Judge
Joel Pressman said.
A Sept. 10 hearing date
was set, at which time a new
trial could be scheduled or
the sentencing will take
place.
Hall has hired a private
attorney to review his case to
determine if there’s suffi-
cient evidence to file a
motion for a retrial.
If he’s sentenced in
September, Hall could
receive up to nine months in
prison.
In May, a panel of nine
Sentencing
delayed for
school bomb
threat caller
TURNTO FIRES ON 27
TURNTO BOMB ON 25
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 23 AUG. 1, 2008
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DUI conviction.
If convicted, Evans — who
had been released in May after
serving several months in jail
for her prior DUIs — faces up
to four and half years in prison,
Roth said.
Defense Attorney Herb
Weston argued that the circum-
stantial evidence pointed to
Evans drinking on the beach. It
wasn’t the actions of Evans
that alarmed the teenagers,
but that she told them she’d
recently been released from
jail for driving under the influ-
ence, the lawyer said.
In denying Weston’s
request to have Evans’ charges
dismissed and her bail
reduced, Judge Timothy
Casserly said, “She is a danger
to the community.”
Evans remains in custody
in lieu of $515,000 bail. She
was ordered back to court
Sept. 4 for trial.
CHARGED
CONTINUED FROM14
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 24 AUG. 1, 2008
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of the historic Inn at Rancho
Santa Fe,” John Modesitt,
president of the Rancho
Santa Fe Art Guild, said.
Tickets will be $10 for
adults and $5 for children,
with a limited number of pre-
ferred tables for eight at $125
each. The tickets will be avail-
able at The Gallery next to
the Union Bank and at The
Inn beginning on July 21. For
more information call the
gallery at (858) 759-3545.
An admission ticket
makes everyone illegible for a
raffle at the end of the con-
cert.
A portion of the proceeds
will go toward helping out-
reach programs, San Pasqual
Academy and Art a Reason to
Survive, or ARTS.
Bring a blanket or set
aside chairs that will be pro-
vided to enjoy picnic fare and
drinks available for purchase.
Only food and drinks pur-
chased at The Inn will be
allowed on the lawn.
GUILD
CONTINUED FROM6
and hardy bulbs are Amaryllis’
belladonna or Naked Ladies.
Leaves grow in spring and then go
dormant in summer. Just about
now clusters of rosy pink trumpet-
shaped flowers shoot up on tall
bare stems. I have carried bulbs
from six different climate zones
and their beauty never failed to
excite my August gardens.
Amaryllis are best planted and
divided right after blooming and
are easy to grow.
Alstroemeria
And old fashion perennial
with azalea-like blooms in sweet
shades of pink, salmon, cerise and
many speckled in darker colors.
Plants are relatively drought toler-
ant and are magnificent in July
with fewer blooms this month.
Garden centers may still have a
few container plants and are well
worth purchasing — even this late
in the season. Plants have thick
root stocks and will return in the
spring. Long lasting cut flowers.
Agapanthus
Lily of the Nile — Evergreen
perennials with clusters of sky
blue and creamy white blooms
have finished their yearly display.
Cut off flower stems, clean up yel-
low base leaves. Good near pools,
excellent container plants and
landscape accents.
FRIENDLY FACES
CONTINUED FROM21
Journalist Silvia Anne Sheafer enjoys sharing
friends and garden friends with readers.
Contact her at ssheafer@coastnewsgroup.com.
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 25 AUG. 1, 2008
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RANCHO SANTA FE —
Marianne Champlin’s oil
“Agua Tibia Spring Poppies”
will be one of many on display
as part of the “Summer In The
Ranch” art show which will be
on display through Sept. 6.
The event opened with a
reception July 17 at the
Rancho Santa Fe Gallery, 6004
Paseo Delicias. Gallery hours
are Monday 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
and Tuesday through Saturday
from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
The show is sponsored by
Morgan Stanley Real Estate in
Rancho Santa Fe and the
Rancho Santa Fe Art Guild.
For details, visit www.ran-
chosantafeartguild.org or call
(858) 759-3545.
Summer art display in the Ranch
women and three men unani-
mously agreed that Hall
phoned in six bomb threats on
three separate occasions last
fall — Sept. 13, Sept. 19 and Oct.
18 — which resulted in the evac-
uation and closure of portions
of the San Marcos college,
including the children’s day
care center.
Three dispatchers who
fielded the phony phone calls
identified Hall as the caller
after authorities played a clip of
his voice, according to testimo-
ny by Sgt. Lee Martin with the
Palomar Police Department.
Further, Martin testified
that records from Hall’s cell
phone revealed that calls had
been placed to the campus
within minutes of the purported
bomb threats.
Hall was working in food
services at the campus cafeteria
when the threats were placed,
the sergeant said.
Throughout the trial,
defense attorney John Lee
urged jurors to evaluate all the
evidence, including “sug-
gestibility” by law enforcement
to get the three identifications
of Hall’s voice, as well as infor-
mation that investigators
ignored evidence that other
individuals may have had
access to Hall’s phone at the
time.
BOMB
CONTINUED FROM22
opening night of Pasquale Del
Mar.This marked the beginning of
a new local haunt for Rancho
Santa Fe residents. Down the
street I could be found catching
up with the after party at Mille
Fleurs. Imagine fabulous dinners
and champagne taking place
under the moonlight and white
lights in the courtyard. I showed
up fashionably late for this day of
celebration, with my fiancé, Robin
Shull and niece, Lauren
Chapman. I was thrilled to see
Maggie and Gary Bobileff, owners
of Mister B, sitting right next to us.
They were kind enough to let me
capture the picturesque moment
under the stars that evening.
On July 18, I made a delivery
to one of my clients in La Jolla.To
my surprise I found legendary
photographer Julius Shulman
(97!) shooting the lovely contem-
porary mutlimillion dollar beach-
front property in La Jolla. I was
lucky enough to sit with Mr.
Shulman. I asked him how he fell
in love with contemporary archi-
tecture and this is what he said:
“By chance. Too many people
today are trying to control and
plan their lives. Let life happen to
you. Let the chips fall were they
may and enjoy this life.”Then he
pointed to the surfers behind us
and explained the one riding the
wave in did it with ease, while the
nervous surfers missed their
opportunity. He then proceeded
to tell me to slow down in asking
him questions because there was
no reason to rush. I took his
instruction and felt grateful for his
words of wisdom. Homeowner
Stephan Lempereles was kind
enough to share this day with me
and allow me to meet his leg-
endary guest. I walked back to my
car feeling rather inspired by
meeting the living legend.
Later that evening, I walked
down to Morgan Run in the
Whispering Palms community to
discover a live band playing on the
patio outside of their bar/restau-
rant area. Attention local
Whispering Palms residents!
There is no need to drive on
Friday night for happy hour when
you can walk down the street and
enjoy music, complimentary
cheese and vegetable trays, plus a
happy hour price for a good glass
of chardonnay. This is an excel-
lent choice for a “low key”
evening.
Save the date exclusive
announcement:
On Aug. 11, come meet and
mingle with Janice Jaraicie of
Nelli at the pre-party for Fashion
Week at Mille Fleurs.The event is
from 6:30 to 9 p.m. The cost to
reserve your fashion show ticket
that evening includes a $37 ticket,
which admits you to the fall
Celebration of Fashion, plus hors
d’oeuvres and wine at Mille
Fleurs. Don’t miss the chance to
meet this popular designer and
attend San Diego’s very first
Fashion Week! It’s rumored Bravo
is coming in to capture the event
for their network. Please RSVP
for the Mille Fleurs event by Aug.
4 at nelli@nelliusa.com or call
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 26 AUG. 1, 2008
GOT LUGGAGE? NEED A VAN?
SEDAN? STRETCH LIMO?
WE CAN HELP.
ACE
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Certain restrictions may apply.
Executive Rides
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Luxury Transportation Service...
Cheaper Than Taxi and Shuttle
LOW AIRPORT FARES:
Rancho Santa Fe........$65
Fairbanks Ranch.........$55
Santa Luz....................$55
Del Mar ......................$52
Solana Beach..............$55
LAX Special ..............$199
HEADS UP Julie Rubio and Bianca
Smith looking smashing in hats on
Opening Day. Courtesy photo
MACHEL’S RANCH
CONTINUED FROM14
the State Water Project. These
restrictions are from federal rul-
ings set to protect several protect-
ed fish species in the Delta, and
will prevent delivery of up to 30
percent of the water from the
State Water Project. This restric-
tion is anticipated to remain in
effect for several years.
The Metropolitan Water
District has projected that there
will be shortages in our water
supply from 120,000 acre-feet up
to 600,000 acre-feet for 2009 —
the amount of water for approxi-
mately 120,000 families of four
for one year. Even if more rain is
received and snowpack goes up
next year it will not be enough to
make up for the deficiencies in
our water supply that already
exist.
Conservation measures are
important in maintaining a sus-
tainable water supply for district
customers, but new water sup-
plies are also necessary. The dis-
trict has contracted for up to
5,000 acre feet of desalinated
water, which equates to 10 per-
cent of the district’s current sup-
ply via the proposed Carlsbad
desalination plant, which is antic-
ipated to begin delivering water
by 2011. Before construction of
the Carlsbad desalination plant
can begin, the project must gain
final approval from the Coastal
Commission.
The district offers many con-
servation programs and rebates.
For a complete list of programs
visit www.omwd.com.
The district includes por-
tions of the cities of Encinitas,
Carlsbad, San Diego, Solana
Beach and San Marcos as well as
the communities of Olivenhain,
Leucadia, Elfin Forest, Rancho
Santa Fe, Fairbanks Ranch, Santa
Fe Valley and 4S Ranch. For
more information about the dis-
trict, visit www.omwd.com.
DROUGHT
CONTINUED FROM3
teaching free CPR/AED
classes, providing infant and
child car seat checks, free
blood pressure check clinics
at the RSF Senior Center,
and delivering safety presen-
tations to area schools and
community groups.
San Diego Medical
Services Enterprise is the
ambulance provider for
Rancho Santa Fe, Del Mar,
Solana Beach, Encinitas and
the city of San Diego.
SDMSE’s AED program, San
Diego Project Heart Beat,
has helped place more than
4,000 of these lifesaving
devices throughout the com-
munity.
DEFIBRILLATOR
CONTINUED FROM8
petty theft with a prior con-
viction, Deputy District
Attorney Jennifer Golovato
said.
He faces more than four
years in prison if convicted,
the lawyer said.
Ramirez’s attorney,
Cindy Grim, alluded to the
court that her client might
be suffering from mental ill-
ness and that while he was
trespassing he hadn’t
planned on removing any of
the items from the locker
room.
Under cross-examination
by Grimm, Perez said
Ramirez’s wallet with a pay-
roll check and cash was
found in the women’s locker
room and that he’d also left
some belongings at the tran-
sit depot across the street
after officers first asked him
to leave the campus.
She argued that this
showed Ramirez wasn’t in his
right mind during the inci-
dent.
However, Judge Joel
Pressman said he believed
Ramirez obtained the com-
munity officer shirt to give
the appearance he belonged
there and was allowed to
walk out with the property
legally.
Pressman set a Sept. 4
trial date.
Ramirez remains in cus-
tody in lieu of $35,000 bail.
POLICE
CONTINUED FROM14
violators in the village; reporting
traffic, circulation and speeding
problems to the California
Highway Patrol; helping deal with
abandoned vehicles; and serving
as a contact point and conduit for
citizen complaints and concerns.
The SVP is part of the
California Highway Patrol’s over-
all commitment to increase
enforcement in the Covenant. In
addition to the 20 hours of weekly
overtime enforcement contracted
by the Association, a full-time
sworn California Highway Patrol
officer, Sam Shockley, patrols the
Covenant and enforces speed lim-
its and other Vehicle Code regula-
tions with the assistance of SVP
volunteers. Sometimes motorcycle
officers assigned to the I-5 corri-
dor divert enforcement to the
Covenant when freeways are
clogged and enforcement is
unnecessary and unproductive.
SVP volunteers help during these
times as well. Ed Rodriguez, a res-
ident of the Ranch since 1997, has
served as a SVP volunteer for
many years. “I really enjoy help-
ing out,”Rodriguez said.
The Explorer Program is an
internship program that gives
young people considering a career
in law enforcement the opportuni-
ty to learn through on-the-job
training. Usually 15 to 21 years
old, these young people gain
insight as to what is needed to be
a law enforcement officer and are
helpful when events, such as the
recent Fourth of July parade, take
place. “We have more parades
than New York City,”Chief Officer
Matt Wellhouser said. “I added 25
uniforms to help with the Fourth
of July parade. They were very
valuable.”
Chris Ramos has been with
the Explorer program for the past
two years. “This program has pro-
vided me an opportunity to
explore law enforcement,”he said.
“We learn a lot of things in the
Explorer program. We participate
in the ride-alongs.We help around
the office, and learn how to write
reports and help with the radio.”
“We appreciate what you do
for us,” Board Director Bill
Beckman said, speaking on behalf
of the Association board. “The
least we can do is help you with a
little financial support.”
Association President Lois
Jones presented checks and cer-
tificates of thanks to Ed
Rodriguez, representing the SVP,
and to Chris Ramos, representing
the Explorers program. Both dona-
tions are part of the yearly budget.
She thanked both groups for the
efforts and services they provided.
PATROL
CONTINUED FROM1
If you have a fun event you would like Machel
Penn to cover, contact her at mpenn@coast-
newsgroup.com.
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 27 AUG. 1, 2008
Guardiagrele, south of the main
city, Pescara.
“Chef Peppino Tinari offers
up some of the finest gourmet fare
in the region,”she said. “He serves
home-baked bread, sautéed mush-
rooms, fresh green salad and Italy’s
famous Montepulciano wine.”
Another uniquely Italian
attraction in Abruzzo is the agrit-
uristica, a small farm/bed-and-
breakfast where tourists can visit
and experience true field-to-table
cuisine.
“Agriturisiticas are required
to produce at least 76 per cent of
everything they serve,” Clary
explained. “This means the veg-
etables come from their own gar-
den, the eggs are probably laid by
their own hens, and they may very
well raise their own meat.”
Clary dined at Azienda
Agrituristica in Rosello, about 25
miles due south of Pescara.
“It has a warm ambience —
dark with heavy wooden tables,”
Clary said. “The place is lively
and, as in all of Italy, the wine
flows freely.”
Clary came to travel writing
circuitously.
The transplanted Ohio native,
who has lived in several California
cities over the years, went to
China in 2004 to teach English.
She eventually began writing
about the country of two billion
for airline magazines. When she
returned to the States in 2007, she
was a regular contributor to those
magazines and others. She now
works almost full time as a travel
journalist and also teaches col-
lege-level courses online.
Clary did more than eat dur-
ing her trip through Abruzzo;
there was the shopping.
“In the small town of
Pescocostanza, you’ll find gold-
smiths who craft a delicate 18-
karat gold pendant called a pre-
sentosa,” she said. “This gold
piece resembles a star and is sur-
rounded by filigree arabesques. In
the center is either a single heart
or two hearts joined by a crescent
moon and symbolizes eternal
love.”
Goldsmiths have been in busi-
ness in Pescocostanza since the
Middle Ages, and many of the
local goldsmiths have been follow-
ing the family tradition for gener-
ations.
Another favorite stop was the
small town of Rocca San
Giovanini along the Adriatic
Coast.
“It felt like a very much like a
Medieval village,” Clary said. “It’s
also a great place for wine and din-
ner on a traditional trabocchi, one
of the wooden piers that also
serves as a restaurant and where
you are sure to enjoy some of the
freshest, tastiest seafood imagina-
ble.”
Hmmm — we’ve returned to
the food again — but it’s
inevitable when you’re discussing
Abruzzo.
“In Chieti Province, the peo-
ple simply went out of their way to
show you their hospitality,” Clary
said. “They have a certain vibran-
cy about them, a zest for
life that includes wonderful
food and wine with everything.”
For information about seeing
Abruzzo in a Fiat 500, visit
www.italyby500abruzzo.com.
HIT THE ROAD
CONTINUED FROM13
“Hit the Road” is a biweekly column. E’Louise
Ondash is a freelance writer living in North
County. Tell her about your travels at eon-
dash@coastnewsgroup.com.
Association can purchase. But
new properties are always being
sought, particularly since the debt
on the Osuna Adobe property is
expected to be retired within the
next three years, and will there-
fore allow more funds to be avail-
able to the Open Space
Committee.
Moore reported that the
Parks and Recreation Committee
is also taking a hard look at the
damage done by the recent Witch
Creek Fire, monitoring the reju-
venation process.
In other Association news,
Smith reported an update on the
red gum lerp psyllid infestation
currently affecting the local euca-
lyptus trees. Entomology expert
David Shaw returned to the
Ranch and conducted tests to see
if wasps were boring through
cones made by the parasite, there-
by destroying the parasites. “It’s
very encouraging,” Smith said.
“According to Shaw’s investiga-
tion, there appears to be a good
concentration of wasps in the area
and there is no reason to panic.
The trees are starting to regrow.
We should let nature run its due
course.”
Covenant Administrator Ivan
Holler reported that the
streetscaping project currently
under way in the village is on
schedule and nearing completion.
The trees are in and landscaping
is nearly completed. Holler
reported that a Use Permit was
obtained for the Osuna Adobe
property and work is in motion.
He said repairs need to be made
to the stucco exterior of the
Osuna due to water damage.
Lisa Bartlett, a member of
the community for the past 40
years, voiced a complaint about
rules and regulations at the
Players Clubhouse that she felt
were “reprehensible, horrible and
illegal.” Lois Jones, speaking on
behalf of the board, said the
board had “no comment” as it
needed a chance to investigate
the matter before responding.
Bartlett is going to put her com-
plaint in writing and submit it to
the board for careful considera-
tion.
SPACE
CONTINUED FROM1
of 10. For details call Suzanne Swanson
at (858) 678-6364.
HAPPY HEARTS The San Diego
North Coastal chapter of WomenHeart
welcomes women with concerns about
cardiac health to share information and
sisterhood at our monthly support group
meeting at 10:15 a.m. Aug. 5, Glen View,
1950 Calle Barcelona, Carlsbad. For
details contact Marilyn Deak at (760)
438-5890.
SEE THE PAGEANTHeld annually in
Laguna Beach, the Pageant of the
Masters recreates great works of art
with living models. The excursion is
scheduled for Aug. 5. Cost is $92, which
includes transportation and loge seating
at the pageant. Departure will be 1:20
p.m. from the parking lot of MiraCosta
College’s San Elijo Campus, 3333
Manchester Avenue, Cardiff; and 2 p.m.
from parking lot 1A at MiraCosta
College’s Oceanside Campus, at 1
Barnard Drive. Return times will be
approximately midnight to the
Oceanside Campus, and 12:30 a.m. to
the San Elijo Campus. For details call
(760) 795-6820.
AUGUST 6
AUTHOR ON SITE Ann Patchett,
author of “Run” celebrates her paper-
back release by reading from her book
at 6:30 p.m., Aug. 6 at the Encinitas
Library at 540 Cornish Drive. Books will
be for sale and there will be a signing.
AUGUST 7
CITY ART The city of Encinitas will
present the work of local artist Juan
Flores from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Aug. 7 at the
Encinitas Library, 540 Cornish Drive.
Flores is a long-time surfer and
Encinitas resident paints his impres-
sions of local surf breaks.
FOR FITNESS Qi Gong is an ancient
system developed in Asia for fitness and
health. Participants will engage in sim-
ple, fluid motions that include standing
and sitting.This course is held from 8:30
to 9:30 a.m. Aug. 7, Encinitas Senior
Center, 1140 Oakcrest Park Drive.There
is a $20 fee for the month of August. For
details call (760) 943-2250.
UNDER THE SEA Peter Stewart will
be at Moana Design from 3 to 9 p.m.
Aug. 7 at 312 S. Cedros Ave., Suite 130,
Solana Beach. Stewart is known for his
fish sculptures and marine-inspired wall
murals. Call (858) 792-0405 for details.
AUGUST 8
TO THE RACESThe Women’s Global
Network will be reserving tables at the
Del Mar races from 3 to 7 p.m., Aug. 8 at
the Del Mar Race Track, 2260 Jimmy
Durante Blvd., Del Mar. The event
includes entrance, seating and scrip
toward food and beverages. Come early
for the newcomers’ race seminar. Fee is
$55. Register online by Aug. 4 at
www.wgn-global.com.
AUGUST 9
SMART PUPS Canine Companions
for Independence will hold an open-
house festival at its Oceanside Campus
for military veterans, active-duty service
members, and their families and friends
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.Aug. 9, 124 Rancho
del Oro Drive, Oceanside. Meet working
CCI assistance dogs and see firsthand
how they are trained to respond to more
than 50 commands.Visit www.cci.org or
call (760) 901-4300 for details.
ONGOING
KIDDIE KAMP The Seaside Day
Camp is hosting day camps for children
entering first- through sixth-grades,
weekdays between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m.
from June 16 to Aug. 22, Scout House in
Glen Park, 2149 Orinda Drive, Cardiff-
by-the-Sea. The Camp will venture out
of the Scout House two days per week
for field trips. Register online at
www.encinitasrecreg.com.
LOGICAL WEIGHT LOSS The
Encinitas chapter of Take Off Pounds
Sensibly will hold meetings at 5:30 p.m.
Mondays and 9 a.m. Wednesdays, San
Diego County Credit Union
Community Room, 501 El Camino
Real, Encinitas. To learn more, call
Diane at (760) 753-2484 or visit
www.tops.org.
MANIC BOTANIC Quail Botanical
Gardens is offering certification classes
on a variety of botanical topics from 7
to 9 p.m. Thursdays and from 9 to noon
Saturdays, 230 Quail Gardens Drive,
Encinitas. Call (760) 436-3036 x206 for
details.
MOKSHA MOMMY The Del Mar
Foundation presents “Mommy and Me
Seaside Yoga,” Powerhouse Park, Del
Mar. Nandini Narayanan will lead
mommies/tykes from 10 to 11a.m., with
mommies/tots to follow from 11 a.m. to
noon.To reserve a spot, e-mail your con-
tact information and your child’s age to
children@delmarfoundation.org.
THANKS BUSH Free Stimulus
Package Rebate assistance will be
available every Thursday from 9 to
11:30 a.m., Oceanside Senior Center,
455 Country Club Lane, Oceanside.
This service is for those individuals who
did not file a tax return for 2007. The
assistance will be done on a first come,
first served basis. Call (760) 435-5250 to
learn more.
CALENDAR
CONTINUED FROM8
started with pony rides, graduat-
ed to lessons, and then I started
jumping,” said Mellen, who spent
time during her childhood in the
Rancho Santa Fe area, where her
parents own a second home.
Her interest in rescue organi-
zations began in the mid-1990s
during a visit to Del Mar. “I was
looking through the (Daily Racing
Form) and saw an ad for horse res-
cue,” Mellen said. “I wondered
why horses would need to be res-
cued. So I went home and went on
the Web site.”
That’s where Mellen first
learned that thousands of horses
are slaughtered every year, and
the meat is sold for consumption
abroad.
“At that point I became
involved in Thoroughbred rescue,”
Mellen said. “I found the main
obstacle for the rescue organiza-
tions was funding. I wanted to
take my commitment one step fur-
ther, so I started (After the Finish
Line). I am the organization the
rescues come to for funding. I can
step in and help … save a horse
from a cruel fate.”
Last year, according to the
Animal Welfare Institute, more
than 100,000 horses, including
about 15,000 Thoroughbreds, were
slaughtered in one of three for-
eign-owned facilities in Texas and
Illinois.
“While a handful of horses
are purposely sold into slaughter
by irresponsible owners, most
arrive at the slaughterhouse via
livestock auction, where unsus-
pecting owners sell the animals to
slaughterhouse middlemen
known as ‘killer buyers,’” accord-
ing to the Animal Welfare
Institute Web site.
Although the three U.S. facil-
ities, which annually exported
about $42 million of horse meat,
have been shut down, “that hasn’t
stopped the slaughter of our hors-
es,”Mellen said. “They just go far-
ther for that fate. Now they’re
shipped to Mexico and Canada.”
The sale and consumption of
horse meat is illegal in California
and Illinois. The American Horse
Slaughter Prevention Act, which
passed the House of
Representatives but failed in the
Senate, would have made killing
horses for human consumption
illegal throughout the United
States.
Actress and animal rights
activist Bo Derek, who was recent-
ly appointed to the California
Horse Racing Board by Gov.
Arnold Schwarzenegger, launched
a campaign earlier this year in
Canada to stop horse slaughter in
that country.
Mellen said her goal is not to
shed negative light on the sport.
“There are a lot of positives in rac-
ing,” she said. “There are many
trainers and owners who support
their horses when they’re finished
racing. But for those that are not
supported when their racing
careers are over, here is After the
Finish Line to step in.
“There’s a lot more life to a
horse when they’re done racing,”
Mellen said. “They give of them-
selves on the racetrack. These
horses do this because we ask this
of them. It’s our choice for them to
race even though they were bred
for it. But some horses could have
no injuries. They are just too slow.
When they’re not wanted, what
happens to them?”
After the Finish Line is fund-
ed solely through donations,
which could come from a portion
of track winnings, said Mellen,
who received money in honor of
Eight Belles.
“People who bet on Eight
Belles sent me e-mails saying they
didn’t feel right keeping the
money they won.”Eight Belles fin-
ished second in the 2008
Kentucky Derby, but was eutha-
nized after fracturing both front
ankles during that race.
To help raise money, After
the Finish Line is holding a
fundraiser, which will include
lunch and silent and live auctions,
from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Aug.
19 at The Inn at Rancho Santa Fe.
To register or for more informa-
tion, visit www.afterthefinish-
line.org or contact Mellen at
dawn@afterthefinishline.org or
(858) 945-1371.
“Every day a horse needs our
help,” Mellen said. “We try to be
the voice for the horses. We want
to give back to the animals that
give us so much excitement.”
THOROUGHBREDS
CONTINUED FROM13
Lovell back to court Aug. 18
for his sentencing.
At the preliminary hear-
ing in February, the two girls
described a world of long
hours in hotel and motel
rooms, fear and constant
arguments with Lovell.
His former girlfriend,
Lazelle T., who was a minor at
the time, testified at a
February preliminary hear-
ing that Lovell made her and
her friend work for hours a
day as prostitutes at various
hotels in Southern California.
“I felt forced, pressured
into it,” she said. “I felt I
would be kicked out on the
street if I didn’t do any-
thing.”
Kacylen D. said the cou-
ple recruited her during a
trip she took with them to
Six Flags. After less than a
year of prostitution, she said
she didn’t see the “bright
side” of it and wanted to get
out.
During her time with
Lovell, Kacylen D. said she
had nonconsensual sex with
him multiple times out of
fear of abuse.
According to the two
women, Lovell made thou-
sands of dollars a month sell-
ing them to clients that were
partly established through
Craigslist.org.
PIMPING
CONTINUED FROM21
rest of the home, but
because the sprinklers acti-
vated, the flames were
slowed until firefighters
arrived to extinguish the
fire.”
The fire was caused by
an electrical problem with
the golf cart, which was
plugged in to be charged at
the time. The golf cart was
destroyed and other items in
the garage, including a scoot-
er, were damaged. It is esti-
mated that the structure sus-
tained $100,000 in damages
and the accessories in the
garage accounted for anoth-
er $100,000 loss. It took 15
minutes for firefighters to
get the fire under control.
There were no injuries
reported. Rancho Santa Fe
Fire Protection District and
Solana Beach Fire
Department responded to
the incident with 13 fire-
fighters and one paramedic
unit. Battalion Chief Fred
Cox served as the Incident
Commander.
FIRES
CONTINUED FROM22
evening of alcohol and
methamphetamines. Said
the prosecutor in Isanti
County, Minn., of the ram-
page by Russell Simon Jr.,
45, “We’re lucky we don’t
have a multiple homicide on
our hands.”
I Demand My Rights!
— Murder suspect
Broderick Laswell, 19, filed a
lawsuit in federal court in
April against the Benton
County (Ark.) Jail, alleging
that he was being “literally”
“starved to death” while
awaiting trial, and complain-
ing of “blurry” vision and of
almost passing out. As evi-
dence of his plight, Laswell
pointed out that, in eight
months behind bars, his
weight had dropped from
413 pounds to 308.
MORE ODD FILES
CONTINUED FROM18
Visit us at: www.coastnewsgroup.com
FIREWOOD You haul. (760) 753-
6384.
MOVING SALE August moving sale.
Cool stereos, trundle bed, tons more
cheap. (760) 439-6102.
YARD SALE Sat., 8/2/08, 8 am - 2
pm., 1176 Nardo Rd., Encinitas, lots
of good stuff - L’Occitane bath prod-
ucts, kitchen ware, tools. Come take
a look.
$2,000 REWARD 2 Silkie Terriers
last seen in Yellow Hummer at
Oceanside Wal-Mart on College & 76.
Please return our loved ones. No
questions asked. (760)908-6972
MEN’S WEDDING BAND found
under water in Cardiff on 7/22/08.
(760) 815-1892
JEWELRY (antique & new) - silver,
gold necklaces, rings, bracelets,
pearls, pocket watches, gems & old
coins $1.00 - $50.00 each. (760)295-
1559
PORTHOLE (NOS) 11” BRASS -
American built post-ww2. Main hous-
ing 11”x1?” round, two ?” threaded
swivel dogs, 8” hinged door, 7” glass
insert, rubber gasket. Never seen sea
duty. This 8 pound nautical item
could be used or displayed. $125
(760) 942-2025
BLENDER Magic Bullet - Fill In The
Box, $50. OBO. (760) 305-7574.
HOTPOINT GAS DRYER heavy duty
with automatic dry control, white
and in good condition. Only $100,
genuine buyers please call - (760)
521-4319
MICROWAVE 19-in. black, like new.
$40. (858) 436-5386
ROTISSERIE Electric Showtime
w/vegetable container. $50. OBO.
(760) 305-757.
WHIRLPOOL ULTIMATE WASHER
Care II Heavy duty (5 wash/spin
speed combination) 8 cycle quiet
excellent condition - only $150.
Genuine buyers please call - (760)
521-4319
FRIDGE Working 27 cu ft side by
side fridge and freezer. In door ice
and water disconnected. $45 only
(619)249-3341
ALL BRAND NEW Sony dreamma-
chine with snooze, cd player, radio,
clock and alarm, $40. 3 conair cord-
keeper hairdryers model 1878 (w
retractable wire) $15 each,
Rejuvenique ultimate facial toning
system $20 (760) 521-4319
HEWLETT PACKARD Scanner/copi-
er PSC 500 - $50 (760) 758-8958
STEREO “AIWA” 3 CD, dual cas-
sette, auto reverse, excellent speak-
ers $75.00 (760)295-1559
TYPEWRITER Electric Sears brand
in good condition. $35. (760) 721-
2779.
BRAND NEW SOLID PINE WOOD
King-sized Bed (Head Board, Foot
Board, side railings and wooden rails
for holding mattress, no box needed)
Selling for only $150, sorry no mat-
tress but that is all you need.
Genuine Buyer please call (760) 521-
4319
COFFEE TABLES & END TABLES
dark smoked glass or off-white wick-
er. very sturdy, look beautiful $45.00
- $100.00 (760)295-1559
DINING TABLE Oak, octagon
shaped, good condition, $50. (760)
801-7640.
DRESSER 5-drawers - 36” wide X 49
1/2” high X 17 1/2” deep. Good condi-
tion. $130 OBO. (760) 754-2487.
EASY CHAIR $20. (760) 721-2779.
RECLINERS Lazyboy wall huggers,
tan, velvety, tapestry, paisley design
F grade fabric. $150 each- OBO (760)
727-6725
ROCKING CHAIR Heavy duty,
maple, carved & pads. Excellent con-
dition. $45. (760) 967-0920.
TV STAND Large Screen Solid Oak
Mission TV Stand Cabinet, 72” Wide
X 24” High, Very Attractive. Asking
$150.00 (760)295-1311
TWO SOLID WOOD CHESTS No
fiberboard, 4 Drawer. Very sturdy,
with metal and roller drawer slides.
Less than year old, excellent condi-
tion. Medium wood shades.
Oceanside. Paid $400, will sell for
$100/ea. (760)722-8862
3 BUDDAS “See No Evil, Hear No
Evil, Speak No Evil” - large brilliant
in color. - $150. (760) 439-8555
AGATES, AND LAPIDARY EQUIP
Selling out! Lots of equipment and
quality rough going at.50 cents a
pound (760) 231-8669
BOWLING SHOES Brunswick,
leather, size 10. (760) 721-2779.
BRONZE-WARE With Rosewood
from Thailand, 14 serving pieces,
$30. (760) 940-6460.
BUMPER JACK For GMC vehicle.
$15. (760) 721-2779.
BURMESE JADE PENDANT
W/CHAIN $25 (760)599-7219
(760)599-7219
BUTTON PEARLS 7.5mm button
fresh water pearls; $25; (760)599-
7219 (760)599-7219
CAR BRA Covercraft custom tail-
ered car bra for Toyota pickup 75-78,
color -black. New, still in box $65.00
(760) 966-1530 or email
abargain4u@cox.net
CLOTHING womens’ (sizes 5-9),
excellent condition, dresses, skirts,
pants, t-shirts (100 pieces).50 cents -
$5.00 or bag full only $10.00 each.
(760)295-1559
COOKWARE Corning-ware cook-
ware set of 7 pieces, like new, blue
flower pattern, removable handles.
$45. Fireplace set - black wrought
iron. $40. (760) 721-2779.
CORAL BRANCH Red, 9-1/2”
mounted. $35. 760.599.7219 E-mail
for picture (760)599-7219
DVD’S dvds for sale.email:
vixen_anime@yahoo.com
EGYPTIAN DRUM Professional
quality dumbek drums from Egypt,
new, with case $95. Instructional CD
and lessons also available. Frank
(760)942-1326
ELLIPTICAL EXERCISE
MACHINE $50 - OBO. (760) 735-
2825
EXERCISE EQUIPMENT Nordicflex
Ultralift $65.00 (760) 966-1530 or
email abargain4u@cox.net
EXTERIOR DOORMATS Coir husk,
2 half moon, half circle, new unused,
$20 each OBO. (760) 944-6460.
FIREWOOD Firewood for sale. Split
& seasoned wood, great for the bar-
becue, camping, fireplace. (760) 942-
7430.
GARDENING SUPPLIES Hose
Reels (wall hung & mobile, Rain Bird
controller, large & small terracota
pots & saucers, scalloped borders,
lots of large & small plastic pots &
saucers, plants, all for $75-OBO.
(760) 944-6460.
HEADBOARD King Size, $25.00,
Fitted King sheets, $5.00 each (760)
598-6217
HOMEDICS MASSAGING SEAT
CUSION 10 massaging points. Home,
office, vehicle use. $20. (760)599-
7219
JADE MONEY FROG Three-legged
Money Frog; 5”long by 3-1/2” wide by
2” high. $25; (760)599-7219 (760)599-
7219
JADE PENDANT Burmese jade pen-
dant with chain. $25 (760)599-7219
(760)599-7219
KEYBOARD Yamaha PSR-GX76,
like new. $149.00. (760) 613-0354
KITCHEN TABLE 4 chairs, good
quality & condition. $95 OBO by
7/27/08. Can be delivered, Encinitas.
(310) 616-6262
LA COSTE POLO SHIRTS $35 each.
New in Bag. Many colors, many sizes.
Get your Xmas shopping done early.
(619)249-3341
LAMP with metal stand - $30. (760)
758-8958
LUGGAGE Leather with fabric, 6
pieces, all on wheels. $150. (760) 944-
6460.
MANUAL PUSH MOWER 18” clean
cut, great for small areas, like new
$40.00 (760) 942-2681
MEN’S BICYCLE 26” 10-speed
Raleigh. Seldom used - $60. And,
exercise bicycle - $60. (760) 753-4863
MIRRORED CLOSET DOORS With
track, 36 1/2” X 38 1/2”, $100. Also, 5
sheets of melamine wood, 1/2” X 4 ft.
X 7 ft. 10” - $10 a sheet. (760) 727-
3979.
NETSUKI COLLECTION $6 to $40;
wood, jade, amber, bone. (760)599-
7219
NEW MENS WORK BOOTS leather
Catepiller brown pull on size 11 no
steal toe never worn Kevlar soles
$60.00 super nice (760) 716-0929
NITRO MODEL AIRPLANE
ENGINES 2 and 4 stroke from $11 to
$90, over 100 to choose from. Can e-
mail list/photos. (760) 599-7219
ENAMELLED KITCHEN SINK Only
$35. Good condition. Size 32” L X 21”
W and 8” deep. Two sections.
(619)249-3341
PAINTINGS (10) museum quality,
extra large assorted oils, court
ordered valuation 14,000K. $150.
each. Must see, must sale. Sacrifice -
unbelievable value. (760) 231-9531
PATIO DOOR BLINDS Custom
made, neutral colored. New, still in
box. 80” x 84” $125.00. (760) 798-
0903.
PATIO TABLE Bistro style. 27” deep,
easy clean plastic. $25. (760) 942-
1303.
PLANTS 15 gallon plants, fan palms,
crown of thorns, jade, loquat, black
pines, $35. each. (760) 436-6604.
PLANTS Handcrafted planters and
pottery. Tropical plants; jade, bam-
boo, lavender, ivy and cactus.
(760)295-1559. $5.00 - $20.00 each.
PLUSH STAND-UP XMAS
SNOWMAN Bought one too many!
Soft sculpture snowman has a pock-
etful of goodies and a smile for
everyone. Polyester and acrylic out-
fit. 14.5” x 5”x 24” high.760-231-7949
QUICK-COUPLER Complete with
hose bib, turnkey & valve box, excel-
lent, $20. (760) 940-6460.
SHOES Men’s Rockport, size 13, 3
pairs at $8 each. (760) 944-6460.
STEREO SPEAKERS Excellent floor
speakers, $250 value. $75 OBO. (760)
757-8339.
SUNGLASSES Revo, like new, excel-
lent condition, $100. Rayban USA,
model Vagabond with case, $50. (760)
944-6460.
SURFBOARD $150 - OBO - Hurry
(760) 471-1807
TOOLS FOR SALE bench grinder-
buffer on wheeled bench $45. Also
bench joiner 4 in. blade $95
(760)944-4510
WALL BRACKET for mounting a TV.
White metal,
BEGINNER PAINTBALL SETUP All
you need to start paintballing.
Includes: Gun, pads, pants, loader,
air tanks. Needs to go. Reduced
prices. $150 for total setup (760)436-
1950or (760) 815 5360
BARE BACK PAD. Brand new, never
riden. All leather. Wool underside
padding. Suede top, double stitched.
Leather latigo straps and brass D
rings. Color=rust. $80. (760)613-3802
FISH THE KELP BEDS converted
windsurfer board, seat, rod holders,
paddle $40.00 (760)944-4510
RACQUET BALL RACQUET Good
condition. Encinitas. $15. (760) 942-
1303.
Sporting Goods
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Financial Reimbursement
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Seeking Foster Parents for:
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Lic. #370602780
San Diego Office
619.584.5777
parents.sandiego@waldenfamily.org
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*Any ads other than private party individuals
selling personal items and automtive ads.
LINE ADS RUN IN ALL FOUR PUBS - 150,000 READERS
THE COAST NEWS GROUP
THE VISTA / SAN MARCOS NEWS
Line ads run in all 4 publications. Display classifieds run
Zone 1: Coast News, 85,000 Zone 2: RSF 9,000 Zone 2: vSM 12,000
1-2 wks 3 wks 6 wks 12 wks 26 wks 52 wks
$40 $36 $32 $28 $24 $20 Display PCI
Per Zone
Items For Sale 200 Items For Sale 200 Items For Sale 200 F.Y.I.
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 28 AUG. 1, 2008
TENNIS RACQUET Prince Graphite
OS $20 (760)632-2487
WETSUIT RubberSoul, full suit, 4/3
mm, size large, brand new,
$145/OBO. (858) 436-5386
WETSUIT Boz short sleeve spring
suit, size medium, good condition.
$50. (858) 436-5386.
JACK DANIELS Old Jack Daniels or
Lem Motlow Whiskey collectible
Bottles and decanters full or empty,
advertising items, bottle boxes, pro-
motional and salesman point of sale.
Only Jack Daniels stuff Please.
(760)630-2480
FINE CABINETRY Built-in or free
standing entertainment centers,
home offices, bookcases or modifica-
tions. In home consultation call (760)
215-0029
MATH / ASTRONOMY Camp Mawks
in Mammoth Lakes. Some financial
aid avail. Some gifted sessions. Also
Alg; Ages 11+. Enroll today. gladesin-
stitute.org (760) 924-2735
DRIVERS: Home daily! 100 % paid
family ins! 2yrs cdl-a w/hazmat, max
3pts w/in 3yrs. 800-373-9001
GREAT JOB FOR MOMS Earn exec.
Income from home. No inventory. P/T
avail. Pauline 760.945.9426
PART-TIME SECRETARY Home
office, must know MAC. (760) 633-
9737
SWIM INSTRUCTORS
$11-$17/hr
760/744-7946
HAIR STYLIST - Space available at
DELUXE HAIR SALON in Leucadia.
Call Pati at (760) 942-1896.
REALISTICALLY earn more money
in the next year than the past 5 years
combined. 800-687-2735
ENCINITAS 1 Bedroom in house,
$600 + utils, W/D, phone line, dep.
760/753-1686.
LEUCADIA With full bath in private
home, $850. (619) 994-7080
ENCINITAS $2200 Light, bright
3BD/2.5Ba w/2-car gar, Irg patio,
frplc, upgrades throughout. Cat OK.
Hunter Properties (760) 436-5700
LA COSTA $3200 Gorgeous
4BD/3.5BA in Bressi Ranch. 3 car gar,
frplc, granite counters, lrg patio.
Comm. pool/spa/park! Hunter
Properties (760) 436-5700.
CARLSBAD: OCEAN VIEW! Two
bedrooms 2 baths, 2209 Sqft home,
Wrap around deck with Ocean view
2 car garage. Quiet Carlsbad neigh-
borhood. Available August 3rd.
$2400.00 call Jessi The Real Estate
Consultants Property Management
(760)543-0171
HOUSE FOR RENT In Encinitas.
Stove, refrig, W/D, 2 bd/1 bath, large
multipurpose room - $1,700, no pets.
(714) 632-3832.
HOUSE IN CARDIFF 3 bd/2bath
house for lease, 2 car garage, fire-
place. (760) 497-7041.
PRVT ROOM downstairs of house w/
bath. private entrance, 4 blks to
beach/ leucadia. inc. util. and
cable..625/mo. call dorian/760-213-
1299 (760) 213-1299
SAN MARCOS WHY RENT WHEN
YOU CAN OWN? 1 bedroom end
unit with a yard, feels like a
detached home! Resort living at
LAKE SAN MARCOS, just steps to
the lake and pool. TOTALLY
REMODELED, quality!Price:
$265,000. to $289,000. Sue Fox, real-
tor, (760)917-4220 www.suefox-
homes.com (760)753-1086
ENCINITAS-1/2 BLOCK TO BEACH
2br/1ba, remodeled kitchen/bath,
new flooring throughout, frig, W/D
Hkps, nice patio, fenced yard, shared
storage room. No smoking/pets.
$1,995 mo. (760) 525-5060.
AVIARA HOME WITH VIEWS
Single-level light-n-bright 3/3 home
on large lot w/rv parking. Crown
molding, skylights, flat-screen
wiring, master bedroom w/french
doors. Tropical landscaping, patio,
spa, outdoor shower. 7106 Mimosa
Dr. Seller will ent. offers $640K-
$679,000. Prudential Calif. Realty
(858) 335-1345
SAN MARCOS JUST LISTED!
MOUNTAIN VIEW in resort-style
Age 55/35 senior park. Walk-in clos-
ets, CALIFORNIA room. Eat-in
kitchen, patio. RENT CONTROL.
MUST SEE. Active park, walk to
stores. Only $72,900. Financing avail-
able. BRING OFFER. Call Sue Fox,
realtor-cell 760-917-4220 or (760)753-
1086
SAN MARCOS WANT A CALIFOR-
NIA ROOM? YOU’LL LOVE LIVING
HERE! Seniors 55/35. RARE 3BR,
2BA PLUS family room. MUST SEE!
Nice & sunny, lots of windows. Large
kitchen, some mountain view.
Double wide. Beautiful & desirable
park w/resort amenities. Quiet
friendly neighbors. RENT CON-
TROL. Only $72,000. Call Sue Fox,
realtor. 760-917-4220 or 760-753-
1086. Web:www.suefoxhomes.com
SAN MARCOS HURRY! 2 bedroom
doublewide, MUST SEE. Bright
kitchen, new appliances. Repainted,
desirable corner lot. Small quiet
park, friendly neighbors. Pool and
spa. Seniors age 55/40. Ask about
open house. $72,000. Sue Fox,
Realtor-Cell (760)-917-4220, or (760)-
753-1086.
Reader Advisory: the National Trade
Association we belong to has pur-
chased the following classifieds.
Determining the value of their serv-
ice or product is advised by this pub-
lication. In order to avoid misunder-
standings, some advertisers do not
offer “employment” but rather sup-
ply the readers with manuals, direc-
tories and other materials designed
to help their clients establish mail
order selling and other businesses at
home. Under NO circumstance
should you send any money in
advance or give the client your
checking, license ID, or credit card
numbers. Also beware of ads that
claim to guarantee loans regardless
of credit and note that if a credit
repair company does business only
over the phone it’s illegal to request
any money before delivering its serv-
ice. All funds are based in US dol-
lars. 800 numbers may or may not
reach Canada.
PREGNANT? CONSIDERING
ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency
specializing in matching birthmoth-
ers with families nationwide. LIV-
ING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7.
Abby's One True Gift Adoptions. 866-
910-5610.
WANTED JAPANESE MOTORCY-
CLES KAWASAKI,1970-1980, Z1-
900, KZ900, KZ1000, H2-750, H1-500,
S1-250, S2-250, S2-350, S3-400. CASH
PAID. 1-800-772-1142. 1-310-721-
0726.
CAMPING MEMBERSHIP: Coast to
coast USA/Canada. $8.00/night (full
hook-up), paid $2595, illness forces
sale, $595. 1-800-236-0327
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. 30
Candy Machines, $5995. Call now! 1-
800-536-4514, (Void SD,CT, MD)
ABSOLUTELY ALL CASH! Do you
earn $800/day? Vending route. 30
machines + candy. $9,995. 1-800-807-
6485. (Void/SD,CT,MD)
A NEW COMPUTER NOW. Brand
Name. Bad or NO Credit - No prob-
lem. Smallest weekly payments
available. Call NOW 800-838-7127
GET A NEW COMPUTER Brand
name laptops & desktops. BAD or
NO credit - no problem. Smallest
weekly payments avail. It's Yours
NOW 1-800-624-1557.
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast,
affordable, accredited. FREE
brochure. Call now! 1-800-532-6546,
ext. 532
www.continentalacademy.com
* REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! * -
Get a 4-room, all-digital satellite sys-
tem installed for FREE and program-
ming starting under $20. Free Digital
Video Recorders to new clients. So
call now, 1-800-795-3579.
GOVERNMENT JOBS. $12-
$48.00/Hour, full benefits. Paid train-
ing. Administrative, Security, More!
FT/PT. 1-800-320-9353.
MYSTERY SHOPPERS! Earn up to
$150 daily. Get paid to shop pt/ft.
Call now 800-690-1272.
$$$ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!
Injury Lawsuit dragging? Need $500
- $500,000++ within 48 hours? Call 1-
877-386-3692, www.casepay.com
IRS TAX Problems? Settle for less-
Eliminate penalties, interest charges
& tax liens. Confidential FREE con-
sultation 1-800-383-5270
BURIED IN CREDIT CARD DEBT.
We can save you thousands & lower
your monthly payments! Call Debt
Relief Hotline for your FREE consul-
tation. 800-399-2410.
NEW TOMCAT BLUEBERRY
PLANTS AVAILABLE FROM AMER-
ICAN BLUEBERRY CO. FOR HAR-
DINESS ZONES 3,4,5! Huge cash
crop needs very little land. 1 acre
can yield 4000-7000 lbs. of blueber-
ries. A small 1/4 acre plot can yield a
very attractive income. Blueberries
sell in stores and Farmers Markets
for about $3.99/lb. YOU DO THE
MATH! TomCat Blueberries can be
planted for $8-$9/per bush. Order
now for fall planting! 715-549-6630.
Starter package/12 bushes as little
as $179+SH. Lower prices on higher
quantity. www.americanblueber-
rycompany.com
VIAGRA/CIALIS, VIAGRA/CIALIS.
Save $300 40 for $99.00. 888-942-
2262, 24/7. www.WESAVEON-
DRUGS.COM
Health & Fitness
For Sale
Financial
Employment
Electronics
Education
Computers
Business Opportunities
Automotive
Adoption
National Trade Ads
Mobilehomes
Homes
Duplexes
Condos/Townhouses
Real Estate 700
Studio/Cottage (Unfurn)
Houses (Unfurn)
LCHOMES.COM
LCHOMES.COM
La Costa Sales & Rentals, Inc.
7720-C El Camino Real, Carlsbad
760-436-5111
Property
Management
Sales - Leasing
Unfurnished Rentals
Furnished Rentals
Vacation & Short Term
Listings & Sales
In La Costa Since 1982
Efficient & Competitive
See Photos & Info on
Available Properties at
Houses (Unfurn)
Condos/Townhouse (Unfurn)
Room For Rent
Rentals 600
Business Oppor. 475
Help Wanted 400
Misc. Services 350
Home Services 325
Items Wanted
Sporting Goods
National Trade Ads National Trade Ads Real Estate 700 Rentals 600 Help Wanted 400 Items For Sale 200
MEMBER:
CALIFORNIA
LANDSCAPE
CONTRACTORS
ASSOCIATION
License #C27 869193
European
Potager Children’s Garden
C
ottage
COME BY THE DES I GN STUDI O AND S EE WHAT WE CAN DO F OR YOU!
OPEN BY APPOI NTMENT ONLY - AVAI LABLE F OR TOURS .
Creating gardens with a 'sense of place', and a philosophy that
every landscape in our vast world is unique. It is important
when we create gardens to first 'read the landscape' and learn
from what we see. Your garden should reflect your own
individual personalitiy, with the realization that your garden
can be both theraputic and healing in nature. Gardens, above
all, can teach us to see what is really important, and
can help us slow our lives down!
Trish
MAKING YOUR DREAMS A REALITY...
Design Studio & Display Gardens
1236 Urania, Encinitas
760-634-1462
Call my
mommy.
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS AUG. 1, 2008
29
Automotive 900 Automotive 900 Automotive 900 National Trade Ads National Trade Ads National Trade Ads
CAN YOU DIG IT? Heavy
Equipment School. 3 wk training
program. Backhoes, Bulldozers,
Trackhoes. Local job placement asst.
Start digging dirt NOW. Toll free 866-
362-6497
SECRET SHOPPERS NEEDED -
Paid to Pose as Customer, Evaluate
Services of Local Stores, Restaurants
& Theaters. Flexible hours, no expe-
rience necessary, training provided.
1-800-585-9024,Ext.6750.
1000 ENVELOPES = $6000 GUAR-
ANTEED! Receive $6 for every enve-
lope stuffed. 24hr information. 1-866-
861-0703, code11.
ASSEMBLE MAGNETS & CRAFTS
FROM HOME! Year-round Work!
Excellent Pay! No Experience! TOLL
FREE 1-866-844-5091, No-MD
$8000 GUARANTEED! Receive $8
for every envelope stuffed with our
sales material. 24/hr. Information 1-
877-220-4470.
$CASH FOR GOLD$. We buy Gold,
Silver & Platinum. Get Cash NOW!
Highest Payouts - Satisfaction
Guaranteed. 888-245-4517.
AIRLINES ARE HIRING: Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified - Job place-
ment assistance. Aviation Institute
of Maintenance. 888-349-5387.
OLD GUITARS WANTED! Fender,
Gibson, Gretsch, Martin. 1930s -
1960s. Top cash paid. 1-800-401-0440.
POST OFFICE NOW HIRING. Avg.
$20/hr. $57K/yr. including Fed.
Benefits, OT. Placed by adSource, not
USPS who hires. 1-866-483-1057
$$CASH$$ - Immediate cash for
structured Settlements, Annuities,
Lawsuits, Inheritances, Mortgage
Notes & Cash Flows. J.G. Wentworth
#1. 1-800-794-7310.
NEED A LOAN? No credit - BAD
credit - Bankruptcy - Repossession -
Personal Loans - Auto Loans -
Consolidation Loans AVAILABLE!
"We have been helping people with
credit problems since 1991". Call 1-
800-654-1816.
A NEW COMPUTER NOW. Brand-
Name laptops & desktops. Bad or NO
Credit - No problem. Smallest week-
ly payments available. It's yours
NOW. Call 800-932-4501
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from
home. Medical, Business, Paralegal,
Computers, Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance. Computer
available. Financial aid if qualified.
Call 800-494-3586
www.CenturaOnline.com
DIRECTV Satellite Television,
FREE Equipment, FREE 4 room
installation, FREE HD or DVR
Receiver Upgrade. Packages from
$29.99/mo. Call Direct Sat TV for
details. 1-888-455-9515.
STOP SWIMMING IN CHLORINE!
Non-Chemical Pool/Spa Purifiers:
The Healthy alternative to chemi-
cals. Information @ www.life-
guardsystems.com or 1-800-6PURI-
FY. 10% Disc. + FREE Shipping w/ad
GOVT FORECLOSED HOMES! Low
$ down! Call now! 800-498-8619
TEXAS LAND SALE! 20-acre
Ranches near BOOMING El Paso.
Good road access. ONLY $14,900,
$200/down, $145 per mo. Money Back
Guarantee. No credit checks. 1-800-
755-8953, www.sunsetranches.com
NC MOUNTAINS. Incredible views,
mountain cabins, riverfront . . . We've
got it all! 2.2acs. w/new log cabin
shell, only $99,900. Financing. 1-828-
652-8700
TENNESSEE MOUNTAIN
ACREAGE. 2 acre beautiful home-
site. Million $ view! Secluded, utili-
ties, overlooking Tennessee River,
close to Marina, Schools, Shopping!
$49,900, low down, owner financing!
330-699-1585.
TIMESHARE RESALES: Save 60-
80% Off Retail! BEST RESORTS &
SEASONS. Call for FREE TIME-
SHARE MAGAZINE! 1-800-780-
3158. HOLIDAYGROUP.COM/IFPA
1987 CADILLAC DEVILLE Runs
great, registered through June 2009 &
smogged. $1,150 OBO. (760) 712-7054
1993 FORD ESCORT LX Station
Wagon. White, new timing belt & bat-
tery, Smogged until Oct. 09. $1,150.
(760) 943-6997
1993 NISSAN SENTRA 125k, auto, air,
ps, 2door, vgc, smogged. $2450.00 or
best (858)922-7649
1993 TOYOTA COROLLA DX 4 door, sil-
ver, automatic. Runs and looks great.
212K mi. $2,300 (760) 940-0078
1993TURBOCHARGED HONDA DEL
SOL with profession greddy turbo and
exhaust. 140K. blue, automatic, alarm,
keyless entry, & much more. good gas
mileage, quick and reliable. Removable
top. $4200 obo (714)357-9376
1994 BMW 325 4-door, automatic,
leather, runs perfect, $3,995. (760) 224-
2020.
1998 ACURA INTEGRA GS Silver
exterior, black leather interior, auto-
matic, air, sunroof, cd player, full power,
92,000 miles. Looks great, runs great,
and gets excellent gas mileage. Job
relocation forces sale. $5,395. Partial
financing may be available. (760) 436-
3848 or (760-420-2745 (cell)
1981 EL CAMINO Auto trans, A/C,
power steering & brakes, recent
rebuild, new tires, smogged, 09 tags.
$2,500. (760) 967-4314.
1998 HONDA PASSPORT 6 cylinder,
2-wheel drive. automatic transmis-
sion, sports utility, A-1 condition,
red. $3,800 OBO. (760) 967-0920.
1999 SATURN LS 4-door, automatic,
interior and exterior in almost per-
fect condition. sun roof 72000 miles!
maintenace kept up. white exterior,
gray interior. Salvaged title. accident
at 16000 miles. no problems since.
$2500 or best offer. Call 858-945-1220
(cell)
2000 C70 COVERTIBLE HT.
Venetian red, black top, tan leather.
Many options. 74Kmiles. KBB
$14,750. Will take best offer. Jim.
(760)436-7586
2000 MERCEDES S500 Black metal-
lic exterior, grey leather interior,
fully loaded, 6 cd bose system, navi-
gation, front and rear heated and
power seats, excellent condition,
always garaged, very low mileage
52,500 miles, $21,500 (760) 802-6719
2000 VOLVO C70, CONV. Venetian
Red, black top, leather interior,
74Kmiles. $14,500/0B0. Jim (760)436-
7586
2001 CONVERTIBLE Chrysler
sebring limited. Top of the line.
Immaculate inside and out. White
with cream leather interior. Looks
great and you will too driving this
beauty. Loaded with all options. 1
owner. All service records. Owners
manual. Free carfax report available.
$100 referral commission $8390 obo.
Kelley Blue Book $11045. (760)510-
9351
2001 TOYOTA COROLLA LE
Silver/gray interior. Auto, A/C, power
windows, door locks, steering with
cruise control & tilt. Original owner
with perfect car report, all mainte-
nance records & always garaged, 30-
35 mpg. Only 96k miles. $6,250 OBO.
(760) 809-4657.
2002 TOYOTA 4-RUNNER 61,000
miles, fully loaded, dark green with
tan interior, perfect condition, looks
great, runs perfect. $11,400 OBO.
(760) 458-1071.
2003 PORSCHE BOXSTER S
Absolutely mint. 27,500 original
miles. Guards red with black leather
interior. All the standard “s”
upgrades including 17” wheels and
large red brake calipers. This car is a
real head turner. Garaged, immacu-
late. See picts @ $34,500
h t t p : / / www. f l i c k r. c o m/ p h o -
tos/28183771@N08/ (619) 890-9600
2004 FORD MUSTANG
CONVERTIBLE Silver w/ Black
Leather and Top, V6, Automatic,
Mach Sound w/ CD Changer, All
Power, Rear Spoiler, 16” Alloys,
Alarm. 50K Miles. $11,500. (760)822-
9418
2004 HONDA ACCORD EX COUPE
One Owner w/ 12K Miles! Silver w/
Black Leather, 240 HP V6 (rated at
30 MPG hwy), 6-Spd, Moonroof,
Heated Seats, CD Changer, Climate
Control, Traction Control, ABS, 17”
Alloys, Loaded and Clean. $15,850
(760)822-9418
2004 LEXUS ES330 Silver w/ Gray
Leather, V6, Automatic, Moonroof,
Navigation, CD Changer, 6 Airbags,
Wood Steering Wheel and Trim,
Heated Seats, Rear Sunshade, All
Power, Loaded, Factory Warranty,
One Owner w/ 66K Miles. $15,950.
(760)822-9418
2004 VOLVO C70 HT
CONVERTIBLE Very RARE Color
Combo!! Black Sapphire Metallic w/
Volcano Red Leather. 2.3L Turbo,
Automatic, Heated Seats and Every
Avail Option. One Owner w/ 39K
Miles. $20K (760)822-9418
1997 HONDA CIVIC EX VTEX, 2-
door, 5 speed, white, power every-
thing, runs good & looks good. $7,000
OBO. (760) 484-3229.
2005 JAGUAR X-TYPE, 26K MILES
1 original owner since 9/05. British
racing green/tan leather. Rare 5 spd
manual trans. Full power, cd. Perfect
condition/carfax. under jaguar war-
ranty and maintenance plan until
9/09. Must see! $16,900 (858) 756-
7892
2005 PONTIAC GTO Modern Day
Muscle Car. 400 hp 6.0L, Automatic,
Gray w/ Black Leather, Loaded, 17”
Alloys, Rear Spoiler, Fast and
Smooth. One Owner w/ 35K Miles.
All Stock. $18,500. (760)822-9418
2005 TOYOTA SOLARA
CONVERTIBLE SE. 225 H.P. V6,
Automatic, AM/FM/CD, PW/PL/PM,
White w/ Gray Sport Cloth Seats and
Black Power Cloth Top, 17” Alloys,
Rear Spoiler, Fog Lights, Remote,
Alarm, Factory Warranty, 30k Miles.
$17,500. (760)822-9418
2005 VOLVO S60 2.5T One Owner w/
18K miles still under factory warran-
ty. 210 hp Turbo, Blue w/ Beige
Leather, Moonroof, Automatic w/
Sport Shift, Rear Parking Sensors,
All Power, 6 Airbags. Over $35K new.
Safe, Sporty only $17,750. (760)822-
9418
2006 LINCOLN ZEPHYR V6, Auto,
Moonroof, Gray w/ Light Gray
Leather, Heated & Cooled Seats, 6
CD Changer, Chrome Wheels, 24K
Miles. Over $34K New. $17,950
(760)822-9418
2006 MAZDA6 S WAGON One
Owner w/ 15K Miles! 215 hp V6 (27
MPG), Automatic w/ Sport Shift,
Silver w/ Gray Cloth, CD Changer,
ABS, Traction Control, All Power, 17”
Alloys, 50K Full Warranty. $14,500.
(760)822-9418
2007 HONDA ACCORD LX SEDAN
2.4L (33 MPG), Automatic, Medium
Blue w/ Gray Cloth. AM/FM/CD, 6
Airbags, All Power, Warranty. 25K
Miles. Only $15,950. (760)822-9418
300 DIESEL 1978 2 owner diesel
Mercedes sedan excellent shape.
great mpg $3450 or best (760)522-
7785
87 VW CABRIOLET white con-
vert,101,000 orig miles, everything
works/runs great. $2,700./OBO. The
perfect car for sunny cali. (760)445-
8729
AUTO 1996 Lincoln Mark VIII Pearl
White 59K Miles. Excellent
Condition looks and runs like new.
Original owner all service records.
Garaged $5,500 OBO. (760) 599-6587
BLACK 1987 BMW 535.1 SERIES
(5speed fully powered), major tuned
up just done with new tyres and
reams, comes with remotes for alarm
system and jvc am/fm cd player.
Selling for $3000 obo. Genuine buy-
ers, please call 760-521-5079 anytime
ELECTRIC CAR 02 Chrysler GEM
bought in 2003 N. E. V. Less than 3K
mi. No $4.00 gas. $6500 (760)722-
5625
MERCEDES, 95, E320, Grn/Tan,
247,900 miles $3500. twr8899@hot-
mail.com
NISSAN 94 MAXIMA SE Tan exteri-
or, 145K, one owner, runs great.
$1,300. (760) 940-1929
TOYOTA PASEO 1992 - 2-door, auto-
matic, great gas mileage, 4 cylinders,
$2,600. (760) 224-2020.
’95 LEXUS LS 400 Immaculate,
125,000 mi, garaged, $9,700/best
(760) 744-7740
2000 TOYOTA CAMRY Lots of new -
air, 3-stack radio, custom wheels.
$4,000 OBO. (760) 967-0920.
1988 DODGE OMNI 4-door, 5 speed,
runs excellent, one owner. $1,450.
(760) 630-4200
79 CHEVY BLAZER 4X4 on 44”
Super Swamper tires, nice truck,
must sell! (949)350-3168
1998 FORD EXPLORER LIMITED
Beautiful pearl white SUV. Loaded
to the max! Bra, new battery 6 disc
changer, leather, sunroof, etc., etc.
Must sell now. $7,000. 760-753-4155
(760)604-4155
2003 DODGE DURANGO V8
Excellent conditions, Metallic
Charcoal, Dual Power Seats, Rear Air
Conditioner, Front Bucket Seats,
Third Row Seats, Leather Interior,
Remote Mirror Control, Luggage
Rack, Running Boards, 2008 plates,
90K miles. PRICE LOWERED to
$8700 OBO! (858)205-2712 Steve
2003 GMC YUKON A gorgeous black
2003 gmc yukon sport utility 4d.
Absolutely no scratches on this vehi-
cle, and it has a spotless record. This
car has a 5.3 liter v8 engine with
72,000 miles on it. 15,500 obo (760)
908-2484
2003 YUKON 4X4 Desireable blue,
captain seats, 7 pass, tan leather, tow
pkg, 67,000 miles, CD, custom
wheels, very clean $19,250/obo
(760)613-6572
2006 CADILLAC ESCALADE A gor-
geous shale 2006 cadillac escalade
sport utility 4d. Absolutely no
scratches on this vehicle, and it has a
spotless record. This car has a 6.0
liter v8 engine with 44000 miles on it.
26,900 obo (760) 908-2484
2006 TOYOTA TUNDRA LIMITED 4
D 2006 toyota Tundra limited, 4 door,
white, electric aluminum tonneau
cover. 18,000 miles! Leather, sunroof,
6 disc cd changer. beautiful truck!!
$27,500 (858) 349-9977
2007 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4 SPORT
V6, Automatic, 4WD, White w/ Gray
Cloth, All Power, AC, Cruise, Tilt,
AM/FM/CD, Traction Control, ABS,
Alloys, Fog Lights, Roof Rack,
Factory Warranty, 32k miles. $12,850.
(760)822-9418
SUV FOR SALE blue toyota high-
lander 2003 with moon rack, 80000
milages in good condition, must see,
$1,2000 (760)481-4374
FORD RANGER XLT 2001 Very good
condition, 55,000 mileage, auto.
Transm 3.0l v6, a/c, radio/cd, p/w etc
5,999 obo. (760) 560-7996
FORD SPORT TRAC 2003 18000$
Great little Truck /SUV only 57k
miles. White, clean inside and out.
Make Offer!! 760.942.9887
FORD XLT ESCAPE V6 very good
mpg. Excellent condition. New tires.
One owner. No accidents.
Immaculate interior. CD player, a/c,
power windows. Average mileage.
$6,700 or best offer. (760) 846-2772
REFRIGERATOR TRUCK 16 FT
BOX Restored -1971 Ford F-600 3
axle 8 spd gas 352 indus eng low orig
miles 16 ft referbox steel plate for
use for storage, heavy equipment
transport — runs.excellent -wimbil-
ton white $9000.00 obo (310)902-9940
1988 FORD F-350 super duty 460
engine 8cyl 2 wd 5 spd manual
rebuilt trans/motor dual tanks $4000.
(760)270-0689
’06 RANGE ROVER SUPER-
CHARGED, DVD,
annwaltonn@msn.com, 36K!
1973 DODGE B-100_SURF VAN 2nd
owner 49K orig. mi, 318 eng, 2 barrel
carb, fact AC, 3 spd with Hurst shifter
on floor, red, pro resto-dual spot-
lights, slotted alum mags. $5300.00
obo (310)902-9940
ISUZU, AMIGO Hatch Back Hard
Top with side windows for an Isuzu
Amigo, Fiber glass, can be painted to
match /easy installation with bolts/
Very Good Condition, Located in San
Marcos, $199.00 OBO (760)744-0699
Accessories
Vans
Trucks & SUVs
Trucks & SUVs
Cars Cars
Cars
Automotive 900
Vacation
Real Estate
Real Estate
Pools/Spas
Miscellaneous
Miscellaneous
Help Wanted
DIRECTORY
• Car Accidents
• Slips & Falls
• Workers Comp.
MICHAEL MAJDICK, ESQ.
800-427-4288
FREE CONSULTATION
NO FEE TILL RECOVERY!
Call 760-436-9737 to place an ad on this page
Call today!
To place your ad
on this page
WINDOW CLEANING
WINDOW
CLEANING
Established 20 Years
CLEARTECH WINDOW CLEANING
Toll Free: 877-778-3359
• Affordable
• Free Estimates
• Uniformed Staff
• Squeeky Clean Finish
ATTORNEYS
• 20 Years Experience
• Reasonable Rates
• Free Estimates
NEED HELP?
CALL DAN at 760
271-5285
MAN
DAN
THE HANDY
HANDYMAN
PAINTING
CONCRETE
CONCRETE
Foundation • Driveways • Walkways
Custom Finishes • Brick and Stone
Masonry • Bobcat / 5 yd. Dump Truck
Tile • Counters • Showers • Floors
760-434-0855
Lic. #612956
Clean • Strip • Seal • Polish • Wax • Buff • Steam
RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL
Stone • Wood • Cement • Marble • Brick • Tile
Pavers • Carpets
Free Estimates • Phone quotes • 7 days-24 hrs.
BONDED • LICENSED • INSURED • CREDIT CARDS
Serving all of San Diego County
Call Now
1-800-775-2637
www.floormastr.com
FLOOR CLEANING & WAXING
Lic #719081
HOUSE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
760-747-7323
858-571-7323
www.ocshousepainting.com
PAINTING
Exterior Specialist
Powerwashing • Stucco Repair
Edward J. Faulkner Owner/Contractor
760-504-1414
Lic. #792234 • Bonded • Free Estimates
FREE ESTIMATES
NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED EVER!
SUMMERTIME
Let the Sun
Shine in!
760-917-0663
Call Steve Williams
Residential/Commercial
Very Reasonable Rates
“2nd generation window washer.”
• Sills • Screens
WINDOW
WASHING
Available - Homes
Powerwashed
YOGA
Yoga Instruction
Teacher is certified in both Vinyasa Flow
(White Lotus Foundation) and Chopra
Yoga (Chopra Center.)
$
150/1hour
Please call
760.889.4305
for information or appt.
in your home
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 30 AUG. 1, 2008
Sell your car at any price, or any one item $150
or less for FREE! Go online to:
www. coastnewsgroup.com.
or call our free ad hotline at 760-436-1070
Deadline is Monday at 4 p.m.
CLASSIFIEDS
PRIVATE
PARTY ONLY
FREE
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 31 AUG. 1, 2008
• U-Do-It Scrub
• We-Do-It Scrub
• Health Food • Toys & Gear
• Outstanding Groomer
• Training Classes
We have carefully selected
the Food, Treats, Toys and
Shampoos that will have
the right nutrients in the
right proportions which
are indispensable to
keeping your dog healthy.
Torrey Hills Center / Carmel Valley
4639 Carmel Mountain Rd. #101 San Diego, CA 92130
858.259.DOGS (3647)
dirtydogsandmeow.com
GRAND OPENING AUGUST 9 & 10!
Visit Our
Dog Park!
FREE
New customers only.
With this coupon. Expires 9-1-08
GALLON
of MILK
need milk?
ALTA DENA HOME DELIVERY
• No minimum order • No contract • No delivery charge!
www.MoonlightMilk.com
Serving San Diego County since 2002
1.800.milk123 x 515
Low Price Guarantee!
50%
OFF
With this coupon.
Expires 8-18-08
One free class coupon
one four week session
In the Moonlight Plaza at
345 S. Coast Hwy. 101
Suite K, Encinitas
Most clients lose 6 inches, 4-8 pounds and 5% body fat.
Lose weight and feel great! Call today to register 760.889.3097
Classes are for all levels and ages
“It’s not just a workout, it’s a lifestyle.”
Bikini Blast Boot Camp
at Moonlight Beach
Meet at the snack bar on
M, W, F at 6am and 7am
FREE
CAR
WASH
$
30 Value
100% Hand-Washed
Inside & Outside
With purchase of complete detail
Not valid with any other offer.
Must mention this ad. Exp. 8-31-08
any Complete Detail
Valued at $225 or more.
$
25 off
THE BEST DETAIL YOU
WILL EVER GET!!!
zimmsdetail.com
Autos • Boats • RV’s • Homes • Driveways • Decks
WE ARE
COMPLETELY
MOBILE
Home, office, or
residential and
commercial accounts.
WE DO FLEET
WASHING
ZIMMS DETAIL
760-717-2185
STRETCHING THERAPY
50%
OFF
Redeem this coupon for half
off your first session with
Judd. Expires 8-18-08
Got Stress, Pain &
Stiff, Achy Joints?
In-home Stretching Pain Relief Therapy
(studio appts avail.)
FITNESSANDBODYWORK.COM
858.442.6861
“For over 15 years I’ve helped thousands of peo-
ple look and feel their best. I guarantee you will
feel amazing after just one session with me.”
Judd Handler
Licensed Massage Therapist,
Fitness Trainer, Nutrition Coach
!"#$
$
10.00
OFF
PATAGONI A • SANI TA • ACORN • CHACO
of Encinitas
745 S. Coast Hwy. 101 Lumberyard, Encinitas • 760-942-2177


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BI RKENSTOCK • MERRELL • ARCOPEDI CO
Purchase of
$75 or more
Not to be combined with any other
discount. Must present coupon
with purchase. Expires 8-18-08


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Now available at
END OF SEASON
CLEARANCE SALE
Huge Savings All Week
BOTTLE
OF WINE
1/2 OFF
All bottles are 1/2 off
7 Days a Week!
1506 Encini tas Blvd. • Encini tas , • 760-943-7243
1 CLASS
FREE
First time clients only. With
coupon. Not valid with any
other offer. Expires 8-31-08
Self-Respect • Self-Control • Self-Defense • Discipline
Confidence • Stretching • Stress Relief • Weight Control
Tae Kwon Do is the Korean martial art. Which
the native Korean people have grown up with
throughout history. It creates spiritual balance
through physical activity. It originated from
the efforts to balance mind and body through
harmony of power, actions an the need to
control the mind.
Master
Hyun Kang
25 YEARS OF TEACHING EXPERIENCE
981 Lomas Santa Fe Dr.,
#C, Solana Beach
858.350.9003
$
10
off
Expires 8-15-08
on second tree
purchased
FRUIT
TREE
FRUIT
TREES
Large variety of fruit trees that
produce well along coast and
inland. Also lilacs, brugmansias,
grapes. Samples of fruit in
season: nectarines, bananas,
sapotes, and grapes.
760.944.7277
solman@cox.net
solman.com
RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS 32 AUG. 1, 2008
Every Day Is A Vacation At Santaluz
Santaluz, California
Located adjacent to prestigious Rancho Santa Fe and just a few miles east of the
renowned Del Mar Torrey Pines Beaches, the private gate-guarded golf community of
Santaluz offers you an unprecedented lifestyle on the Pacific Coast. The world class
Rees-Jones golf course meanders the community offering amazing ocean and mountain
views to La Jolla and the Pacific and both a challenging and playable game. Hacienda
Santaluz, part of the expansive 3,800 acre village, offers amenities including hiking,
biking, walking on the 11 acre village green, resort style pool, Pro Shop, hardwood
basketball court, performance stage, a fitness center, tennis courts, alfresco dining at the
Roast Coffee Shop and even a Camp Santaluz for the young ones. The sensational 35,000 sq. ft. Santaluz Clubhouse
rising on its knoll above the 18th green with panoramic views beckons you to a world of casual elegance, peace, quiet,
and relaxation. Here you are pampered from fine dining to the therapeutic world-class spa treatments. Embrace where
the indoor and outdoor lifestyles come together. Be on vacation everyday at Santaluz. Visit the virtual home tours of
these three homes.
Prices from the low $1,000,000s to under $3,000,000
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Berkshire Hathaway Company
Chairman’s
Circle Platinum
Legend Award
Recipient
Robyn
Raskind
Cell 858.229.9131
www.RobynRaskind.com
rraskind@san.rr.com
Member of Fine Homes, Architectural & Estate Divisions
2008 5-Star Client Satisfaction – San Diego Magazine

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