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TOWN OF LONG LAKE

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
2 Town of Long Lake

Acknowledgments

Advisory Committee:

Clay Arsenault Biz Noonan


Richard Dechene Ally Parent
Liz Forsell Rachel Pohl
Kenneth Hawks Alex Roalsvig
Tim Helms Craig Seaman
Hillarie Logan-Dechene Noelle Short
Ed Meelan Lukasz Stryszowski
Barbara Taylor

Funded By: Project Consultants:


Comprehensive Plan 3

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements 2
Table of Contents 3
Introduction 4
Project Background and Planning Process 6
Review of Relevant Planning Initiatives 8
Inventory and Analysis of Existing Conditions 11
Public Participation 16
Vision Statement 22
Goals and Recommendations 25
Recreation 28
Infrastructure 33
Critical Services 36
Economic Development and Tourism 38
Environmental Resources 43
Housing 46
Transportation 48
Community Services and Municipal Operations 50
Hamlet Beautification and Initiatives 54
Quality of Life 55
Town-wide Improvements Map and Hamlets Maps 58
Implementation 62
Funding 63
Partners 64
Recommendations Matrix 66
Appendix A: Existing Conditions 83
Appendix B: Public Engagement 96
4 Town of Long Lake

Introduction

What is a Comprehensive Plan? Project Initiation:

A Comprehensive Plan is a document that provides Long Lake applied for competitive funding from NYS
direction for local government policy and future Empire State Development (NYS ESD) to prepare a
actions. A Comprehensive Plan is an opportunity for Comprehensive Plan in 2018. In late 2018 NYS an-
a community to take stock of the issues and oppor- nounced that the grant application was successful,
tunities it faces, to identify residents’ shared vision and the Town was awarded funding from the state
for the future, and to provide recommendations to combine with additional local funds. The Town
and strategies to guide the Town to in pursuing its developed a Request for Proposals and solicited
goals for the future. This Comprehensive Plan is qualified consultants to propose approaches to the
important because it will help ensure that the Town planning process. Upon selecting the preferred con-
of Long Lake evolves in line with residents’ collective tractor, the Town formed a Comprehensive Plan Ad-
vision for the community. It will help set priorities for visory Committee (hereafter “Advisory Committee”)
investments in infrastructure, capital improvements, and started work developing an actionable plan that
and economic development initiatives. would guide Town decisions for the next 20 years.
Comprehensive Plan 5

About Long Lake:

Long Lake is a rural community located in Hamilton


County, one of the least densely populated regions of
New York State. Completely within the Adirondack Park,
Long Lake contains a mix of public and private lands
interspersed with a remarkable collection of lakes, riv-
ers, and waterways. The Town of Long Lake contains two
hamlets, Long Lake to the east and Raquette Lake to the
west. (Hamlets are unincorporated communities without
independent municipal governments, they are unofficial
places within a Town. For the purposes of this document
the Town of Long Lake, which contains both hamlets is
referred to as "Long Lake"). People have been drawn to
Long Lake for generations as a place to recreate and visit,
and a select group have decided to call Long Lake their
“No matter how
permanent home. Those that have settled in Long Lake much you plan, it is
express a deep affection for the tight-knit community, the
beautiful setting, and the rural lifestyle, but life in Long tenacity, unyielding
Lake is not without its challenges. Housing, year-round
employment, access to groceries and healthcare, unreli- desire to succeed,
able broadband, and a shrinking population are several
of the challenges facing Long Lakers. Residents generally and the ability to
enjoy Long Lake as it is. Residents would like to see more
young families, a balanced year-round economy, reliable cope with change
internet service, a supportive climate to establish new
small businesses, and the continued protection of the that will eventually
Town’s environmental resources.
prevail.”
Intended Outcomes of the Planning Process:

The intended outcome of this planning process is the
identification of a shared vision for the Town’s future, the

establishment of goals necessary that support the shared -Perry Payne
vision, a series of detailed recommendations and strat-
egies to meet those goals, and finally a suite of options
that the Town can consider to implement the recommen-
dations. This plan recognizes that Long Lake has limited
capacity and resources to employ in pursuit of the various
recommendations. As it always has, the success of Long
Lake as a community will rely on the work of dedicated
Town staff, volunteers, and strategic partnerships with
key businesses, state agencies, and community groups.

This document is not intended to serve as a “silver bullet”


that will resolve all the issues facing Long Lake. It does
provide a series of recommendations and strategies that
could incrementally shape the course of the Town’s fu-
ture. Through perseverance and diligence, the Town can
take steps towards reaching its long-term goals.
6 Town of Long Lake

Project Background and Planning Process


The Planning Process
“Long Lake was a hard
Developing a Comprehensive Plan is a process
requiring detailed analysis, public engagement,
place to live in and yet it
and multiple rounds of feedback from project had many comforts. We
partners and the community at large. Background
information is gathered through the review of pri-
had six months of winter,
or planning efforts, researching existing environ- that was a dreary time,
mental and demographic conditions, and solicit-
ing input from a broad section of the community. the summer came, it was
With funding from NYS Empire State Develop- so pleasant we forgot all
ment (ESD), the Town of Long Lake created an
Advisory Committee that consisted of residents, about the long winter”
business owners, property owners, recreational
enthusiasts, municipal staff, and stakeholders
from community organizations. The Advisory – Livonia Stanton, Resident
Committee was tasked with overseeing the plan-
ning process.
of Long Lake, 1849
The Advisory Committee employed a variety of
outreach techniques to encourage participation
by a broad range of community members appro-
priate for the Town’s unique demographics. Long
• Initial identification of “Issues and Opportuni-
Lake has a small and dispersed population that
ties.”
is divided east-west by the Town of Indian Lake
• Review of prior local and regional planning
and the Hamlet of Blue Mountain Lake. Driving
efforts that provided knowledge of existing
through Town between the Hamlet of Long Lake
initiatives and a foundation for addressing
and the Hamlet of Raquette Lake takes at least
local and regional issues.
30 minutes. Further complicating the public
• An inventory and analysis of the existing
engagement process is the seasonality of many
conditions, which examined current popula-
of the people who call Long Lake home; some
tion trends, the local economy, land use and
claim Long Lake as their permanent residence
ecological features, and the availability of
but spend considerable portions of the winter
community services and utilities.
elsewhere. Other Long Lake seasonal residents
• Public participation events, which included
have multi-generational connections to the com-
stakeholder interviews, two focus groups
munity, which has imbued families with a sense
sessions, participation at the Long Lake and
of permanence in Long Lake. Considering these
Raquette Lake winter carnivals, and an online,
unique circumstances, the development of the
mail-in, or pick up and drop off survey.
Comprehensive Plan relied upon a multi-faceted
• The project team (Town staff and consultants)
public engagement strategy.
conducted several site visits accompanied by
Advisory Committee members to gain famil-
The Advisory Committee began meeting in the
iarity with the Town. These site visits were
Autumn of 2019 and conducted or oversaw the
invaluable to developing an understanding of
following:
Comprehensive Plan 7

Issues and Opportunities

At the first meeting, the Advisory Committee met with the Town staff and the planning consultants who would be
facilitating the planning process. The Advisory Committee discussed the planning process, the desired outcomes,
and, most importantly, established a preliminary list of “Issues and Opportunities” that would help guide the re-
view of relevant planning initiatives, the land use and demographic research, and the development of many of the
survey questions. Most Advisory Committee members spent decades working, running businesses, raising fami-
lies, and volunteering in the Town, which allowed them to provide some of the most holistic views on the issues
Long Lake is facing. The following table highlights the main issues and opportunities identified at the first Advisory
Committee meeting.

Issues Opportunities
The cost of the Long Lake school district is high, but Renewed enthusiasm and energy from community
it is a vital community asset members

There are fewer businesses than there were 10, 20, There are new young people are moving into town with
or 30 years ago families, businesses, and ideas. This wasn’t the case five
years ago
The high cost of real estate is prohibitive for many Business retention and attraction of even a few would
young families. Many are moving to other more be very helpful
affordable communities like Tupper Lake.

There are not many conveniences like fresh food Vacant business locations are available for reuse
and jobs that do not require a long commute.

Local businesses have limited access to capital for The expansion of shoulder season activities
improvements and growth
Physical divide between Raquette and Long Lake Growing interest in diversifying recreational offerings
makes for two distinctive communities (mountain biking, jeep trails, etc.)
There is a sense of ‘stagnation’ Telecommuting and ‘project work’ (i.e. in the digital age,
skilled workers living in Long Lake can work on projects
remotely via the internet)
The lack of municipally owned land at Raquette Lake Large number of skilled residents who have had careers
for community facilities such as bathrooms in diverse fields and moved (back) to Town
Inconsistent internet and cell service in various por- Numerous active community groups and lake associa-
tions of the Town, particularly Raquette Lake. tions
Reactive instead of proactive planning

Lack of resilient power infrastructure in Town (a


back-up generator in Newcomb only services as far
as Blue Mountain Lake)
8 Town of Long Lake

Review of Relevant Planning Initiatives

Recognizing that many Advisory Committee members since recreation and tourism are becoming the primary
and other residents have already contributed their time economic drivers of the region.
and expertise to previous planning efforts, the planning
process began with a review of relevant documents to Recreation and Tourism Related Plans:
gather their insights and to prevent the duplication of
efforts. There is a wealth of research and outreach that
A culture of recreation and leisure has influenced the
has gone into the development of regional plans and the
area for over a century. Recreation and tourism eclipsed
following section provides a high-level overview of the
the extractive industries of mining and logging as the
most relevant documents. Despite the volume of existing
primary economic drivers in the region decades ago.
plans, no plan has specifically addressed Long Lake as a
Compared to surrounding areas, Long Lake has a long
municipality in the way that a Comprehensive Plan does.
history of tourism. Long Lake is located near and home
Unlike previous planning efforts, a Comprehensive Plan
to several great camps, such as the Great Camp Saga-
is intended to provide a course of action for the Town
more, and large post-Civil War era hotels.
Board and other community partners.
Previous planning efforts have highlighted the potential
For the purpose of this document, the review of existing
for additional or expanded recreational opportunities
plans is summarized and grouped into two main cate-
in and around the Town of Long Lake. These plans
gories: “Recreation and Tourism” and “Community and
have identified marketing initiatives as a key strategy to
Economic Development.” It is recognized that the dis-
further promote existing recreational opportunities. The
tinction between the two categories has become vague,
following plans are summarized in relation to Long Lake:
Comprehensive Plan 9

Adirondack Five Towns/ Upper Hudson Recre- Hamilton County Average Traveler Profile,
ation Hub Supplemental and Hamilton County 2018
Marketing Plan (2019):
Source: ROOST, 2019
56
This plan was developed by the Regional Office of Age:
Sustainable Tourism (ROOST). The plan outlines
4.3 persons
Party Size:
strategies and tactics for marketing efforts in Essex,
Franklin, and Hamilton Counties. The Town of Long (3.2 adults, 1.1 child)
Lake is part of the “Adirondack 5 Towns,” a recreational 3 nights
partnership hub that came together to advocate for
Length of Stay:
$312 per day
the classification of the Essex Chain acquisition. The
Spending per Day: *mostly on lodging and
partnership is being leveraged to gain public and private
investment in lodging, restaurant, attractions, and other meals
31% Hotels
Lodging:
types of tourism-related venues beyond the Essex Chain
lands. While this plan is not specific to the Town of Long 28% Camping
Lake, it does provide insight on the regional tourism 16% Rental
industry and includes extensive research on recreational 12% Second Home
visitation that has been used to attract tourism to Long 11% Family/Friends
Lake. The following table was created with demographic Outdoor Activities
research generated by ROOST.
Key Attraction:
GSW. The GSW Complex Plan proposed additional trail
NYS’s Travel and Tourism Sector: A Statewide networks for connectivity within the Town of Long Lake.
Regional Analysis (2017):
Adirondack Hamlets to Huts (2016):
This analysis was completed by the NYS Department
of Labor (NYS DOL). Like the ROOST 5 Towns plan, this Adirondack Hamlets to Huts is an incorporated non-
analysis provides research on tourism trends in relation profit founded in 2016 with the mission to establish trail
to employment and wages. The Town of Long Lake is networks for “hut-to-hut” travel in the Adirondacks. With
identified to be in the “North Country Labor Market funding from the NYS Department of State (NYS DOS),
Region.” According to the analysis, this region has this organization has created a trail network named
witnessed an 8.6 percent growth in tourism employment the Adirondack Community-based Trails and Lodging
and employs over 8,000 individuals in the tourism System (ACTLS). The ACTLS includes trail routes and
industry. accommodations for hikers; some of the routes include
recreation opportunities within the Town of Long Lake,
Great South Woods Complex Plan (2016): such as the network’s “Historic Great Camp Traverse”
route.
The Great South Woods (GSW) Complex Plan was
completed by the NYS Department of Environmental Raquette River Corridor Blueway Trail Plan
Conservation (NYS DEC) in partnership with the SUNY
(2010):
College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF), the
Adirondack Park Agency (APA), and the Hamilton County
Spearheaded by the NYS DOS, this plan is a waterway-
Board of Supervisors. The purpose of this plan was to
based outdoor recreation and heritage tourism initiative
create an inventory of recreational opportunities in the
that involves multiple municipalities and regional
GSW and provide recommendations on how to protect
entities. This plan offers several recommendations
and enhance those resources. The Town of Long Lake
related to paddling opportunities within the Town of
is identified to be along the northern boundary of the
Long Lake, as the Town contains much of the Raquette
River headwaters.
10 Town of Long Lake

lack of developable properties.


Community and Economic
Development Related Plans: Hamlets 3 (2010):
The balance of the prior planning efforts focus on basic Hamlets 3 was a planning effort completed by the APA.
community development needs facing rural Adirondack This effort, which built on the Hamlet 1 and Hamlet 2
communities, including revitalizing Hamlets, meeting the planning efforts, sought to help local communities and
needs of seniors, and providing affordable housing. regional decision-makers plan for sustainable develop-
ment, or “Smart Growth.” The plan made recommen-
Central Adirondack Partnership – CAP 21 Annual dations for all Adirondack Hamlets regarding land use,
Report (2019): zoning, financing, and local government participation.
The plan includes a series of concept drawings showing
The Central Adirondack Partnership (CAP) is a regional improvements to the Hamlet of Long Lake’s public realm
partnership that has formed a non-profit organization and streetscapes, including parks and trails.
to address concerns, interests, and aspirations of the
region’s residents. The Town of Long Lake is part of the Aging-in-Place in the Tri-Lakes Region of the
CAP-21 regional strategic plan. Adirondacks (2010):

West Central Adirondacks Housing Needs As- In 2010, Mercy Care for the Adirondacks completed this

sessment (2011): Community Empowerment Action Plan with the goal of


addressing the increasing need for elder care in the Ad-
irondacks. While this plan only addresses the neighbor-
This plan was created as an initiative of CAP-21. The plan ing localities of Lake Placid, Saranac Lake, and Tupper
addresses the lack of affordable housing in the region, Lake, it does provide “Draft Action Plans” for commu-
with specific insight on the Town of Long Lake’s housing nities that are planning for the provision of additional
needs. The plan addresses two of Long Lake’s housing senior services, like the Town of Long Lake.
challenges: its inflated housing market and the potential
Comprehensive Plan 11

Inventory and Analysis of Existing Conditions

The following section summarizes the existing conditions and current trends observed in the Town of
Long Lake (See Appendix A: Existing Conditions). The inventory and analysis portion of the Comprehen-
sive Plan provides the community with baseline data on the key demographics, economic information,
land uses, municipal facilities, and natural resources of the community. This research helped define pri-
orities and inform strategies to meet community goals. This information will also serve as a benchmark
that residents can use to measure progress and analyze changes over time. These data were gathered
from various sources including the U.S. Census Bureau, the Hamilton County Tax Assessor, the Ameri-
can Community Survey (ACS), the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the NYS Department of Transpor-
tation (NYS DOT), and others.
12 Town of Long Lake

Population

The permanent, year-round


population of the Town of Age Profile of Long Lake, Raquette Lake and Hamilton County
Long Lake is approximately 25%
379 according to the 2018
ACS 5-year estimates (this
data includes a margin of 20%

error of +/- 86). In 2010,


the U.S. Census Bureau’s
15%
Decennial Census reported
a population of 711. The
population has declined at 10%

an average rate of 8% since


the early 1990s, as noted in
5%
the figure depicted below.
The population decline has
been accompanied by a 0%
rise in the average resident 0-5 5-9 10 - 14 15 - 19 20 - 24 25 - 34 35 - 44 45 -54 55 - 59 60 - 64 65 - 74 75 - 84 85 +
Long Lake Raquette Lake Hamilton County
age and significant decreas-
es in school enrollment, rized as “seasonal, recreation or occasional” uses.
indicating that younger families are not moving to

Economy
the area, and younger people are leaving the area.
As seen in the age profile below, the demographics
of Long Lake can be summarized as that of a retire-
ment community with an aging community and a The economy of Long Lake is driven by seasonal tour-
large base of second homeowners. According the ism and recreation. Recognizing this and understanding
2018 ACS 5-years estimates, nearly 96 % of housing the value that a proactive approach to attracting tour-
units in Long Lake and Raquette Lake are catego- ism and developing recreation amenities brings to the

Historic Population
7000

6000

5000

4000

3000

2000

1000

0
1840 1850 1860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2016 2017
Long Lake Hamilton County
Comprehensive Plan 13

The Town is a destination for


naturalists and recreation seekers
alike. Guide services, floatplane
operators and similar eco-tourism
businesses have capitalized on the
Town’s wealth of natural assets.
Most private businesses in the
Hamlets of Long Lake and Ra-
quette Lake are small, indepen-
dent, and are family run. These
small businesses add to the iconic,
small-town charm of the Town
and makes Long Lake stand out
against other more commercial-
ized Adirondack communities that
are closer to highways and the
Park perimeter.

Employment trends show that


many Long Lake residents work
two or three part-time jobs due
community, the Town created a Parks and Recreation to the lack of full-time year-round
Department. The department has been successful in positions. Most employment opportunities are during
promoting tourism through numerous year-round the brief period in the summer when high school and
events, multi-media marketing, ad campaigns, and the college students are on break. However, trends in public
development of recreational facilities. school athletic schedules and college start dates are
shortening the window when families can take vaca-
State operated facilities are an extremely important tions, thereby impacting the local economy. Other than
source of overnight visitors and provide affordable the tourism industry, many residents are also employed
accommodations. The five NYS DEC campgrounds in in educational services, either in Long Lake or in a neigh-
the Long Lake area are estimated to have around 4,000 boring school district.
day-visitors (users such as picnickers, hikers, swimmers,
etc.) per year. State investments in staffing and capital
improvements to these facilities is very important to Land Use and Ecological Features
the local economy as restaurants, retailers, and guide
services benefit from the guests they attract. Established by the New York State Legislature in 1971,
the APA is tasked with developing “long-range land
The Hamlets of Long Lake and Raquette Lake are both use plans for both public and private lands within the
well known for their numerous summer camps and boundary of the Park.” The Adirondack Park Land Use
retreat centers, including the Boy Scouts’ Sabattis Reser- and Development Plan divides private lands into six land
vation, the Long Lake Adventure Camp, SUNY Cortland’s use classifications: Hamlet, Moderate Intensity Use, Low
satellite facilities, and the famous “Great Camp Saga- Intensity Use, Rural Use, Resource Management, and
more.” The employment opportunities and visitors that Industrial Use. The plan also divides public lands into
these institutions provide are important aspects of the seven use categories, which determine the type and
local economy. intensity of public use allowed for that area.
Long Lake consists of three public and five private land
14 Town of Long Lake

use classifications, which are illustrated in the following Public APA Classifications
*Source: NYSDEC & APA
tables. The three public classifications are Wilderness,
Wild Forest, and Intensive Use. The table “Public APA
APA Total % of Town
Classifications” identifies the total acreage of these land
classifications within Long Lake.
Classification Acres
Wild Forest 38,171.6 13.3%
Private classifications include Hamlet, Moderate Inten-
sity, Low Intensity, Rural Use, and Resource Manage- Wilderness 71,131.3 24.7%
ment. The APA provides the overall intensity guidelines
for development of the private land use areas of the Intensive Use 304.7 0.1%
Park. The table “Private APA Classifications” illustrates
the total acreage, allowed development intensities, and
percentage for each land use. Resource
Management (private APA classification)
and Wilderness (public APA classification) Private APA Classifications
*Source: NYSDEC & APA
account for approximately 74 percent of
the Town’s total land area, whereas Ham-
APA Allowed Inten- Total % of Town
let, Moderate Intensity, Low Intensity, Wild
Forest and Rural Use accounts for nearly
Classification sites Acres
16.5 percent of the Town’s total land area. Hamlet No Guidelines 1.324.8 .5%
Much of the Resource Management land is
in large vast tracts owned by hunting clubs, Moderate 1.3 acres 2,799.1 1%
forestry companies, and limited liability Intensity
corporations. Low Intensity 3.2 acres 2,606.9 .9%

Rural Use 8.5 acres 2,443.0 .8%

Resource 42.7 acres 141,220.5 49.1%


Management
Comprehensive Plan 15

Plains, Pigeon Lake, Round Lake, Sargent Ponds, and


Natural Resources William C. Whitney. The various UMPs in the Town have
posed challenges in aligning the Town’s interests with
Long Lake is well known for its multiple bodies of water, that of State agencies tasked with land management.
including, but not limited to, Long Lake, Raquette Lake,
Lake Eaton, Uncas Lake, Marion River, Lake Cora, Forked
Lake, Lake Lila, and Little Tupper Lake. The majority of Community Services and Utilities
Long Lake’s water bodies and watersheds have excel-
lent water quality due to its forested and pristine sur-
Long Lake provides a variety of public services to resi-
roundings. Many residents have expressed a desire to
dents, including two emergency squads, two libraries,
conserve these natural resources and they have created
a health care center, a public water supply, and numer-
water quality protection groups like the Long Lake Asso-
ous recreational facilities. Volunteers are critical to the
ciation to advocate for and educate landowners on the
provision of fire and emergency services. The Raquette
best practices of stormwater management, invasive spe-
Lake ambulance squad is also known for having the
cies eradication, and proper sewer/septic maintenance.
longest ambulance transport in New York State with a
Please see Apendix A: Existing Conditions for a map of
76-mile one-way ride to Utica, NY, which is a consider-
the Town’s various water resources.
able challenge for both volunteer squad members and
the patients they are serving. The Long Lake firehouse
NYS DEC, with the APA, utilize Unit Management Plans
was recently rebuilt and updated. The Raquette Lake
(UMPs) to guide management decisions and land use
firehouse is also looking to rebuild and improve upon its
policies in State land. The Town of Long Lake includes
facilities.
portions of nine separate UMPs, including Blue Moun-
tain, Blue Ridge, Five Ponds, High Peaks, Moose River
16 Town of Long Lake

Public Participation

A range of public engagement methods were em-


ployed to ensure meaningful input from residents of
both Hamlets, including stakeholder interviews, focus
group meetings, participation at winter carnivals, and
a survey that was available online and in print. These
activities were promoted through press releases in
local newspapers, Town-wide announcements, social
media, flyers, and direct invites to residents.

Stakeholder Interviews

Stakeholders are members of the community that


offer unique perspectives due to their experience,
role in the community, or employment. The Adviso-
ry Committee identified key stakeholders who had space for a seasonal workforce. Several businesses
significant investment and involvement in both the even house their own workforce, which takes up space
Hamlets of Long Lake and Raquette Lake. Contacting that could be otherwise rented as a tourist accommoda-
a wide cross-section of stakeholders served to expand tion. Some stakeholders suggested that the seasonality
the Advisory Committee’s awareness and to solicit input of the area makes banks weary of providing business
from residents and visitors to develop strategies for loans, and those who currently have businesses have
Long Lake’s future. Stakeholders were interviewed by found it difficult to create succession plans due to the
phone, and their input was summarized and included lack of investment in the community and challenges in
as an appendix to this Comprehensive Plan. The inter- attracting new business leaders. Business owners also
views provided an opportunity for specific feedback reported that the lack of telecommunications infrastruc-
from volunteers, engaged citizens, business owners, ture adds to the uncertainty of managing their opera-
school board members, instrumental landowners, and tions.
community service leaders.
Stakeholders felt that by addressing these issues there
During the interviews, stakeholders defined the Town may be opportunities for the Town to grow. Stakehold-
as place of serene beauty with a “close-knit” communi- ers were adamant about balancing economic growth
ty and excellent opportunities for outdoor recreation. while preserving the rural character of the community;
Stakeholders identified affordable housing, economic the things that make Long Lake Long Lake.
seasonality, and access to broadband as major issues
affecting the Town’s growth and development. Some additional comments that were heard include the
following:
Many business owners noted that maintaining or
starting a new business in Long Lake can be challenging • Long Lake is known for its campgrounds and access
due to these issues. The lack of affordable housing has to recreational opportunities, primarily hiking. It
made it difficult to attract young families, entrepre- would benefit local businesses if the campgrounds
neurs, and employees to the area and to provide living were open longer.
Comprehensive Plan 17

• Long Lake is a more affordable place to stay and


visit compared to other areas of the Adirondack
Park, with lower prices for lodging and restau-
rants. This information could be included in
marketing material to attract more visitors to the
Town.
• If the broadband and cell service issues could be
addressed, Long Lake would be an ideal commu- and attendees had an open dialogue with one another
nity for telecommuters, with its small school, natural and with the session organizers. The first series of focus
beauty, location within a few hours of major cities, group sessions lasted the course of an entire day.
and low cost of living. A second focus group session was held at the Raquette
• With an aging population, locally and regionally, Lake School and convened residents, business owners,
there in an opportunity to create services, housing, and individuals associated with local institutions for a
and other needs for the retired and elderly popula- round table discussion about Raquette Lake specific
tion. issues.
• The Hamlet of Raquette Lake has a smaller popu-
lation and economy than the Hamlet of Long Lake. Participants of the focus groups represented a
There could be more communication and shared cross-section of the community, including representa-
resources between the Hamlets. tives from Town staff (e.g., Parks and Recreation, High-
way, Water, etc.), Business owners, local and regional
organizations, the Long Lake Public School, the fire
Focus Group Sessions department, the tourism industry, and other interested
residents. The participants identified regional and local
issues that impact the Town of Long Lake. Participants
The Advisory Committee hosted two well-attended
reflected on topics such as population, housing, busi-
focus group sessions: one in the Hamlet of Long Lake
ness sustainability, recreation and tourism, and educa-
and one in the Hamlet of Raquette Lake. These focus
tion.
groups were comprised of a collection of individuals
with specialized interests or knowledge of a topic area.
These discussions generated additional insight into the
The meetings were used to gain perspective, generate
community and provided valuable recommendations.
ideas, and prompt discussions between participants.
First, almost all the participants noted Long Lake’s pop-
Information gathered during the focus group meetings
ulation decline and its aging demographics. The Long
was crucial to understanding some of the challenges
Lake Public School is seen as a pillar of the community
facing the Town and in providing potential short- and
and participants were eager to identify ways to sustain
long-term solutions.
and attract young families. One of the most import-
ant challenges facing young families in the area is the
The first series of focus group sessions was held at the
availability of affordable housing and living-wage jobs.
Long Lake Town Hall and covered the topics of ‘Tourism
Additionally, the Town of Long Lake has seen its popula-
and Recreation,’ ‘Business (or Economic Development),’
tion age, with a growing number of retirees and seniors.
‘Schools and Education,’ and ‘Community Groups.’ A
Discussions prompted ideas for improved handicap
focus group was convened for each of the topic areas
accessibility to municipal buildings, enhanced senior
18 Town of Long Lake

services, and the need for apartments or assisted living who can telecommute. The attractiveness of Long
to make it easier for the growing number of seniors to Lake’s community, school, and recreation opportuni-
stay in the community. ties could be marketed.
• Creating an alumni group may help bring resourc-
Focus group participants applauded the businesses that es back to the school and community. It may also
have remained in the community and would like to see encourage graduates to return to the area and have
those businesses supported. Several conversations led mentor-ship opportunities.
to the idea that a chamber of commerce or business • Business owners and other professionals may con-
association should be created so the community and sider collaborating to support students who want to
businesses could support one another. Focus group start a business or take over an existing business.
participants felt that some sort of business association • Using the community and the region as an edu-
could also be helpful in attracting additional investment cational tool could be beneficial for engaging the
to the area. school with its surroundings. It would also create a
unique educational opportunity that could be mar-
Conversations with focus group participants, particularly keted.
in Raquette Lake, highlighted how their remote location,
limited services, and small population size have contrib- Winter Carnivals
uted to the Hamlet’s resilient community that is able to
come together in times of need to support one another
Traditionally, public workshops are used to gather input
and address challenges.
on a Comprehensive Plan. They are typically held in a
public building, such as a school or town office, and
Finally, all focus groups recognized recreation and
advertised as a stand-alone event. The Advisory Com-
tourism to be a guiding force in the Town’s economy.
mittee recognized that the typical approach to a public
Participants wished to see continued efforts to expand
workshop would most likely have sparse attendance
recreation opportunities into the shoulder and winter
and not engage a wide audience. Instead, the Adviso-
seasons. Specifically, participants discussed the need to
ry Committee determined that having a presence at
create more multi-use trails and snowmobile connec-
existing community events would be a better method to
tions, potentially through the “Powerline” trail, which
connects the Hamlets of Long Lake and Raquette Lake.
In addition, they discussed that tourism in the area
could be further enhanced by attracting visitors to the
downtown and Hamlet areas of the Town by creating
walk-ability and transportation plans. Participants noted
that the “Little Bus” is already effectively used and could
be further utilized to transport visitors to and from
campgrounds or other lodging options.

Some additional comments that were heard include the


following:

• The power of social media and the popularity of


photography was discussed as a tool that could be
used to draw more people to Long Lake, especially
engage residents in the planning process. The planning
during the shoulder season. Bird guiding service has
consultant representatives attended both the Long Lake
been popular year-round.
and Raquette Lake Winter Carnivals, setting up interac-
• If the power and broadband situations improved,
tive displays and answering questions from interested
it could be beneficial to advertise the area to those
residents.
Comprehensive Plan 19

community who were seasonal residents and unavail-


Residents were asked to comment on improvements able for in-person communication.
they would like to see and what they felt made Long
Lake or Raquette Lake special. Many residents and visi- A survey was developed with extensive Advisory Com-
tors commented on the nostalgia of the area and events mittee input and was launched in both paper and digital
such as the Winter Carnivals. formats. The digital version of the survey was distribut-
ed via email, social media, and the Town website. The
The improvements that were recommended by carnival paper version was distributed at both Winter Carnivals,
attendees centered on services or infrastructure that the Raquette Lake Post Office, Raquette Lake Transfer
could support living in Long Lake or Raquette Lake full- Station, the Tap Room, the Long Lake Town Office, the
time, such as improved broadband and internet access, Long Lake Post Office, and the CV Whitney Long Lake
greater availability of housing for families and the retire- Public Library. For residents who did not have the ability
ment community, and access to grocery stores. There or desire to mail completed surveys in, collection boxes
was also a significant amount of input on how to expand were placed at the Long Lake Town Office and the Ra-
the shoulder season in the area through winter events quette Lake Post Office.
or increased and improved snowmobile connections.
The survey asked participants for feedback on the
Some additional comments that were heard include the Town’s existing quality of life, economic development,
following: conservation and natural resources, community char-
acter, and future vision. The survey launched in early
• Many seasonal residents noted that Raquette Lake January 2020 and closed in early March, providing a
is unique in that it has multiple water-access only three-month period for residents to respond. Over
properties. The (mostly seasonal) residents of these 300 individuals responded to the survey, including 39
properties are very secluded from anything else permanent Raquette Lake residents, 130 permanent
going on in the Town or Hamlet. Long Lake residents, 134 seasonal residents, and 21
• Some residents feel that the housing market is a people who work in the Town. The response rate was
challenge to families or young professionals who 43% of the year-round population. The demographics
may want to live in the area year-round. Most of the of survey respondents correlated with information that
real estate is consumed by second-home owners was garnered during the inventory and analysis. Many
who drive up the prices. respondents (over 50%) were 55 or older and identified
• Raquette Lake residents and visitors feel
isolated from the Town of Long Lake, not
only in distance but in community and
communication.
• A more direct comment that some
Raquette Laker residents made was that
West Mountain should have a clearing
at the top so that it has a view for hikers
and also provides access for a helicopter
to land for safety reasons.

Community Survey

One of the obstacles the Advisory Committee


sought to overcome in the public participa-
tion process was engaging members of the
20 Town of Long Lake

themselves as retired.
Survey responses offered a variety of
insight into residential quality of life;
most year-round and seasonal resi-
dent of Long Lake and Raquette Lake
(75%) rated the general quality of life
in the Town of Long Lake as good or
excellent, with a majority rating it as
‘good.’ Most seasonal residents of both
Hamlets also agreed that the quality
of life in the area is improving. Year-
round Long Lake residents were split
in their response of the quality of life
improving, and 45% of year-round
Raquette Lake residents disagreed that
the quality of life is improving, with only
14% agreeing that the quality of life in In addition, most respondents felt strongly about con-
the area is improving. serving the area’s natural resources. When asked what
the greatest perceived threat was to the area’s natural
Overall, full-time residents of Long Lake and Raquette resources, most respondents said pollution, over-devel-
Lake ranked community character, town services, and opment, septic run-off, invasive species, acid rain, over-
the local school systems with higher importance than use of trails, and general carelessness of people.
did the seasonal residents. All respondents ranked lakes Many respondents expressed that they tremendously
and waterfront areas, natural beauty and resources, and enjoyed visiting or living in Long Lake, but there is a
recreational opportunities with importance. need for additional amenities and services to attract
For the most part, respondents were extremely satisfied families, young professionals, and other year-round
by the services offered by the Town, specifically recre- residents to the Town.
ation opportunities. Respondents said they recreated
in a variety of ways, but hiking, walking, and paddling Some additional comments that were heard include the
were the preferred recreation activities for addition- following:
al amenities and services to attract families, young
professionals, and other year-round residents to the • Raquette Lake needs a new firehouse
area. Respondents expressed that they would like to • The Town needs more senior services and should
see improvements to internet and broadband access, continue and expand services provided by the Town
increased access to food and grocery services, more bus
affordable single-family housing, and opportunities for • The population of young families and young profes-
employment. sionals needs to grow
• Property care should be encouraged, specifically in
Almost all the respondents agreed that the Town should downtown areas
focus its economic development efforts on small com-
mercial business, year-round residents, telecommunica- All input from public engagement activities was summa-
tion, and a grocery store. Seasonal resident respondents rized and recorded. Summaries can be found in Appen-
also highly ranked outdoor recreation enthusiasts as dix B "Public Engagement" of this plan. This information
a focus for economic development. Full-time resident was used to develop preliminary concept plans, related
respondents ranked senior housing, affordable housing, cost estimates, and planning recommendations for the
and health care facilities higher than seasonal residents Town that are included in the Comprehensive Plan.
as focuses for economic development.
Comprehensive Plan 21
22 Town of Long Lake

Vision Statement

A Vision Statement describes the desired future state of a community and provides a picture
of what the community is working towards. It serves as the organizing feature of the goals and
recommendations.

When community members are approached with difficult or contentious decisions, they can
ask themselves, “how does the proposed action support or detract from residents’ vision for
the community?” The Vision Statement can serve to re-orient decision makers in times of
uncertainty.

The Advisory Committee utilized the Vision Statement prepared as part of the Hamlet 3
initiative as a foundation for the Comprehensive Plan Vision Statement. The Hamlets 3 Vision
Statement involved substantial community input, but it was focused strictly on the Hamlet of
Long Lake. The Vision Statement was revised by the Advisory Committee to include references
to the entire Town and the Hamlet of Raquette Lake and is based on their review of previ-
ous planning efforts, their personal experiences, and the extensive public input on residents’
vision for the future of the Town.

The following Vision Statement was developed by the Advisory Committee:


Comprehensive Plan 23

Vision Statement

"The Town of Long Lake will retain its character as a


close-knit community with an emphasis on independence, pride,
and place. The Town’s well-managed waterways and mountains
will continue to provide a scenic landscape that is a unique place
to visit, work, live, and recreate for people of all ages and abili-
ties. The Town’s elected officials, community organizations, and
businesses will work together to advocate for the Town’s in-
terests and cultivate a setting that will be conducive to the
establishment and ongoing success of year-round small businesses.
Public spaces and business districts will retain their
small-town charm through a series of improvements that
emphasize walkability, curb appeal, and the utilization and main-
tenance of existing properties. The Town’s school districts will
continue to serve as points of community pride and utility,
delivering a high-quality education and providing facilities for
community activities. The Town government will use various tools and
techniques to maintain an open dialogue with and between the Ham-
lets of Long and Raquette Lake so that all residents feel that they are
able to actively participate in municipal affairs. Long Lake will ad-
vocate for itself to various levels of government for funding and
other resources so that residents have access to critical needs, such as
medical services, quality infrastructure, communication technology, and
housing. The Town will focus on enhancing its recreational assets and
open spaces to promote itself as a year-round recreational destination
without being negatively impacted by overuse. Working with Lake As-
sociations, not-for-profits, and State agencies, the Town will have a co-
ordinated plan to ensure the environmental quality of its waterways."
Goals and Recommendations
Comprehensive Plan 25

Goals and Recommendations

The following goals and recommendations were devel- “Vision is not enough, it
oped over the course of the Comprehensive Planning
process and reflect the combined input from public
must be combined with
engagement, the inventory and analysis, previous plan- venture. It is not enough to
ning efforts, best practices, and most importantly, the
Advisory Committee. stare up the steps, we must
The goals and recommendations are intended to
step up the stairs.”
support efforts that will enhance the overall communi- -Vaclav Havel
ty quality without requiring foundational shifts to the
character of the Town. The goals and recommenda-
tions outline a plan for a resilient community in which
low or moderate growth is viewed as stabilization or
maturity, not necessarily decline. Residents and visitors
alike have always balanced their desire for amenities This plan contains a substantial number of recommen-
associated with larger towns - things like full-service dations, which can be overwhelming when considered
grocery stores, movie theaters, home improvement as a whole. Not all of the recommendations require im-
stores, etc. - with their love for Long Lake’s wild and mediate action or direct leadership by the Town, so in
un-commercialized setting. Based on community input, addition to being organized by topic area (as identified
most residents understand that you can’t have big city below), they have been organized by key themes and,
amenities in a small rural town, but the Town’s set- in some instances, assigned a priority.
ting is not necessarily at odds with the modest goals
of a stable local economy, reasonably priced housing, • Recreation
reliable infrastructure, and access to basic health and • Infrastructure
social services. • Critical Services
• Economic Development and Tourism
This plan recognizes that a quality community can exist • Environmental Resources
without exponential growth. Successful small towns • Housing
have recognized that in order to adapt to the chang- • Transportation
es in the national and global economy that favor big • Community Services and Municipal Operations
cities over rural areas, they need to take stock of their • Hamlet Beautification and Initiatives
existing, place-based assets that cannot be replicated • Quality of Life
elsewhere, things like local history, independent busi-
nesses, and access to world-renowned open spaces.
Town-wide Maps of Recommendations
These recommendations show how the Town, with its
limited population and capacity, can configure its assets
To make the recommendations of this document more
in a resilient way to support a stable and successful
approachable three maps outlining many of the key
community.
recommendations related to physical improvements
were prepared. These maps are located at the end of
As a community, Long Lake is already pursuing many of
this section.
the goals and recommendations outlined here. Despite
the Town’s small size, a robust network of community
organizations, volunteers, Town staff, and elected offi- Key Themes of the Plan Recommendations
cials have proven their capacity to start tackling these
issues. Outlining the goals and recommendations that Throughout the planning process- public engagement
may already be underway is intended to recognize the events, Advisory Committee meetings, stakeholder
efforts and to provide a basis for their continuation. interviews, and community survey- several key themes
26 Town of Long Lake

wove through the goals and recommendations: collab- ensure that once visitors are drawn to the Town their
oration, recreation assets and tourism infrastructure, experiences stand out from other destinations. Visitors
economic development and tourism, and quality infra- require physical infrastructure like clean water, quality
structure and services. These themes are outlined here trails, sidewalks, boat launches, parks, and beaches. In
to orient the reader, help organize the goals and recom- addition to providing a great user experience, the Town
mendations, and identify where the various recommen- needs to ensure that the physical recreation and tour-
dations fit into the overall vision for the Town. ism infrastructure is designed and built in such a way
that is does not compromise the integrity of the attrac-
The following themes overlap and complement one tion itself, whether it be the lakes, waterways, trails,
another, and some recommendations address multiple land, or character of the Town.
themes. For example, by collaborating with lake asso-
ciations the Town can protect its recreation assets and Means of improving the physical aspects of the Town’s
promote economic development. recreation assets vary by location, purpose, and involved
parties. Some improvements will require ongoing co-
1. New Spirit of Collaboration ordination with State partners, willing landowners, and
institutions, while other more basic improvements, such
as building sidewalks in the Hamlet areas, making im-
Despite the appearance of rugged individualism, Long
provements to Mount Sabbatis, and developing wayfind-
Lake residents have proven that their greatest achieve-
ing signage, can be done using local forces and common
ments have come from working together. The rec-
grant programs.
ommendations of this plan will require that the Town
continue these existing partnerships, develop new ones,
and develop a series of committees that are recom- 3. Economic Development and Tourism
mended in this plan in order to tap into the wealth of
resources that existing organizations, residents, and Simply having tourism infrastructure like a world class
businesses can bring to the table. Thankfully, building trail system and pristine lakes is one thing, but fully
collaborations and organizing groups is something that leveraging those assets to build the local economy, sup-
can be done in the near term with sweat equity. Collab- port new and existing businesses, and improve the tour-
oration for collaboration’s sake is not productive, so the ism industry requires supportive policies and programs.
Town must approach the formation of new committees
carefully. In forming a business association, a Raquette The Parks and Recreation Department has led the
Lake Committee, or an Implementation Committee, the charge in activating the Town’s existing tourism infra-
Town Board will need to clearly define their structure structure with events, programming, branding, and
and objectives, as well as methods for evaluating their marketing. The Town, through the Parks and Recreation
progress towards their objectives. The maintenance of Department and proposed business association, needs
existing collaborations with groups like the lake associa- to continue to support and expand these efforts to draw
tions and with new groups like Adirondack North Coun- in visitors and increase event and activity programming.
try Association (ANCA) will require the elements of any The Town has been successfully expanding these efforts
relationship: good communication, conflict resolution, through new marketing techniques, hiring new staff, and
and sense of shared responsibility. expanding shoulder season activities. These successes
form the foundation for ongoing improvements.
2. Fully Leverage the Town’s Recreation Assets
and Tourism Infrastructure The Town will need to stay abreast of industry trends
and help coordinate with the local business community.
Coordination with the business community will allow
Recreation and tourism are among the Town’s strongest,
the Town to help connect them with the resources they
most marketable assets. The Town needs to contin-
need to thrive and help identify opportunities for train-
ually maintain, improve, and expand these assets to
ing, mentorship, and legacy planning.
Comprehensive Plan 27

4. Long Term Investments in Quality Infrastruc- • The recommendation can be implemented by the
Town with existing resources and capacity.
ture and Community Services • There are easily identifiable funding sources, grants
or otherwise, that could launch this project.
In addition to immediate strategic actions, the Town also • The issue being addressed by the recommendation
needs to make sure that the basics of a quality commu- came up repeatedly throughout the public engage-
nity are in place. This can take years of deliberate plan- ment process,
ning, monitoring, and maintenance. The Town should • The recommendation is intended to address a criti-
have a framework for how they can attend to long-term cal element of the Comprehensive Plan (regardless
actions that will help ensure that residents have quali- of funding or feasibility).
ty, reliable infrastructure, clean water, fire and medical
services, and municipal buildings. This includes a Capital Stay Flexible
Improvement Plan (CIP), ongoing training, budgeting
for important initiatives, maintaining existing facilities,
Even with a well-considered plan, unexpected oppor-
upgrading water infrastructure, and ensuring that the
tunities and challenges can arise at a moment’s notice;
Town is not negatively impacting water quality. The
new grant programs are developed and released annu-
management of municipal infrastructure and provision
ally, large properties unexpectedly transfer ownership,
of community services is intrinsically tied to the develop-
public health crises emerge from across the globe. The
ment of a successful local economy.
Town will need to remain flexible and opportunistic

“Hot Chilis” - Priority Recommendations 🌶 as it pursues its goals and take advantage of changing
conditions. Staying focused on the big picture goals and
vision and being willing to alter course can help sustain
momentum.
Hot Chilis are priority recommendations that are
deemed more important than others and should be
Following the Recommendation section is "Implementa-
pursued in the near term. Recommendations that are
tion". This section identifies the strategic partnerships,
marked with a hot chili meet some combination of the
funding mechanisms, and timelines needed to meet
following parameters;
these goals are identified.
28 Town of Long Lake

Recreation
Long Lake has drawn recreationists for generations.
Between hiking, fishing, boating, snowmobiling, bird
watching, biking, and walking, Long Lake can satisfy the
appetite of thrill-seekers and casual outdoors-men alike.
Outdoor recreation has encountered a surge in popular-
ity over the past decade, and the Town is well positioned
to leverage many of the existing assets they already
have in place.

Long Lake has recreational facilities that are owned and


managed by the Town, as well as access to thousands of
acres of land that are owned and managed by the State.
The Town and private businesses have taken an active
role in marketing the recreational offerings available in
the area as well as investing in new facilities and mainte-
nance equipment.

Investing in outdoor recreation can meet the dual goals


of environmental protection and economic develop-
ment. In the Adirondacks, towns have been taking a
more active role in the process of developing UMPs and
advocating for projects that dovetail with their needs,
like snowmobile connectors. Other non-governmental
organizations like “Hamlets to Huts” are developing
programs that blur the line between recreating on public
land, patronizing local businesses and institutions, and zation has goals that overlap with the others. The result
celebrating regional culture and history. is a recreation destination that provides substantial and
sustainable economic benefits to the region. The Town
The distinctions between land ownership (Town, Coun- of Bolton in Warren County partnered with the Lake
ty, State, private easement) or classification are rarely George Land Conservancy to develop a plan to improve,
important to recreationists, who instead focus on the manage, and expand their recreational offerings to
activity at hand. By working with the NYS DEC, willing support economic development, protect environmental
landowners, and institutional partners, the Town could resources, and improve the quality of life for residents.
help develop recreational facilities that provide a seam- The public-private partnership has allowed for a rapid
less user experience, regardless of who owns the actual expansion and improvement of recreational facilities in
land. Examples of communities that have successfully the Town, including land acquisition, trail building, and
blurred the line between public and private land with new trail heads.
complementary services and facilities include Bar Har-
bor, Maine and Woodstock, Vermont. In both examples Accessible multi-use trails represent a growing demand
the municipal government has longstanding partner- in the area; this could be due, in part, to the aging pop-
ships with chambers of commerce, historical groups, ulation that favors low impact activities that encourage
land trusts, state land managers, and institutional part- exercise and year-round usage. The John Dillon Park is
ners, with the shared understanding that each organi- a hugely popular wheelchair accessible trail system that
Comprehensive Plan 29

attracts users of all abilities. Proposed improvements to the area. The Town, with participation of willing insti-
the Cederlands Conservation Easement emphasize ADA tutions, could help develop an inventory of underuti-
accessibility and can help bolster the Town’s reputation lized facilities and connect them with potential users
as an accessible destination. or organizations.

Goal: Provide all residents and visitors with a


3. 🌶 Further develop Mount Sabbatis for a wide
range of active and passive recreation activities.
variety of quality recreation options that are Mount Sabbatis hosts a variety of activities and
suitable for a wide range of ages, abilities, and should continue to expand its offerings to include a
interests throughout the year. more interconnected trail system for mountain bik-
ing, skiing, and hiking, as well as enhanced gather-

🌶
ing places. Stakeholders identified opportunities to
connecting Mount Sabbatis to points along Deerland
1. Work with State and regional partners to Road with the “powerline trail,” which would provide
leverage existing recreational assets (i. e. Buttermilk a parallel alternative to Deerland Road. Recently,
Falls, Owl’s Head Mountain, Death Falls, West the Town started working with a professional trail
Mountain, etc.) that may not be on municipal land builder to design improvements to the trail system
but serve as important landmarks and destinations. and the resulting concept drawings provide a basis
The Town can work with the NYS DEC to take an for more detailed design work. To complement trail
active role as a stakeholder in the UMP update pro- development, other improvements may include
cess as the document is being drafted or to initiate
enhanced landscaping along Deerland Road, an im-
amendments to UMPs for specific improvements.
proved parking area, revitalization of the courts, and
UMPs are not updated on a regular schedule, so the
improved wayfinding. Similar efforts to revitalize and
Town will need to continually work with the State to
update the most out of date UMPs and to encour- expand park facilities in the Town of Queensbury
age their active implementation once updated. The have been very successful. The Town developed a
Town should also continue to advocate to the NYS mountain bike trail system at Gurney Park. Now, the
DEC to implement the recently approved Cedarlands well-designed facility draws mountain bikers from
Conservation Easement Recreation Management across the State and has also been integrated into
Plan (RMP). the school district’s extracurricular activities, with
school-aged children participating in organized rides
2. Foster public-private partnerships that incorporate and joining mountain biking teams. Similar im-
outdoor recreation with other activities, such as his- provements at Mount Sabbatis would provide a very
torical interpretation, classes, lodging, etc.. Aligning visible public amenity and could help with the Town’
businesses and outdoor recreation can further both s ambitions to attract more families and visitors.
recreation and economic opportunities. Hamlets to Due to the Mount Sabbatis’ high-profile location, the
Huts has already begun to explore this option and Town should engage residents in the design process,
has partnered with SUNY Cortland to use WH Parks- including public meetings, stakeholder sessions, and
Family Center on Raquette Lake to accommodate a public vetting of alternatives.
clients. This arrangement is a promising example of
how existing facilities can be better utilized by form- 4. Develop a plan to regularly monitor and maintain
ing new partnerships. Throughout the Town there municipal recreation assets and collaborate with the
are other institutions that may have extra capacity at State on their facilities (i.e. maintaining trailheads
various points of the year. Places that host large and campgrounds, communicating with NYS DEC on
groups in the busy summer months but are left idle maintenance issues). NYS DEC allows municipalities
in the shoulder seasons could partner with other or other community groups to enter into “Voluntary
organizations or initiatives that do not have the Stewardship Agreements” (VSAs) that allow for ad-
physical space they need to pursue programming in ditional support in the maintenance of facilities. For
30 Town of Long Lake

example, in the Town of Bolton the local land con- nance and upkeep of snowmobile trails. The Town
servancy plows and patrols a trailhead on State land owns various snowmobile trail grooming apparatus
under a VSA that would otherwise receive minimal that require secure storage and annual mainte-
attention from NYS DEC. If the Town of Long Lake nance. The Town needs to ensure that there are
was interested in providing and maintaining privies trained staff and appropriate storage facilities.
or garbage receptacles, they could arrange for a
temporary revocable permit with the NYS DEC. The 7. Emphasize accessibility when planning and de-
Town should also work with NYS DEC to gain access signing new facilities so that there are high quality
to their trailhead register records to gain insight into facilities for people with limited mobility and per-
where visitors are coming from and which areas sons with disabilities, in addition to John Dillon Park
are most popular. During the planning phase of the and the proposed improvements at the Cederlands
GSW Complex Plan, researchers digitized trailhead Conservation Easement. As the local population
register data to make fine-tuned land management continues to age (along with the average visitor age),
decisions. This type of information about facilities there will be an increased demand for these facili-
located in the Town could help local decisionmaking ties. Designing public facilities to be more accessible
as well. to persons with disabilities is generally referred to as
“Universal Design,” in which programs and facilities
5. Continue to map and market existing recreational are designed to be usable by all people, to the great-
assets. This includes the development of a cohesive est extent possible, without separate or segregated
physical wayfinding system, updating the existing access for people with disabilities. A variety of uni-
municipal recreation maps into one digital location, versally designed facilities will broaden Long Lake’s
and digitally marketing the mapping products. The visitor-base and improve residential quality of life.
Town has a repository of maps and digital data
that has not been compiled. Consider working with Goal: Improve connections between existing
organizations like Green Goat Maps who encourage recreational facilities
map sponsorship from targeted interest groups. The
Ausable River Association in Essex County worked 8. Expand the network of accessible multi-use trails
with Green Goat Maps to develop an Ausable River and develop connections to existing multi-use trails
Fly Fishing Map that provides a highly attractive in the region. Various regional recreation plans (i.e.
layout and includes highlights on the importance GSW, Raquette River Corridor, Hamlets to Huts,
of river health and native brook trout. A map of the Remsen-Lake Placid Travel Corridor Plan, etc.) pro-
Town’s recreational assets has been compiled as vide a basis for these connections. This will require
part of this project and is contained in Appendix A; coordination with willing private landowners, institu-
Existing Conditions. tions, businesses, the State, and the APA. Stakehold-
ers and residents have expressed a desire for trails
6. Continue to dedicate Town resources to the mainte- that are like the Thendara-Old Forge-Big Moose-In-
Comprehensive Plan 31

let-Eagle Bay (TOBIE) trail system, which allows for ment of Public Works (DPW) to initiate construction.
pedestrians, cyclists, horses, wheelchairs, snowmo- While this approach does not conform to the NYS
biles, etc. The Town has participated in the UMP DEC’s land management procedure, it has allowed
process but should also consider a grassroots effort the Town and NYS DEC to recognize that their inter-
to establish trail connection priorities. The Town of ests and priorities often dovetail.

🌶
Johnsburg took a proactive approach to establish
trail network development priorities in advance of a
9. Establish and/or formalize trail access directly
NYS DEC initiated UMP update process. This allowed
from Hamlet business districts. Some of the most
the Town to look at the trails within their municipal
popular and successful outdoor recreation desti-
boundaries holistically (as opposed to a piecemeal
nations include trail networks that can be accessed
UMP basis) and determine what would meet their
from downtown areas. The result is a synergy
needs first, and the statutory needs of the APA and
between businesses like restaurants, retailers, and
NYS DEC second. Positioning the Town’s needs first
accommodations that keep visitors in one place
allowed the Town to identify what actions they could
without the need to drive out of the community. The
take as a municipality, whether it was applying for
City of Helena, Montana has done an excellent job
grants, coordinating with the NYS Department of
of incorporating various trail access points on public
Transportation (NYS DOT), or using their Depart-
lands to their existing downtown sidewalk network
32 Town of Long Lake

and business district and is a case study in making mentation of recent updates to relevant UMPs by
the connection between hiking trails and econom- the NYS DEC and NYS DOT so that this important link
ic development. The Town can work with willing is established. Shorter, warmer winters will necessi-
landowners and groups like Hamlets to Huts who tate the more regular use of overland connections
are versed in the details of recreation easements. and, specifically, the access to the C7B Newcomb
The recently completed spur trail connecting to the snowmobile trail via a re-routed connector from the
Northville-Placid Trail is a good example of this; NYS DEC boat launch over State land.
however, additional trails that offer connections to
short, easy hikes with scenic vistas are also popular
with tourists. Short hikes are attractive because
they appeal to a wider range of visitors and they
allow visitors to ‘bundle’ activities like dining and
shopping that bolster the local economy. Working
with willing landowners, the Town should identi-
fy additional opportunities to formalize existing
access to trails from various points in the hamlets,
including “the Pinnacle” overlooking Long Lake.

10. Improve the overall connectivity of the snowmobile


trail network and develop an on-land, multi-use
connector so that a frozen lake crossing is not
required to connect the Hamlets of Long Lake and
Raquette Lake. The Town should pursue the imple-
Comprehensive Plan 33

Infrastructure

Infrastructure is one of the most significant municipal Bridges and causeways along Route 28 near Raquette
assets that a Town must manage, requiring long range Lake are not owned or maintained by the Town but
planning, skilled operation, and large investments. Long serve as critical connections between Raquette Lake
Lake’s municipal infrastructure is primarily limited to and points east. There are multiple concerns about this
roads and water distribution systems. Municipal waste- route that have been raised during the planning pro-
water treatment has not been necessary due to a low cess, which include potential flooding over the causeway
population and a dispersed development pattern. Res- and the need to accommodate a wider range of users
idents and businesses rely on private systems, typically on the bridges. The bridge is in need of upgrades, but
consisting of on-site septic systems. preliminary designs from the NYS DOT do not include
adequate space for multiple transportation modes (e.g.,
Water distribution systems operated by the Town have bicycle, snowmobile, and pedestrian) to use the bridge
been a longstanding challenge because of the use of at once, which poses a safety hazard as well as a hin-
floating water lines in lakes to provide water to homes derance to the Town’s economic development efforts
near waterfront areas. The shallow depth to bedrock in focused on snowmobile trail connectivity
most of the developed portions of the Town has made
the prospect of installing subsurface water pipes pro-
hibitively expensive. However, the costs of maintaining
the existing water distribution system can be expensive
because failure of the floating water lines often requires
a rapid response from a trained diver. Recent mapping
and upgrades to the water system by the Town Water
Department have resulted in efficiencies in detecting
and locating leaks in the system. This mapping system
should be supported and maintained, as needed.

Several dams located in the Town are used to establish


the water supply (one in the Hamlet of Raquette Lake
and one outside the Hamlet of Long Lake) and water lev-
el controls (at the outflow of Raquette Lake, Lake Eaton,
Long Lake Park, and Robinson Reservoir). The Jennings Higher volume roadways in the Town are owned and
Memorial Pond features a dam and causeway that were maintained by NYS or Hamilton County, which allows the
identified as potential features of a public park in the Town to focus their maintenance (repaving and rehabili-
Hamlets 3 Plan. The oldest and potentially most impact- tation) efforts on smaller local roads. The Town Highway
ful of these dams is the Raquette Lake outflow dam, Department plows local roadways to accommodate the
which was constructed in 1860. This dam controls the safe passage of snowmobiles along the road shoulder.
water level in Raquette Lake, which impacts transporta-
tion, recreation, and the local economy. According to the Telecommunications infrastructure is critically import-
NYS DEC, the 121-foot-long dam has not been officially ant to the Town of Long Lake due to its remote location.
assessed for the downstream hazard potential in the Over the past two decades there has been a remarkable
event of a dam failure and its last inspection is listed as shift from in-person transactions to internet and phone-
occurring in 1901. While it is unlikely that it has not been based services. Access to internet is not about surfing
inspected since this time, this indicates that inspections the web, it is about access to banking, marketing, video-
may be limited or unaccounted for on the public record. conferencing, education, telehealth services, and shop-
34 Town of Long Lake

ping for basic goods and services. Internet service in the


Town of Long Lake is generally better in and around the
Hamlet of Long Lake, while internet service in the area
of Raquette Lake is slower and less consistent. Direc-
tives from the State mandating the provision of internet
service in rural areas and municipal investments have
resulted in improved service, but considerable improve-
ments are still needed to ensure that Long Lake resi-
dents have access to reliable internet.

Goal: Ensure that the infrastructure is designed,


operated, and built in a sustainable and resilient
manner.

1. Work with State and federal partners to ensure that


all dams and other water control infrastructure is
maintained and upgraded to appropriate standards.
This may also include the clarification of ownership
and maintenance responsibilities for this infra- to ensure that they are operated and maintained in
structure. Organizations like Trout Unlimited and such a way that the do not negatively impact wa-
the Hamilton County Soil and Water Conservation ter quality. Many of the State facilities have been
District (HCSWCD) can serve as useful partners in in operation for decades and may need upgrades.
improving existing dams for the purposes of fish Considering the volume of visitors to State facilities
migration and can enhance the productivity of the throughout the summer, any system deficiencies
Town’s fisheries. The Jennings Memorial Pond dam have the potential to make a large impact.
is in need of upgrades, and funding options for this
should be explored since the dam plays an import- 4. The Town of Long Lake Highway Department, led by
ant role as an element of a desired public park. the Highway Supervisor, maintains all Town roads.
The Town should ensure that the department has
2. Make electrical service more reliable, particularly in the appropriate equipment to maintain road shoul-
emergency situations (e.g., redundant service, gen- ders for safe snowmobile access. This is an issue
erators, etc.). The Town’s long distance from power that touches upon both public safety and economic
generation sources means that there is a greater development, as access to businesses and local
amount of transmission infrastructure exposed to and State-owned recreation resources are essential
risks like falling trees and windstorms. The Town to the local economy and support investments to
should continue to diversify its power sources and include better access to Cedarlands the Essex Chain
consider using generators, solar, and battery cells. Lakes, Town of Webb trail system, and the like.
Currently, the Town is in conversations with National
Grid about the possibility of utilizing new high-ca- Goal: Increase cellular telecommunications
coverage so that there is adequate and reliable
pacity battery cells as backup power supplies. The
Town should diligently pursue ongoing coordination
with National Grid to ensure that this project moves service throughout the populated portions of the
forward. Town.

3. Working with the NYS DEC, explore options to eval- 5. Help facilitate the construction and installation of
uate the wastewater systems at State run facilities recently approved telecommunication towers in Ra-
Comprehensive Plan 35

quette Lake. Two new cellular towers were approved


by the APA in early 2020. The Town should maintain Goal: Ensure that public and private wastewater
a dialogue with the property owners and consider
systems are operated and maintained so that
engaging CAP-21 if project financing stalls.
they do not pose a risk to human or environmen-
6. Monitor trends in 5G cellular technology to identi- tal health.
fy opportunities to improve coverage in the Town
of Long Lake. The Town’s low population density 11. Explore strategies to educate homeowners on ways
means that there are fewer customers to purchase to upgrade and maintain septic systems. This effort
cellular service, so there will be less of market de- can dovetail with the work already underway by local
mand to expand 5G into Long Lake. The Town will lake associations to educate homeowners about the
need to stay abreast of government programs that importance of a properly maintained septic system.
encourage providers to cover rural areas. The HCSWCD provides education and outreach
materials for municipalities and homeowners in the
Goal: Ensure that the municipal water system is area and could help coordinate local efforts.

safe, reliable, and compliant with all pertinent 12. Identify areas with high concentrations of on-lot
health standards. septic systems (i.e. Hamlet areas) and explore formal
management and maintenance programs. Identify-
7. Continue recent water system upgrade initiatives. In ing ‘hot spots’ will allow the Town and lake associa-
the Hamlet of Long Lake, there has been an ongoing tions to target their efforts to where they will have
push to improve the water system. Ongoing efforts the most impact. The HCSWCD and the lake associ-
to upgrade the Hamlet of Raquette Lake’s smaller ations have a good track record of collaborating on
system should be continued as well. educational outreach on similar topics. Any efforts
to improve on-lot septic will need to focus on work-
8. Update and maintain the interactive online maps ing with willing landowners, robust data collection,
of the water system. The Town Water Department and identifying possible funding sources that can
recently developed an online database of all wa- incentivize replacement where it may otherwise be
ter distribution system features. The Town should cost-prohibitive for a property owner.
ensure that this digital mapping is maintained and
updated in one secure place that will be accessible
Goal: Ensure that infrastructure is designed and
to the Town if the company currently hosting the
data ceases involvement in the project.
installed in a visually appealing manner.

13. Identify new locations for electric substations in Ra-


9. Seek funding to identify and address potential leaks,
quette Lake that will not degrade the visual appeal
including transmission lines in lakes. Being able to
of the community or occupy space that could be put
swiftly identify problem areas without deploying a
to better use. The two substations in Raquette Lake
specialized diving team will save the Town money
are currently located in high visibility areas around
in the long term. Current mapping initiatives and
the Raquette Lake School. The Town, School District,
transmission line upgrades are already helping with
and energy companies should coordinate to locate a
this issue.
less visible location. The recently passed NYS Con-
stitutional amendmnet (s. 8026) established a 500
10. Maintain staffing levels and continue to provide
acre land bank that allows for increased flexibility
training opportunities. A well-trained staff is critical
with the siting of critical municipal infrastructure and
to ensuring reliable water system function. The insti-
could be considered for this effort.
tutional knowledge of existing staff is very difficult to
replace.
36 Town of Long Lake

Critical Services
Volunteers play an outsized role in providing critical
services in the Town of Long Lake. Critical services
include fire protection and emergency medical ser-
vices. Long Lake does not have a police department
and instead relies upon the Hamilton County Sheriff’s
Department and NYS Police for law enforcement. Fire
protection is provided by the Long Lake Volunteer Fire
Department and the Raquette Lake Volunteer Fire De-
partment, with support from the Raquette Lake Ladies
Auxiliary and surrounding municipalities’ volunteer
departments. The Long Lake Rescue Squad and the
Raquette Lake Volunteer Ambulance Squad provide
medical service and transportation and is composed
of volunteers and professional Emergency Medical
Technicians (EMTs) and paramedics.
ment facility, and explore creative funding mech-
The changing demographics of the Town are resulting
anisms that would allow the project to proceed
in a smaller pool of able-bodied volunteers and a higher
without requiring the complicated grant administra-
proportion of the population that is likely to require
tion or excessive debt associated with some federal
medical services and transportation.
grant programs. The current facility needs to be
upgraded, but there is a small tax base to service
Long distances to hospitals and medical facilities stress
the cost of a large construction project. Stakeholders
the capacity of local volunteers. Volunteers making four-
have indicated that the creative use of local forces to
hour, round-trip ambulance rides often do so despite
assist in material acquisition and construction could
having their own business or occupation to attend to.
help minimize costs.
Routine medical services are available at the Long Lake
Medical Center (“the Marylou Whitney Medical Com-
2. Support the volunteers who serve as the critical
plex”). The Town of Long Lake owns and maintains the
first responders through training and recruitment
building and staffs the facility with nurses and adminis-
programs, equipment, and the provision of ade-
trative support, while an individual private practitioner
quate physical space. The Town of Long Lake should
tends to patients. This public-private arrangement is
regularly coordinate with volunteer groups to en-
further outlined in “Community Services and Municipal
sure that they have the appropriate meeting space,
Operations.”
access to technology, training opportunities, and
other assistance needed to ensure their long-term
Goal: Ensure that the Town of Long Lake first viability. This could include advertising on the Towns’
responders and associated volunteers have the website and social media accounts for volunteers or
resources and support that they need to pro- fundraising assistance.

vide residents and visitors with fire and medical


3. Explore hiring EMTs to serve the population of
services. Raquette Lake. This may include collaborating with

1. 🌶 Modernize the Raquette Lake Fire Depart-


adjacent municipalities. The long distance between
Long Lake and the nearest hospital, combined with
the shrinking pool of volunteers, represent twin
Comprehensive Plan 37

challenges for residents needing urgent medical available to serve as volunteer ambulance drivers.
care. The Town of Long Lake should continue to
foster productive relationships with adjacent mu- 6. Ensure that there is a reliable back-up electrical
nicipalities to potentially defer the costs of hiring supply available in Raquette Lake, possibly collo-
medical professionals. Efforts at the State level have cated with an upgraded transfer station. Continue
provided some support for increasing the ability of to maintain the Raquette Lake school a as critical
municipalities to form special districts to fund emer- facility/ Red Cross shelter for emergency situa-
gency medical services. The town can also work with tion. Recent communications with National Grid
their representatives at the State level to support representatives indicate that there is an interest in
the “Fair Play” bill that would allow departments that utilizing new battery technology to provide backup
operate their own ambulances to allow them to set power for Raquette Lake. The Town should continue
fees and charges for their services and bill insurance to coordinate with National Grid to help facilitate the
companies accordingly. installation of such infrastructure.

Goal: Increase the resiliency of the Town by


7. Maintain a contingency plan for natural disasters,
weather events, and public health emergencies. The
improving communitywide emergency/disaster Town should prepare and regularly update a local
preparedness. emergency plan that outlines the various proce-
dures that the Town government should take in the
4. Ensure adequate telecommunication service for event of a large-scale disaster. The Town should
emergency service providers. This includes support- incorporate all departments to understand their
ing the recently approved cell towers in Raquette respective roles and protocols. This is curretnly done
Lake, as well as evaluating where there are gaps in in cooperation with Hamilton County Public Health
the communication network that are also activity and Hamilton County Emergency Managment.
centers. Please see “Infrastructure” for associated
recommendations regarding telecommunications. 8. Ensure that there is an efficient procedure for com-
municating with residents in the event of an emer-
5. Increase the availability of municipal workers in the gency. The Town already uses mailings, email, social
Hamlet of Raquette Lake who are authorized to media and, very recently, “robocalling” to reach
serve as ambulance drivers and first responders. residents. The Town should continue to advertise
The Town of Long Lake encourages municipal work- and solicit participation in the robocalling service so
ers to also serve as volunteer ambulance drivers; that all residents are included in the system. Many
however, since there are fewer municipal facilities in residents are not yet fully aware of this new service.
Raquette Lake, there are fewer municipal employees
38 Town of Long Lake

Economic Development and Tourism


Economic development and tourism have always been Economic Development Department and is bolstering
intrinsically linked in the region. Tourists are drawn to shoulder season activities, expanding marketing efforts,
the area for recreation, unspoiled natural attractions, and developing plans for small business training.
quaint Hamlets, shops, accommodations, and eateries.
Most private businesses in the community are depen- Recent public health events, like the COVID-19 pan-
dent on outside visitors. Across the Adirondack Park, demic, may have long-lasting impacts on the tourism
communities have generally reached consensus that industry. As of spring 2020, there are various operating
tourism has eclipsed the extractive industries, such as requirements that will impact the ability of Long Lake’s
logging and mining, in overall economic impact and commercial establishments to operate. Multiple camps
employment and that investing in the tourism industry and institutions have closed for the season, cutting off
is an economic imperative. Embracing tourism can be an important source of visitor spending and employ-
a means to an end; as the income from tourism sup- ment. Regularly scheduled events, like the 4th of July
ports local families, there are expanded opportunities Fireworks, will need to be reconsidered for social dis-
to develop ancillary businesses that are not exclusively tancing. Restaurants will be limited to a reduced number
focused on outside visitors. of patrons. Despite these unprecedented challenges,
the coronavirus pandemic is presenting opportunities
Long Lake’s ‘brand’ is what keeps many people com- for Adirondack communities as safe and accessible
ing back again and again. The Town has differentiated tourism destinations. In the era before air travel, the
itself from other tourist attractions like Lake Placid Adirondacks (and Catskills) were the mountain getaway
or Lake George Village by maintaining a smaller scale for the entire metropolitan New York region where
commercial presence in the Hamlet areas. With the families could pack the car and be at their destination
sole exception of Stewarts, there are no chain or fran- within a day. Now as air travel is viewed as higher risk,
chise businesses. The Town’s most beloved institutions, the 60 million people who live within a day’s drive of the
restaurants, accommodations, tourism services are Adirondacks may be coming to the Park with renewed
independent, family run businesses. While this situation enthusiasm. The Town of Long Lake will need to ensure
makes for a wholly authentic visitor experience, it is also that any influx of tourism in the midst of a pandemic is
a challenging situation to maintain. Small, family run handled in such a way that residents and workers are
businesses in a highly seasonal town require a degree of not put in harm’s way.
resiliency above and beyond what would be required to
run a business in a well populated, year-round com-
munity. Unlike large businesses with full management Goal: Retain existing businesses in Town

🌶
teams, marketing departments, multiple locations,
and bigger cash reserves, running a small business is a
1. Help create or encourage a voluntary busi-
constant struggle. Long Lake’s unique situation- a short
ness association that would allow for business to
season, lack of employees, weather dependency, and
business networking, as well as networking between
unreliable internet service- only adds to that challenge.
the business community and local government but
would not have the taxing authority of a Business
Currently there is no Chamber of Commerce or business
Improvement District (BID). This business associa-
association to provide local businesses an opportuni-
tion would also serve as a first point of contact for
ty to network and develop a coordinated approach to
new business owners in the area and could help
improving the business climate in the Town. Instead, the
advance related programming and events organized
Town, through the Parks and Recreation Department,
by the Parks and Recreation Department. Already,
has taken on the role of a Chamber of Commerce and
the Parks and Recreation Department has devel-
Comprehensive Plan 39

oped plans to facilitate a dialogue between business existing attractions, like hikes, beaches, nearby mu-
owners and can serve as the stepping off point for seums, and other businesses, as well basic knowl-
the eventual formation of a formal business asso- edge about the environment, history, and culture.
ciation. Relying on the already established Parks
and Recreation Department will help to prevent the 3. Seek funding support for improvements for small
unnecessary duplication of efforts and volunteer businesses (e.g., façade improvement program,
burnout. Past efforts to establish economic develop- building upgrades, staffing). A locally managed
ment committees resulted in periodic meetings and micro-loan fund can have a powerful impact, with
useful dialogues, but the Parks and Recreation De- limited amounts of administrative burden. A low
partment has been able to make more meaningful or no interest loan fund could be used to improve
and lasting improvements without the encumbrance multiple businesses.
of a full committee. (See “Implementation” section
for a detailed outline of this approach). 4. Formalize and regularly update the Parks and Rec-
reation Department’s established marketing plan
2. Explore a tourism training program for employees to to ensure the longevity and success of efforts that
strengthen the tourism industry. The Town’s Parks are already underway. The Parks and Recreation
and Recreation Department has initiated the first Department has developed a multi-pronged mar-
steps in a training program and should continue to keting strategy that clearly outlines how the Town
develop this initiative. The target audience would be is continuing to expand their programming and
recently hired employees who would be trained at advertise to potential visitors. The Parks and Recre-
the beginning of the season in the right knowledge, ation Department has been increasing the breadth
skills, and abilities to deliver a top-quality visitor of their multi-media marketing efforts, which cur-
experience. Participants would learn of the Town’s rently includes social media outreach, regular video
40 Town of Long Lake

posting, blog entries, and articles.

5. Support and promote the unique float plane indus-


try and its iconic presence at Long Lake to ensure its
longevity and legacy. The presence of a float plane
operator in the Town of Long Lake is a significant
tourist attraction. The Town should coordinate with
the existing float plane operator to understand in-
dustry trends, physical needs, marketing needs, and
legacy planning (see recommendation 8 for a more
detailed overview of legacy planning). The Town
should also promote and support the "cruise and
dine" industry that allows for a wide range of visitors
to explore the Town's waterways in a low impact
manner while also supporting local jobs.

6. Help facilitate the training of business owners to


use internet marketing, branding, and booking
technology best practices. This could include peer-
to-peer networking, group webinars, or hiring a
technology expert for training sessions. The Parks
and Recreation Department has outlined a program 8. Work with existing businesses to develop legacy
to conduct such training. The Town should continue planning so that as aging owners retire their busi-
to support this initiative and actively solicit partic- nesses can continue. Small, independent businesses
ipants. The Town should consider partnering with are the heart of the Town’s economy. Running small,
local colleges, particurally SUNY Canton's new small seasonal businesses is a demanding task and leaves
business innovation hub to help small businesses, or little time for long-range legacy/succession planning.
those looking to start a new venture. However, many business owners have put their life’s
work into their business and would prefer to see
7. Identify programs that will allow existing businesses it continue, as opposed to shuttering the business
to upgrade and enhance their accommodations to and selling the land for second home development.
keep pace with industry standards without negative- This action dovetails with the goal of fostering new
ly impacting their character. Residents appreciate businesses, since good legacy (or succession) plan-
the authentic, rustic charm of Long Lake, and similar ning can help align new investors with young entre-
destinations have leveraged the presence of tradi- preneurs who may have the interest and energy to
tional mid-century lodging as a marketable asset. run businesses but lack the necessary start-up. The
In the Catskills, there has been a renewed effort to proposed business association and the Parks and
restore mid-20th century motor lodges and cottage Recreation Department could assist with aligning
colonies in a way that retains their appearance while mentoring opportunities through organizations like
providing modern amenities, such as improved SCORE (Service Corps of Retired Executives) and
bathrooms, wifi, and other features that meet ANCA.
current consumer expectations. Regional lodging
studies have been completed, but a Town initiative Goal: Attract and foster new businesses that
would provide local establishments with more per-
will provide local employment and amenities, in
sonalized assistance. This could also involve inviting
trade representatives and hosting a forum on the
addition to serving to reinforce the character of
current state of the accommodation industry. the community.
Comprehensive Plan 41

9. Identify and actively market available commercial


12. Create or enhance an existing venue for perfor-
properties in the Town. There are multiple vacant
mances and community gatherings that could
commercial properties that could benefit from ad-
be used year-round, including providing parking,
ditional marketing. Thousands of visitors - who are
restrooms, etc. The Town will need to determine
potential investors - pass through the Town during
whether a venue space would be more appropri-
the busy season and could be receptive to digital or
ate at the Town Beach, or at a different site with a
physical marketing efforts. The Town’s well-estab-
potentially wider range of site configurations, like
lished marketing program could be utilized in this
Mount Sabbatis. The Town has made consider-
way. However, if the Town is to assist in the market-
able strides in increasing programming and events
ing of private property, every effort must be taken to
throughout the year and they will need to evaluate
ensure that it is a fair and transparent process (i.e.
how their current facilities are meeting their growing
not using tax-payer dollars to promote one private
needs. The increase in shoulder season activities is
business as the expense of another).
highlighting the need for space that can be used in
inclement or cold weather.
10. Incentivize the establishment of new businesses in
the Town through micro-lending, mentorships, work-
13. Provide reliable, high-quality telecommunications
ing with SCORE (a free business training and men-
service. This action is described in greater detail in
toring organization partnered with the U.S. Small
the “Infrastructure” recommendations, but it is men-
Business Association), and training. The proposed
tioned here as well to emphasize its importance to
business association could serve as a key player in
economic development efforts. Recent public health
this effort. The Town’s Park and Recreation Depart-
crises have accelerated the acceptance and prac-
ment is in the process of developing training semi-
ticality of conducting business remotely. As more
nars for local businesses.
people are able to work from home on a permanent
basis, Long Lake’s high quality of life, combined
11. Promote infill development in Hamlet areas where
with good internet access could serve to draw more
land use controls (i.e. design, use, and density regu-
working age families.
lations) are most flexible. The APA considers Ham-
lets the growth and service centers of the Park and
14. Continue efforts to promote year-round visitation
encourages development in them. The APA imposes
and foster a sustainable level of tourism that does
very limited permit requirements unless develop-
not overshadow the essential small-town character
ments are proposed in critical environmental areas
like wetlands, if projects are over 40 feet in height,
or if more than 100 sites or units are proposed.
Review of tax parcel data shows that there is sig-
nificant space available for development within the
existing Hamlet districts in the Town; however, it is
recognized that the cost of land can be prohibitive.
It is also worth noting that while Long Lake does
have a significant amount of land not with the For-
est Preserve land classification, much of this land
is owned by large landowners, and market factors
limit some development opportunities.

Goal: Increase tourism in the shoulder and ‘off’


seasons to increase the viability of year-round
businesses.
42 Town of Long Lake

of the community that residents


and visitors are drawn to in the first
place. The hiring of an addition-
al full-time employee to assist in
developing and launching shoulder
season events has benefited the
Town’s tourism promotion efforts.
The increased staffing level has
allowed the Parks and Recreation
Department to organize and pro-
mote events, while also attending
to other marketing and tourism
promotion activities, expanding the
Department’s effectiveness.
of such organizations, as they could serve on local
15. Continue to pursue opportunities to participate in committees or assist with the proposed business
regional tourism initiatives that package outdoor association.
recreation with local hospitality and retail services • Conduct regular outreach to understand their long-
(e.g., Hamlets to Huts, Great Northern Forest Canoe range plans and needs, as well as their visitation
Trail). The Town benefits from its location along patterns (i.e. spikes and low points). This could help
various regional land- and water-based trails. While the Town and local businesses prepare for an influx
the Northville-Placid Trail has been in existence for a of visitors and plan complementary activities.
lnearly a century, the Hamlets to Huts initiative and
the Great Northern Forest Canoe Trail have both re- 17. Conduct a lodging study to inventory the existing
ceived considerable attention and investment in just stock of accommodations and identify the needs
the past five years. Each of these initiatives has full of current operators to ensure the viability of ex-
time staff dedicated to marketing and promotion. isting accommodations. While past lodging studies
Working with these groups would allow the Town have been conducted, a more focused local study
to leverage the efforts that are already underway to should be used to help support the unique lodging
support the local economy. This effort could include mix that’s within the Town. A lodging study will also
cross marketing on each other’s websites, identify- identify any gaps in the current market. A study
ing potential AirBnB owners along trail routes, and could simply consist of a user survey to understand
working with local restaurants to cater to partici- what visitor expectations are and how they are being
pants. met. Information gathered from a user survey could
be used to inform the above recommendation to
16. Leverage institutional partnerships (e.g., Long Lake explore ways to upgrade existing businesses.
Camp for the Arts, Long Lake Adventure Camp,
Great Camp Sagamore, Raquette Lake Boys and
Girls Camps, Sabattis Boy Scout Camps, etc.). Ra-
quette and Long Lake both benefit from the pres-
ence of large institutions that employ residents and
boost visitation to the area.

• Take advantage of their accommodations, facilities,


and marketing to attract more visitors and provide
additional local employment opportunities.
• Leverage the organizational expertise and networks
Comprehensive Plan 43

Environmental Resources
Long Lake’s environmental resources include the lakes, provide an additional level of oversight and to develop
mountains, forests, and rivers that have drawn residents plans to improve water quality and prevent the spread
and visitors for generations. A well-managed environ- of invasive species. While lake associations do not have
ment not only provides “eco-system services,” such as the ability to enforce regulations, their power lies in
clean air and water, forestry products, and wildlife, but advocacy and education, including their ability to com-
also the cultural and psychological benefits derived from municate with waterfront property owners, organize
proximity to such wild landscapes. Long Lake’s environ- residents around issues, educate the public about best
mental resources are also a critical part of the Town’s practices, encourage people to take steps to reduce
economy; many survey respondents, stakeholders, and their impact on water quality, and raise funds for lake
residents expressed how the Town’s economy is inex- initiatives. The Long Lake Association is currently de-
tricably linked to the health of the environment, partic- veloping a lake management plan with the Lake Cham-
ularly the lakes and waterways. Maintaining the envi- plain/ Lake George Regional Planning Board (LCLGRPB).
ronmental quality of Long Lake is critical to the Town’s
continued success as a tourist destination and place to Goal: Protect and improve water quality of Long
live.
and Raquette Lakes to ensure their value as cul-
tural, environmental, and economic resources.

🌶
The NYS DEC and the APA manage many of the environ-
mental resources in the Town of Long Lake. APA regula-
tions provide standards of environmental protection for 1. Support the development of lake/watershed
public and private land that are some of the strongest management plans for both Raquette and Long
in the State. The Town has an opportunity to influence Lakes. Long Lake is in the process of developing a
the management of State-owned resources through the lake management plan already. Raquette Lake is in
UMP development process. Efforts like the Adirondack the St. Lawrence River Watershed Plan (SLRWP) area,
Five Towns/Upper Hudson Recreation Hub and the GSW a final plan for this large-scale project is anticipated
Complex Plan highlight how to be released in late 2020. Upon
municipalities or recreationists the completion of the SLRWP, the
can take a proactive approach RLPF should work with local part-
to advocating for their interests ners to develop a more localized
during the creation of or amend-
ments to UMPs.

A significant portion of devel-


opment in the Town is concen-
trated along the shorelines of
Long Lake and Raquette Lake.
As a result, the lakes are most
susceptible to human impacts
compared to many of the Town’s
other environmental features.
The Long Lake Association and
the Raquette Lake Preservation
Foundation (RLPF) have a good
working relationship with the
Town and have stepped in to
44 Town of Long Lake

plan that will provide targeted recommendations for


Raquette Lake and open additional grant funding 4. Continue and expand the existing aquatic invasive
opportunities for water quality projects. species monitoring of boat launch sites using volun-
teers and paid staff. The Town of Long Lake con-
2. Work with the State to evaluate the impacts of road tributes financially to lake monitoring efforts on an
salt on local waterbodies and drinking water sup- annual basis. This practice should be continued as
plies and explore potential alternatives. The Town of the threat of invasive species continues to grow. The
Long Lake relies on NYS DOT for road salt and has seasonal “Lake Stewards” who monitor boat launch
limited responsibility for its application. There is also sites work for modest wages and have struggled to
a limited amount of shoreline abutting roadways on find adequate housing. As the Town explores actions
both Raquette and Long Lakes, meaning that there to address overall housing needs, the Lake Stewards
are relatively smaller areas contributing road salt should be considered as well.
into waterways. However, as water quality monitor-
ing continues, the Town will need to work with the 5. Ensure regular coordination and communication
lake associations to ensure that sodium levels in between lake associations and the Town. This will
local waterways do not exceed safe levels. This will allow the Town and the lake associations to stay
allow interested parties to make informed decisions abreast of grant opportunities, water quality trends,
about the necessity of exploring alternatives to road and opportunities to partner on projects.
salt.
6. Creatively leverage State and federal grant programs
3. Work with regional, State, and federal partners to that may have been overlooked in the past, such as
develop a fisheries management plan for the Town’s the Northern Border Regional Commission and U.S.
waterways. Fishing is very important to the local Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) grant pro-
economy, but there is no long-term plan in place grams for planning in rural communities. While State
that specifically addresses the fisheries in Long level grant funding opportunities are most familiar
and Raquette Lakes. The Town, in partnership with to municipalities, there are a variety of federal pro-
the lake associations, can pursue State and federal grams that can be used to support environmental
programs that will help study and manage the local quality projects in Long Lake. As noted in the “Imple-
fisheries (see Implementation Matrix for potential mentation” section, programs like the Great Lakes
grant programs). Restoration Initiative should be considered.

Goal: Ensure that the open spaces, lakes, 7. Continue to collaborate with colleges and universi-
streams, and forests that define Long Lake are ties to leverage their staff and students’ academic
and technical expertise. Paul Smith’s College, SUNY
managed responsibly so that they can continue Cortland, and SUNY ESF all have a local presence
to provide the environmental, economic, and and complementary academic programs. Working
scenic functions that draw residents and visi- with their environmental studies and biology de-
tors.
Comprehensive Plan 45

partments to identify long-term service learning and


research-based projects can provide mutual bene-
fit to the Town’s environmental resources and the
colleges.

8. Work with property owners that have aging septic


systems, particularly along the waterfront, to up-
grade their systems. The HCSWCD, NYS DEC, and
Paul Smith’s College already works with lake associ-
ations to educate property owners about how their
property maintenance practices can impact water
quality. The Town of Long Lake can support this
effort by exploring septic inspection regulations or
maintenance standards. Other communities in the
region have implemented programs that encourage
septic inspections when property is transferred.

9. Support ongoing invasive species eradication efforts.


The Town of Long Lake should continue to provide
material and financial support to the lake associa-
tions for this effort. In addition to direct financial
support, the Town can be a valuable partner in
12. Advocate to NYS DEC to better align the various UMPs
securing grant funding. In NYS, grant applications
throughout the Town, so that there is an approach to
are viewed favorably when they show collaborations
land management that better relates to the human
between municipalities and other organizations.
communities contained within. This could be done
at an individual UMP basis or through updates to the
10. Advocate for evaluation, monitoring, and any nec-
GSW Complex Plan. Other possible alternatives to the
essary upgrades to State facilities’ wastewater
current UMP geographies would be to use watershed
treatment systems (at campground and day-use
boundaries to delineate UMPs.
facilities). Stakeholders indicated that the upkeep of
State campgrounds is important to the overall water
13. Ensure that trails and trailhead facilities are designed
quality of the lakes. Some expressed concerns with
in a sustainable manner so that outdoor recreation
select facilities, as well. State campgrounds and day-
does not have an unduly negative impact on the
use facilities host thousands of visitors every sum-
Town’s environmental resources. Outdoor recreation,
mer, and, if their wastewater systems were to fail,
particularly hiking, has been growing in popularity
the impact on local waterways would be negative.
over the past decade. Elsewhere in the Adirondacks,
local trail systems that were previously used only by
11. Educate tourists and visitors on the importance of
a small number of visitors are experiencing signifi-
environmental stewardship to build appreciation for
cant increases in visitation. To address issues like trail
and to protect the Town’s resources. Many residents
erosion, inappropriate disposal of human waste, and
expressed concern that visitors to the area were not
overcrowded parking areas, the NYS DEC launched
aware of how their activity can impact the Town’s
a “Sustainable Tourism” initiative, which includes
natural resources. The Town could include informa-
improving trails, installing more information signage,
tion kiosks promoting “leave no trace” principles at
upgrading parking areas and providing additional por-
popular outdoor recreation destinations and in the
table bathrooms. The Town should coordinate with
Hamlet areas. This could be part of the Town’s com-
the NYS DEC to identify areas where these “Sustain-
prehensive wayfinding signage program (please see
able Tourism” practices could be implemented.
Concept Maps on pages 58-61)
46 Town of Long Lake

Housing

Like many Adirondack communities, Long Lake suffers


from a lack of housing stock that is affordable to people
Goal: Help ensure that there is housing available
living and working in the area full-time and suitable for for a full range of incomes, ages, and abilities.
an aging population. Retaining and attracting residents This includes seasonal workforce housing,
that are of the age to raise a family and retaining older age-appropriate housing for seniors, and hous-
residents are community priorities, but without the ap-
ing that is financially attainable for people
propriate types of housing, it will be a difficult task.
working locally.

🌶
The number of seasonal or second homes far outweighs
the number of year-round residences. Second home-
owners play a significant role in the local economy, 1. Investigate municipal options to encour-
bringing in money to spend at local establishments, age the creation of quality, affordable housing that
paying property taxes, volunteering in local organiza- meets the needs of working families, recognizing
tions, and injecting vibrancy into the community. How- that the Town will need to follow an alternative
ever, the demand for second homes in Long Lake results approach to addressing housing issues then it has in
in residents competing with buyers from areas with the past. Exploring private market driven initiatives
much higher earning potential. Residents working locally that build off public-private partnerships would ease
have a median household income of $58,750, while the the burden on local taxpayers and program admin-
median value of a single-family dwelling in the Town is istrators. A public-private partnership would allow
$235,200. the Town to use its abilities to acquire and hold land
while it identifies a preferred buyer. The Town can
Rental housing is hard to find for employees and tempo- take a proactive approach to identifying available
rary residents, and there are very few rental properties land that is in appropriate areas for housing. After
available to Long Lake residents. Over 90% of the hous- acquiring the land, the Town could transfer it to
ing stock is owner-occupied, as opposed to the national housing developers at less than market rate. This
ratio of approximately 65% owner occupied and 35% would allow housing developers to produce housing
renter occupied. This means that housing for seasonal units at a reasonable price and then transfer those
employees and potential residents is limited. Various savings on to the eventual tenants or owners. The
stakeholders reported that filling vacant jobs, even for Town would need to ensure that appropriate con-
stable, year-round positions, has been challenging due trols are in place (i.e. deed restrictions, etc.) so that
to a scarcity of rental housing. the housing cost does not price out local families.
Alternatively, the Town can identify affordable hous-
In the past, Town residents and leaders have initiated ing developers that are active in the region and open
projects to address the housing problem, but the costs a dialogue with them to outline local needs and help
and complexity of launching the projects, the adminis- identify potential sites for housing. The Town of
trative burdens associated with grant funding, and the North Elba recently conducted a detailed “Housing
stigma for potential residents stalled the projects. How- Needs Assessment” and immediately engaged Re-
ever, as housing becomes a more pressing issue across gan Development, an affordable housing developer
the Adirondack Park and society at large, new, promising active throughout upstate NY, to start exploring sites
models are emerging. New approaches to address the for a 40-60-unit complex. North Elba’s efforts have
housing crisis emphasize locally designed programs involved the Town, ROOST, local businesses, and
built by private developers as opposed to top-down State representatives.
federal programs that come with considerable ‘red-tape’
and contractual obligations. 2. Explore creative solutions to housing seasonal work-
Comprehensive Plan 47

ers, such as letting out rooms and working with the


proposed business association to pool employer re-
sources. Dormitory style housing has been a success
in similar seasonal tourism destinations. Depending
on the type of worker, the shared housing could
include shared restrooms and kitchen areas, or
independent apartments complete with kitchen and
bathroom facilities, as well as private entrances. The
Town in partnership with NGOs could help identify
available properties for renovation and leaseing out
to local businesses for staff housing or long-term
rentals.
3. Work to develop safe, accessible housing for se-
niors to age in place through new construction or
6. Partner with existing regional, State, and federal
the rehabilitation of existing homes. Existing hous-
agencies to participate in existing housing programs
ing providers like the Sunmount Homes could be
that have emerged since Long Lake last attempted
engaged with to determine if there are opportunities
to address housing issues. One such option is the
to reprogram their facilities for more senior-oriented
Adirondack Community Housing Trust, a non- profit
purposes. The rehabilitation of existing single-family
established in 2007 to help local working families
homes should be considered as well, since there are
making up to 120% of the area median income pur-
many single seniors who may be at risk of unsafe liv-
chase homes.
ing conditions due to their inability to afford needed
repairs. A locally established housing rehabilitation
7. The Town should monitor the “Short Term Rental”
fund could help support seniors to age in place,
(STR) industry (AirBnB, VBRO, HomeAway, etc.) local-
while at the same time preventing the Town’s limited
ly to evaluate its impacts. STRs are filling an import-
housing stock from further deteriorating.
ant role in providing accommodations as second
homes are replacing campgrounds, cottage colonies,
4. Explore alternative types of housing strategies that
and motels. To date, STRs’ impact has been positive
would allow seniors to age in the community, if not
because of the increased visitation they support;
age in place. This option could include multiple
however, STRs have the potential to skew the local
seniors choosing to live in one house with shared
housing market and to introduce semi-commercial
facilities while they rent out their single-family
enterprises into residential neighborhoods. The
home. This would allow residents to have increased
Town should take an active role in coordinating with
opportunities for socialization, while still retaining
STR owners and engage them with local tourism
independence. Any housing solution of this type
promotion efforts, since many STR owners serve as
would require the assistance of someone capable of
ambassadors or informal travel guides for the com-
organizing and administering such an arrangement.
munity and are the first point of contact for visitors.
To track trends in STRs, the Town should consider
5. Explore public-private coordination, such as working
web-based services like “Host Compliance” or “Prop-
with the Adirondack Experience or Great Camp Sag-
erty Guard.” These web-based services monitor sites
amore, to address housing issues. Large institutions
such as AirBnB, VBRO, etc and can determine where
dependent on seasonal employees could prove to
rentals are and how often they are occupied.
be valuable partners in finding housing solutions, in
a large part due their access to financing and ability
to assist with the administration of grants. Alterna-
tively, the Town should consider working with adja-
cent municipalities to address housing issues.
48 Town of Long Lake

Transportation

Long Lake covers a large geography, and residents are ships with local businesses, some of which have indi-
required to travel long distances within and outside of cated are willing to improve /support access to their
the Town. Historically, railroads, guide boats, and steam establishments from Hamlet areas and local camp-
boats were used to move people around; now, private grounds. The Town will need to continue to recruit
automobiles are the primary mode of travel. Some eligible drivers if they wish to expand this program.
residents depend on boats and snowmobiles to access
properties not served by roads. The Town’s aging popu-
lation will increase demand for transportation services
2. 🌶 Enhance the sidewalk network in the Ham-
lets so that residents and visitors can travel between
for tasks like shopping, medical appointments, and so- multiple destinations safely and comfortably. Im-
cialization. The Town’s “Little Bus” is already serving this proving and extending sidewalks has been a long-
role, and residents have expressed a desire to continue standing topic of interest in the community as a
and expand this service for both recreational events, like quality of life issue, an economic development issue,
New Year’s Eve celebrations, and more utilitarian pur- and a transportation issue. The Hamlet of Raquette
poses, like rides for senior events and services. Lake is in particular need of pedestrain accomoda-
tions and many pedestrians walk along Route 28
Goal: Improve resident and visitor mobility a 55 mph roadway. Since sidewalk improvements
for both recreational and practical purposes touch on so many different aspects of the Town,
there are various avenues that the Town should
through a variety of modes. explore for project funding (refer to the "Implemen-
tation" section for more detail on funding opportu-
1. Continue and expand the capacity and geography
nities).
covered by the “Little Bus” shuttle service, and
explore ways to provide similar service in Raquette
3. Expand the availability and reliability of non-emer-
Lake. This may be accomplished through partner-
Comprehensive Plan 49

gency transportation for medical services, seniors,


and other residents with limited mobility. Due to the
Town’s long distance from emergency and special-
ized medical care, residents struggle to access the
medical services they need. As the Town’s popu-
lation continues to grow older, this will be an in-
creasingly important issue to address. The Warren/
Hamilton Office of the Aging should continue to be
coordinated with. Alternatives to publicly provided
transportation include “rideshare” type services like
“Uber” and “Lyft.” While these services are depen-
dent on the availability of participating drivers, the
Town could advertise the presence of such services;
for example, the Village of Saranac Lake includes
links to Uber and Lyft on their website under the
topic of transportation. The Town should consider
working with senior groups to introduce them to
these new technology-based rideshare services.

4. Work with State partners to ensure that the needed


bridge improvements include adequate space for
various modes of transportation, including snow-
mobiles, cyclists, and pedestrians. The NYS DOT is
responsible for bridge repairs and replacement on
State roadways. Bridges are an important aspect of
the Town’s outdoor recreation and transportation
plans since they are used by snowmobilers, hikers,
bikers, and other forms of transportation. Bridges
should include adequate space for two opposing
lanes of automobile travel, as well as additional
space for recreationists and snowplows.

5. Ensure the State prioritizes road improvements


to facilitate access to State lands and recreational
assets. The Town has limited responsibility for the
main roads traversing the community. However, the
Town should continue to advocate for well-main-
tained roads to the County and State. In 2013, the
Town of Newcomb was successful in petitioning the
State for upgrades to 28N after years of neglect.
50 Town of Long Lake

Community Services
and Municipal Operation

The Community Services and Municipal Operation sec-


tion identifies policies and programs that the Town can
pursue as they manage municipal facilities, provide com-
munity services, and encourage residents to become
more actively engaged in local government.

Throughout the hamlet areas of Long Lake and Raquette


Lake there are municipal facilities (leased or owned) that
need to be upgraded for functional and aesthetic rea-
sons. Municipal buildings are scattered throughout the
Town, and some facilities no longer serve the purposes
for which they were originally designed.

Town managed facilities are also an important aspect of


the Town’s tourism infrastructure. Providing some of the
most basic amenities for visitors can encourage longer
and more frequent visitation. These basic amenities in- lease land for municipal facilities, such as the transfer
clude things like well-maintained restrooms, information station. Without municipally owned land the Town of
booths, and parking lots. Long Lake has been unable to make as many visible and
permanent municipal investments in the Hamlet of Ra-
Age friendly services and facilities are of increasing quette Lake as some Raquette Lake residents would like.
importance, since 28.5% of Long Lake’s population is 65 Facilities like restrooms, parking areas, and public space
years or older, nearly double the national rate of 15.2%. have been provided through informal arrangements
Despite a decreasing number of year-round residents, with landowners in the Raquette Lake Hamlet area. The
the proportion of older residents is growing and does Town of Long Lake will need to ensure that residents of
not show signs of decreasing. Older residents have Raquette Lake do not feel ignored or underrepresented
unique needs and face issues such as social isolation, in Town affairs.
transportation challenges, alternative housing needs,
and the need for assistance with meal-preparation and Goal: The Town of Long Lake should strive to
nutrition, to name but a few. The Town already provides
upgrade the utility and appearance of their pub-
multiple senior-oriented services and activities that will
need to be continually expanded and developed. lic facilities to improve municipal services and
instill civic pride.
The large geographic distance between the Hamlet of
Long Lake, which serves as the center of municipal op-
erations, and the Hamlet of Raquette Lake has resulted
1. 🌶 Develop a Capital Improvement Plan (CIP). A
CIP is a tool that is used to coordinate the location,
in concerns about the distribution of municipal services timing, and financing of capital improvements over
and the ability of Raquette Lake residents to partici- a multi-year period. A CIP will provide the Town
pate in local government. The Town of Long Lake owns with a well-considered approach to investing in
almost no land around Raquette Lake and is required to infrastructure and other capital improvements, like
land acquisition, major equipment purchases, and
Comprehensive Plan 51

municipal construction. Generally, a CIP includes a space for visitors. Simple steps like providing wire-
listing of the capital projects, equipment, and major less internet, clean restrooms, and event informa-
studies, a ranking of projects, a financing plan, a tion are proven to increase the number of people
timetable for the construction or completion of the stopping in a community, as opposed to driving
project, a project justification, and a classification, through to a destination with more amenities.
itemization, and explanation for the project expen-
ditures. A CIP will be very important for the Town to 4. Locate the municipal archives in an place that has
attract development in its Hamlets and to make in- adequate capacity, is safe, and accessible in order to
formed decisions about what type of infrastructure preserve and promote the areas rich history.
and municipal buildings to invest in. A CIP can also
include a strategy for how to better utilize existing Goal: Continue to support the Long and Raquette
assets and explore opportunities for consolidation
Lake School Districts and further integrate them
and decommissioning of redundant or underutilized
municipal facilities.
into the community.
5. Work with the Raquette Lake School District to en-
2. Enhance existing municipal buildings:
hance and improve their programming and facilities
• Update Town Hall for community space with ade-
to meet the needs of residents and visitors. Resi-
quate facilities for education, meetings, and cook-
dents use the Raquette Lake School for exercise, so-
ing and crafting events. This could include working
cialization, meetings, and other community events.
with surrounding landowners (i.e. Church, Library,
In the absence of any municipally owned facilities,
School) to increase availability/awareness of parking,
the school serves as the de facto community space
improving the septic system, and providing appro-
in the Hamlet of Raquette Lake. Raquette Lake resi-
priate ADA access. The Town Hall’s location in the
dents have expressed interest in further leveraging
center of the Hamlet at a halfway point between
the school facilities to serve as a space that would
Mount Sabattis and the Long Lake Beach could allow
have utility as a tourism amenity.
it to serve as an important ‘anchor.’
• Similar upgrades should be considered at the
6. Explore options to further integrate the Long Lake
existing Town Offices. The appearance of the ex-
School into the fabric of the community, possibly by
isting facilities does not reflect the significance of
using school facilities for additional events, con-
the building use. As a tourist information center,
tinuing education classes, performances, overflow
the offices should present a more inviting façade,
parking, etc. Despite serving a relatively small num-
including larger windows and improved pedestrian
ber of students, the LLCSD has wide support from
access from the front of the building. In conjunction
residents and is viewed as a pillar of the community.
with overall improvements to the appearance and
functionality of the building, there should be ade-
quate wayfinding installed so that visitors approach-
ing by automobile will use the Parks and Recreation
Department’s tourism information as their first point
of contact.

Goal: Continue to improve municipal facilities


and services that enhance the viability of the
year-round tourism industry

3. Provide a facility that serves as first point of contact


for visitors and tourists with information, restrooms,
and other amenities. Elsewhere in the Adirondacks,
communities are recognizing the need for a physical
52 Town of Long Lake

While there are limits to the influence that the Town


of Long Lake has on the LLCSD, an open dialogue
and constant pursuit of new partnerships will help
both organizations. The Community Teacher Student
(CTSO) Organization can serve as an important liai-
son between the school and the community.

Goal: Provide additional opportunities for the


residents of the Hamlet of Raquette Lake to
participate in local government affairs and have
equal access to Town services.

7. 🌶 Form an official Raquette Lake Committee


and require regular coordination with the Town
Board to ensure better representation of Raquette
Lake residents in local government affairs. An offi-
cially appointed Committee will provide routine com-
munication between Hamlets. Despite, or due to,
Raquette Lake’s small size, there are many citizens
who are very engaged in multiple community groups
and organizations. The Town Board should consider
recruiting and appointing a committee of active Ra-
quette Lake residents to make regular reports to the
Town Board. The Raquette Lake Committee would
be empowered to meet independently in Raquette
Lake and either send representatives or meeting
minutes to the Town Board. Public review of the Ra-
quette Lake Committee reports by the Town Board
work with residents to establish the best use of that
will ensure that the issues facing Raquette Lake
land. The Town of Long Lake does not own land in
residents and businesses are being considered on a
the Hamlet of Raquette Lake and is required to rent
regular basis.
space for their facilities. Residents and stakeholders
expressed a desire for tourism facilities, such as
8. Explore technology that will allow Raquette Lake
restrooms, garbage receptacles, and information
residents to take a more active role in Town Board
booths. As an alternative to outright acquisition, the
deliberations (e.g., live broadcast via the internet,
Town could work with willing landowners to estab-
recordings of board proceedings being posted on
lish long term leases on land.
Town website, etc.). Recent public health emergen-
cies caused by COVID-19 have required residents
10. Clearly communicate the activities of the Town
to rapidly adopt new remote meeting technology.
Board and various Town departments, including
While the circumstances of the health emergency
the Parks and Recreation Department, the Water
are unfortunate, the Town and residents should con-
Department, etc., to keep residents informed of the
tinue to leverage newfound familiarity with remote,
various Town initiatives underway. The Parks and
internet-based meeting platforms to improve public
Recreation Department updates the Town website,
dialogue.
posts to social media, and issues press releases on
a regular basis, but based on community feedback
9. Consider working with willing landowners to pursue
from the survey, residents still desire more infor-
the public acquisition of land in Raquette Lake, and
mation about the various initiatives and programs
Comprehensive Plan 53

underway by the Town. Increased communication housing design (e.g. wheelchair accessible, single
of Town activities would also serve to engage resi- story, etc.) when new development occurs or when
dents of Raquette Lake who feel underrepresented existing facilities are updated. The Town will have
in Town affairs. This could include the publication of an opportunity to promote universally accessible
annual reports from various departments or even housing design if it participates in public-private
engaging newsletter articles published on the Town partnerships (i.e. municipal acquisition of land and
website then disposition to preferred developer) to address
local housing issues.
Goal: Enable older residents and visitors to re-  
main in the community as productive, dignified,  

and healthy citizens.

11. Continue to provide services targeted at seniors


(e.g., nutrition, socialization, medical, transportation)
at various locations throughout the Town. Social-
ization is of particular importance to seniors in the
community. Increasing opportunities for seniors
to volunteer could benefit local organizations and
improve seniors’ quality of life. Residents have indi-
cated that slots for volunteers at the local libraries
are in high demand, and any vacancy is quickly
occupied.

12. Encourage the development of universally accessible


54 Town of Long Lake

Hamlet Beautification and Intiatives

While Long Lake encompasses a massive geography,


most activities, shopping, and attractions are concen-
trated in the small Hamlet areas at either end of Town.
Due to the compact size of the Hamlets, the Town has
an easily identifiable place to concentrate on beauti-
fication and other improvements to the public realm.
Community members have provided a series of ideas
for improvements such as lake access and docking on
Raquette Lake, improvements to the causeways, con-
necting Long Lake Town Beach to the central business
area via sidewalks and the path behind the school, im-
provements to public parking, public restrooms, tourism
information outlets, performance space, and wayfind-
be used throughout the Hamlet areas. All lighting
ing. The improvements are displayed graphically in the
should be ‘dark-sky’ compliant and not produce un-
series of maps contained at the end of this document. In
necessary glare and light pollution. Lighting will also
addition to drawings a series of preliminary cost esti-
improve pedestrian safety.
mates provide a basis for future grant funding requests.
• Complete Streets: This is a design philosophy and
practice that encourages that roadways be built
Goal: Improve the appearance of the Hamlet to accommodate all users, not just private auto-
areas to ensure the Town continues to present a mobiles. In the Hamlet areas this means adequate
charming appearance to residents and visitors. sidewalks, crosswalks, and bicycle facilities. Danger-

1. 🌶 Conduct overall streetscape enhance-


ments in the Hamlet districts (e.g., lighting, side- •
ous intersections should be improved for bike and
pedestrian safety, as well.
Street trees: Street trees offer myriad benefits to a
walks, landscaping, complete streets). As part of the downtown area. They are aesthetically appealing,
Town’s overall livability and attractiveness to visitors, and they provide shade in the summer. While an
improvements to the Hamlet areas’ streetscapes Adirondack community, Long Lake has relatively few
should be prioritized. Long Lake benefits from hav- street trees in the Hamlet areas and should consider
ing compact walkable Hamlet districts, which allow planting some at select locations. Street tree place-
the Town to concentrate improvements on relatively ment will need to consider snow removal and snow
small portions of its overall area. storage.
• Wayfinding: Wayfinding is a coordinated system
• Sidewalks: An attractive and functional sidewalk net- of signage and mapping that allows users to un-
work is one of the most essential and basic elements derstand and comfortably explore an area. Good
of a successful downtown. Encouraging visitors to wayfinding highlights local assets, encourages more
get out of their cars and explore encourages shop- in-depth visitation, and enhances appreciation and
ping and dining in the area. Sidewalks also fulfill a understanding of an area. A good wayfinding system
basic public health need, allowing residents to stay uses consistent fonts, styles, and colors on signage
active as they go about their day to day business. to provide a cohesive experience. The types of sig-
Improving and installing sidewalks in the Hamlets nage in a wayfinding system include pedestrian scale
should be a top priority for the Town. signs, automobile oriented signs, trail wayfinding
• Lighting: Attractive, pedestrian-scale lighting should signs, kiosks, and interpretative signage.
Comprehensive Plan 55

Quality of Life
Having a good quality of life means that residents are nity pride. Celebrating local history is a way to build
not just surviving long winter months and blackfly sea- community spirit and tap into the growing market for
son but are thriving and having a rewarding experience ‘heritage tourism.’ While historic institutions like Great
as members of a community. Many of the above recom- Camp Sagamore and the Adirondack Experience provide
mendations are intended to improve overall quality of world-class exhibitions and programming, there is no lo-
life; however, some initiatives and recommendations do cal museum in the Town. Currently, Long Lake’s munici-
not fit neatly into one of the above topic areas. Through- pal archives do not have adequate storage space. There
out the public engagement process, residents brought may be opportunity to develop a local museum space
up a series of issues and ideas that have a large impact (possibly co-located with other Town facilities) that also
on quality of life. serves as improved archive space.

Access to appropriate medical facilities is an issue for Outdoor recreation is discussed in this plan as an eco-
many residents. There is one medical provider in the nomic development and environmental issue, but it is
community, but it is a practice built around a single, also an important aspect of residents overall wellness,
independent doctor. There is some uncertainty about not just from a recreational persepctive, but as a healthy
the long-term future of the practice in the event of the living opporutnity. Ample and well designed outdoor
doctor’s eventual retirement. According to a 2019 survey recreation facilities will provide residents with an oppor-
of graduating medical doctors, only 1% want to live in tunity to maintain an active lifestyle that will improve
communities under 10,000. overall community health.

Residents have expressed a desire for increased access Goal: Maintain Long Lake’s high quality of life
to food and groceries. Existing food retailers in the
and retain the essential rural character of the
community do offer essential groceries and allow for
custom orders, but most residents leave the community
community.
for routine grocery shopping. Those without the trans-
portation or time to travel as far away as Glens Falls, Old 1. Continue to organize and promote events (e.g., Win-
Forge, Saranac Lake, or Utica are limited to the offerings ter Carnivals) as both a means to draw visitors and
of local retailers. strengthen the existing sense of community. While
this recommendation is already an ongoing effort of
A good quality of life also includes a sense of commu- the Parks and Recreation Department as an eco-
nomic development initiative, it is also a very import-
ant community building activity. Many second-home
owners may not have had opportunities through
work or the local schools to interact with the com-
munity. Fun, public events provide an opportunity
for seasonal and second homeowners to connect
with other residents and strengthen the sense of
community.

2. Increase access to affordable healthy food by work-


ing with for-profit businesses, non-profit organiza-
tions like AdkAction and ANCA, and other commu-
nity groups. (For a full description of the various
community groups and regional partners please see
56 Town of Long Lake

improving transportation access. The Long Lake


“Partners” in the “Implementation” section.) There
Medical Facility is operated by a single doctor with
are multiple food retailers in the Town of Long Lake
considerable assistance from a municipally hired
that provide retail groceries for residents. Due to
support staff of nurses and administrators. As an
the small size of the year-round population and
independent practice, the doctor’s office provides
other logistical issues, the profit-margin on providing
a level of personalized care unavailable at larger
groceries is very narrow. The Town should consid-
health-care conglomerates. If the Town wishes to
er reaching out to existing retailers to understand
continue to support an independent practitioner,
their needs and to identify potential partnerships
there will need to be plans to recruit and train a
with groups like AdkAction and ANCA. The Keese-
replacement for the current doctor. The rising cost
ville Pharmacy in Essex County has partnered with
of medical school and Long Lake’s rural lifestyle will
local food producers to sell healthy fresh foods at
make attracting a replacement challenging. Addi-
their store. ANCA provides logistical and adminis-
tionally, the transition between practitioners if the
trative support needed to connect the retailer with
current doctor retires will need to be carefully man-
the producers. As a result, the Keeseville Farmacy
aged and planned for. The alternative to continuing
provides affordable and healthy local products to a
a publicly supported private practice would be to
previously underserved area. Any arrangement of
engage with a regional healthcare provider. Whether
this nature should be designed not to compete with
the Town chooses to maintain their current practice
local retailers.
or to explore alternatives, there will need to be the
appropriate funding and planning in place.
3. Continue to provide municipal space for education,
fitness, socialization, and volunteering. The Town
5. Cultivate an appreciation and understanding of
organizes a series of events like wreath-making,
the Town’s history to build local pride and leverage
exercise classes, and musical shows. These events
a growing interest in heritage tourism. This could
provide much needed socialization for residents
include working with institutions like the Great
throughout the year. This opportunity for socializa-
Camp Sagamore and Adirondack Experience on
tion is particularly important for the growing cohort
remote displays and programming. Emphasizing
of seniors who live alone and do not work. In addi-
local history will allow the Town to further diversi-
tion to one-off events, the Town should continue
fy their tourist “customer base” to include people
to develop regularly programmed, ongoing events
who may be less interested or able to participate in
and activities for residents to participate in. Various
active outdoor recreation. The Town has an active
County departments share a common mission and
historical society that has had success with events
can help the Town develop programming for these
like their Annual Summer Historic Weekend. Other
efforts.
niche areas of historical interest include Great Camp
architecture and Long Lake’s status as the birth of
4. Ensure that residents have access to adequate
the American vacation. Pursing historical/heritage
health and human services, whether it be through
programming may allow the Town to access addi-
retaining and expanding existing facilities, con-
tional grant funding from the NYS Office of Parks,
necting residents with telemedicine programs, or
Recreation and Historic Preservation (OPRHP).
Comprehensive Plan 57
d
on

P
r ry
e
Sp

LEGEND Improve the connectivity


N um
b er 4 G
at e

The Town should continue


COMMUNITY
CONNECTOR TRAIL
of the snowmobile trail
network developing u a an
w 7
5
6
4
10A
b er 5 G a te
to advocate to the NYS DEC
Li t t le S
q
Nu
m
to implement the recently
SNOWMOBILE TRAIL
on-land connection to
the Hamlets of Long
7
5
4
610 M
P o o he g a
nd
Rd
approved Cedarlands
Conservation Easement

n
PROPOSED SNOWMOBILE

Be n
B og La k e
Lake, Raquette Lake and Mo o
Recreation Management Plan
TRAIL KE

t
n B

Rd
beyond. i ne rr

sh

a
el

HAMLETS-TO-HUTS LA Po n
d (RMP)
E R
ROUTE Rd PP ra Continue to promote

O
L il a G at n ge
ake TU e
universally designed facilities y

COMP
MULTIPURPOSE TRAIL L
CEDARLANDS

a
W
LE

rk
FOOT TRAIL TT to attractsLausers
ke of all ages CONSERVATION
Pa
LI

y
pand
u s abilities. EASEMENT

le
n g
La
UNPAVED ROAD LAKE m

ra
G
UNMARKED TRAIL
Æ
·

rk
LILA 30 Pa

PLAN

KE
l lon
Di

LA
n
J oh

FIRE TOWER Saw

NG
R o a d Way m y
d ill W

a
on
HAND LAUNCH Elk
P Co ff ee Po t T

LO
p

2020
ke
La

ke
Rd
PAVED PARKING LOT tl o
w
Continue to dedicate Town P ic k w ick et
P ar
RAMP LAUNCH resources to the maintenance Ln
UNPAVED PARKING LOT and upkeep of snowmobiling vil
le

Ln
a

rd m

T
LAKE

Ji
il

Mil e
SEE INSET MAPi

H
er

rb e l l n
k
Mi x
trails. ic

l L
r K

Ri d
ech e Ln
EATON

B
Be rk W a y

R
ce

Si x
a

Work with State and regional


P

LONG LAKE Æ
·
28N

Ln
Wetlands
partners to advocate for E nd
ion
A Comprehensive Plan is a document that
Surface Water existing recreational assets Expand gateway and
Spg
provides direction for local government policy
such as Buttermilk Falls, Owl’s wayfinding
C lub signage throughout d
State Owned Land and future actions, providing an opportunity

l
Co
r and
the town to identify key places

a
M in e r v
B
Head Mountain and Cedarlands for a community to take stock of the issues and
re

State Easements
BRA

th

P
Conservation Easement. of interest.
k
opportunities it faces, identify a shared vision for
ar

Town Park Land a


W
NDR

the future, and to provide recommendations and


y

Other Conserved Land BUTTERMILK strategies to guide the Town in pursuing its goals
ETH

H o sl
Parcel Boundaries FALLS Wa y y
e for the future.
Æ
·30

s
E
LAK This plan is important because it will help ensure
LAK

D
FO
R KE
BI LE that the Town of Long Lake evolves in line with
O
E

M residents’ collective vision for the community,


NOW
Continue to map and market S and will help set priorities for investments
existing recreational assets, in infrastructure, capital improvements, and
including the development of economic development initiatives.
a cohesive digital wayfinding
system. 7
5
4
6 3

TOWN WIDE GOALS AND VISION


• Goal: Provide all residents and visitors with a variety of quality recreation options that are suitable • Goal: Protect and improve water quality of Long and Raquette Lakes to ensure their value as
for a wide range of ages, abilities, and interests throughout the year. cultural, environmental, and economic resources.

RECREATION

ENVIRONMENT
RAQUETTE • Goal: Improve connections between existing recreational facilities. Expand the network of • Goal: Ensure that the open spaces, lakes, streams, and forests that define Long Lake are managed
LAKE accessible multi-use trails and develop connections to existing multi-use trails in the region. responsibly so that they can continue to provide the environmental, economic, and scenic functions
• Goal: Ensure that the infrastructure is designed, operated, and built in a sustainable and resilient that draw residents and visitors.
E

manner. • Goal: Help ensure that there is housing available for a full range of incomes, ages, and abilities.
BIL

TRANSP HOUSING
This includes seasonal workforce housing, age-appropriate housing for seniors, and housing that
MO

An t
• Goal: Increase cellular telecommunications coverage so that there is adequate and reliable service
OW

SN
le

Rd
is financially attainable for people working locally.
rs

SEE INSET MAP L o n g Pt


throughout the populated portions of the Town.
• Goal: Ensure that the municipal water system is safe, reliable, and complaint with all pertinent • Goal: Improve resident and visitor mobility for both recreational and practical purposes through a
RAQUETTE LAKE variety of modes.
health standards.
Æ
·
INFRASTRUCTURE

28
• Goal: The Town of Long Lake should strive to upgrade the utility and appearance of their public
B ILE • Goal: Ensure that public and private wastewater systems are operated and maintained so that they
M O Work with State partners do not pose a risk to human or environmental health. facilities to improve municipal services and instill civic pride.
OW S
SN to ensure that the needed • Goal: Continue to improve municipal facilities and services that enhance the viability of the year-
a g am

• Goal: Ensure that infrastructure is designed and installed in a visually appealing manner.

COMMUNITY SERVICES & OPERATIONS


Unc a s Rd bridge improvements include round tourism industry
or

• Goal: Ensure that the Town of Long Lake first responders and associated volunteers have the
e Rd

adequate space for various


resources and support that they need to provide residents and visitors with fire and medical • Goal: Continue to support the Long and Raquette Lake School Districts and further integrate them
modes of transportation,
services. into the community.
including snowmobiles,
• Goal: Provide additional opportunities for the residents of the Hamlet of Raquette Lake to participate
SERVICES

• Goal: Increase the resiliency of the Town by improving community-wide emergency/disaster


preparedness. in local government affairs and have equal access to Town services.
• Goal: Retain existing businesses in Town • Goal: Enable older residents and visitors to remain in the community as productive, dignified, and
Un c a s R
Ol d

K
i healthy citizens.
d c • Goal: Attract and foster new businesses that will provide local employment and amenities, in
ll

re
• Goal: Improve the appearance of the Hamlet areas to ensure the Town continues to present a
a

W ay
addition to serving to reinforce the character of the community.

BEAUTIFICATION
charming appearance to residents and visitors.
ECONOMY

• Goal: Increase tourism in the shoulder and ‘off’ seasons to increase the viability of year-round
businesses. • Goal: Maintain Long Lake’s high quality of life and retain the essential rural character of the
community.
F ox W a y

STATE OWNED LAND PROPOSED GATEWAY SIGNAGE


& ENHANCEMENTS

ay
W
w
STATE EASEMENTS

n
Fa
W
POST OFFICE
hi
s p e r i n g Wo o
ds
Tr
ip
Wa
y TOWN PARK LAND MEDICAL CENTER
le
Ln Upgrade and enhance existing Town

Wh
lle Ta

Hi
i
rv
Hall building to improve its currentr b e l l EXISTING TRAIL BEACH ENHANCEMENTS

it e
Continue sucessful efforts to upgrade

ll
c ke W Hill
Ki Ln

P in
function as a community center,

ay
the public beach with new amenities and
e
Wa

y
attractions including a permanent covered nutrition site, and Long Lake Town Court. PROPOSED TRAIL PROPOSED HIKING ROUTE
i
!
stage with electric hookup for summer concerts on Upgrades include expanded parking, wifi, a
Provide attractive gateway treatments the water; increase the available parking capacity; upgrade DOH certified kitchen, expansion of the Town court PROPOSED SNOWMOBILE TRAIL PROPOSED MOUNTAIN BIKING
along the three main corridors arriving LifeGuard stand with protective cover; replace concrete and associated offices. To provide more usable space,

A
da
into the hamlet, with welcome signage, materials and equipment currently stored here would PROPOSED SIDEWALK ENHANCEMENTS

m
sidewalks; provide new public docks and gravel walkways; Work with NYSDEC and willing

Ln
d

Pa
landscaping and other treatments to mark the arrival k
W and install new historical sign and interpretive / wayfinding landowners to create B i
an on land be moved to new storage facility near the current DPW

r
M

r
a

y
Jim
ou

into the Hamlet of Long Lake. garage.


nt

n
signs to help people learn their way around. connection between Dock Road and Jim
ai

Me

Za
ad
ows
Bird Road.

m
TOWN HALL RENOVATIONS

p
GATEWAY ENHANCEMENTS TOWN BEACH IMPROVEMENTS
W

W
ay

ay
Cle ment
Ln
Mi
x Ln

Ha

Tw l l s
n y
a

i
W
ay

Walker
W

ECT
A us t i n
l a rks

N
Ln
C

CO N
W
ay

!
y
j
!
a r k Wa y
r
e eche

B
Æ
·30
W
ay

ay n
P

g
W ma

ni n
f

Æ
Ho f

·
an
28N

KE
LA
y
Wa
v

d
ea Bl

r
B e
g
s Rd M ci n t yre

NG
od e l li
L Ch

LO
n
n L i
!
E n d io

B
ur Rd
ns ce
i
Work with willing landowners to secure a long- r igh t Rd R
ay

eu n
W d
W

W ay
term access agreement to the Jennings Pond Provide new sidewalks and
Fr

S
Ln
Ap W i

street trees with similar


in

Dock
Causeway. Improve access to the causeway from
i S
a

Long Lake Beach with walking path, overlook and amenities such as pedestrian
K eo u g h
resting/seating areas. Provide necessary upgrades Rd scaled lighting, banners and
to Jennings Pond
T a m a r Dam.
a ck W a
y
Æ
· 30 wayfinding signage in the hamlet Æ
·
28N

d
r R
ay
s
W
Be c ke
center area to improve connectivity
ni
e
between the lake and local attractions /
T h un d e
r CONTINUE NATURE TRAIL
W ay
D
S ch ool L n
businesses.

ENHANCED STREETSCAPE SHAW Continue to upgrade existing


POND town facilities to include
additional storage for town
Provide necessary upgrades to the ball fields to promote the use equipment and materials currently
and coninued support of the school soccer program, baseball, ladies JENNINGS
C oo n e y
stored at various places including the
municipal offices and town hall.

W
softball teams and community soccer program. PARK POND

ay
LONG LAKE BALL FIELD UPGRADES HIGHWAY & WATER
DEPARTMENT
Ja

s n
W mi
j
! PAVED PARKING LOT ay
L on

O w l s Hea d L n
Tif

y RAMP LAUNCH
!
an

Hi ll
i UNPAVED PARKING LOT
! th
i

u
La

So
R

Ln

FOOT TRAIL
ke
d

State Owned Land


C
em
Pa

State Easements
et

Ab
vi

er

Town Park Land


lli

Work with willing landowners to secure


Wetlandsyear round
en

y
on
ak

n
S t o ne L
i

Tr
access to the powerline trail. This connection
Surface Water would
Ln

ai
Wa y
MT. SABBATIS
l
Tax Parcels
provide a connection between Deerland Road, the
PAVILION Upgrade existing town offices
hamlet area, Mt. Sabbatis and to the Northville-Placid St
an ll
Ln

COMP
Hi
to function as a local tourist
Trail. Æ
·
30
t on

information center, with improved


Further develop Mt. Sabbatis for a wide range of active and passive configuration, signage, parking, storage
L i n d en W a
DEVELOP POWERLINE TRAIL recreation activities, including an interconnected trail system for
IL
y

and display setting for historic items.

PLAN
RA mountain biking, skiing and hiking as well as enhanced gathering
IN ET places. Improve the current pavillon structure and improve visual
RL and physical connections between the hamlet and the pavillon. UPGRADE TOWN OFFICES
W E

2020
Connect to adjacent areas with the “Powerline Trail”. Provide an
0 450 900 1,800 US Feet PO improved parking area, as well as new wayfinding signage to help
anchor this asset as a visible amenity to residents and visitors.

ENHANCE MOUNT SABBATIS


Enhance the sidewalk network within STATE OWNED LAND PROPOSED GATEWAY SIGNAGE
the hamlet so that residents and visitors Explore opportunities to provide community amenities such as & ENHANCEMENTS
can travel between multiple destinations restrooms and info kiosks to support visitors and tourism. This STATE EASEMENTS POST OFFICE
safely and comfortably, providing new would include exploring options for long term operation and
sidewalks with bike and pedestrian maintenance agreements and working with willing landowners. TOWN PARK LAND FIRE DEPARTMENT
connections.
o ld in g Po
int R
d LAND OWNER COORDINATION
EXISTING TRAIL
SIDEWALK NETWORK

G
Continue to maintain public docking facility PROPOSED TRAIL
and lake access, working with willing
landowners, lake associations, private BIG ISLAND SNOWMOBILE TRAIL
U n c as Rd landowners, and not-for-profits to support
Expand hours of operation at the a staffed aquatic invasive species station.
Transfer Facility and improve capacity Additionally, explore partnerships to secure
of municipal storage. Mic housing for seasonal lake stewards.
k
Rd

TRANSFER STATION WATERFRONT ACCESS


Rd
Bay
Duck

Modernize the Raquette Lake Fire Department


facility and explore creative funding
TRANSFER Bac k R d

K E mechanisms that would allow the project to


STATION A n t lers R d hurch
Rd
LA proceed without requiring complicated grant
TE
C

T administration or excessive debt. Creative use of local


U E forces to assist in material acquisition and construction
HARDING
A Q could help to keep costs down for town equipment and materials.
Dil lon R d
ISLAND R
POST DUCK
BAY RAQUETTE LAKE FIRE DEPARTMENT
OFFICE
POPLAR
POINT

Improve causeway to prevent flooding, create bike Work with NYS DOT to ensure bridge is
and pedestrian link between school and hamlet. adequately maintained for various modes
CAUSEWAY ENHANCEMENTS 7
5
4
62
P o p l ar
Pt
of transportation including snowmobiles,
pedestrians, and cyclists.
FIRE State Owned Land
DEPARTMENT BRIDGE MAINTENANCE Wetlands
Surface Water
Tax Parcels

Provide attractive gateway


Æ
·
28

treatments along the main corridors


leading into the hamlet, with 0 250 500 1,000 US Feet
welcome signage, landscaping and
other improvements to highlight arrival
and support community identity. Potential to add
a new pavilion as a community event and gathering space. OTTER
BAY
GATEWAY ENHANCEMENTS Work with power company to ensure that substations do not visually
dominate the gateway to Raquette Lake. Also continue to explore
community wide generator or battery cell.

POWER COMPANY COORDINATION

Work with Great Camp Sagamore


to improve signage from roadway.
SIGNAGE

COMP
Work with the Raquette Lake School
District to enhance and improve their
Work with APA and DEC to upgrade programming and facilities to meet the Work with DOT and DEC to plan

PLAN
snowmobile trail connection on Sagamore needs of residents and visitors, including and construct snowmobile bridge
Road. parking and wayfinding. across South Inlet.
SNOWMOBILE TRAILS
SCHOOL DISTRICT IMPROVEMENTS SNOWMOBILE CROSSING

2020
Sa
ga
m
or
e
R
d
62 Town of Long Lake

Implementation

Tackling the recommendations in this plan may be seem ability to shape its future and enact land use policies.
daunting, but the Town does not need to go it alone Instead, the Town will need to influence State agen-
or start from scratch. The following section outlines an cies and elected officials through advocacy. Identifying
approach to forming committees or working groups, where in the decision-making process the Town has the
identifies funding sources, and lists potential partners at greatest opportunities to effectively influence policies
the regional, state, and federal level. Using the concept and programs will be an ongoing effort. Proof of this
drawings and preliminary cost estimates associated with approach’s value is exemplified by successful lobbying
select projects, the Town will have the tools it needs to efforts for three constitutional amendments, one for the
start bringing this plan to reality. However, implemen- Town’s water plant property and another for Township
tation will require the sustained efforts of the Town, 40 (the state initiative to resolve unclear title issues dat-
volunteers, community groups, and local businesses. ing back to the establishment of the Adirondack Park).
No one department or elected official will be able to
single-handedly endeavor upon all of this plan’s recom- A Comprehensive Plan is intended to reflect the vision
mendations. Partnerships new and old will need to be and goals of the community; as time passes, the plan
fully leveraged if this plan is to succeed. will need to be reviewed so that it continues to reflect
the community’s interests. The Town should review the
A key element of this plan is the recognition that while recommendations of this plan on an annual basis and
Long Lake is a unique, independent municipality with its adopt revisions as necessary. Without periodic evalu-
own interests and concerns, there are many other com- ation it is more likely that the Comprehensive Plan will
munities throughout the region that are facing similar lose relevancy as the Town’s guiding document.
challenges. Working with regional partners, like adjacent
municipalities and the County, to identify solutions to In NYS the Comprehensive Plan serves as the backbone
shared issues will be critical to this plan’s success. for land use regulations, or zoning. The topic of land
The presence of vast areas of State-owned land that is use regulations was mentioned by some residents and
beyond the typical controls afforded to municipalities stakeholders during the public engagement process
through “Home Rule” authority complicate Long Lake’s but was not determined to be a pressing issue. Some
residents expressed an interest in using zoning regula-
Comprehensive Plan 63

tions to assert greater control over land use while other so that any new committee would not be interfering
residents were less inclined to develop an additional with ongoing activities.
layer of regulations in the Town. Since the Town of Long • Town Board designs the composition of the Imple-
Lake is within the Adirondack Park, the Adirondack Park mentation Committee (tentatively suggest a repre-
Agency (APA) has a large role in regulating land use, sentative from the lake association(s), the business
and many municipalities defer to the APA for land use community, the Parks and Recreation Department,
decisions. Other municipalities develop their own zoning a Town Board member, someone from Raquette
regulations that are approved by the APA (referred to as Lake, etc.) and publicly solicits applications for these
Agency Approved Local Land Use Plans (AALLUPs) that positions.
allow them some autonomy to make land use decisions • Working with potential Implementation Committee
as long as they do not supersede APA regulations. The members, the Town Board establishes a meeting
Town of Long Lake may choose to exercise this option in schedule and a reporting schedule for the commit-
the future should they feel that APA regulations do not tee. The Town and the committee should establish
adequately reflect the community’s vision. clear benchmarks and timeframes so that progress
can be objectively evaluated.
• Once underway, the Implementation Committee’s
Implementation Committee activities and agendas should be fully publicized so
that a wide range of citizens are engaged with the
To formalize this concept of partnerships, the Town
process.
should explore the creation of a standing “Implementa-
• The Town Board and Implementation Committee
tion Committee” that will work with the Town Board, the
should revisit the mission of the committee on an
Parks and Recreation Department, local businesses, and
annual or semi-annual basis. This would allow the
other organizations. This committee will most likely be
Town an opportunity to review the committee’s
led by the Parks and Recreation Department, but careful
original benchmarks and reorient the committee as
consideration must be taken not to overburden already
conditions change and priorities shift.
busy staff. Instead the proposed Committee would
• If the initial Implementation Committee is success-
provide additional support and attention to long-range
ful and there if there is enough public support and
initiatives that the Town Board and the Parks and Recre-
participation for such a group, the Town could form
ation Department may need assistance with due to their
a local development corporation (LDC). Municipali-
already considerable responsibilities. This committee
ties form LDCs because they are exempt from many
would be responsible for making regular reports to the
of the constitutional and statutory provisions that
Town Board and would serve as a vehicle for network-
guide the operations and financial transactions
ing, idea sharing, organizing volunteers, and training.
conducted by local governments. There are multi-
This plan also recommends the formation of a business
ple issues that an LDC could assist with, including a
association (see “Economic Development and Tourism”
recent interest in donating money to local organiza-
section), but - as a first step - it is recommended that
tions in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic; with-
the Implementation Committee be formed, and, if a
out an LDC, the Town did not have an appropriate
viable number of businesses are willing to participate in
mechanism for holding this money and distributing
a business association, then one could be formed at a
it. Also, an LDC could provide additional flexibility for
later date.
the Town to work with the private market to address
housing issues, including the acquisition of land and
The following section outlines how the Implementation
contracting for labor without prevailing wage restric-
Committee or Business Association could be formed and
tions.
operated:

• The Town Board officially recognizes the need for a


Funding
standing committee and develops a clear mission
statement and outline of responsibilities. This would Based on the proposed concept designs and proposed
include a careful review of ongoing efforts of existing improvements outlined in the plan, several preliminary
Town departments and regional partners like ROOST cost estimates were prepared in order to provide the
Town some figures when considering budgeting and
64 Town of Long Lake

funding request for select projects. The plan calls for prehensive Plan.
several gateway enhancements that typically range
from $20,000 to $50,000. Together, after factoring in Successfully applying for and receiving a grant is just the
minor contingencies and "soft costs" related to survey, first step in managing a successful project. Launching,
design and permitting, the total estimated cost for the managing and closing a grant funded project requires a
five locations is $210,000. Similarly, the proposed Town considerable amount of time and attention on behalf of
Beach improvements total $570,000 and the continua- the recipient. While there are regional partners like the
tion of the Nature Trail is $324,000. At 7,500 liner feet, LCLGRPB who can help with grant administration, the
the proposed new or improved sidewalks segments is Town should ensure that there is a basic understanding
approximately $3.15 million An allowance of approx- of what successfully managing a grant entails. Ensuring
imately $36,000 would be sufficient for the proposed that Town staff are adequately trained in advance of
way-finding signage program. Other improvements will starting a grant-funded project will result in a smoother
require further vetting and conceptualizing in order to transition from being awarded funding to launching a
prepared respective cost estimates. In order to pay for project.
these improvements, it is anticipated that the Town
of Long Lake will require significant funding support. List of Funding Sources:
As such, Grants are the primary means by which the
recommendations and projects contained in this plan
NYS DOS Local Waterfront Revitalization Program
will be funded. The adoption of a Comprehensive Plan
(LWRP):
puts a municipality at a competitive advantage over
NYS DOS’s LWRP, funded under Title 11 of the Envi-
other municipalities without a Comprehensive Plan. In
ronmental Protection Fund (EPF), provides matching
New York State, most grant opportunities are accessed
grants on a competitive basis to eligible villages, towns,
through the Consolidated Funding Application (CFA) pro-
cities, and counties located along New York’s coasts or
cess. The CFA process is an element of New York State’s
designated inland waterways for planning, design, and
Regional Economic Development Council (REDC) initia-
construction projects to revitalize communities and wa-
tive, in which the State is divided into 10 regions, each
terfronts. Grant categories include preparing or updat-
with its own strategic plan for economic and community
ing an LWRP; preparing an LWRP Component, including
development. On an annual basis, grant opportunities
a watershed management plan; updating an LWRP to
from a range of state organizations (e.g., NYS DOS,
mitigate future physical climate risks; implementing an
NYS DEC, NYS ESD) are applied for via the CFA process.
LWRP or a completed LWRP Component; and improving
Municipalities proposing projects that best align with
public waterfront access for canal communities. This
their REDC’s priorities are awarded funding. Long Lake is
program helps communities breathe new life into their
part of the North Country REDC and should refer to the
waterfronts and underused assets in ways that ensure
REDC’s strategic plans and progress reports, which are
successful and sustainable revitalization. The Town of
updated on a semi-annual basis.
Long Lake has multiple eligible waterways and can apply
for funding through this program. The priorities of the
In addition to the CFA process, there are other State and
LWRP grants are updated periodically and NYS DOS
federal grant opportunities that the Town can pursue.
representatives should be consulted before deciding to
Due to the Town’s location in the Great Lakes watershed
prepare an application.
and proximity to the Canadian border, there are vari-
ous federal grants that the Town can pursue. Hamilton
NYS OPRHP:
County relies upon the LCLGRPB for County planning
The EPF Grants Program provides matching grants on
issues, and the Town should continue a dialogue with
a competitive basis for the acquisition, planning, and
the LCLGRPB to stay abreast of regional and federal
development of parks, historic properties, and heritage
grant opportunities as they arise. LCLGRPB coordinates
areas located within the physical boundaries of the
directly with the U.S. Economic Development Admin-
State of New York. The Parks grant is for the acquisition,
istration (USEDA) and could potentially identify rural
development, and planning of parks and recreational
development programs that align with the Town’s Com-
facilities to preserve, rehabilitate, or restore lands, wa-
Comprehensive Plan 65

ters, or structures for park, recreation, or conservation Renewal (OCR) under the direction of the Housing Trust
purposes and for structural assessments and/or plan- Fund Corporation (HTFC). NYMS funds are awarded to
ning for such projects. The Historic Preservation grant is units of local government and non- profit organizations
for the acquisition, improvement, protection, preserva- that are committed to revitalizing historic downtowns,
tion, rehabilitation, or restoration of properties listed on mixed-use neighborhood commercial districts, and
the State or National Register of Historic Places and for village centers. NYMS grants are available for technical
structural assessments and/ or planning for such proj- assistance projects or targeted improvements, such as
ects. Long Lake may be able to leverage the presence of facade renovations, interior commercial and residential
multiple historic properties to apply for funding through building renovations, and streetscape enhancement
OPRHP. projects. Both the Hamlets of Long Lake and Raquette
Lake may be eligible for funding through this program.
NYS ESD:
ESD has several grant programs that, together, make Dormitory Authority (DASNY) State and Municipal (SAM)
available $150 million of capital grant funding for the Capital Program:
REDC Initiative. Capital grant funding is available for DASNY administers SAM Grants awarded by the Senate
capital- based economic development projects intended Finance Committee, the Assembly Ways and Means
to create or retain jobs; prevent, reduce, or eliminate Committee, and the Executive. This flexible funding is
unemployment and underemployment; and/or increase used for a variety of capital projects. Typically, these
business or economic activity in a community or region. grants are applied for with the strong support from
elected officials at the State level.
NYS DOS Brownfield Opportunity Areas (BOA) Program:
NYSDOS’s BOA Program provides communities with Environmental Facilities Corporation (EFC) Green Innova-
guidance, expertise, and financial assistance (up to 90 tion Grant Program (GIGP):
percent of the total eligible project costs) to complete GIGP provides grants on a competitive basis to proj-
BOA Nomination Plans, which are revitalization strate- ects that improve water quality and implement green
gies for neighborhoods or areas affected by brownfields stormwater infrastructure in New York State. GIGP is
or economic distress. Collections of vacant commercial administered by the NYS EFC. Grants cover a minimum
properties in downtown areas are good candidates for of 40% and up to a maximum of 90% of the eligible proj-
this program, and Long Lake may be able to leverage the ect costs, as estimated in the application. A match from
presence of such structures in the Hamlet areas. State or local sources for the balance is required. Water
quality projects along Raquette Lake and Long Lake
NYS DOS Local Government Efficiency (LGE) Grants: should be considered for this program.
The LGE Grant program assists local leaders in identify-
ing best practices and implementation actions focused Non-CFA Funding Opportunities:
on reducing municipal expenditures, limiting the growth
in property taxes, and increasing efficiencies in service New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets
delivery. Projects can include local government reorga- (NYS DAM):
nization, functional or service delivery consolidation, co- NYS DAM provides a variety of grants and technical
operative service agreements, and the establishment of assistance to municipalities, non-profits, farmers, and
regional service delivery mechanisms. Long Lake should food markets to support and encourage the viability
consider utilizing this grant program either in partner- of agriculture in New York State. Many of their grant
ship with Hamilton County (to explore additional shared programs focus on connecting producers to consumers
services opportunities), or as a way to explore the more and supporting educational outreach. The Town could
effective provision of municipal services in the Hamlet of work with NYS DAM, and possibly ANCA, to connect with
Raquette Lake. locally and regionally produced food. Grants are ac-
cessed via the "Grants Gateway," as opposed to the CFA
New York Main Street (NYMS) Program: The NYMS portal, and have different application cycles. NYS DAM
program is administered by the Office of Community has been funding more projects that connect local and
66 Town of Long Lake

regional food producers with underserved communities;


Long Lake’s relative shortage of fresh food options may U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Devel-
increase the Town’s eligibility for NYS DAM-funded food opment Community Facilities Direct Loan and Grant
access projects. Program:
This program provides affordable funding to develop
Northern Borders Regional Commission: essential community facilities in rural areas. Communi-
These grants emphasize projects that promote econom- ties with a population under 5,500 are eligible for low
ic development. As noted in this plan, there is a clear interest loans or grants. Essential community facilities
connection between Long Lake’s environmental quality, include things like schools, firehouses, and medical fa-
tourism, recreational facilities, and economic develop- cilities. This program can be considered for projects like
ment. Elizabethtown (in Essex County) secured funding the Raquette Lake Fire Department building.
from this program for the design and construction of a
mountain bike trail network. Elizabethtown won funding Partners
by making a compelling case that outdoor recreation
facilities play a crucial role in the region’s economic
Due to the Town’s small population and relatively limited
development.
resources, partnerships with other regional organiza-
tions should be explored as a means to meet communi-
Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLFI): ty goals. The following list of potential partners should
The GLFI is a federally funded EPA-led initiative intended
serve as a stepping off point for the Town.
to target the biggest threats to the Great Lakes eco-
system. This program has funded non-point pollution
Hamilton County:
prevention programs, invasive species eradication, and
County government can help address regional concerns
habitat restoration. Projects around the Town’s water-
and serve as the coordinating body between municipal-
ways are eligible for funding through this program.
ities. For projects that involve shared services and re-
gional facilities (such as health care and social services),
Adirondack Foundation’s Generous Acts Program: the County government can play a leading role. Hamil-
The Adirondack Foundation, based in Lake Placid works
ton County Tourism and Hamilton County Office for the
with Adirondack organizations and communities to
Aging are two departments that may be most suited to
support valuable community development projects
working with the Town.
that align with the following priority program areas:
well-being, educational opportunity, and community and
Lake Champlain/ Lake George Regional Planning Board
economic vitality. Some Adirondack communities have
(LCLGRPB):
used funding from the Adirondack Foundation to serve
This organization is the regional planning and devel-
as a local cash match for State grants.
opment agency for the area with access to state and
federal grant opportunities. The LCLGRPB can also assist
U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA) Public
in grant administration, community planning, and water-
Works Program: shed related issues.
The EDA Public Works program invests in communities
to revitalize, expand, and upgrade their physical infra-
Hamilton County Soil and Water Conservation District
structure in order to attract new industry; encourage
(HCSWCD):
business expansion; diversify local economies; and
The Hamilton County Soil and Water Conservation Dis-
generate job growth. This program invests in technol-
trict staff members work to reduce soil erosion, protect
ogy-based infrastructure, as well as traditional public
water quality and quantity, manage invasive species,
works projects, such as water and sewer improvements,
and offer diversified programs and educational events
industrial parks, and brownfield redevelopment. The
to the public. In order to protect the integrity of Ham-
LCLGRPB generally serves as an intermediary between
ilton County's natural resources, the District provides
local communities and the EDA.
technical assistance to landowners, municipalities, and
Comprehensive Plan 67

organizations that meet conservation needs. HCSWCD


Hudson Headwaters Health Network:
already collaborates with the local lake associations on
This group works to address rural healthcare issues spe-
various water quality initiatives.
cific to the Adirondacks, including senior services, trans-
portation, nutrition, etc. They can help connect commu-
Adirondack North County Association (ANCA):
nities with federal funding for public health initiatives.
This not-for-profit organization that assists in regional
Adirondack/ Glens Falls Regional Transportation Com-
economic development initiatives in the Adirondacks.
mittee (AGFTC): As the MPO for the North Country,
ANCA conducts extensive research and publishes white
AGFTC has helped with transportation related projects
papers on economic trends and opportunities in the
including streetscapes, bridges, trail planning and other
Adirondacks. ANCA can provide small business assis-
facilities.
tance and training and connect local entrepreneurs with
regional initiatives.
Paul Smiths Adirondack Watershed Institute
The Adirondack Watershed Institute (AWI) is a compo-
Central Adirondack Partnership for the 21st Century
nent of Paul Smith's College whose mission is to "protect
(CAP-21): clean water, conserve habitat and support the health
This organization’s mission is to “nurture and support
and well-being of people in the Adirondacks through sci-
vibrant and sustainable year-round Adirondack commu-
entific inquiry, stewardship and real world experiences
nities through its work in promoting economic revitaliza-
for students." AWI works with municipalities and lake as-
tion, social responsibility and environmental balance.”
sociations to monitor, study, and protect local resources.
In the past, CAP-21 has worked with communities on
AWI may also be able to help the Town access funding
economic development initiatives and has assisted in
opportunities.
securing grant funds for important capital projects like
emergency communication towers.
Other Universities and Colleges:
SUNY Cortland and SUNY Environmental Sciences and
Adirondack Health Institute (AHI): Forestry (ESF) have a local presence as well as various
AHI works on public health issues specific to the Adiron-
departments and programs that complement the goals
dack Park. Using data, public outreach, and collabora-
of the Town and lake associations. Lake associations
tions, AHI is an invaluable resource and can help identify
already work with colleges on environmental monitor-
federal funding. Much of AHI’s work has shifted to how
ing. In addition to environmental issues, the Town could
they can support the improvement of communities’
coordinate with the colleges to identify other opportuni-
public health as a means to reduce the number of trips
ties to collaborate in the fields of outdoor recreation and
to the hospital due to preventable environmental and
hospitality. This could include service learning or the use
lifestyle-caused conditions.
of interns.

Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST): Central Adirondack Association (CAA):


ROOST is a destination management and tourism
The CAA is a longstanding regional chamber of com-
marketing agency for the northern Adirondacks. ROOST
merce and destination marketing organization serving
conducts surveys, outreach, and studies to stay abreast
the region from Forestport, along the Rt 28 corridor
of tourism trends, identify target markets, and promote
through Old Forge, Inlet, Raquette Lake, Blue Mountain
member communities. Hamilton County provides fund-
Lake to Indian Lake and along Rt. 30 corridor to Long
ing to ROOST on an annual basis.
Lake.
Implementation Table

Recommendation Lead (listed first) and Potential Funding Source(s)


Partners

Recreation

Goal: Provide all residents and visitors with a variety of quality recreation options that are suitable for a wide
range of ages, abilities, and interests throughout the year
Work with State and Re- Town , NYSDEC, APA, LCL- Smart Growth Grant, OPRHP
1 gional Partners to leverage GRPB
existing regional assets.
Foster public private partner- Town, private landowners, Town, private landowners, institu-
2 ships incorporating recre- institutions, NYSDEC tions, NYSDEC
ation with other activities
Town OPRHP
3 Further Develop Mt Sabbatis

Develop a plan to regularly Town NYSDOS LGE, NYSESD


4 monitor and maintain mu-
nicipal recreation asset
Continue to map and market Town Nominal Administrative or Budget
5 existing recreational assets Allocation

Continue to dedicate Town Town Town


resources to the mainte-
6 nance and upkeep of snow-
mobiling trails.

Goal: Improve connections between existing recreational facilities

Expand the network of Town, NYSDEC, APA OPRHP, NYSDOT TAP


accessible multi-use trails
7 and develop connections to
existing multi-use trails in
the region.
Establish and/or formalize Town, willing landowners OPRHP, Smart Growth Grant, NYS-
trail access directly from DOT TAP, USDA
8 Hamlet business districts.
Improve overall connectiv- Town, NYSDEC OPRHP, USDA
ity of the snowmobile trail
network and develop an on-
land, multi-use connector so
9 that a frozen lake crossing is
not required to connect the
Hamlets of Long Lake and
Raquette Lake.

Infrastructure

Goal: Ensure that the infrastructure is designed, operated and build in a sustainable and resilient manner.

Work with State and Feder- Town, NYSDEC, HCSWCD, GLRI, USEDA, NBRC
al partners to ensure that LCLGRPB
all dams and other water
1 control infrastructure is
maintained and upgraded to
appropriate standards.
Make electrical service Town, National Grid, New NBRC
more reliable, particularly in York State Elecric and Gas
2 emergency situations (e.g., Corporation (NYSEG)
redundant service, genera-
tors, etc.).
Working with the NYSDEC, Town, NYSDEC, NYSDOH NYSDEC Water Quality Improve-
explore options to evaluate ment Program (WQIP)
the wastewater systems at
state run facilities to ensure
3 that they are operated and
maintained in such a way
that they do not negatively
impact water quality.
The Town of Long Lake De- Town Budget Allocation
partment of Public Works led
by the Highway Supervisor
maintains all Town Roads.
Town should ensure that the
4 Highway and Water Depart-
ments have the appropriate
equipment to maintain road
shoulders for safe snowmo-
bile access.

Goal: Increase cellular telecommunications coverage so that there is adequate and reliable service through-
out the populate portions of the Town
Help facilitate the con- Town, private landowners Telecommunications providers
struction and installation
of recently approved tele-
5 communication towers in
Raquette Lake. Two towers
were approved by the APA in
2020.
Monitor trends in 5G cellular Town Nominal Administrative Costs
technology to identify oppor-
6 tunities to import coverage
in the Town of Long Lake.

Goal: Ensure that the municipal water system is safe, reliable and complaint with all pertinent health stan-
dards
Continue recent initiative of Town NYS Environmental Facilities Corpo-
7 water system upgrades. ration (NYSEFC), CDBG

Update and maintain the Town Budget Allocation


8 interactive online maps of
the water system.
Seek funding to identify Town NYS Environmental Facilities Corpo-
and address potential leaks, ration (NYSEFC), CDBG, NYSDOH
9 including transmission lines
in lakes.
Maintain staffing levels and Town, HCSWCD Budget Allocation
10 continue to provide training
opportunities.

Goal: Ensure that public and private wastewater systems are operated and maintained so that they do not
pose a risk to human or environmental health.
Explore strategies to educate Town with Lake Associa- NYSDEC WQIP,HSCWCD
homeowners on ways to tions, LCLGRPB, HCSWCD
11 upgrade and maintain septic
systems.
Identify areas with high con- Town with Lake Associa- NYSEFC Engineering Planning Grant
centrations of on-lot septic tions, HCSWCD (EPG) program
systems (i.e. Hamlet areas)
12 and explore formal man-
agement and maintenance
programs.

Goal: Ensure that infrastructure is designed and installed in a visually appealing manner

Identify new locations Town, Electric Providers Nominal Administrative Costs


for electric substations in
Raquette Lake that will not
13 degrade the visual appeal
of the community or occupy
space that could be put to
better use.

Critical Services

Goal: Ensure that the Town of Long Lake first responders and associated volunteers have the resources and
support that they need to provide residents and visitors with fire and medical services
Modernize Raquette Lake Town, Fire District USDA, FEMA
Fire Department Facility and
explore creative funding
mechanisms that would
1 allow the project to proceed
without requiring complicat-
ed grant administration or
excessive debt.
Support the volunteers who Town
serve as the critical first
responders through training
2 and recruitment programs,
equipment and the provi-
sions of adequate physical
space.
Explore hiring EMTs to serve Town Budget Allocation
3 the population of Raquette
Lake.

Goal: Increase the resilience of the Town by improving community wide emergency/disaster preparedness

Ensure adequate telecom- Town, Telecommunications FEMA


4 munication service for emer- Providers
gency service providers.
Increase the availability of Town Budget Allocation
municipal workers in the
Hamlet of Raquette Lake
5 who are authorized to serve
as ambulance drivers and
first responders.
Ensure that there is a re- Town, Electric Providers National Grid
liable back-up electrical
supply available in Raquette
Lake, possibly collocated
6 with an upgraded transfer
station.

Maintain a contingency plan Town, HCSWCD, Hamilton FEMA, Homeland Security


for natural disasters, weath- Co. Dept. of Emergency
7 er events and public health Management
emergencies.
Ensure that there is an effi- Town Nominal Aministrative Costs
cient procedure for commu-
8 nicating with residents in the
event of an emergency.

Economic Development and Tourism

Goal: Retain the existing businesses in Town that are essential to the community character, provide local
income and employment, and attract visitors.
Help create or encourage Town, ANCA Hamilton Co. IDA, NYSDOS
a voluntary business as-
sociation that would allow
1 for networking business to
business and between the
business community and
local government
Explore a tourism training Town with ANCA/ROOST Hamilton Co. IDA, Hamilton Co.
program for employees to Tourism
2 ensure strengthen the tour-
ism industry.
Seek funding support for Town, LCLGRPB NYS Main Street program, Hamilton
improvements for small County IDA, LCLGRPB
3 businesses (e.g. façade im-
provement program, build-
ing upgrades, staffing).
Formalize and regularly Town OPRHP
update the Parks and Recre-
ation Department's market-
4 ing plan to ensure the lon-
gevity and success of efforts
that are already underway
Support and promote the Town, Hamilton Co. Tour- NYSESD, LCLGRPB RLF
unique float plane industry ism
5 and its iconic presence at
Long Lake to ensure its lon-
gevity and legacy.
Help facilitate the training of Town, LCLGRPB Hamilton Co. IDA, ROOST, NYS
business owners to use in- Tourism Association
ternet marketing, branding,
and booking technology best
6 practices.

Identify programs that will Town, LCLGRPB, Hamilton LCLGRPB, Hamilton Co. IDA
allow existing businesses to Co. Dept. of Economic De-
upgrade and enhance their velopment
7 accommodations in order
to keep pace with industry
standards without negatively
impacting their character.
Work with existing business- Town w/ ANCA, Hamilton Hamilton Co. IDA
es to develop legacy plan- Co. IDA, Hamilton Co. Dept.
8 ning so that as aging owners of Economic Development
retire their businesses can
continue.

Goal: Attract and foster new businesses that will provide local employment and amenities, in addition to
serving to reinforce the character of the community.
Identify and actively market Town, Hamilton Co. Dept. Hamilton Co. IDA
9 available commercial proper- of Economic Development
ties in the Town.
Incentivize the establishment Town Business Association Hamilton County IDA, Hamilton Co.
of new businesses in the Dept. of Economic Development,
Town through micro-lending, NYS Microenterprise, LCLGRPB RLF
mentorship, working with
10 SCORE (a free business train-
ing and mentoring organiza-
tion partnered with the US
Small Business Association)
and training.
Promote in fill development Town Nominal Adminsitrative Costs
in Hamlet areas where land
11 use controls (i.e. design, use,
and density regulations) are
most flexible.

Goal: Increase tourism in the shoulder and 'off' seasons to increase the viability of year-round businesses.
Create or enhance an exist- Town, ANCA OPRHP, NYSDOS LWRP
ing venue for performances
and community gatherings
that could be used year-
12 round, including parking,
restrooms, etc. (Community
Services/Municipal Opera-
tions crossover)
Provide reliable, high-quality Town, LCLGRPB, Hamilton -USEDA, NBRC
telecommunications service Co. IDA
(Infrastructure cross-over)
13

Continue efforts to promote Town, ROOST NYSESD Tourism Matching Funds


year-round visitation and Program
foster a sustainable level
of tourism that does not
14 overshadow the essential
small-town character of the
community that residents
and visitors are drawn to in
the first place.
Continue pursue opportuni- Town as member of Five
ties to participate in regional Towns Initiative
tourism initiatives (i.e. Ham-
lets to Huts, Great Northern
15 Forest Canoe Trail) that pack-
age outdoor recreation with
local hospitality and retail
services
Leverage institutional Town, Hamilton Co. Tour-
partnership (e.g. Long Lake ism
Camp for the Arts, Long Lake
16 Sports Camp, Great Camp
Sagamore, Raquette Lake
Boys and Girls Camps, and
Sabattis Boy Scout Camp.).
Conduct a lodging study to Town, APA, Consultant NYSDEC Smart Growth, Hamilton
inventory the existing stock County IDA
of accommodations and
17 identify the needs of current
operators to ensure the
viability of existing accom-
modations.

Environmental Resources

Goal: Protect and improve water quality of Long and Raquette Lakes to ensure their value as cultural, envi-
ronmental, and economic resources
Support the development Lake Associations, LCL- NYSDEC, NYSDOS,
of lake/watershed manage- GRPB, HCSWCD
ment plans for both Ra-
quette and Long Lakes.

Work with the State to eval- Town, NYSDOT, HCSWCD NYSDEC


uate the impacts of road salt
on local waterbodies and ex-
2 plore potential alternatives

Work with regional, state and Town, NYSDEC, HCSWCD, NYSDEC, GLRI, TU
federal partners to develop TU
3 a fisheries management plan
for the Town's waterways.

Goal: Ensure that the open spaces, lakes, streams, and forests that define Long Lake are managed responsibly
so that they can continue to provide the environmental, economic, and scenic functions that draw residents
and visitors.
Continue and expand the Town with Lake Associa- NYSDEC, AWI
existing aquatic invasive tions and HCSWCD, AWI
4 species monitoring of boat
launch sites using volunteers
and paid staff.
Ensure regular coordination Town with Lake Associa- Nominal Administrative Costs
and communication be- tions
5 tween lake association and
the Town.
Creatively leverage State and Town working with LCL- Nominal Administrative Costs
Federal grant programs that GRPB
may have been overlooked
in the past such as the
Northern Border Regional
6 Commission and US Environ-
mental Protection Agency
(EPA) grant programs for
planning in rural communi-
ties.
Continue to collaborate with Town with local colleges Nominal Administrative Costs
colleges and universities to and Universities
7 leverage their staff and stu-
dents academic and techni-
cal expertise.
Work with property owners Town, HCSWCD NYSDEC, NYSDOS
that have aging septic sys-
8 tems, particularly along the
waterfront, to upgrade their
systems.
Support ongoing invasive Town with Lake Associa- NYSDESC, AWI
9 species eradication efforts. tions, HCSWCD, AWI

Evaluate alternative to tra- Town, NYSDOT, Hamilton NYSDOT, NYSDEC


ditional road salt to reduce Co. DOT, HCSWCD
10 water quality degradation
and protect drinking water
supplies.
Advocate for upgrades to Town NYSDEC
State facilities' wastewa-
11 ter treatment systems (at
campground and day use
facilities).
Educate tourists and visitors Town, HCSWD NYSDEC
on the importance of envi-
ronmental stewardship to
12 build appreciation for and to
protect the Town's resourc-
es.
Advocate to NYSDEC to Town as a member of the
better align the various Unit Five Towns Initiative
Management Plan (UMPs)
throughout the Town, so
13 that there is an approach
to land management that
better relates to the human
communities constrained
within.
Ensure that trails and trail- Town NYSDEC
head facilities are designed
in a sustainable manner so
14 that outdoor recreation does
not have an unduly negative
impact on the Town's envi-
ronmental resources.

Housing
Goal: Help ensure that there is housing available for a full range of incomes, ages, and abilities. This includes
seasonal workforce housing, age-appropriate housing for seniors, and housing that is financially attainable
for people working locally.
Investigate municipal op- Town, Hamilton Co. IDA, NBRC, NYSHCR
tions to encourage the LCLGRPB
creation of quality, afford-
able housing that meets the
1 needs of working families,
recognizing that the Town an
alternative approach to past
efforts.
Explore creative solutions to Town with proposed busi-
housing seasonal workers, ness association
such as letting out rooms,
working with proposed
2 business association to pool
employer resources, etc.

Work to develop safe, ac- Town with Hamilton Co.


cessible housing for seniors Office for the Aging
3 to age in place through new
construction or the rehabili-
tation of existing homes.
Consider local incentives to Town, Hamilton Co. IDA
achieve housing goals, such
as tax breaks, waiving of
4 building permit fees, or mu-
nicipal assistance with land
acquisition.
Explore public-private co-
ordination, such as working
with the Adirondack Experi-
5 ence or Great Camp Saga-
more, to address housing
issues.
Partner with existing region- Town, Hamilton Co. IDA, NBRC, Common Ground 2020
al, State, and Federal agen- LCLGRPB
cies to participate in existing
6 housing programs that have
emerged since Long Lake
last attempted to address
housing issues.
The town should monitor Town Nominal Adminstrative Costs
the "Short Term Rental"
7 (STR) industry (Airbnb, VBRO,
HomeAway, etc.) locally to
evaluate its impacts.
Transportation

Goal: Improve resident and visitor mobility for both recreational and practical purposed through a variety of
modes.
Continue and expand the Town with support from
capacity and geography cov- business community
ered by the "Little Bus" shut-
tle service and explore ways
to provide similar service in
1 Raquette Lake.

Enhance the sidewalk Town NYSDOT, NYSDEC Smart Growth


network in the Hamlets so
that residents and visitors
2 can travel between multiple
destinations safely and com-
fortably.
Expand the availability and Town, with Office of the Hamilton County
reliability of non-emergency Aging
transportation for medical
3 services, seniors and other
residents with limited mo-
bility.
Work with State partners Town working with NYS- NYSDOT
to ensure that the need- DOT and NYSDEC
ed bridge improvements
4 include adequate space for
various modes of transporta-
tion, including snowmobiles,
cyclists, and pedestrians.
Ensure the State prioritizes Town Nominal Adminstrative Costs
road improvements to facil-
5 itate access to State lands
and recreational assets.

Community Services and Municipal Operations

Goal: The Town of Long Lake should strive to upgrade the utility and appearance of their public facilities to
improve municipal services and instill civic pride.
Develop a Capital Improve- Town NYSDOS LGE, NYSESD
ment Plan (CIP). A CIP is a
tool that is used to coordi-
1 nate the location, timing, and
financing of capital improve-
ments over a multi-year
period.
Enhance existing municipal Town State and Municipal Facilities (SAM)
2 buildings Program through DASNY

Goal: Continue to improve municipal facilities and services that enhance the viability of the year-round tour-
ism industry
Provide a facility that ser- Town OPRHP, NYSDEC Smart Growth,
vices as first point of contact NBRC, Adirondack Foundation
for visitors and tourists with
information, restrooms, and
3 other amenities

Locate the municipal ar- Town, SALS (Southern OPRHP, NYSED - NYS Library Con-
chives in an appropriate Adirondack Library Institute servation/Preservation Discretion-
place that is safe and acces- System), NYSED ary Grant Program
4 sible in order to preserve
and promote the areas rich
history.

Goal: Continue to support the Long and Raquette Lake School Districts and further integrate them into the
community.
Work with the Raquette Lake Town - RLCSD Adirondack Foundation
School District to enhance
and improve their program-
5 ming and facilities to meet
the needs of residents and
visitors.
Explore option to further in- Town - LLCSD
tegrate the Long Lake School
into fabric of the community
possibly by using school fa-
6 cilities for additional events,
continuing education class-
es, performances, overflow
parking, etc.

Goal: Provide additional opportunities for the residents of the Hamlet of Raquette Lake to participate in local
government affairs and have equal access to Town services.
Form an official Raquette Town Nominal Administrative Costs, NYS-
Lake Committee and require DOS LGE
regular coordination with the
Town Board to ensure better
representation of Raquette
Lake residents in local gov-
ernment affairs.
7

Explore technology that will Town NYSDOS LGE


allow Raquette Lake resi-
dents to take a more active
role in Town Board deliber-
ations (e.g., live broadcast
8 via the internet, recordings
of board proceedings being
posted on Town website,
etc.).

Work with willing landown- Town - Raquette Lake Com- ESD, NYSDOS LWRP
ers to pursue the public mittee
acquisition of land in Ra-
9 quette Lake, and work with
residents to establish the
highest and best use of that
land.
Clearly communicate the Town Nominal Adminsitrative Costs
activities of various Town
Departments, including the
Parks and Recreation De-
10 partment, the Water Depart-
ment, etc. to keep residents
informed of the various
Town initiatives underway

Goal: Enable older residents and visitors to remain in the community as productive, dignified and healthy
citizens
Continue to provide services Town, County Office for the Budget Allocation
targeted at seniors (e.g., nu- Aging
trition, socialization, medical,
11 transportation) at various
locations throughout the
Town.
Encourage the development Town , County Office for Budget Allocation
of universally accessible the Aging
housing design (e.g. wheel-
chair accessible, single story,
12 etc.) when new development
occurs or when existing fa-
cilities are updated (housing
crossover).

Hamlet Beautification and Initiatives

Goal: Improve the appearance of the Hamlet areas to ensure the Town continues to present a charming ap-
pearance to residents and visitors.
Conduct overall streetscape Town CFA, NYSDEC Smart Growth Grant,
enhancements in the Hamlet CDBG
1 districts (e.g., lighting, side-
walks, landscaping, complete
streets)
Incentivize property main- Town Nominal Adminstrative Costs
tenance and beautification
in the business districts and
2 consider targeted enforce-
ment of NYS Property Main-
tenance Code.

Quality of Life

Goal: Maintain Long Lake's High quality of life and retain the essential rural character of the community.

Continue to organize and Town Business Association, Budget Allocation


promote events (e.g., Win- Hamilton County Tourism
ter Carnivals) as both a
1 means to draw visitors and
strengthen the existing
sense of community.
Increase access to affordable Town Funding opportunities through
healthy food by working ANCA, NYSDOH
with for-profit businesses,
2 non-profit organizations like
AdkAction and ANCA, and
other community groups.
Continues to provide mu- Town with ANCA Nominal Administrative Costs
nicipal space for education,
3 fitness, socialization, and
volunteering.
82 Town of Long Lake
Comprehensive Plan 83

Appendix A: Existing Conditions


Page 1 of 12

Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan


Inventory and Analysis
November 18, 2019

Introduction:
Centrally located in the Adirondacks, the Town of Long Lake is home to roughly 400 people. The population of
the town peaked in the early 1900s, and the number of permanent residents and school enrollment has been in
decline since 1990. However, the population fluctuates because of the region’s flourishing tourism and
recreation-based economy. The town is a second home for nearly 2,000 seasonal residents. (U.S. Census,
American Community Survey)

With over 75% of the Town comprised of forested land, five NYS Department of Environmental Conservation
(DEC) campgrounds, and numerous lakes, the Town of Long Lake offers multiple opportunities for camping,
hiking, paddling, mountain biking, snowmobiling, and more. The Town is an epicenter for multiple Adirondack
attractions, including the Wild Center and the Adirondack Museum. It also has short drives to nearby Old Forge
and Lake Placid.

Population:

Populations Trends:
The population of Long Lake has been declining at an average rate of 8% since the early 1990s. The most recent
Census, 2010, indicated a population of 711. Recent American Community Survey (ACS) estimates show the
population of Long Lake to be down by nearly half at 473 as of 2017; the margin of error for the ACS estimate is
8.2%
Page 2 of 12

Hamilton County, within which Long Lake is located, has seen similar population decline trends. However, the
trends have been less extreme, with an average rate of decrease of 2% from 1990 to 2017. Based on the Census,
the population of Hamilton County was 4,836 in 2010. 2017 ACS estimates for the county were 4,434. Historic
Population information is not available for Raquette Lake, a hamlet within the Town of Long Lake. However,
using Tax Parcel data hamlet had an estimated population of 123 in 2000 and 108 in 2010.

Population Age:
The “Aging in Place in the Tri-Lakes Region of the Adirondacks” study, by Mercy Care for the Adirondacks,
cited the Lake Placid, Saranac Lake, and Tupper Lake communities as being older than the state and the
national average. The study estimated that 17% of the Tri-Lakes Communities’ residents are 65 or older. The
populations of Long Lake and Raquette Lake are similar, with Census data reflecting a larger number of
residents in retirement age. According to Cornell University’s Program on Applied Demographics (PAD), the
population of Hamilton County is projected to have a median age of 65 by 2030. An aging community often
requires greater health care resources and may have implications on the local school district due to the
decline of young families with children.

Town of Raquette
Hamilton County
Long Lake Lake
Median Age 53 57 55
Page 3 of 12

Housing:
In the West Central Adirondacks Housing Needs Assessment (2012) it was found that Hamilton County has the
second-largest percentage of second homeowners in the nation. The estimated summer population is just under
5,000.

2010 US Census data indicates roughly 96% of housing units


categorized to have “seasonal, recreational or occasional” uses.
Raquette Lake was similar with 97% of housing units categorized as
secondary homes. This percentage equates to 6,181 in Hamilton
County, 1,453 in Long Lake and 509 in Raquette Lake. The remaining
percentage of vacant housing was mostly “For Rent” or “For Sale” with
a very small percentage of permanent, year-round housing.

Of the occupied housing more than half of the homes are inhabited by
two or fewer people. Long Lake and Hamilton County had a greater percentage of two-person households while
Raquette Lake had an even percentage of one- to two-person households. Less than 30% of all households in
Hamilton County, Long Lake, and Raquette Lake had more than three people per household. These trends
continue to show that a very small portion of the population is families with children and lends itself to that of a
retirement community.

School Enrollment and Educational Attainment:


The Town of Long Lake contains two school districts, Long Lake Central School and Raquette Lake Union Free
School. Long Lake Central School currently has 53 students enrolled in grades K through 12. The Raquette Lake
School is no longer active as enrollment declined in the early 2000s. In 2005, Raquette Lake began paying tuition
to send their students to other districts. There are currently four school-aged children, living in Raquette Lake,
who attend schools in the neighboring towns. The school still exists with a board and three staff members under
what the NYS DOE calls a “nonoperating district”.
Page 4 of 12

According to the New York State Department of Education (NYSDOE), student enrollment in the Long Lake
Central School District has steadily declined since the 1990s. The decline in student enrollment is consistent in
what is to be expected with an aging population. Schools in the surrounding area, such as Indian Lake Central
School, are also experiencing declines in enrollment. Newcomb Central School District was experiencing declines
but has managed to increase enrollment through the introduction of an International Student program in 2007.

Economy:

Employment Status:
Long Lake, Raquette Lake, and Hamilton County both have higher percentages of persons “Not in the Labor
Force” when compared to New York State. These statistics continue to speak to the trends of a growing
retirement age cohort. (U.S. Census, American Community Survey)

Compared to Raquette Lake and Hamilton County, Long Lake has a greater percentage of persons identified as
unemployed at roughly 14%, 7% more than Raquette Lake and Hamilton County, and 10% more than the state
average. The Collaborative Economic Plan of 2012 produced by the Central Adirondack Marketing Partnership
(CAMP) notes that higher percentages of persons not employed and not in the labor force, such as these
communities, is a signal of low income and an aging population. The plan also says that many full-time employed
people in the Adirondack’s region may work two or even three part-time or seasonal low paying jobs to make a
living. (U.S. Census, American Community Survey)

Employment Trends and Industries:


According to the Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST) 2019 Marketing Plan, tourism in the
Adirondacks is a 1.4 billion-dollar industry, supporting over 20,000 jobs. The plan also noted that in 2016, Essex,
Franklin, and Hamilton counties generated over 600 million dollars from tourism. This includes lodging, dining,
entertainment, and retail. In addition, a study done by Tourism Economics showed that 50% of all labor income
in Hamilton County is generated by visitors. Out of all the counties in the Adirondack Park, Hamilton County is
Page 5 of 12

the most dependent on tourism.

The table below shows what industries the Town of Long Lake, Raquette Lake and Hamilton County residents
work in. Nearly 41% of employed residents in Raquette Lake work in tourism related industries, such as
Accommodations and Food Services; Arts, Entertainment and Recreation; and Retail Trade. Long Lake is split
roughly between Tourism-related Industries and Educational Services, with the Long Lake Central school being
one of the largest employers. Employment trends in Hamilton County continued showing Tourism as the
primary source of employment. (U.S. Census, American Community Survey)

Town of
Raquette Lake Hamilton County
Long Lake
Accommodation and food services 13% 9% 5%
Administrative and support and waste 3% 2% 3%
management and remediation services
Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting 0% 0% 0%
Arts, entertainment, and recreation 3% 9% 3%
Construction 0% 0% 20%
Educational services 32% 8% 11%
Finance and insurance 0% 0% 1%
Health Care and Social Services 4% 8% 14%
Information 3% 0% 1%
Manufacturing 12% 7% 7%
Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction 0% 0% 1%
Other services 3% 0% 3%
Professional, scientific, and technical services 5% 2% 2%
Real estate and rental and leasing 4% 0% 1%
Retail trade 14% 23% 10%
Transportation and warehousing 3% 2% 11%
Utilities 1% 0% 0%
Wholesale trade 0% 0% 5%

Further analysis of the Town of Long Lake showed that of the 309 residents who are employed only 59 residents
work and live in Long Lake. 250 employed residents travel outside the Town of Long Lake for work. There are
176 people employed in the Town of Long Lake including 117 people who commute from outside of the Town.
The average commute time for Hamilton County, Town of Long Lake and Raquette Lake residents is 24 minutes.
(U.S. Census, On-The-Map Tool)

The chart above shows the industries employing within the Town of Long Lake. Again, the Long Lake Central
School stands out as the largest employer while Tourism industries are a close second.

• The North County Regional Economic Development Council (NCREDC) 2013 Strategy identified a 5%
increase in the number of small businesses, number of small business employees, and their average
Page 6 of 12

wage from 2010 to 2012.

• The average income in Long Lake, Raquette Lake, and Hamilton County is $55,800.00. (U.S. Census,
American Community Survey)

The following table was generated by information from the Town of Long Lake and from the business
directory on mylonglake.com.

Local Info - Long Lake/Raquette Lake Business Inventory


Accommodations - LL 19
Accommodations - RL 12
Aero Service & Seaplanes 1
Animal Care 1
Artisan, Craftsman, Gallery 7
Attractions 2
Automotive 4
Bank 1
Beauty, Health and Wellness 7
Boat Builders, Rentals, Sales and Marinas 9
Logging and Lumber 3
Real Estate 3
Restaurants 9
Retail & Shopping 9
Page 7 of 12

Recreation:
Recreation is a driving force behind Long Lake’s and Hamilton County’s tourism industry. The Adirondack
Council estimates that the Adirondack Park receives nearly seven to ten million visitors annually. Of those
visitors, 200,000 are seasonal residents.

Many Adirondack towns partake in partnerships or collaborations to support their tourism economies. Long
Lake is identified by ROOST as part of the “5 Towns” that make up the Upper Hudson Recreation Hub.

Both Long Lake and the hamlet of Raquette Lake boast a wide range of recreational activities for all four
seasons. The list includes, but is not limited to:
• Birding • Hiking
• Boating • Mountain Biking
• Camping • Paddling
• Cycling • Rafting
• Fish & Game • Seaplane Rides
• Golf • Snowmobiling

Within the Long Lake area, there are five DEC campgrounds; Lake Eaton, Forked Lake, Tioga Point,
Golden Beach, and Brown Tract Pond. The five DEC campgrounds in the area estimate having around
4,000 day-visitors per year. Paul Smith’s college also has a campground in Long Lake known as “John
Dillon Park”.

The area is host to numerous summer camps and retreat centers, including the Boy Scout’s Sabattis
Reservation and the famous “Great Sagamore Camp”. Also, Long Lake sits between multiple area
attractions such as the Adirondack Museum and the Wild Center.

The 2018 Leisure Travel Study by ROOST noted that 87% of Hamilton County visitors visit for hiking.
The study also noted that, compared to other areas of the Adirondack Park, Hamilton County had the
highest percentage of visitors who are drawn to the area for snowmobiling.

The Town of Long Lake sponsors multiple events to bolster its tourism economy, including a quilting
camp, birding festival, multiple fishing derbies, a winter carnival and more.

• If all the lodging options in Long Lake were to be at capacity the town could hold roughly 4, 880
guests. Lodging options include hotels, motels, cabins, cottages, resorts, campgrounds, and
vacation rental homes. There are currently 19 accommodations in Long Lake and 12 in
Raquette Lake.
Page 8 of 12

Hamilton County Average Traveler Profile, 2018


Age: 56

Party Size: 4.3 persons (3.2 adults, 1.1 child)

Length of Stay: 3 nights

Spending per Day: $312 per day, mostly lodging and meals

Lodging: 31% Hotel, 28% Camping, 16% Rental,


12% Second Home, 11% Family/Friends
Key Attraction: Outdoor Activities

According to ROOST’s 2019 Leisure Travel Study, the average traveler in Hamilton County has the
characteristics listed above. Visitor surveys collected by ROOST show visitation to Hamilton County is
greatest during the Summer. The study determined that the average visitor typically has an income in
the range of $80,000 to $100,000 and is primarily coming from Southern and Western New York. The
income of visitors is nearly $25,000 more than the income of Long Lake residents.

The following chart was created in accordance to data from ROOST’s 2019 Leisure Travel Study.
Page 9 of 12

Land Use & Ecological Features:

Land Use:
The Town of Long Lake encompasses 287,897 acres, with 260,672 acres of land and 27,392 acres of
water. Most of the parcels in Long Lake are categorized as Residential Properties. However, the
Adirondack Park Agency’s (APA) Land Classification shows the greatest uses of land, by acre, in the Town
of Long Lake are Resource Management, Wilderness, and Wild Forest. According to the Hamilton County
Tax Assessment, New York State owns 46% of the land in Hamilton County.

The Town of Long Lake is also unique in that it is one of the 26 municipalities in the Adirondack Park and
one of four in Hamilton County that does not have land use controls such as zoning, site plan review,
subdivision regulations, or an APA-Approved Local Land Use Program.
Page 10 of 12

Water:
The Town of Long Lake has multiple bodies of water within its boundaries, including but not limited to
Long Lake, Raquette Lake, Lake Eaton, Forked Lake, Lake Lila, and Little Tupper Lake. The Town is also
home to numerous ponds and rivers.

Most notably, the Town of Long Lake contains the headwaters of the Raquette Watershed, a sub-
watershed of the St. Lawrence Watershed. The Raquette Watershed flows north from the Adirondack
mountains into the St. Lawrence River. Much of the watershed is forest except for Long Lake and
Raquette Lake. With the greatest population density, the Town of Long Lake is the most populated area
in the watershed. Therefore, water pollution is known to be higher in this region of the watershed
compared to others.

According to the Hamilton County Soil and Water Conservation District, Long Lake is classified for
swimming and recreation but not drinking water. Both Raquette Lake and Lake Eaton have AA
classifications and could be used as a source of drinking water. Lake Eaton may also support a trout
population (AA(T)).

Water Quality Surface Area Watershed Area


Classification (Acres) (Acres)
Long Lake B 4,077 301,467
Lake Eaton AA (T) 556 3,157
Raquette Lake AA 5,263 80,691
Page 11 of 12

Community Services and Utilities:

Emergency Services:
The Town of Long Lake has two emergency squads, the Long Lake Rescue Squad and the Raquette Lake
Rescue Squad. Both squads are composed of volunteer and non-volunteer NY State Certified EMT’s. Also,
both Raquette Lake and Long Lake have volunteer fire departments serving each hamlet.

• The Raquette Lake Ambulance Squad is thought to provide one of the long ambulance transports
in the state with a 76-mile ride to Utica, NY.

Food Access:
The Town of Long Lake’s business directory list five stores that provide groceries and nine restaurants. In the
Hamlets 3 study, some public comments were made that the availability of groceries is seasonal, and residents
sometimes must go out of town to do their shopping.

Health Care:
The Town of Long Lake has one health center known as the Long Lake Medical Center. The Medical
Center has one doctor who is affiliated with other local area hospitals including Adirondack Medical
Center and Glens Falls Hospital.

In the Hamlet 3 study, residents commented that they often go to Tupper Lake or even Warren County
for medical care and services indicating that services they need aren’t available locally.

Recreation and Entertainment:


The Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department services the community by promoting tourism through
numerous year-round events and recreation facilities. On their webpage, the department advertises facilities
such as the Long Lake pavilion, a ball field, tennis and basketball courts, the Geiger Ice Skating Rink, the Mt.
Sabattis Sledding Hill, and over 70 miles of snowmobile trails.

Long Lake and Raquette Lake both have town docks available for the public to use. Long Lake also has public
docks that are available for a maximum of six hours. Additional water access is available through the Town
beach on Long Lake. The beach features a rope swing, a trampoline, and a slide and offers free swimming
lessons during the summer.

The Town also has two libraries with one in each hamlet; The Long Lake Public Library and the Raquette Lake
Library.

Town Amenities:
The Town of Long Lake provides residents in both hamlets with a public water supply. According to the Water
District’s annual report, the system serves over 800 permanent residents and a seasonal population of about
2,000 people. The system has 813 service connections in the hamlet of Long Lake and 72 service connections in
the hamlet of Raquette Lake.

The Town also has two transfer station facilities with one in the hamlet of Long Lake and the other in Raquette
Lake. Residents may use the facilities by obtaining a permit from the Town Clerk. The transfer stations also
follow a local Hamilton County law that mandates a recycling program.
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APA Land
[ 20 Elm St. Suite 110, Glens Falls, NY 12801 Town of Long Lake Classification
0 0.375 0.75 1.5 p (518) 824-1920 www.chazencompanies.com 8.19.2019 Hamilton County, NY
Miles
84 Town of Long Lake
Comprehensive Plan 96

Appendix B: Public Engagment


Page 1 of 4

Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan


Stakeholder Interview, Winter Carnival and Survey Input
Summary
Winter 2020

Stakeholders are members of the community that offer unique perspectives due to their experience,
role in the community, or employment. The Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan Committee utilized
stakeholder interviews, focus groups (under separate cover), public events and a community survey to
identify community issues, opportunities, and ideas. Contacting a wide cross-section of stakeholders
serves to expand the Committee’s awareness and to solicit input from residents and visitors to develop
strategies for Long Lake’s future. The following summarizes a series of in-person and telephone
interviews, public engagement at winter carnivals, and the community survey results that were
conducted by Chazen representatives in early 2020.

The following provides an overview of key observations and findings from the stakeholder
engagement:

Stakeholder Interviews

Defining Characteristics of Long Lake or Raquette Lake:

• Long Lake is known for its campgrounds and access to recreational opportunities
primarily hiking.
• Long Lake is central in location, equidistant to Lake Placid, Old Forge, etc.
• Long Lake is an affordable place to stay and visit. Note: Lodging and restaurant prices
are lower compared to other areas of the ADK park.
• The communities in Long Lake and Raquette Lake are small and “close knit”.
• Raquette Lake has less population and economy, there is limited communication and
shared resources between Raquette Lake and Long Lake.

Greatest Issues Facing the Area:

• Housing is an issue that greatly impacts the community. There is a lack of affordable
housing options for young families/professionals and seasonal staff. Much of the
housing market is occupied by second homeowners and seasonal residents.
• Seasonality of the area can be difficult for the success of businesses.
• Succession planning maybe difficult for many business owners, there is little investment
coming into the area.
• The lack of zoning sometimes limits growth and development due to deference to the
APA Hamlet. There is also risk of unwanted development due to lack of zoning.
• Access to reliable and affordable broadband and cell service is difficult for attracting
new residents to the area but also for businesses and potential telecommuters.

Resources, Opportunities and Potential Solutions:

• Resources should be spent to attract people to Long Lake for all 4-seasons. The area
should be advertised as an all year-round tourism destination.
Page 2 of 4

o Snowmobiling is very popular in the area during the winter, with the
acquisition of new state lands there maybe be opportunity to expand trails.
• A grant program could be helpful to support businesses or entrepreneurs who are
looking to invest in the area.
• If the broadband and cell service issues could be addressed Long Lake would be an ideal
community for telecommuters; small school, natural beauty, within a few hours of
major cities, affordable cost of living.
• With an aging population, locally and regionally, there in an opportunity to create
services, housing and other needs for the retirement and elderly population.

Long Lake Winter Carnival

As part of the ongoing public engagement effort for the Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan, a
Chazen representative attended the Long Lake Winter Carnival at the Mount Sabbatis Recreation Area
on Saturday, January 18th.

The purpose of attending the event was to inform residents about the planning process, gather input,
and to promote participation in a community survey. Chazen set up a series of interactive poster boards
in a tent next to the main event registration booth.

Throughout the event residents and visitors engaged with the Chazen planner and discussed various
community topics including:

• There is a growing demand for alternative housing for aging residents. Many residents who have
already raised a family or lost a spouse no longer need large homes with rural acreage. One
resident discussed her idea of pooling the resources of local seniors to develop a senior housing
complex that would feature apartment style units and shared common spaces. This would allow
elderly residents to remain in their community without needing to remain isolated in large
homes that are physically and financially challenging to maintain.
• Long Lake provides an excellent sense of community not found in other places. This draws
visitors and residents from a wide geography.
• Increased access to fresh food is important to residents.
• Residents noted a desire for quality housing that is affordable to people working in the area.
There is a mis-match between the wages available to workers and the cost of housing.
• There is a need for improved availability and reliability of internet service.
• Residents appreciate the outdoor recreation options available to them and would like to
establish more of them.

Raquette Lake Winter Carnival

A Chazen representative also attended the Raquette Lake Winter Carnival in Raquette Lake on Saturday,
February 22nd.

Throughout the event residents and visitors engaged with the Chazen planner and discussed various
community topics including:

• Lack of Utilities and Infrastructure specifically regarding power and broadband. Many
residents/visitors feel that it is nearly impossible to telecommute or run a successful business
with the number of issues they have accessing the internet.
Page 3 of 4

• Many seasonal residents noted that Raquette Lake is unique in that it has multiple water-access
only properties. These, mostly seasonal, residents are very secluded from anything else going on
in the Town or Hamlet.
o They seem to prefer it that way.
• Residents feel that the housing market is a challenge to families or younger professionals who
may want to live in the area year-round. Most of the real estate is consumed by second-home
owners who drive up the prices.
• Raquette Lake residents and visitors feel distant from the Town of Long Lake not only in distance
but in community and communication.
• There were numerous snowmobilers at the event who felt that increased connections and trails
would allow Long Lake to have longer winter season and receive more tourism benefits.
Specifically, with a trail that connects Raquette Lake to Long Lake without having to cross a
waterbody.
• A more direct comment that at least two Raquette Lakers made was that “West Mountain”
should have a clearing at the top so that it has a view for hikers but also provides access for a
helicopter to land for safety reasons.

Survey

The survey asked participants for feedback on the Town’s existing quality of life, economic
development, conservation and natural resources, community character, and future vision. The
survey launched in early January 2020 and closed in early March, providing a three-month period
for residents to respond. Over 300 individuals responded to the survey, including 39 permanent
Raquette Lake residents, 130 permanent Long Lake residents, 134 seasonal residents, and 21
people who work in the Town. The response rate was 43% of the year-round population. The
demographics of survey respondents correlated with information that was garnered during the
inventory and analysis. Many respondents (over 50%) were 55 or older and identified themselves
as retired.

Survey responses offered a variety of insight into residential quality of life; most year-round and
seasonal resident of Long Lake and Raquette Lake (75%) rated the general quality of life in the
Town of Long Lake as good or excellent, with a majority rating it as ‘good.’ Most seasonal residents
of both Hamlets also agreed that the quality of life in the area is improving. Year-round Long Lake
residents were split in their response of the quality of life improving, and 45% of year-round
Raquette Lake residents disagreed that the quality of life is improving, with only 14% agreeing that
the quality of life in the area is improving.

Community Character

Overall, full-time residents of Long Lake and Raquette Lake ranked community character, town
services, and the local school system with higher importance than did the seasonal residents. All
respondents ranked lakes and waterfront areas, natural beauty and resources, and recreational
opportunities with importance.

Town Services
Page 4 of 4

For the most part, respondents were extremely satisfied by the services offered by the Town,
specifically recreation opportunities. Respondents said they recreated in a variety of ways, but
hiking, walking, and paddling were the preferred recreation activities for additional amenities and
services to attract families, young professionals, and other year-round residents to the area.
Respondents expressed that they would like to see improvements to internet and broadband
access, increased access to food and grocery services, more affordable single-family housing, and
opportunities for employment.

Economic Development

Almost all the respondents agreed that the Town should focus its economic development efforts
on small commercial business, year-round residents, telecommunication, and a grocery store.
Seasonal resident respondents also highly ranked outdoor recreation enthusiasts as a focus for
economic development. Full-time resident respondents ranked senior housing, affordable
housing, and health care facilities higher than seasonal residents as focuses for economic
development.

Conservation and Natural Resources

most respondents felt strongly about conserving the area’s natural resources. When asked what
the greatest perceived threat was to the area’s natural resources, most respondents said
pollution, over-development, septic run-off, invasive species, acid rain, over-use of trails, and
general carelessness of people.

Many respondents expressed that they tremendously enjoyed visiting or living in Long Lake, but
there is a need for additional amenities and services to attract families, young professionals, and
other year-round residents to the Town.

Some additional comments that were heard include the following:

• Raquette Lake needs a new firehall


• The Town needs more senior services and should continue services provided by
the Town bus
• The population of young families and young professionals needs to grow
• Property care should be encouraged, specifically in downtown areas

Data from the survey is provided under a separate cover.


Page 1 of 7

Long Lake Comprehensive Plan


Executive Summary of the Focus Groups
Date: January 22, 2020 & March 5, 2020
Location: Long Lake Town Hall & Raquette Lake Union Free District

Introduction:

On January 23, 2020 and March 5, 2020, Chazen Planners met with several focus groups from Long Lake
and Raquette Lake communities. Six meetings, each with a different stakeholder group were held
throughout the two days. The meeting categories were Town Staff, Business Owners, Recreation and
Tourism, Community and Civic Involvement, School Community, and Raquette Lake community (note, the
Raquette Lake community consisted of residents, business owners, and key stakeholders). Overall 25
stakeholders attended. The following is a summary of the feedback, ideas and overall comments that were
heard in those meetings.

Town Staff:

Community Strengths:
Water Department Upgrades and Mapping:
The water department recently acquired $5 million dollars for upgrades for their system. Water
service to waterfront residents has improved considerably with fewer breaks and better water
pressure. The Water Department has also made excellent use of resources and partnerships in
creating digitized maps of Long Lake’s water services. Mapping of Raquette Lake water
distribution systems is underway.

School:
Town staff agreed that the school is essential to the community. An attendee noted that there
has been periodic talk about closing or merging the school since 1965 and it has yet to happen. It
was also noted that not many residents complain about school taxes or supporting the school.

Tourism:
Town staff noted that if you don’t work for the town or for the school you most likely work in the
tourism industry. Tourism in Long Lake provides a much-needed economic boost in the summer.

Community Weaknesses:
Water Services Challenges:
The water department discussed some of the challenges they face in providing water services to
the Town. They noted that the elevation changes in the town make it difficult to pump water. The
distribution system is old with watermains from the 1930’s. Pipes breaks in lake have had to be
fixed by contracted diving services. Many of the lake front homes are also located on ledge adding
to the challenge of proper, buried water service. The Department of Health has expressed concern
about the potential for lake water infiltration into the drinking water supply lines.

Page 1 of 7
Page 2 of 7

Housing:
It was noted that housing in the area is often expensive and not affordable for young families.
Seniors also struggle to stay in the area because their homes have to much maintenance.
Workforce/Temporary Housing is also an issue. When seasonal summer employment increases
businesses often must house their staff.

Jobs:
The lack of availability in good paying full-time jobs is also difficult for keeping people in the area.
Many of the town’s current residents work multiple jobs to make an income. Finding people to
work 9-week long part-time jobs in the summer is also an issue.

Opportunities or Potential Solutions:


Handicap Accessibility:
Participants noted that there is an opportunity to make the town offices handicap accessible. Long
Lake is primarily composed of an elderly and retired population that could benefit from easier
access to the town and its services.

Apartments:
Many of the town staff agreed that apartments could be beneficial for the town. Apartments
would allow for housing seniors who do not wish to leave the area and have the potential to
provide affordable housing for young professionals and other people needed for the workforce.

Community Threats:
Town Office Space:
The town staff was in consensus that they do not want their office spaces moved to the town hall
(former fire station). They don’t see the benefit and feel that there is not enough space in the
Town hall to house them properly. The staff also feel that their current space is lacking. For
example, the water department really doesn’t have space and more space is needed for storing
archives.

Business Owners, Recreation and Tourism:

Community Strengths:
Local Permitting:
Brian commented that as a contractor acquiring building permits is relatively easier to do in
Long Lake versus other areas.

School:
The local school is viewed as an economic entity into and of itself. A $3 million-dollar capital
campaign recently passed within the first round of school budget voting with 30% more votes
than necessary to approve.

The “Little” Bus:

Page 2 of 7
Page 3 of 7

The town owned bus is seen by many stakeholders as a benefit to community. Whether it is
being used for seniors or for town events it has had a positive impact on the community.

Community Weaknesses:
Power Outages:
It was noted that power outages in the area can make it difficult to run a business.

Rural Broadband:
Stakeholders noted that while there are internet options, they are either unreliable or
expensive. Most of Long Lake does not have reliable cell service. AT&T owns the town cell
tower, but Verizon is more popular around the Adirondack Park in general.

Workforce:
Business owners noted that finding people to work is difficult. Business owners have turned to
international students and J-1 visas. College students only have 4-6 weeks of the season to
work. Housing also needs to be supplied for seasonal workforce.

Lodging:
Stakeholders noted that visitors have higher expectations for their lodging. Many of the cottages
and cabins in Long Lake are considered dated and lacking in amenities.

In addition to the changing lodging expectations of visitors, stakeholders noted that during peak
tourism times there is often not enough “beds” and that occupancy is often reached. Major
events such as the Fourth of July seem to lack capacity.

Opportunities and Potential Solutions:


Business Association or Chamber of Commerce:
There may be an opportunity to create a business association or a chamber of commerce to
support and bring together businesses.

Walkability and Transportation:


The Town could improve walkability and transportation to further engage visitors and bring in
campers from Forked Lake and Lake Eaton campgrounds.

Photography and Marketing:


The power of social media and the popularity of photography was discussed as a tool that could
be used to draw more people to Long Lake, especially during the shoulder season. Joan noted
that her bird guiding service is busy year-round.

Tele-commuting:
If the power and broadband situations improved it could be beneficial to advertise the area to
those who can tele-commute. The attractiveness of Long Lake’s community, school and
recreation opportunities could be marketed.

Page 3 of 7
Page 4 of 7

Recreation Options:
The parks and recreation department are highly regarded and is known of their great work with
events and advertising. There may be an opportunity to capitalize on their work by making some
improvement to Mt. Sabbattis, creating more signage for recreation opportunities, and making
the “Powerline” snowmobile trail into a 4-season trail.

Community Threats:
Sense of Business Community:
It was noted that the business community doesn’t necessarily get along or support one another.
This has made it difficult to collaborate, create a unified vision and for new businesses to be
successful.

Community and Civic Involvement, School Community:

Community Strengths:
School:
The school was noted again as a staple in the community. Comments were made that praised
the school for having an excellent administration and staff that are producing well-rounded
students.

Tourism:
It was noted that the tourism season has grown because of second-home owners. The area is
very busy during the summer and could be busier in the summer being equidistant from Gore
Mountain and Whiteface. Seasonal homeowners also provide for tax base in the area.

Community Weaknesses:
Housing:
It was again noted that the availability of affordable housing is an issue. There appears to be a
major disconnect between wages and the real-estate available. Teachers who work at LLCS
don’t live in or near town.

Elderly often sell their homes and they are bought by second-homeowners.

Jobs and Workforce:


It was again noted that there is a lack of decent paying jobs and lack of labor to fill current
positions that are part-time or seasonal.

Volunteerism:
While Long Lake is a close-knit community it seems that many of the same people are civically
involved. Residents noted that seasonal homeowners are not here to contribute time and do
not work therefore they remain disconnected from the community.

Opportunities and Potential Solutions:


Convert Raquette Lake School to a BOCES or trade school:

Page 4 of 7
Page 5 of 7

The Raquette Lake School is a non-operating district. There may be some opportunity to make
use of the building and provide extra support for students in the region by converting it into a
BOCES or trade school.

Create an Alumni Group for the school:


Creating an alumni group may help bring resources back to the school and community. It may
also encourage graduates to return to the area and have mentorship opportunities.

Develop a business mentoring group:


Business owners and other professionals may consider collaborating to support students who
want to start a business or take over a business that is currently existing.

Explore “place-based” education:


Using the community and the region as an educational tool could be beneficial for engaging the
school with its surroundings. It also creates a unique educational opportunity that could be
marketed.

Community Threats:
Population Decline:
It has been observed that many people have left Long Lake over the years. There has been a
domino effect as it creates for less socialization in the town. Residents noted that the 80’s and
90’s had greater populations.

Fire and Emergency Services:


It was mentioned that with a lack of volunteers in the fire and ambulance squads the emergency
response could be slow and inadequate. The Bay Ridge squad out of Queensbury has been
contracted to work with Long Lake

Raquette Lake Community:


Please note, the format of this focus group varied slightly from the Long Lake focus groups. This was
done to ensure that a wide range of topics were discussed.

Internet and Communications:

Raquette Lake has inconsistent and unreliable internet service. Residents and institutions are
finding ways to get enhanced service, but at considerable personal expense. The Town of Long
Lake invested resources in securing enhanced internet service in the Hamlet of Long Lake. Focus
group attendees were curious as to whether the Town government could be doing more to
advocate on behalf of Raquette Lake residents. Businesses (like Raquette Lake Supply and
Burkes Marine) and cottage industries are challenged by slow and unreliable internet service.
There are internet-based cottage industries that are being held back by poor internet service.

Raquette Lake residents were exploring the possibility of running communication lines
underwater, but the NYS Attorney General ruled against that possibility.

Page 5 of 7
Page 6 of 7

Residents do not necessarily feel that the internet providers have provided the level of service
that they are required to by NYS.

Emergency Services:

There is a need for a new, and cost-effective fire station, which is underway. The long-term
viability of emergency services is a concern. Aging and declining enrollment among volunteers
threatens this essential community services. Travel times to medical facilities are a health issues
and practical issue for volunteers. The need for regional solutions and paid support for EMT’s
and paramedics is evident to some. Many volunteers wear many hats in the community.

Housing:

Housing is a serious issue. There have been various attempts to provide affordable and senior
housing on the local level, but none have been successful. The use of grant funds has been
challenging for the Town because of issues with prevailing wage, match requirements, and
administration.

The lack of housing has held back businesses. There are approximately seven job openings in
Raquette Lake that are not being filled, partially because of the difficulty with finding affordable
and quality housing. The community may be open to public and private affordable housing
efforts that were not similar to the Town’s previous subsidized housing efforts.

State Investments in Existing Facilities:

Golden Beach, Tioga Point, Browns Tract, and one more are state owned and operated
campground facilities that bring in many visitors throughout the summer months. However,
residents are concerned that a shortened season (ending on Labor Day) has a negative impact
on fall tourism. Residents are interested in keeping the facilities open further into the fall.

Residents identified multiple physical improvements that the State could be making in the
facilities to ensure that they are attractive to visitors and environmentally sound. Some
residents expressed concern about the status of the existing wastewater treatment facilities.
State needs to coordinate and work with Town to maintain and improve existing facilities. Local
resources, such a gravel area available (instead of trucking many miles), and trails that are
considered snowmobile trails are inadequate/unusable.

Raquette Lake Issues

Some noted the fishery is in good condition, but others indicated there was a decline. Some
residents are skeptical about the state’s practice of harvesting Lake Trout eggs. There has been
an increase in algae blooms. They have not necessarily been harmful (or Harmful Algal Blooms
“HABS”), but their increased frequency is disturbing. Milfoil management ins an ongoing issue.
Sedimentation caused by stormwater runoff is another concern. Some attendees felt there was
a need for a watershed management plan and that the dam ownership and management
needed to be addressed.

Public Spaces/ Municipal Operations

Page 6 of 7
Page 7 of 7

The area serving as the de facto Town center around Raquette Lake Supply is privately owned,
which has been a barrier to municipal investments in public facilities.

The privately-owned area in the center of Raquette Lake is used for parking, boat launching,
shopping, etc. However, the land used by the community has been subsiding. This is an issue

School Facilities

The Raquette Lake school serves as an important community facility. People use it for classes, a
fitness room, and as a community safety building (it has its own generator). An attendee at the
focus group session noted that when there are rainy days the Town loses a lot of visitors to
other areas (ADK Experience, Wild Center, etc.). The possibility of further programming the
school facilities was noted.

Economic Development and Supporting Infrastructure

The causeway needs improvement and should accommodated improved multimodal access.
There is a need for public restrooms. The former ranger station or somewhere near the boat
launch (working with willing landowners).

Page 7 of 7
Document 2A
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan
Community Survey Results Data
April 8, 2020

The following document is intended to provide Advisory Committee Members a reference document
for the survey data that was collected as part of the Comprehensive Planning process.
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q1 What best describes you?


Answered: 347 Skipped: 0

ANSWER CHOICES RESPONSES

Hamlet of Raquette Lake Resident 11.24% 39

Town of Long Lake Resident 37.46% 130

Seasonal Resident of Long Lake 20.46% 71

Seasonal Resident of Raquette Lake 18.16% 63

Visitor 6.05% 21

Other (please specify) 6.63% 23

TOTAL 347

1 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q2 How long have you lived or been visiting Long Lake or Raquette
Lake?
Answered: 346 Skipped: 1

100%

80%

60%

40%

20%

0%
0 to 5 5 to 10 10 to 20 Longer All my life Comments
years years years than 20
ears
ANSWER CHOICES RESPONSES

0 to 5 years 6.07% 21

5 to 10 years 4.91% 17

10 to 20 years 8.96% 31

Longer than 20 years 39.88% 138

All my life 36.42% 126

Comments 3.76% 13

TOTAL 346

2 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q3 What is your age?


Answered: 347 Skipped: 0

100%

80%

60%

40%

20%

0%
Under 18 18-24 25-35 35-55 55-65 65 + Comments

3 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q4 What is your employment status?


Answered: 345 Skipped: 2

Other
Other (please
(please
Do
Do Not
Not Work
Work specify)
specify)

Full-Time
Full-Time

Retired
Retired

Seasonal
Seasonal Full-Time
Full-Time
Part-Time
Part-Time
Seasonal
Seasonal Part-Time
Part-Time

Self-employed
Self-employed

4 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q5 How far do you travel for employment?


Answered: 272 Skipped: 75

0 to 15 minutes

15 to 30
minutes

30 to 60
minutes

More than 60
minutes

Work from Home

Telecommute

Other (please
specify)

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

ANSWER CHOICES RESPONSES

0 to 15 minutes 31.62% 86

15 to 30 minutes 13.24% 36

30 to 60 minutes 7.35% 20

More than 60 minutes 3.68% 10

Work from Home 6.99% 19

Telecommute 2.21% 6

Other (please specify) 34.93% 95

TOTAL 272

5 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q6 How far do you travel to do most of your regular shopping?


Answered: 314 Skipped: 33

0 to 15
minutes

15 to 30
minutes

30 to 60
minutes

More than 60
minutes

Other (please
specify)

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

ANSWER CHOICES RESPONSES

0 to 15 minutes 13.38% 42

15 to 30 minutes 19.11% 60

30 to 60 minutes 34.39% 108

More than 60 minutes 29.30% 92

Other (please specify) 3.82% 12

TOTAL 314

6 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q7 How would you rate the quality of life in Long Lake or Raquette Lake?
Answered: 316 Skipped: 31

100%

80%

60%

40%

20%

0%
Excellent Good Neutral Fair Poor Other
(please
specif )
ANSWER CHOICES RESPONSES

Excellent 31.65% 100

Good 48.42% 153

Neutral 7.28% 23

Fair 6.33% 20

Poor 1.27% 4

Other (please specify) 5.06% 16

TOTAL 316

7 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q8 Would you say that the quality of life in Long Lake or Raquette Lake is
improving?
Answered: 314 Skipped: 33

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Strongly Agree Agree Neither agree nor disagree Disagree


Strongly disagree Comments

ANSWER CHOICES RESPONSES

Strongly Agree 4.14% 13

Agree 29.62% 93

Neither agree nor disagree 41.40% 130

Disagree 18.47% 58

Strongly disagree 2.55% 8

Comments 3.82% 12

TOTAL 314

8 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q9 What do you value most about Long Lake or Raquette Lake? Please
indicate how important each of the following factors is in your decision to
live in Long Lake or Raquette Lake.
Answered: 315 Skipped: 32

Born and
raised here

Community
character

Good town
services (fi...

Local School
System

Local History

Lakes and
waterfront...

Proximity to
work
Natural
beauty
and
resources
Recreational
opportunities

Quality
neighborhood...

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Very Important Important Somewhat Important


Not at all Important No Opinion

9 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

VERY IMPORTANT IMPORTANT SOMEWHAT NOT AT ALL NO TOTAL WEIGHTED


IMPORTANT IMPORTANT OPINION AVERAGE
Born and raised here 8.97% 11.03% 14.48% 32.41% 33.10%
26 32 42 94 96 290 2.04

Community character 43.09% 42.43% 10.20% 1.64% 2.63%


131 129 31 5 8 304 1.65

Good town services 49.84% 35.92% 10.68% 0.65% 2.91%


(fire, police, town 154 111 33 2 9 309 1.56
highway and water
department)

Local School System 32.68% 26.14% 12.09% 13.73% 15.36%


100 80 37 42 47 306 1.76

Local History 28.10% 39.22% 24.51% 4.90% 3.27%


86 120 75 15 10 306 2.00

Lakes and waterfront 71.15% 22.44% 4.17% 0.32% 1.92%


areas 222 70 13 1 6 312 1.30

Proximity to work 9.90% 22.53% 14.33% 20.48% 32.76%


29 66 42 60 96 293 1.80

Natural beauty and 75.64% 20.19% 2.88% 0.32% 0.96%


resources 236 63 9 1 3 312 1.26

Recreational 53.99% 31.31% 10.86% 1.28% 2.56%


opportunities 169 98 34 4 8 313 1.54

Quality 54.52% 35.81% 5.16% 0.32% 4.19%


neighborhoods/Quality 169 111 16 1 13 310 1.43
of life

10 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q10 What type of services are most needed in Long Lake or Raquette
Lake? Please indicate how important each of the following services is for
the community.
Answered: 316 Skipped: 31

Medical or
Health
Services

Facilities and
Services for...

Internet
Services

Fire and
Safety
Services

Infrastructure
(Roads,...

Public Works
(Sewer and...

Education

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Very Important Important Somewhat Important


Not at All Important No Opinion

VERY IMPORTANT SOMEWHAT NOT AT ALL NO TOTAL WEIGHTED


IMPORTANT IMPORTANT IMPORTANT OPINION AVERAGE
Medical or Health 63.46% 31.09% 4.49% 0.64% 0.32%
Services 198 97 14 2 1 312 1.42

Facilities and Services 40.71% 42.95% 11.22% 1.92% 3.21%


for the Elderly 127 134 35 6 10 312 1.68

Internet Services 69.11% 22.29% 7.32% 0.64% 0.64%


217 70 23 2 2 314 1.38

Fire and Safety Services 73.97% 21.90% 3.49% 0.32% 0.32%


233 69 11 1 1 315 1.30

Infrastructure (Roads, 53.67% 34.50% 10.86% 0.32% 0.64%


Sidewalks, ect.) 168 108 34 1 2 313 1.57

Public Works (Sewer 53.67% 31.63% 7.67% 3.51% 3.51%


and Water Systems) 168 99 24 11 11 313 1.54

Education 49.51% 28.80% 12.62% 3.24% 5.83%


153 89 39 10 18 309 1.58

11 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q11 How would describe the availability of recreation in the Town? This
includes things like parks, playgrounds, walking trails, playing fields, etc.
Answered: 312 Skipped: 35

Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

Other (please
specify)

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

ANSWER CHOICES RESPONSES

Excellent 26.60% 83

Good 43.27% 135

Fair 24.36% 76

Poor 2.88% 9

Other (please specify) 2.88% 9

TOTAL 312

12 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q12 How do you recreate in and around Long Lake or Raquette Lake?
Choose 3 or more.
Answered: 312 Skipped: 35

Hiking

Biking

Canoeing,
Kayaking,...

Horseback
Riding

Walking

Hunting

Fishing

Snowmobiling

Motor-boating

Skiiing or
snowboarding

Cross-country
skiing or...

Skating

Bird Watching

Other (please
specify)

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

13 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

ANSWER CHOICES RESPONSES

Hiking 66.67% 208

Biking 23.72% 74

Canoeing, Kayaking, Paddling 66.99% 209

Horseback Riding 0.00% 0

Walking 68.91% 215

Hunting 19.23% 60

Fishing 43.91% 137

Snowmobiling 20.51% 64

Motor-boating 60.26% 188

Skiiing or snowboarding 11.54% 36

Cross-country skiing or snowshoeing 34.94% 109

Skating 9.62% 30

Bird Watching 24.04% 75

Other (please specify) 17.95% 56

Total Respondents: 312

14 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q13 How should the Town focus on economic development? Please


indicate how important each of the development actions is for the Town to
pursue.
Answered: 305 Skipped: 42

15 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Small
Commercial...

Large
Commercial...

Forest
Product
Industries

Mining
Industries

Year Round
Residents

Seasonal
Residents

Outdoor
Recreation...

Historic and
Cultural...

Senior
Housing
or Facilities

Youth
Facilities

Heath Care
Facilities

Affordable
Housing

Telecommunicati
ons...

Accommodations
(hotel,
mote...

Grocery
Store

Retail

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Very Important Important Somewhat Important


Not at all Important No Opinion

16 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

VERY IMPORTANT SOMEWHAT NOT AT ALL NO TOTAL WEIGHTED


IMPORTANT IMPORTANT IMPORTANT OPINION AVERAGE
Small Commercial 67.22% 25.17% 4.64% 1.32% 1.66%
Businesses 203 76 14 4 5 302 1.37

Large Commercial 7.27% 16.26% 32.18% 39.45% 4.84%


Businesses 21 47 93 114 14 289 2.94

Forest Product Industries 15.77% 33.22% 29.87% 12.08% 9.06%


47 99 89 36 27 298 2.20

Mining Industries 4.10% 11.26% 21.84% 48.46% 14.33%


12 33 64 142 42 293 2.86

Year Round Residents 68.11% 24.58% 4.98% 1.00% 1.33%


205 74 15 3 4 301 1.36

Seasonal Residents 35.79% 38.46% 20.07% 3.34% 2.34%


107 115 60 10 7 299 1.86

Outdoor Recreation 46.00% 38.67% 13.33% 0.67% 1.33%


Enthusiasts 138 116 40 2 4 300 1.66

Historic and Cultural 27.00% 42.00% 25.00% 2.67% 3.33%


Resource Facilities 81 126 75 8 10 300 1.97

Senior Housing or Facilities 29.57% 38.87% 19.93% 6.31% 5.32%


89 117 60 19 16 301 1.92

Youth Facilities 26.85% 45.97% 20.13% 3.36% 3.69%


80 137 60 10 11 298 1.93

Heath Care Facilities 54.52% 32.78% 9.03% 1.34% 2.34%


163 98 27 4 7 299 1.53

Affordable Housing 42.62% 34.23% 15.10% 4.36% 3.69%


127 102 45 13 11 298 1.74

Telecommunications 64.45% 24.58% 8.64% 1.00% 1.33%


Infrastructure 194 74 26 3 4 301 1.44

Accommodations (hotel, 39.93% 40.59% 16.17% 1.98% 1.32%


motel, bed and breakfast) 121 123 49 6 4 303 1.78

Grocery Store 62.71% 26.07% 8.91% 1.98% 0.33%


190 79 27 6 1 303 1.50

Retail 24.40% 43.99% 23.02% 6.53% 2.06%


71 128 67 19 6 291 2.08

17 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q14 What should the Town do to support or improve the business


community?
Answered: 152 Skipped: 195

18 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q15 How important is it to you that the Town protects the following
resources? Please indicate how important the following are in accordance
with your views.
Answered: 295 Skipped: 52

Forest Land

Open Space

Scenic Vistas

Wetland,
Streams
and...

Historic
Resources

Lake,
Shoreline
an...
Water Quality
of Lakes
and...

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Very Important Important Somewhat Important Not at all Important


No Opinion

VERY IMPORTANT SOMEWHAT NOT AT ALL NO TOTAL WEIGHTED


IMPORTANT IMPORTANT IMPORTANT OPINION AVERAGE
Forest Land 61.77% 23.55% 11.95% 2.05% 0.68%
181 69 35 6 2 293 1.56

Open Space 51.72% 27.59% 15.86% 2.76% 2.07%


150 80 46 8 6 290 1.76

Scenic Vistas 57.44% 34.26% 6.23% 1.38% 0.69%


166 99 18 4 2 289 1.54

Wetland, Streams and 66.78% 23.63% 8.22% 0.68% 0.68%


Aquifers or Groundwater 195 69 24 2 2 292 1.45

Historic Resources 40.48% 42.21% 14.88% 0.35% 2.08%


117 122 43 1 6 289 1.81

Lake, Shoreline and 67.92% 25.26% 6.14% 0.34% 0.34%


Waterfront Access 199 74 18 1 1 293 1.40

Water Quality of Lakes 82.31% 14.63% 2.38% 0.34% 0.34%


and Other Water Bodies 242 43 7 1 1 294 1.22

19 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q16 What do you perceive as the greatest threats to natural resources


where you live?
Answered: 200 Skipped: 147

20 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q17 If you had someone from out-of-town visiting Long Lake or Raquette
Lake where would you tell them to visit?
Answered: 256 Skipped: 91

21 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q18 What makes Long Lake or Raquette Lake unique from other
communities in the Adirondack Park?
Answered: 234 Skipped: 113

22 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q19 What types of local activities, organizations, and institutions do you


support or are you involved in?
Answered: 213 Skipped: 134

23 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q20 What is your vision for the future of Long Lake or Raquette Lake over
the next 10 to 20 years? Is there anything you would create or change in
the community?
Answered: 224 Skipped: 123

24 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q21 Is there anything that you feel strongly about not changing in the
community?
Answered: 171 Skipped: 176

25 / 26
Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan SurveyMonkey

Q22 If you have any other ideas or comments that were not addressed in
the above questions, please leave your comments below.
Answered: 88 Skipped: 259

26 / 26
Page 1 of 3

Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan


Meeting #1 Notes
Date: September 4, 2019
Location: Town Hall

Attendees: Alexandra Roalsvig, Ally Parent, Barbara Taylor, Hillarie Logan-Dechene, Liz Forsell, Richard
Dechene, Tim Helms, Tim Touchette, Paul Cummings (Chazen), Ethan Gaddy (Chazen)

The first meeting of the Long Lake Comprehensive Plan Committee was held at 7am on September 4, 2019
in the Town Hall.

The meeting began with Committee member introductions. The Committee includes representatives from
Long Lake, Raquette Lake, native Long Lake and Raquette Lake residents, residents who grew up
elsewhere, retirees, working age people, business owners, and the like.

The following is an overview of the meeting. Additional thoughts and comments were captured on
mapping and via input from committee members before and after the meeting.

1) Introductions
• Committee members introduced themselves and expressed why they are interested in
participating and what they hoped for with the planning process.
• It was noted that the planning process will be driven by the Committee and that
Committee members will serve as ‘ambassadors’ for the project. This includes educating
community members about the planning process and the purpose of the Comprehensive
Plan as well as obtaining feedback from the community.
2) Meeting schedule
• The Committee is open to the possibility of meeting in the evening. The committee agreed
alternating between morning and evening meetings to accommodate everyone’s schedule
is preferred.
3) Public Engagement
• Public engagement is crucial to the planning process. Committee members noted that
there have been some community planning projects in the recent past. A turnout of 30 to
40 people is considered a good benchmark and goal.
• Chazen will review the results of a community survey conducted within the past few years
to ensure previous public engagement is taken into consideration.
• Stakeholder outreach will be important to gather information. There are many residents
who don’t show up at public meetings but have a wealth of knowledge. Committee
members were asked to think about potential stakeholders. The final list of people to
reach out to will be approved by the Committee at a forthcoming meeting.
• Committee members noted that there are a lot of residents who leave for the winter and
that by Columbus Day many are gone. It will be necessary to make the public aware of the
planning process and to gather contact information for residents who will be out of town.
Page 2 of 3

• The possibility of using an electronic survey to contact residents and part-time residents
who may be out of town as an alternative to relying strictly on in-person public workshops
was discussed.
• It was noted that there will be an opportunity to hold events in the Spring which will help
to engage a wider range of residents and visitors as they return to Town.
• Committee members noted that there are a various existing organizations that hold
regular meetings and that they could be used to spread the word and gather input on the
Comprehensive Plan.
• Raquette Lake has solid Facebook group that could be leveraged.
• Committee members said that posting flyers on Post Office wall, Stewarts, bars, etc.
would be effective.

4) The Committee discussed what they considered Issues and Opportunities

Issues:

• Roads are hard on vehicles, which increases the expense of transportation


• The cost of the school district is high (while it was recognized that the school is a vital community
asset)
• There are fewer businesses than there were 10, 20, or 30 years ago
• The high cost of real estate is prohibitive for many young families. Many are moving to other more
affordable communities like Tupper Lake
• There are not many conveniences like fresh food and jobs that do not require a long commute
• Disinformation about demographic trends in the region is sowing confusion
• Local businesses have limited access to capital for improvements and growth
• Physical divide between Raquette and Long Lake makes for two distinctive communities
• Sense of ‘stagnation’
• Lack of municipally owned land at Raquette Lake for community facilities such as bathrooms
• Inconsistent internet and cell service in Raquette Lake
• Reactive instead of proactive planning
• Lack of resilient power infrastructure to Long Lake (a back-up generator in Newcomb only services
as far as Blue Mountain Lake)

Opportunities:

• Renewed enthusiasm and energy from community members


• New young people are moving into town with families, businesses and ideas. This wasn’t the case
five years ago
• Business retention and attraction of even a few would be very helpful
• Vacant business locations
• Expansion of shoulder season activities
• Interest in diversifying recreational offerings (mountain biking, jeep trails, etc.)
• Telecommuting and ‘project work’ (i.e. in the digital age, skilled workers living in Long Lake can
work on projects remotely via the internet)
Page 3 of 3

• Large number of skilled residents who have had careers in diverse fields and moved (back) to
Town
• Numerous active community groups and lake associations

5) Chazen discussed the various components of the Comprehensive Plan process and potential
outcomes.
• There will be a series of recommendations and action items that the Town can pursue to
develop capacity internally as well as to secure grant funding from the state.
• The Consolidated Funding Application (CFA) process is how NYS disperses most grant
funding. This competitive “CFA” process favors communities with Comprehensive Plans.
• A Committee member noted that applying for and administering grants can be a
challenge. Chazen noted that there are regional approaches (e.g. the 5 Towns, county
level economic development groups, etc.) and other capacity building strategies that
could be explored.

Next Steps
• Committee members should gather contacts and reach out to community members who are
leaving for the winter months
• Committee members should think of stakeholders and share them with Chazen
• Chazen will develop a focused inventory and analysis of the community that will provide good
data for decision making
• Chazen will review existing planning efforts (e.g. “Hamlets 3” etc.)
• Chazen will schedule a more extensive field visit to Raquette Lake.
Page 1 of 4

Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan


Meeting #2 Notes
Date: November 18, 2019
Location: Town Hall (Second Floor of Old Fire Hall)

Attendees: Alexandra Roalsvig, Barbara Taylor, Craig Seaman, Ed Meelan, Hillarie Logan-Dechene, Ken
Hawks, Noelle Short, Rachel Pohl, Richard Dechene, Tim Helms, Tim Touchette, Paul Cummings
(Chazen), Ethan Gaddy (Chazen)

The second meeting of the Long Lake Comprehensive Plan Committee was held at 5:30 pm on November
18, 2019 on the second floor of the Town Hall.

The meeting began with Committee member introductions, including some new Committee members.

The following is an overview of the meeting. Additional thoughts and comments were captured on
mapping and via input from Committee members before and after the meeting.

1. Introductions and Review of Previous Meeting


• Since the first meeting, the Committee was expanded to include more members.
• The Committee reviewed the meeting notes from the September 4th meeting. It was
noted that the purpose of the meeting notes is not to create a verbatim transcript of the
entire event, but rather a summary of the discussions and build a rationale for eventual
decisions and recommendations that become a part of the Comprehensive Plan.
2. Comments on Raquette Lake Site Visit
• On September 27th, Chazen and some Committee members conducted a site visit of the
Raquette Lake area.
• The site visit was conducted with Raquette Lake Committee members to ensure that
Chazen develops a deeper understanding of the Raquette Lake community and its
distinguishing characteristics.
• Chazen distributed a map of the areas that were visited, as well as a brief memorandum
outlining the information and ideas discussed on the site visit.
3. Review of Preliminary Inventory and Analysis
• Chazen presented a 12-page Inventory and Analysis (I&A), which provides baseline
demographic, land use, and economic data about the Long Lake area. The purpose of
developing an I&A at the early stages of the planning process is so that residents and
Committee members are making decisions from a shared set of facts.
• The information contained in the I&A can also be used for benchmarking purposes. For
example, if one of the Town’s goals is to increase the proportion of young families in the
community, the Town can revisit the I&A a decade later to check what progress has been
made.
• Committee members briefly discussed the finding that 97% of housing in the Town is for
seasonal and second homes. This fact can make it difficult to understand the population
characteristics of these seasonal and temporary visitors.
Page 2 of 4

• The Committee noted that, despite the decline in overall population, enrollment at Long
Lake School has remained fairly stable over the past 10 years.
• Committee members noted that the school is one of the community’s largest employers.
However, finding housing for teachers is a challenge. Housing availability (especially
rental) is a challenge.
• Committee members noted that housing has been an issue for other employers in the
area as well.
• The seasonal rental market outcompetes the year-round rental market because of the
higher rents charged during the summer. A three-month summer rental can generate
more income than a 12-month rental and require far less maintenance and administration
(no heating costs, driveway plowing, or tenant management in the winter if property is
not rented).
• There is a limited labor pool and local employers are hiring post-retirement workers.
• The Committee is curious about the seasonal unemployment numbers.
• Ten years ago, there was an affordable housing initiative that failed. Committee members
noted that the stigma associated with subsidized housing and the caveat that the units
could not be resold at a higher market rate deterred potential residents.
• Committee members noted that Long Lake has the highest educational attainment levels
in the state (*Note: this claim has not been corroborated with US Census data. 2017
American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year estimates indicate that 26.4% of the population
25 years and over has a bachelor’s degree or higher as compared to 35.3% of all New
Yorkers and 52.6% of Tompkins County residents).
• Committee members noted that there are many people that are self-employed or
employed by small informal companies, so actual employment and industry dynamics are
difficult to capture with conventional techniques.
• Accommodations
i. Committee members noted that the closure of Whispering Woods campground
(approximately 15 years ago) was a big loss. There were 150 campsites at the
privately-owned campground, which generated of transient visitors who would
shop, dine, etc.
ii. Many businesses operate at a loss during the winter months. Without year-round
profitability, many business owners are inclined to sell their properties to
developers.
• The Committee discussed the idea of lake access and whether or not most residents had
easy access to the lakes. Committee members noted that, unlike some other towns like
Indian Lake, both Raquette and Long Lake have good visual and physical access to the
waterways. Committee members did note that owning a motorboat is prohibitively
expensive for some residents. This conversation moved on to the idea of how some new
residents are unfamiliar with the activities and sports that many longtime residents
consider to be a part of life in Long Lake. Committee members noted that there is not a
middle class in Long Lake.
• Public restrooms by the waterfront are a huge benefit. It encourages people to get out of
their cars and hang around.
Page 3 of 4

• The number one question that lake stewards at Raquette Lake field is “where is the
bathroom.”
• Committee members briefly discussed the closure of some businesses that had no legacy
plans, indicating that lack of customers/bad economic environment might not be the only
obstacle facing the local business climate.
• Committee members noted that without the two lakes there would be no community.
Part of this planning effort should be to ensure the environmental quality of the lakes.
• Essential Services
i. Raquette Lake has just two Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) to answer
medical calls. They serve on a volunteer basis, and residents presume that there
will be a need to hire a paid EMT or other first responder.
ii. Long Lake has 2.5 EMTs.
iii. The Town encourages Highway Department employees to drive ambulances. The
town encourages municipal workers to drop whatever work they are doing in
order to drive ambulances when needed.
iv. In Long Lake the rescue squad is housed in a separate building from the fire
department.
v. The Committee discussed the municipal space/building and the ability of the
existing spaces to meet community needs. Currently, the Town Offices are housed
in a residential building with limited storage space. The Town Justice has an office
the size of “a postage stamp.”
• Food Access
i. Committee members discussed the nearly universal desire for increased access to
fresh food and groceries.
ii. A Committee member outlined an idea to increase the availability of fresh food by
training students at BOCES to take part in retail operations.
iii. Several food outlets have closed in recent years, narrowing the available food
options.
iv. Many people are using Stewarts to buy groceries.
• Internet Access
i. There are two internet providers: SLICK and Frontier.
ii. Committee members noted that Frontier’s service left much to be desired.
iii. Service varies between providers and between uses (i.e. television, internet,
telephone).
iv. Committee member noted that there should be a concerted effort to stay abreast
of new technology for data, in particular 5G (fifth generation cellular data
transmission technology).
• The Committee discussed public outreach options
i. Due to high response rate from the Committee in providing stakeholder names,
focus group sessions would be used to supplement individual interviews.
ii. Focus groups allow for productive dialogue with and between individuals and can
provide a wealth of qualitative data.
Page 4 of 4

iii. Chazen will ‘piggy-back’ on planned Winter Carnivals at Raquette Lake and Long
Lake.
iv. An online survey will be developed to reach residents who will be unable to
attend events in person. Chazen will draft a survey and circulate to Committee for
review. Survey will be used to gather input and weigh community priorities.

Next Steps
• Chazen will draft a community survey for Committee review for launch early 2020.
• Committee members will continue to review the list of stakeholders for Chazen to contact.
• Chazen will work with Committee to establish focus group sessions for January meetings.
• Committee and Chazen will work to publicize the fact that there will be Comprehensive Plan
outreach at the Long Lake Winter Carnival (January 18th) and at the Raquette Lake Winter Carnival
(February 15, 16, 17- Presidents Day Weekend).
Page 1 of 4

Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan


Meeting #2 Notes
Date: November 18, 2019
Location: Town Hall (Second Floor of Old Fire Hall)

Attendees: Alexandra Roalsvig, Barbara Taylor, Craig Seaman, Ed Meelan, Hillarie Logan-Dechene, Ken
Hawks, Noelle Short, Rachel Pohl, Richard Dechene, Tim Helms, Tim Touchette, Paul Cummings
(Chazen), Ethan Gaddy (Chazen)

The second meeting of the Long Lake Comprehensive Plan Committee was held at 5:30 pm on November
18, 2019 on the second floor of the Town Hall.

The meeting began with Committee member introductions, including some new Committee members.

The following is an overview of the meeting. Additional thoughts and comments were captured on
mapping and via input from Committee members before and after the meeting.

1. Introductions and Review of Previous Meeting


• Since the first meeting, the Committee was expanded to include more members.
• The Committee reviewed the meeting notes from the September 4th meeting. It was
noted that the purpose of the meeting notes is not to create a verbatim transcript of the
entire event, but rather a summary of the discussions and build a rationale for eventual
decisions and recommendations that become a part of the Comprehensive Plan.
2. Comments on Raquette Lake Site Visit
• On September 27th, Chazen and some Committee members conducted a site visit of the
Raquette Lake area.
• The site visit was conducted with Raquette Lake Committee members to ensure that
Chazen develops a deeper understanding of the Raquette Lake community and its
distinguishing characteristics.
• Chazen distributed a map of the areas that were visited, as well as a brief memorandum
outlining the information and ideas discussed on the site visit.
3. Review of Preliminary Inventory and Analysis
• Chazen presented a 12-page Inventory and Analysis (I&A), which provides baseline
demographic, land use, and economic data about the Long Lake area. The purpose of
developing an I&A at the early stages of the planning process is so that residents and
Committee members are making decisions from a shared set of facts.
• The information contained in the I&A can also be used for benchmarking purposes. For
example, if one of the Town’s goals is to increase the proportion of young families in the
community, the Town can revisit the I&A a decade later to check what progress has been
made.
• Committee members briefly discussed the finding that 97% of housing in the Town is for
seasonal and second homes. This fact can make it difficult to understand the population
characteristics of these seasonal and temporary visitors.
Page 2 of 4

• The Committee noted that, despite the decline in overall population, enrollment at Long
Lake School has remained fairly stable over the past 10 years.
• Committee members noted that the school is one of the community’s largest employers.
However, finding housing for teachers is a challenge. Housing availability (especially
rental) is a challenge.
• Committee members noted that housing has been an issue for other employers in the
area as well.
• The seasonal rental market outcompetes the year-round rental market because of the
higher rents charged during the summer. A three-month summer rental can generate
more income than a 12-month rental and require far less maintenance and administration
(no heating costs, driveway plowing, or tenant management in the winter if property is
not rented).
• There is a limited labor pool and local employers are hiring post-retirement workers.
• The Committee is curious about the seasonal unemployment numbers.
• Ten years ago, there was an affordable housing initiative that failed. Committee members
noted that the stigma associated with subsidized housing and the caveat that the units
could not be resold at a higher market rate deterred potential residents.
• Committee members noted that Long Lake has the highest educational attainment levels
in the state (*Note: this claim has not been corroborated with US Census data. 2017
American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year estimates indicate that 26.4% of the population
25 years and over has a bachelor’s degree or higher as compared to 35.3% of all New
Yorkers and 52.6% of Tompkins County residents).
• Committee members noted that there are many people that are self-employed or
employed by small informal companies, so actual employment and industry dynamics are
difficult to capture with conventional techniques.
• Accommodations
i. Committee members noted that the closure of Whispering Woods campground
(approximately 15 years ago) was a big loss. There were 150 campsites at the
privately-owned campground, which generated of transient visitors who would
shop, dine, etc.
ii. Many businesses operate at a loss during the winter months. Without year-round
profitability, many business owners are inclined to sell their properties to
developers.
• The Committee discussed the idea of lake access and whether or not most residents had
easy access to the lakes. Committee members noted that, unlike some other towns like
Indian Lake, both Raquette and Long Lake have good visual and physical access to the
waterways. Committee members did note that owning a motorboat is prohibitively
expensive for some residents. This conversation moved on to the idea of how some new
residents are unfamiliar with the activities and sports that many longtime residents
consider to be a part of life in Long Lake. Committee members noted that there is not a
middle class in Long Lake.
• Public restrooms by the waterfront are a huge benefit. It encourages people to get out of
their cars and hang around.
Page 3 of 4

• The number one question that lake stewards at Raquette Lake field is “where is the
bathroom.”
• Committee members briefly discussed the closure of some businesses that had no legacy
plans, indicating that lack of customers/bad economic environment might not be the only
obstacle facing the local business climate.
• Committee members noted that without the two lakes there would be no community.
Part of this planning effort should be to ensure the environmental quality of the lakes.
• Essential Services
i. Raquette Lake has just two Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) to answer
medical calls. They serve on a volunteer basis, and residents presume that there
will be a need to hire a paid EMT or other first responder.
ii. Long Lake has 2.5 EMTs.
iii. The Town encourages Highway Department employees to drive ambulances. The
town encourages municipal workers to drop whatever work they are doing in
order to drive ambulances when needed.
iv. In Long Lake the rescue squad is housed in a separate building from the fire
department.
v. The Committee discussed the municipal space/building and the ability of the
existing spaces to meet community needs. Currently, the Town Offices are housed
in a residential building with limited storage space. The Town Justice has an office
the size of “a postage stamp.”
• Food Access
i. Committee members discussed the nearly universal desire for increased access to
fresh food and groceries.
ii. A Committee member outlined an idea to increase the availability of fresh food by
training students at BOCES to take part in retail operations.
iii. Several food outlets have closed in recent years, narrowing the available food
options.
iv. Many people are using Stewarts to buy groceries.
• Internet Access
i. There are two internet providers: SLICK and Frontier.
ii. Committee members noted that Frontier’s service left much to be desired.
iii. Service varies between providers and between uses (i.e. television, internet,
telephone).
iv. Committee member noted that there should be a concerted effort to stay abreast
of new technology for data, in particular 5G (fifth generation cellular data
transmission technology).
• The Committee discussed public outreach options
i. Due to high response rate from the Committee in providing stakeholder names,
focus group sessions would be used to supplement individual interviews.
ii. Focus groups allow for productive dialogue with and between individuals and can
provide a wealth of qualitative data.
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iii. Chazen will ‘piggy-back’ on planned Winter Carnivals at Raquette Lake and Long
Lake.
iv. An online survey will be developed to reach residents who will be unable to
attend events in person. Chazen will draft a survey and circulate to Committee for
review. Survey will be used to gather input and weigh community priorities.

Next Steps
• Chazen will draft a community survey for Committee review for launch early 2020.
• Committee members will continue to review the list of stakeholders for Chazen to contact.
• Chazen will work with Committee to establish focus group sessions for January meetings.
• Committee and Chazen will work to publicize the fact that there will be Comprehensive Plan
outreach at the Long Lake Winter Carnival (January 18th) and at the Raquette Lake Winter Carnival
(February 15, 16, 17- Presidents Day Weekend).
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Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan


Meeting 4 Notes
Date: April 30, 2020
Location: Go to Meeting - Virtual

Attendees: Alexandra Roalsvig, Clay Arsenault, Craig Seaman, Kenneth Hawks, Tim Touchette, Elizabeth
Noonan, Liz Forsell, Barbara Taylor, Michael Allen, Paul Cummings (PC), Ethan Gaddy(EG), Jordyn
Conway

The fourth meeting of the Long Lake Comprehensive Plan Committee was held at 2:00 pm on April 30,
2020 through a virtual platform, “Go to Meeting”.

The meeting began with a recapture of the previous meeting where Paul Cummings and Ethan Gaddy
briefly explained where we are in the planning process, how the recommendations were created and how
implementation will be addressed in the plan itself.

The following is an overview of the meeting. Additional thoughts and comments were captured on input
from Committee members before and after the meeting.

1. Review and Discussion of the Vision Statement:


• Is this a mission statement, a goal? EG explained that is an aspirational statement reflecting where
the community would like to see themselves in the future. It is used to orient committee as they
look at the comprehensive plan and look at what they are trying to address.

• Is the plan supposed to have a timeline? If so what is it? EG answered, the life of a plan is roughly 10
years, with consecutive reflections on the vision statement and goals during that time. The
committee should revisit the plan overtime and as changes occur in the community. PC added the
committee may want to add a window in which the plan is reviewed.

• Who is the audience for this? PC answered this is a document that the Town Board should be
referencing for creating budgets, decision making and other various policy documents. The plan is
for the community holistically a well (residents, businesses/organizations, investors). Funding
sources will also look to the plan. The plan is written to multiple audiences. Part of the planner’s job
in this process is to streamline the adoption of the plan. With good public outreach and support this
is usually achieved.

• At this point the Town Board is supportive of this plan. PC added the board may request changes to
the draft plan, usually minor changes are requested, engagement from the board is a good thing.

2. Review and Discussion of Preliminary Goals and Recommendations

• Recreation: Recommendations were made in the idea that recreation is important to the town and
that there are action items that can be made in partnership with the DEC UMP (Unit Management
Plans) to benefit the Town.

• Campgrounds need to be mention, there are three in the Town, Forked Lake is technically outside
the Town but bring traffic and economy to the area. Town should definitely interface more with the
DEC and the APA, consider keeping campgrounds open longer.
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• What are we already doing that is successful? How can we enhance what we are doing? DEC did a
presentation on plans for the Cedar Lands but there has not been any action on advancing those
plans. Kenneth Hawks mentioned issues with the sale of lands and the Boy Scouts Council. Plan
should address what Town may want to advocate for or support.

• Ethan Gaddy mentioned that Michael Allen will be creating graphics for the ideas that are being
mentioned in the plan.

• Infrastructure: We heard a lot from the water department regarding distribution and sewer systems
impact water quality. One of the big things we heard was about resiliency especially given the
Town’s remote nature.

• Noted that the water system is in both hamlets and that in general they all need to be improved and
maintained. Should be water systems plural. Ethan Gaddy noted that Barbara Taylor has provided
some extensive comments on partnerships that already exist and are necessary to include in the
plan. Paul Cummings noted that we may want to include a Capital Asset Plan to score higher on
grants.

• Heard a rumor that the Town maybe working on a backup generator for the Raquette Lake
Community, power often goes out. The community really needs more reliable power. Clay Arsenault
has had extensive communications with National Grid and they have plans to do a battery backup
plan. The plan is to have this up and running by 2022. Chazen would love to see notes from National
Grid meetings to include current state of affairs in plan.

• Critical Services: This area has an emphasis on resiliency. Volunteers have played an important role
in providing critical services (fire departments, emergency preparedness). We found it important to
build this into the plan. We would like to see current protocols that have been created due to
COVID-19 to assist in furthering this section of the plan.

• Commented that emergency communication with Raquette Lake should be noted in this part of the
plan.

• Ethan Gaddy: Noted his conversation with Dr. Rider and the potential need to explore options in
continuing to provide medical care either from a private practioner or facility. Paul Cummings noted
this a national rural issue, our job is to flag these issues and catalogue opportunities for future
support and addressment.

• Noted that Hudson Headwaters approached the Town last year. He believes health care needs to be
addressed sooner than later.

• Added that Town has just started robo-calling for emergency communication purposes. They use
“One Call Now”. There is a data collection page on the Long Lake website.

• Economic Development and Tourism: Essentially, many of the things mentioned in this section are
already underway. We discussed this section with Alex to gain clarity, for example there is already a
marketing plan in place that is being followed. We also heard that there have been past efforts to
form a chamber of commerce or business alliance. One of the things we are thinking about is seeing
if the Town Board would ask Business owners to be engaged in some sort of committee to come
together and address issues and opportunities. Maybe business community could advise board and
board could support collective business efforts. For example, business community maybe supportive
of offsetting the cost of the “Little” Bus.
Page 3 of 4

• Feels that the right person in charge of some sort of business group would be needed to be
successful, someone outgoing and able to bring people together. Paul Cummings noted that it could
be as formal or as informal as the Town wants it.

• Noted that the Town previously had an “Economic Enhancement” committee. There used to be a lot
of steam behind this, but it has recently petered out as it lacked formality. Many business owners
get very busy during the summer and don’t have time.

• Through public health, they are thinking about bringing businesses together to discuss how they are
going to re-open. This may be a jumping off point for starting some business collaboration.

• Environmental Resources: The environmental health of the area is significant to the community not
only for the economy but as a large part of the quality of life. We heard from some of the lake
protection organizations and we made recommendations on programs that could be implemented
that are being used by the DEC. For example, robust water quality testing. The narrative in this
section will recognize current efforts and bolster areas that need support.

• Ethan Gaddy: Recreational Fishing is very popular in the Town. We may want to communicate with
DEC on stocking and fisheries maintenance.

• There is no formal communication or analysis.

• Long Lake is the only source of fertile Lake Trout that serves the entire area. We haven’t got DEC
region 5 attention. Would like to see state do a formal analysis for Raquette Lake for fish.

• Housing: Affordable housing is seen as a challenge across the Adirondack Park. We are seeing some
models of how Towns are becoming involved in this issue.

• Transportation: We heard many ideas primarily related to the Little Bus, walkability and
connectivity.

• Snowmobiling is a big part of our winter economy and there has been a need to greater connectivity
especially between the hamlets and get the snowmobiles off the water. She has talked with Hamlets
to Huts and currently working on some efforts.

• Municipal Buildings: One of the recommendations we are likely to make is the creation of a Capital
Asset Plan to evaluate most efficient uses of municipal spaces and potential improvements.

• Paul Cummings: For example, expanding uses of the school in Raquette Lake.

• Ethan Gaddy: We were somewhat limited in what we could recommend in Raquette Lake due to lack
of municipally owned land.

• Paul Cummings: There may be interest in creating a Raquette Lake committee to provide some
formal input to the Town Board given the distance between the hamlets.

• Given the distance and lack of broadband/internet availability it is difficult to provide the
opportunity for Raquette Lake residents to be involved in Town Board meetings.

• Is there interest and willingness for Raquette Lake residents/committee to meet?

• Thinks this could have potential if action was taken on Raquette Lake input. Former supervisor, Greg
Wallace, had a committee in Raquette Lake but it was unsuccessful due to lack of action. There is a
Page 4 of 4

property in Raquette Lake hamlet that is about to become for sale and could be the only opportunity
for municipal land.

• A committee in Raquette Lake would need a dedicated year-round resident to head this
up/spearhead efforts.

• Quality of Life: Recommendations including providing fresh food, maybe provide current retailers
with connections to produce. For example, working with ANCA to strengthen the food system and
handle the logistics.

• We are lucky in that we have more than other surrounding communities have. We could benefit
from having more promotion of the “mom and pop” stores.

• Raquette Lake Supply Store is able to act as a distribution center. Liz Forsell noted that you can
“order” what you would like.

• Michael Allen: Commented that graphics will be tied to geographical areas. The starting point is any
know areas that are in need of improvements such as a beach area, a trail, town spaces. We want to
try and show any aspirational physical improvements to help people understand recommendations
of the plan. Looking to create poster that captures all of the efforts that maybe undertaken.
Distance between LL and RL hamlet centers make graphics challenging. Current thoughts are to have
one town-wide map and two more detailed hamlet specific maps.

• Paul Cummings: We also want to provide you with some cost estimates for budgeting purposes.

• The last recommendation recognized the cultivation of the Town’s history.

• History of the Town has a lot of untapped potential and should be kept in the plan.

• Paul Cummings: There is a lot in these recommendations that involve right sizing. We hope this plan
sets the Town up for grant funding.

Next Steps
• Chazen will review comments from Committee on goals and recommendations.
• Chazen will continue editing and writing plan document
• Behan Planning will create concept maps to accompany the goals and recommendations of the
plan.
Page 1 of 4

Town of Long Lake Comprehensive Plan


Raquette Lake Site Visit Notes
Date: September 27, 2019
Location: Various Locations Throughout Raquette Lake

Attendees: Alexandra Roalsvig, Liz Forsell, Ken Hawks, Paul Cummings (Chazen), Ethan Gaddy (Chazen)

Representatives from Chazen and Comprehensive Plan Committee members from the Raquette Lake
portion of the Town of Long Lake met at 9:30 am at the Raquette Lake school. Attendees boarded the
Long Lake municipal transport and commenced a tour of the southern portion of Raquette Lake.

• Approximately 12 or 29 miles of Raquette Lake’s shoreline is accessible by roadway. The remaining


99 miles are accessible by water only.
• The causeway connecting Raquette Lake to points east floods periodically. The NYSDOT has a
different methodology for cataloguing flood events and Committee members noted that there
have been more flood events then the NYSDOT has on record. When this causeway is flooded
there is no access to points east. This is a potential issue for emergency vehicles.
• Burkes Marina is one of two marinas on the lake. The business employs 5- or 6-year round
employees and would hire 10 if there were workers available. There is also storage space for
about 300 boats on-site. Onsite cabins are rented during the summer months.
• Inland from Burkes Marina is “Burketown” a collection of homes and camps on dirt roads.
Burketown has its own water system and is managed on an ad hoc basis. Approximately 30 people
live in the area year-round.
• There are 4 state campgrounds associated with Raquette Lake, one of which is in Arietta and the
other in Indian Lake.
• Committee members referenced the TOBIE recreation path (named because it links the
communities of Thendara, Old Forge, Big Moose, Inlet and Eagle Bay). This type of trail could be
installed in Raquette Lake and would provide a more accessible experience for people of all
abilities.
• One Committee member noted that two individuals claiming to represent SUNY performed an
archeological excavation of a known historic site in Raquette Lake. However, when contacted,
SUNY representatives claimed to have no knowledge of any sort of archeological work being done
on their behalf. The location of the removed artefacts and the identity of the purported
archeologists are both unknown.
• SUNY Cortland’s Pine Knot is one of two major institutions accessible only by water.
• The driving tour visited Riley’s Cottages on Rush Point. The compound consists of family camps
and weekly rental cottages. Committee members noted that visitors passing through Raquette
Lake via the roadway only get limited visual access to the Lake. It requires leaving the roadway
which is primarily on private land to experience the Lake.
• Committee members noted that when the state campgrounds are open, there is space for about
700 campers. This number does not include lodging available at cabins and other places.
• Tony Harper’s Pizza and Clam Shack is open on weekends.
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• There are 5 NYSDEC Unit Management Plans (UMPs) for Raquette Lake. There are 14 UMPs
impacting the Town of Long Lake. *Note Long Lake is in NYSDEC Region 5 and NYSDOT Region 2*
• The Raquette Lake Fire Department next to Birds Marina is also used for community events. There
are plans to move the facility across the street.
• Raquette Lake is served by NYSEG and National Grid. This is problematic because as one
Committee member noted, “We’re at the end of a 75 mile long extension cord, any disturbances
along the cord shuts down our power.” Additionally, the substations are visually unappealing.
• Committee members also noted the need for increased resiliency in the power distribution
system. Currently the area is susceptible to outages and back-up generators are located relatively
far away.
• At the school building the Committee noted that 2010 was the last year that the school instructed
pupils. Now there are only 4 school aged children in Raquette Lake who are enrolled in the Town
of Webb or Inlet. To make the school viable there would need to be at least 40 pupils. It costs
approximately $100,000 per instructor.
• When asked about why businesses are closing, Committee members noted that it wasn’t for a lack
of customers. There are many long-term family businesses whose family members have moved
away. As owners retire without a succession plan, it is financially rewarding to sell the land for
development of second homes.
• On the road to Camp Sagamore the shuttle stopped at the new snowmobile connector trail to
Moose River. Committee members indicted their general dissatisfaction with the trail because of
the difficulty of grooming it. Recent court cases by environmental groups have virtually ceased
new snowmobile trail construction.
• In the center of Raquette Lake there is a church owned by Raquette Lake Supply, it is open
periodically and for special events.
• Raquette Lake Supply also owns the building and land where the Post Office is located.
• The building adjacent to the church was once used for overflow crowds before it was used as a
multi-purpose space. Now it is out of use due to structural issues.
• Raquette Lake Supply (RLS) owns the area referred to as the Village Green. RLS is privately owned
by Jim Dillon. The long-range plan for RLS is uncertain.
• There is one portable toilet near the parking area. RLS has indicated that they would help establish
a permanent site for a restroom, but that it would be the Town’s responsibility to maintain it.
• Many of the homes and camps to the northwest of RLS are being converted into houses for
summer residents and visitors.
• Committee members noted that the availability and cost of housing is prohibitive. This was an
issue when an individual was hired as postmaster, but upon failing to locate affordable housing in
the area was forced to decline the position.
• The transfer station is on land owned by RLS and leased by the Town. There are two year round
employees.
• At one point there were more private water distribution systems, now many have transitioned to
private wells.
• Committee members noted that the Town can not route municipal water lines through state land.
Page 3 of 4

• All 911 calls are routed to Herkimer, which can lead to some confusion with locations and place
names.
• The group toured through the Girls Camp, a large summer program where over 300 campers
spend 7 weeks. Across the lake is the complementary Boys Camp, which is rated as one of the top
10 camps in the US.
• The Town manages the dam at the end of the lake. The NYSDEC has not provided the Town with
any sort of official permits for managing the water levels. However, the water on Raquette Lake
generally fluctuates about 3 feet while the water on Long Lake fluctuates about 9 feet.
• Committee members noted that there are about 20 active AirBnB listings in Raquette Lake. There
would most likely be more rentals, but there is a shortage of labor to clean and maintain the
rentals.
• Regarding community provided transportation, Committee members noted that most trips (like
recreational events) leave from Long Lake as opposed from Raquette Lake.
• In 2007 the Town tried to address the shortage of affordable housing. Land was secured and
infrastructure was installed. It was the responsibility of individuals interested in housing to
manage the administration of USDA and other grant programs. Due to this complexity and
possible other factors like the perceived stigma of affordable housing, the initiative failed to
address affordable housing needs in any meaningful way.
• The housing shortage has impacted Raquette Lake in unexpected ways. The boat launch stewards
that monitor invasive species are funded through grants. However, the grants to not account for
housing and Raquette Lake cannot take advantage of all available stewards due to lack of housing.
• Dillon Road, leading from the Village Green is used by residents for walking, biking and
snowmobiling.
• The second weekend in August is the busiest day in Raquette Lake.
• Winter Carnival is also a popular activity
• The Town dock is more frequently at capacity because of the increasing popularity of pontoon
boats, which are much larger than older style boats.
• Committee members outlined the various water quality and lake management programs they are
involved with including their Volunteer Stewardship Agreement (VSA) with the NYSDEC, the
Citizen Statewide Lake Assessment Program (CSLAP), and the Adirondack Watershed Institute
(AWI).
• Most residents are older in Raquette Lake, there is a gap in the age range between 9 and 23 years
old. Most residents are over 60, and mostly over 65 years old.
• Broadband is an issue in Raquette Lake. Residents are turning to various solutions to meet the
need for internet, including signal boosters and small private providers.
• Committee members provided a preliminary list of issues that they feel are of primary concern;
o Extend the boat launch
o Establish a public restroom
o Develop public space
o Address parking capacity issues in the summer
o Create a tourist information booth
o Install a boat wash station
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o Install a cell/information tower (this is also an emergency services issue)


o Lake depth for boat tours
o Consider a TOBIE type trail between Village Green and Golden Beach
• Committee members estimated that there are approximately 95 year-round residents.
• Regarding the cell/info tower- are there co-location options?
• The school grounds present an opportunity for additional activities/uses, but as a school district
there are some restrictions on what is allowable.