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MASON-MERCER

STAINLESS STEEL and BRONZE BRAIDED HOSE
STAINLESS STEEL
and BRONZE
BRAIDED
HOSE

FITTING OPTIONS

60 years ago (when the writer started), braided stainless steel hose had been in use for quite some time. As I remember, there were only a few major manufacturers. such as Chicago Metal Hose and Anaconda. For the most part, the smaller assemblers did not invest in the expen- sive equipment that forms straight tubing into the helical and annular forms, and certainly not in the complex braiding equip- ment. Thus the standards in the industry were maintained by the major firms. While helical hose (corrugations in a continuous helix) was still popu- lar, the movement toward annular corrugations (each corrugation independent as in expansion joints) was moving along rapidly, because of lower stress and greater movement at a given pitch. There were two broad descriptions of annular hose, Open and Close pitch, that described the spacing of the corrugations. In general, open pitch was used in low pressure applications where the braid was not required, and the hose might be used to take up some axial expan- sion as in diesel exhaust. Close pitched hose was always used for transverse movement and applications where the stainless steel braid was required to control thrust.

e t he stainless steel braid was required to control thrust. Open Close Pitch Pitch The
e t he stainless steel braid was required to control thrust. Open Close Pitch Pitch The
e t he stainless steel braid was required to control thrust. Open Close Pitch Pitch The
e t he stainless steel braid was required to control thrust. Open Close Pitch Pitch The

Open

Close

Pitch

Pitch

The corrugated hose provides flexibility and prevents leakage, but has virtually no resistance to pressure thrust. In a solid piping system, there is no external thrust, as the pressure on the projected area of the inside of the pipe is equalized by the two ends or bends in the pipe. The force is taken by the pipe wall. Once a flexible hose is inserted, that capability is gone.

RAISED FLOATING FACE FLANGES FIXED FLANGES THREADED
RAISED
FLOATING
FACE
FLANGES
FIXED
FLANGES
THREADED
GROOVED NIPPLES
GROOVED
NIPPLES
NIPPLES COPPER SWEAT ENDS
NIPPLES
COPPER
SWEAT ENDS

Bulletin BH-29-3.3

When fluid or gas pressure is applied to each corrugation, it tends to open axially, and this adds to the thrust of the

pipe area multiplied by the line pressure. As the thrust pulls

on the anchored braid ends, the interwoven bias weave

applies inward radial pressure to the corrugations as well.

Pressure capability is largely a function of the braid. When higher pressures are needed, it is seldom accomplished

by thicker tubing as you would lose flexibility. It is most

often accommodated by increasing the strength of the braid, using braid with heavier wire or tighter spacing described as Double or Triple Braid or just multiple braid layers. While braid angle is an influence, a quick compari- son of braid strength is to multiply the wire area by the total number of wires around the circumference.

area by the total number of wires around the circumference. Braided Hose for all Pressure Applications

Braided Hose for all Pressure Applications

circumference. Braided Hose for all Pressure Applications Hose without braid for diesel exhaust and similar

Hose without braid for diesel exhaust and similar applications

Since the braid is stretched taut by the pressure in the axial direction and kept that way, hoses cannot accept axial motion. All flexibility is at right angles to the axis, so the hose flexes transversely. Most machinery vibrates in a radi- al direction from the main shaft. Therefore, the hose should be installed parallel to the shaft for best performance, although it seldom is. It must be installed at a 90° angle to the motion in expansion applications. When major motion occurs in two planes, two hoses at right angles to each other are one way to solve the problem.

ANCHORS Horizontal & Parallel to Axis
ANCHORS
Horizontal &
Parallel to Axis
Vertical Hoses are not Parallel
Vertical
Hoses are
not Parallel

to Vibration

Axis

ANCHORS

Motion in 2 Planes
Motion in
2 Planes
not Parallel to Vibration Axis ANCHORS Motion in 2 Planes Transverse ANCHORS Expansion & Contraction A
Transverse ANCHORS Expansion & Contraction
Transverse
ANCHORS
Expansion &
Contraction

A metallic hose offers more

bend resistance as the pres- sures increases. The term “flexi- ble” means flexure without fatigue rather than easy flexure. In many applications the pipeline must be anchored right after the

2

hose to force the hose to flex or the hose serves little pur- pose. For best results, one near the hose and the other some distance away provide a better solution, as pipe may pivot through one anchor. Spacing between anchors is a function of pipe diameter.

4D 14D Anchor Anchor
4D
14D
Anchor
Anchor

While we have influenced specifications over the years, our volume had always been very low, because we were not competitive. That has changed. In setting standards for our new product range, we were dismayed to find that the term “Close Pitch” had almost become meaningless. Competitive literature does not include the number of corrugations per foot nor transverse stiffness. We are publishing pitch on all product pages and transverse stiffnesses on pages 5, 6, 7 & 8, so this bulletin begins to provide direction. DDoo nnoott bbee ffoooolleedd bbyy tthhee ssaalleessmmaann wwhhoo bbeennddss aa hhoossee lliikkee aa rreeeedd When most people visualize a hose flexing, the image is bending in an arc. Unfortunately, this is not true. When flanged hose is displaced, the rigid pipe flanges remain parallel. The hose remains relatively straight at both ends and takes an open “S” shape between the two ends, as shown below. Nippled hoses act the same way.

two ends, as shown below. Nippled hoses act the same way. “S” Shaped Hose Our hose

“S” Shaped Hose

Our hose has a safety factor of 4 times the rated pressure. When comparing allowable operating pressures with other manufacturers, ask for burst pressure. It may be they are working at a lower safety factor. We prefer not to. All stainless steel hose loses strength at higher tempera- tures. In the interests of safety and good engineering, use the correction factors to lower ratings when lines are hot. We arrived at our standards of corrugations per foot by buying samples from approximately six of the well known manufacturers. The variation was more than a factor of two. Our pitch matches the best of the competitors. Some other firms may have a tighter pitch, but our spacing ranks among the “quality suppliers” and makes the hose very flexible. The question comes up as to why others do not use a tighter pitch. The answer is the fewer the corrugations, the shorter the length of the original tubing to arrive at a fin- ished length, and the faster the forming process. This decreases cost in direct proportion to the shorter length of the original tubing. Flexibility suffers but the product is cheaper.

Our sales representatives already have a full sized photo comparing our braided copper sweat end hoses with a well known competitor’s as shown below.

Our 4” live length is 68% longer than their 2 3 /8”. We stripped the braid and counted the corrugations. Their product, sold as “close pitched”, had 5 active corrugations. We have 22 or 4.4 times as many.

That is why specifications and published information are so important. It is the end user’s only protection.

For the past 50 years, we have based our vibration control mountings, hanger and pad recommendations on field experience. Rubber expansion joints have been tested acoustically and constantly improved for reliability. Since proper seismic restraint not only prevents property dam- age but more importantly saves lives, all of our seismic products are destruction tested for confirmation after design. We would not be living up to our self imposed standards without the same intense engineering attention to Stainless Steel Hose.

Based on visits to jobsites, we knew that very short hose lengths, the typical “plumbers helper”, did nothing but pos- sibly reduce misalignment stress. Holding both ends of the hose provided a sense of equal vibration with no reduction from one end to the other. Even double lengths seemed to act about the same way.

1 1 /2” x 9” Copper Fitted Hoses

9” End to End 4” 2 3 /8” Live Live Length Length
9”
End to
End
4”
2
3 /8”
Live
Live
Length
Length

Brand X

Mason CPSB

Experience always provides background for the next step. In machinery vibration control a theoretical isolator often failed to perform because the structure was not as stiff as the isolator. We solved the problem by producing isolators with lower stiffness than the structure.

We started this study by calculating transverse schedule 40 pipe stiffness. This is important as the hose faces this resistance.

There are many manuals that provide hose designs for misalignment, misalignment and vibration amplitude or straight connectors for vibration only. However, we could find no information on the force required to move a hose transversely— the key factor in selecting a hose to reduce vibration transmission.

Pipeline vibration reduction is based on hose length, pres- sure and the bending resistance of the steel piping it is attached to. While a vibration amplitude of ± 1 /8” would be unacceptably high, our study is based on that displace- ment as ± 1 /8” is the industries’ “Pump Connector” stan- dard. When comparing the stiffnesses of straight pipe lengths versus flexible hoses, if the flexible hose has a transverse stiffness greater than the pipe it is connected to, there is no reason why it would reduce vibration transmis- sion. There is the influence of the system’s inertia based on the mass provided by check and shutoff valves, strain- ers, etc., as well as the mass of the pipe filled with water directly after the flexible hose, but that is a variable. While it must help, it is an unknown.

1 1 /2” x 9” Cross Section of Copper Fitted Hoses (Braid Removed to Reveal Active Corrugations)

Fitted Hoses (Braid Removed to Reveal Active Corrugations) B r a n d X Mason CPSB

Brand X

(Braid Removed to Reveal Active Corrugations) B r a n d X Mason CPSB 5 Active

Mason CPSB

(Braid Removed to Reveal Active Corrugations) B r a n d X Mason CPSB 5 Active
(Braid Removed to Reveal Active Corrugations) B r a n d X Mason CPSB 5 Active
(Braid Removed to Reveal Active Corrugations) B r a n d X Mason CPSB 5 Active

5 Active

Corrugations

22 Active

Corrugations

DISPLACEMENT FORCE (lbs)

TEST DISCUSSION

Our in house capability does not include dynamic measure- ment. However, the following static data is the first publicized attempt to measure displacement forces as a basis for specifi- cations. Despite recommendations to the contrary, the average pump installation has the hoses installed vertically. The disturbing force is radial to the pump rotor. Since the hose is vertical, it is most effective when the unbalance is parallel to the floor and least when the force is vertical, as the hose is rigid in that direction. However, when the force is vertical, it is push- ing or pulling the riser and in general, the riser and header are stiffer in that direction. We continue to suggest two hoses at right angles to each other, or when only one hose is used, installed parallel to the axis of the pump, chiller, compressor, etc. While proper suggestions, we recognize piping restrictions often make it impossible. The test results on pages 5 & 6 are the forces required to dis- place straight hose lengths 1 /8” at three common pressures. These forces are compared to the resistance to 1 /8” movement

provided by 10’, 8’ and 6’ lengths of schedule 40 Steel Pipe. We used our computerized Baldwin Universal Tester so we could test two hoses in parallel to prevent machine distortion. Long lengths of pipes were bolted to the flanges at each end and guided through rigid rollers, so the flanges were held par- allel as in the field. Water pressure was introduced by a hydraulic pump and measurements taken at 0, 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250psi. All readings were divided by 2 for single hose val- ues. Since our hoses are all very close pitched and flexible, we believe competitive products would prove stiffer. We tested a few hoses from the same lot and found variations. Therefore, our tabulations are only in the order of magnitude. We anticipated very large forces, but not as large as they turned out to be. Testing rig deflections lowered the 1 /8” dis- placement values. 12” and larger data was not usable. 12”, 14” and 16” numbers are extrapolations. We are rebuilding these jigs heavier and will publish corrected test information in the future. Similarly, very small sizes dropped below the testing machine’s sensitivity, but they are in the proper direction.

We do not Recommend Industry Pump Connector Length.

Displacement

Force is

3690 lbs./0.125”

at 170 psi.

We also do not recommend 12 x 24 length.

It is better than 12 x 14, but Displacement Force is still too high— 2650 lbs./0.125” at 170 psi.

Recommended

Length

Displacement

Force drops to

1150 lbs./0.125”

at 170 psi.

4

4000 FFL 12 x 14 170 psi 150 psi 3000 150 psi 2000 1000 0
4000
FFL 12 x 14
170
psi
150
psi
3000
150
psi
2000
1000
0
0.062
0.125
DISPLACEMENT FORCE (lbs)

DISPLACEMENT (in)

7000 FFL 12 x 24 1 70 p si 6000 5000 1 50 psi 4
7000
FFL 12
x 24
1 70
p si
6000
5000
1 50
psi
4 0 0 0
3000
50
psi
2000
1000
0
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0 .5
0.125
DISPLACEMENT (in)
3000
FFL 12 x 36
170
psi
2500
150
psi
2000
50
psi
1500
1000
500
0
0.25
0.5
0.75
1
DISPLACEMENT FORCE (lbs)

0.125 DISPLACEMENT (in)

0.75 1 DISPLACEMENT FORCE (lbs) 0.125 DISPLACEMENT (in) Typical Short Industry Pump Connector 12” x 14”

Typical Short Industry Pump Connector 12” x 14” at Maximum 0.125” Offset

Industry Pump Connector 12” x 14” at Maximum 0.125” Offset FFL 12 x 24 at 0.5”

FFL 12 x 24 at 0.5” Offset

Industry Pump Connector 12” x 14” at Maximum 0.125” Offset FFL 12 x 24 at 0.5”

FFL 12 x 36 at 1” Offset

In addition to corrugation count and configura- tion, live length rather than overall length is the stiffness control. All of our tables include this information. We have kept nipples as short as possible to maximize the flexible hose portion, but notice that a 1 /2”x6 1 /2” MN has only 2 3 /4” of live length, 1 1 /4” x 8 1 /2” only 3 1 /4”, 4” x 12” only 5”. That is why the forces needed to move these “Pump Connector” lengths are so exces- sive. The live hose is so short that the connec- tor has difficulty or finds it impossible to assume the shape shown in the center photograph on page 4.

The lengths suggested in our specifications are based on experience. The height of equip- ment rooms controls the length of the risers. The pressure depends on the height of the building. It is hard to visualize 1 /2” through 2” threaded hoses that would be connected to pumps or other equipment with long risers that go to the ceiling. They might not be connect- ed to risers at all. Small lines seldom operate at more than 150psi, because they service low buildings. Therefore, we are suggesting overall 24” lengths at 150psi. These selections show the forces needed to flex the hose are all below the stiffness of the pipe. The vibrating energy of small sized equipment is also lower and min- imizes risk of serious transmission problems.

The same logic applies to the 2” through 4” sizes if we continue with the assumption that the pressure remains at 150psi. However, at 250psi, the hose stiffness increases dramatically. On virtually all major projects, the specifications allow for thread- ed nipples only through 2” diameter. So while we provide the force information for 2 1 /2”, 3” and 4” threaded nipple ends, our recommended lengths are based on flanged hoses in diameters of 2 1 /2” and larger. We have included copper pipe rather than ignoring it. However, copper tubing is both light and soft. Copper flexible hoses are better suited to allowing for thermal movement than reducing vibration. Moving on to the larger diameter 2 1 /2” through 16”, we have to assume both higher pressures and longer risers. Typically a 4” pipe 8’ long offers 90 lbs resistance to 1 /8” movement. A 4” x 24” flanged hose at 150 psi has a resistance of 105 lbs., so it is too stiff. At 36” long, it drops to 50 lbs. and even at 250psi, 80 lbs., and still lower than the pipe stiff- ness. This sort of comparison is reasonable down through the study. A 36” FF length is about as long as practical because of valve heights and other problems. We are still synthesizing a great deal of information, so establishing one fixed length of 36” for 2 1 /2” through 16” diameter appears to be a proper engineering choice at this time rather than an oversimplification.

BALDWIN TESTER REPORT ON FORCE REQUIRED TO DISPLACE 1 /2” - 4” NIPPLED HOSES 1 /8” Information provided as a general guide to magnitude

THREADED NIPPLE HOSES (British Units)

 

Force Required for 1/8” displacement (lbs)

MN

Hose

Length

End

Live

Corru-

gations

Hoses

Water Pressure

Steel Pipe Schedule 40 Riser Length (feet)

Dia.

to End Length

per

 

(psi)

(in)

(in)

(in)

foot

50

150

250

6

8

10

1 /2

6 1 /2

2 3 /4 8 1 /4 14 1 /4 20 1 /4

92

6.0

14.0

20.0

 

1 /2

12

92

0.8

0.8

1.0

0.5

0.2

0.1

1 /2

18

92

1.0

1.0

1.0

lbs

lbs

lbs

1 /2

24

92

*0.3

0.4

0.5

 

3 /4

7

3 1 /4 8 1 /4 14 1 /4 20 1 /4

80

10.0

18.0

25.0

 

3 /4

12

80

1.5

2.5

3.8

1.1

0.5

0.2

3 /4

18

80

0.4

2.0

4.0

lbs

lbs

lbs

3 /4

24

80

*

1.0

1.5

 

1

83 3 /4

72

13.0

30.0

50.0

 

1

12

7 3 /4

72

2.0

4.0

12.0

2.5

1.1

0.6

1

18

13 3 /4

72

0.5

1.5

2.5

lbs

lbs

lbs

1

24

19 3 /4

72

*0.5

1.0

1.5

 

1 1 /4 1 1 /4 1 1 /4 1 1 /4

8 1 /2

3 1 /4 6 3 /4 12 3 /4 18 3 /4

67

50

110

180

 

12

67

3.5

15

20

6

2.4

1.2

18

67

1.5

4

6.5

lbs

lbs

lbs

24

67

2.5

3.5

 

1 1 /2 1 1 /2 1 1 /2 1 1 /2

9

3 3 /4 6 3 /4 12 3 /4 18 3 /4

63

120

250

310

 

12

63

20

60

105

9

4

2

18

63

5

15

23

lbs

lbs

lbs

24

63

3

6

8

 

2

10 1 /2

4 1 /2

58

180

360

460

 

2

12

6 0 /0

58

120

265

400

20

8

4

2

18

12 0 /0

58

20

60

90

lbs

lbs

lbs

2

24

18 0 /0

58

6

15

23

 

2 1 /2 2 1 /2 2 1 /2

12

18

5 0 /0 11 0 /0 17 0 /0

48

48

220

30

360

80

475

120

45

lbs

20

lbs

10

lbs

24

48

10

25

40

3

12

5 0 /0

46

350

600

750

90

lbs

35

lbs

20

lbs

3

3

18

24

11 0 /0

17 0 /0

46

46

100

35

190

70

250

110

4

12

5 0 /0

32

500

825

900

210

lbs

90

lbs

45

lbs

4

4

18

24

11 0 /0

17 0 /0

32

32

150

110

305

175

400

260

THREADED NIPPLE HOSES (Metric Units)

 

Force Required for 3mm displacement (kg)

MN

Length

Corru-

Hoses Water Pressure (kg/cm 2 )

Steel Pipe Schedule 40 Riser Length (m)

Hose

End

Live

gations

Dia.

to End Length

per

(mm)

(mm)

(mm)

meter

3.4

10.3

17.2

1.8

2.4

3

15

165

70

302

2.7

6.4

9.1

 

15

305

210

302

0.4

0.4

0.5

.23

.09

.05

15

457

362

302

0.5

0.5

0.5

kg

kg

kg

15

610

514

302

*0.1

0.2

0.2

 

20

178

83

262

4.5

8.2

11.3

 

20

305

210

262

0.7

1.1

1.7

0.5

0.2

0.1

20

457

362

262

0.2

0.9

1.8

kg

kg

kg

20

610

514

262

*

0.5

0.7

 

25

203

95

236

5.9

13.6

22.7

 

25

305

197

236

0.9

1.8

5.4

1.1

0.5

0.3

25

457

349

236

0.2

0.7

1.1

kg

kg

kg

25

610

502

236

*0.2

0.5

0.7

 

32

216

83

220

23

50

82

 

32

305

171

220

2

7

9

2.7

1.0

0.5

32

457

234

220

1

2

3

kg

kg

kg

32

610

476

220

1

2

 

40

229

95

207

54

113

141

 

40

305

171

207

9

27

48

4

2

0.9

40

457

234

207

2

7

10

kg

kg

kg

40

610

476

207

1

3

4

 

50

267

114

190

82

163

209

 

50

305

152

190

54

120

181

9

4

2

50

457

305

190

9

27

41

kg

kg

kg

50

610

457

190

3

7

10

 

65

65

305

457

127

279

157

157

100

14

163

36

216

54

20

kg

9

kg

4

kg

65

610

432

157

5

11

18

75

75

305

457

127

279

151

151

159

45

272

86

340

113

40

kg

17

kg

9

kg

75

610

432

151

16

32

50

100

100

305

457

127

279

105

105

227

68

374

138

408

181

96

kg

40

kg

21

kg

100

610

432

105

50

79

118

BALDWIN TESTER REPORT ON FORCE REQUIRED TO DISPLACE 1 1 /2” - 16” FLANGED HOSES 1 /8” Information provided as a general guide to magnitude

FLANGED END HOSES (British Units)

 

Force Required for 1/8” displacement (lbs)

FFL

Hose

Length

Face

Live

Corru-

gations

Hoses

Water Pressure

Steel Pipe Schedule 40 Riser Length (feet)

Dia.

to Face Length

per

 

(psi)

(in)

(in)

(in)

foot

50

150

250

6

8

10

1 1 /2 1 1 /2 1 1 /2 1 1 /2

9

6 7 /8 9 7 /8 15 7 /8 21 7 /8

63

20

55

85

 

12

63

8

27

42

9

4

2

18

63

3

10

16

lbs

lbs

lbs

24

63

266

 

2

96 1 /8

58

60

125

185

 

2

12

9 1 /8

58

22

57

95

20

8

4

2

18

15 1 /8

58

6

18

29

lbs

lbs

lbs

2

24

21 1 /8

58

3

10

15

 

2 1 /2 2 1 /2 2 1 /2 2 1 /2

9

6 1 /8 9 1 /8 15 1 /8 21 1 /8

48

145

275

380

 

12

48

45

100

140

45

20

10

18

48

15

45

75

lbs

lbs

lbs

24

48

7

25

35

 

3

96 1 /8

46

225

475

575

 

3

12

9 1 /8

46

105

245

320

90

lbs

35

lbs

20

lbs

3

3

18

24

15 1 /8

21 1 /8 33 1 /8

46

46

30

15

105

55

130

80

3

*36

46

10

35

50

 
 

50

100

200

 

4

96 1 /8

32

490

620

700

 

4

12

9 1 /8

32

220

385

505

210

lbs

90

lbs

45

lbs

4

4

18

24

15 1 /8

21 1 /8

32

32

65

40

155

105

210

155

4

36

33 1 /8

32

20

50

80

 

5

12

8 7 /8

29

440

650

750

 

5

18

14 7 /8

29

190

355

420

440

190

95

5

24

20 7 /8

29

85

195

225

lbs

lbs

lbs

5

36

32 7 /8

29

65

135

150

 

6

12

8 7 /8

25

675

950

1050

 

6

18

14 7 /8

25

445

670

750

820

350

180

6

24

20 7 /8

25

170

450

505

lbs

lbs

lbs

6

36

32 7 /8

25

70

155

180

 
 

50

150

180

 

8

12

8 5 /8

23

1200

1450

1680

 

8

18

14 5 /8

23

710

1250

1290

2110

890

455

8

24

20 5 /8

23

325

750

850

lbs

lbs

lbs

8

36

32 5 /8

23

155

400

425

 
 

50

150

170

 

10

13

9 5 /8

21

1870

2200

2590

 

10

18

14 5 /8

21

1345

1580

1860

4690

1980

1010

10

24

20 5 /8

21

900

1060

1250

lbs

lbs

lbs

10

36

32 5 /8

21

570

680

800

 

12

*14

10 5 /8

20

2670

3140

3690

8130

lbs

3430

lbs

1755

lbs

12

12

*24

*36

20 5 /8

32 5 /8

20

20

1920

830

2250

980

2650

1150

14

*14

10 5 /8

18

3970

4675

5500

10900

4600

2300

14

*36

32 5 /8

18

2370

2780

3270

lbs

lbs

lbs

16

*16

12 5 /8

16

5200

6120

7200

16400

6900

3500

16

*36

32 5 /8

16

2860

3370

3960

lbs

lbs

lbs

*Not tested. Best estimates.

FLANGED END HOSES (Metric Units)

 

Force Required for 3mm displacement (kg)

FFL

Length

Corru-

Hoses Water Pressure (kg/cm 2 )

Steel Pipe Schedule 40 Riser Length (m)

Hose

Face

Live

gations

Dia.

to Face Length

per

(mm)

(mm)

(mm)

meter

3.4

10.3

17.2

1.8

2.4

3

40

229

175

207

9

25

39

 

40

305

251

207

4

12

19

4

2

1

40

457

403

207

1

5

7

kg

kg

kg

40

607

556

207

1

2

2

 

50

229

156

190

27

57

84

 

50

305

232

190

10

26

43

9

4

2

50

457

384

190

3

8

13

kg

kg

kg

50

610

537

190

1

5

7

 

65

229

156

157

66

125

173

 

65

305

232

157

20

45

64

21

9

5

65

457

384

157

7

20

34

kg

kg

kg

65

610

537

157

3

11

16

 

75

229

156

151

102

215

261

 

75

305

232

151

48

111

145

40

kg

17

kg

9

kg

75

75

457

610

384

537

151

151

14

7

48

25

59

36

75

*914

841

151

5

16

23

 
 

3.4

6.9

13.8

 

100

229

156

105

222

281

318

 

100

305

232

105

100

175

229

96

kg

41

kg

21

kg

100

100

457

610

384

537

105

105

30

18

70

48

96

70

100

914

841

105

9

23

36

 

125

305

225

95

200

295

340

 

125

457

378

95

86

161

191

201

85

44

125

610

530

95

39

89

102

kg

kg

kg

125

914

835

95

30

61

68

 

150

305

225

82

306

431

476

 

150

457

378

82

202

304

340

371

157

81

150

610

530

82

76

204

229

kg

kg

kg

150

914

835

82

32

70

82

 
 

3.4

10.3

12.4

 

200

305

219

75

544

658

760

 

200

457

371

75

322

567

585

958

405

207

200

610

524

75

147

340

386

kg

kg

kg

200

914

829

75

70

181

193

 
 

3.4

10.3

11.7

 

250

330

244

69

848

998

1175

 

250

457

371

69

610

717

844

2128

898

460

250

610

524

69

408

481

567

kg

kg

kg

250

914

829

69

259

308

363

 

300

*256

270

66

1211

1424

1674

3688

kg

1556

kg

797

kg

300

300

*610

*914

524

829

66

66

871

376

1021

445

1202

522

350

*256

270

59

1801

2121

2495

4930

2080

1065

350

*914

829

59

1075

1261

1483

kg

kg

kg

400

*406

321

52

2359

2776

3266

7430

3134

1605

400

*914

829

52

1297

1529

1796

kg

kg

kg

SPECIFICATION

Flexible stainless steel hoses with a safety factor of 4 shall be manu- factured using type 304 stainless steel braided hose with one fixed and one floating raised face carbon steel plate flange. Sizes 2 1 /2” (65mm) and smaller may have threaded nipples. Copper sweat ends, 4” (100mm) and smaller, may have SS (gas service) or Bronze (water service) bodies. Grooved ends may be used in sizes 2” (50mm) through 12” (300mm). Welding is not acceptable. Minimum lengths, minimum live lengths and minimum number of convolutions per foot to assure flexibility are as tabulated. Shorter lengths are not acceptable.

Hoses shall be installed on the equipment side of the shut off valves horizontal and parallel to the equip- ment shafts wherever possible. Submittals shall include original test data showing force/displacement, fittings, material, live lengths, number of corrugations per foot and safety factor at pressure ratings. Hoses shall be type BSS or CPSB as manufactured by Mason Industries, Inc.

 

Min.

 

COPPER SWEAT BRONZE * End to Live End Length

Min.

Pipe or

Tubing

Size

FLANGED Face to Live Face Length

THREADED End to Live End Length

GROOVED End to Live End Length

COPPER SWEAT BRONZE * End to Live End Length

Convo-

Pipe or

FLANGED Face to Live Face Length

THREADED End to Live End Length