Contents
Preface Staff Holding Administrative Positions Abbreviations 1.0 Introduction 1.1 1.2 Aims of the PhD Handbook Staff involved in the Management of PhDs 1.2.1 The Supervisors 1.2.2 The Administrative Supervisor 1.2.3 The Head of School 1.2.4 The Postgraduate Coordinator/Director 1.2.5 The School Research/Postgraduate Committee 1.2.6 The Associate Deans 1.2.7 The Faculty Office 1.2.8 The PhD Convener 1.2.9 The Research Degrees Committee 1.2.10 The Research and Postgraduate Studies Office 1.2.11 The Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) 2.0 Background to the PhD 2.1 2.2 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 The Place of the PhD Degree in the University Academic Requirements of PhD Study Initial Approach to the School and the University Developing a Proposal Provisional Registration The Research Period Writing-Up and Submission Examination Flowchart Summary Initial Proposal Research involving Confidential or Sensitive Material Research Proposals from Scholarship Holders External Party Involvement in the Support of Research Students The Appointment of Supervisors The Administrative Supervisor Changes to the Supervisory Team Supervisor Training External Supervisors 7 8 9 10 10 10 10 10 11 11 11 12 12 12 12 12 12 13 13 13 15 15 15 15 15 16 16 17 18 18 18 19 19 20 20 20 20 20 21

An Outline of the Process

Research Proposals

Supervisors

PhD Handbook

1

7 6.17 Maintenance of Registration 6.8 Supporting the Student 7.22 Conversion of a PhD to a Master’s Degree 7.6 Identifying Problems 7.13.16 Notification of Changes to Registration 6.3 Approval 6.6.0 Formal Admission and Registration Requirements 6.9 Admissions Criteria Conversion of a Master’s Degree to a PhD International Students Applications to Register Approval of Provisional Registration Enrolment and Payment of Fees Annual Re-enrolment Attendance at University and Study at a Distance Employment 22 22 22 22 23 23 23 23 23 24 24 24 26 26 26 27 27 28 28 28 29 29 29 29 29 30 31 31 31 31 31 32 32 32 32 32 33 33 33 34 34 6.2.3 Scheduling Meetings 7.12 Move from Provisional to Full Registration 6.1 Full Research Proposal 6.2.1 7.2 Providing Academic Guidance 7.7 Six-monthly Progress Reports 7.2 6.10 Facilitating Administrative Compliance 7.8 6.13 Confirmation of Full Registration 6.2.1 Assessing the Student 7.9 Encouraging Academic Contacts 7.5 6.2.2.18 Registration and Other Work 6.1 6.4 6.6 6.2.2.2 Presentation of the Proposal 6.2.2 The Role of Supervisors The Responsibilities of Supervisors 7.2.2.14 Date of Registration 6.12 Encouraging Publication 2 PhD Handbook .11 Collaborating Institutions 6.3 6.15 Duration of Registration 6.13.2.19 Extensions and Suspensions of Registration 6.11 Assisting Examination Arrangements 7.5 Providing Feedback 7.10 Period of Overseas Research 6.20 Concurrent Study 6.2.0 Supervision Protocols 7.21 Change of Title 6.4 Milestones 7.13.

3.1 Statistical Packages Research Ethics 34 35 35 35 35 35 35 35 35 36 36 36 37 37 37 37 37 38 39 39 39 39 39 39 39 39 40 40 40 40 40 41 41 41 42 42 43 43 43 43 Research Resources PhD Handbook 3 .1 Student Learning Support Service 10.5 9.5 Specialised Collections 9.3 The Responsibilities of Candidates 7.7 Giving Notice of Submission 7.4 8.3.2 Range of services 9.2.3.13 Support for Supervisors 7.5 Facilitating Administrative Compliance 7.2.3.3.2.7.3 Research Seminars 9.3.0 Research Advice 10.3 Registration as an ITS Client 9.3.3 Financial Assistance 9.4 Inter-Library Loan and Document Delivery 9.5 ITS Student Help Desk Service 9.1 Responsibilities of the Head of School 9.3.2.2.1 Planning the Research 7.0 9.6 Meeting Ethical Guidelines 7.2 Statistical Advice 10.0 8.3.1.2 Minimum Resources Agreement 9.4 Identifying Problems 7.1 Lending Services 9.4 Accessing the Network 9.3 8.2 8.2.1 8.3.1.3.2 Actively Pursuing the Research 7.Te Pataka Korero 9.1 Introduction 9.8 Submitting the Thesis 7.1 Evaluation of Research Supervision Human Ethics Committee Human Ethics Approval for Research Animal Ethics Committee Authorship and Acknowledgement Guidelines Appropriate Conduct in Research School Resources to Support PhD Candidates 9.9 Publishing 7.2.1.3.3 The University Library .3.2 Information Technology Resources 9.3 Participating in University Intellectual Life 7.4 8.3.3.6 Other Libraries 10.2 Reference and Research Services 9.

3.3 Binding 13.2.3 General Guidelines 12.6 Official Information Act 1982 14.2 General Principles 12.3 Doctoral Completion Awards 11.2 Deposit 13.2.0 The Thesis 13.2.2.2 PhD Submission Scholarships 11.0 The PhD Examination 14.2.2.4.1 Public Availability of Theses 13.5 Paper 13.2 Early Submission 44 44 44 44 44 45 45 45 46 46 46 46 47 47 47 47 48 49 49 49 49 50 51 51 51 51 51 52 53 54 54 54 54 54 54 55 55 56 59 59 59 4 PhD Handbook .4 Externally-funded Scholarships and Grants 11.1 Seeking Assistance from the Administrative Supervisor 12.7 Length 13.3 Copyright and Intellectual Property 13.4.4.2 Permanent Binding of the Thesis 13.5 Research Grants 11.2.2.9 Specimen Layout of Title Page 13.2.3 Seeking Assistance Outside the Faculty 12.2 Seeking Assistance from the Associate Dean 12.3.4 Lodging a Formal Grievance 12.3.0 Research Funding and Financial Support 11.1 Temporary Binding for Examination 13.1 Layout 13.4 Resolving Administrative Difficulties 13.4.3.4 Withholding Access to Theses 13.3.4.1 Introduction 13.1 Appointment of Examiners 14.1 Introduction 12.3 Format 13.4 Pagination 13.11.0 Resolution of Problems 12.3.4 Availability and Withholding of Access to Theses 13.2 Guide to the Presentation of Theses 13.8 Computer Use 13.2 Citation style 13.7 Tutoring and Demonstrating 12.6 Photographic and Colour Copy Illustrations 13.6 Loans and Allowances 11.1 University Scholarships 11.

1.1 Minor Amendments 14.4 Examination 14.10 Student Learning Support Service 16.5 Rights and Obligations Regarding Conduct 15.1 Accommodation Service 16.4 Childcare 16.9 Minor Amendments and Revisions 14.1.7 MAI Ki Poneke 16.1.8 Report on the Oral Examination 14.1.13 Court of Convocation 16.1.9.1 Student Union Building 16.2 Recreation Centre References Appendix 1: Summary of Tasks and Responsibilities Appendix 2: Summary of Role Responsibilities Appendix 3: Statute for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy PhD Handbook 59 61 62 63 63 63 64 64 64 65 65 66 66 66 66 67 67 67 68 68 69 69 69 69 70 70 70 70 70 71 71 71 72 72 72 72 72 73 74 75 77 86 5 .9 Student Health Service 16.11 Victoria Interntational 16.5.1 Introduction 15.1.3 Submission 14.2 Career Development and Employment 16.2 Values and Ethos 15.5.1.4 The VUW Postgraduate Students’ Association 15.9.9.3 Disputes about Revision 14.1.2 Student Union Complex 16.2 The Policy on Staff Conduct 15.2 Revisions 14.1 The Statute on Student Conduct 15.8 Financial Support and Advice 16.5.1.3 Collegiality 15.2.12 Alumni Association 16.5 Disability Support Services 16.0 University Student Services 16.1.10 Revision and Re-Submission of Thesis for Second Examination 15.1.0 The University Community 15.1.1 Student Services Group 16.2.1.3 Formal procedures 16.6 Kaiwawao Maori/ Maori Student Services Adviser 16.6 Arrangement of Oral Examination 14.3 Counselling Service 16.14.5 Examination of the Thesis 14.7 Conduct of Oral Examination 14.

nz/home/about/policy/research.victoria.victoria. Postgraduate Student Website PostgradLife is a student-centred website that aims to provide students with ‘everything they need to know’ about postgraduate study at Victoria.ac. tel 64 4-463-5350. and a forum for students to post details about their research online www.nz.ac.nz/home/ about/newspubs/universitypubs/phd_handbook.ac.pdf 6 PhD Handbook .nz/ international/. it offers practical advice and support.victoria. Comments and suggestions for improvements are welcome: researchoffice@vuw.ac.International Students If you are an international student who is not currently enrolled.nz. Web access to policy information and the guidelines referred to in the PhD Handbook can be viewed at: www. email victoria-international@vuw.aspx The web version of the Handbook is likely to contain any recent updates or changes and can be downloaded directly at www.victoria. As well as linking directly to relevant sites.nz/postgradlife The PhD Handbook was updated by the Research and Postgraduate Studies office in 2008.ac. there are things you will need to know before you read the PhD Handbook.ac. Please contact Victoria International www.

PhD theses are evaluated by international standards. and verbal presentation skills. as well as spending serious and concentrated time on their studies. which is a distinctive feature of study for this degree. but we would also like you to realise that study for this degree poses exciting challenges and holds out the prospect of significant (and well-earned) rewards. pastimes and forms of community service. theorising. The PhD Handbook is an important dimension of the support we provide for all our students enrolled at doctoral level. During the course of your research you will build upon your previous education and training to work at the highest scholarly level and produce a thesis that will make a significant contribution to your discipline. These skills provide the basis for further academic work and they are also likely to be invaluable in a wide range of other occupations. The information provided in the Handbook is governed by the PhD Statute and policy of the University. The Handbook offers you and your supervisor guidance on many aspects of the process of supervised research. analysis. often by examiners from around the world.Preface To the Candidate On behalf of Victoria University of Wellington. and that it will be enjoyable. We know from the research that students are more likely to complete their degree if they develop academic and social connections with their peers. You will develop and demonstrate skills in research. These are important issues. written communication in the language of your discipline. intellectually stimulating and ultimately. study undertaken for your PhD will provide you with what could be termed ‘extrinsic’ opportunities to improve yourself professionally. Many of the rewards of study for the PhD degree are what we might call ‘intrinsic’. Neil Quigley Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) PhD Handbook 7 . I would like to welcome you to your PhD studies at this institution. Parts of the Handbook draw attention to the amount of effort and time you will have to commit to completing your PhD. I hope that the information presented in this handbook will help to ensure that your experience as a PhD student at Victoria is a well-rounded one. so the award of this degree is a mark of truly global academic distinction. they are a consequence of your commitment to undertake intensive original work in your chosen field of study. In addition to these intrinsic benefits. organising your work and time. rewarding.

Individual staff email addresses follow the form: firstname. Faculty Offices Architecture and Design. x6217 Commerce and Administration. x5191. Jenny Christie. Lois Baillie. x6975 Science. x7493 Associate Deans and Delegated Authorities Architecture and Design. Postgraduate Coordinator Commerce and Administration. x6112 Scholarships Manager. x5023. x5619 Research Manager. then dialling the extension required. Sandra Crews. Alison Munro. Shona de Sain. Philippa Hay. Sandra France. Convener of the Research Degrees Committee. x5676.vuwsa. Associate Professor Allison Kirkman. x5190 Postgraduate Research Coordinator. Professor Tony Angelo. Johann Barnard. Room 205 Facilitator and Disputes Adviser. x9569 Humanities and Social Sciences. Professor Laurie Bauer. Professor Luanna Meyer.ac. Professor George Baird.nz 8 PhD Handbook . Kristina McGuiness-King. sandra. Associate Dean (Graduate Studies and Research) Education. Robert Stout Building. Professor Sally Davenport. x5087 Education. Jenny Calder-Smith. Extension numbers beginning 8xxx may be reached by calling the automated attendant on 0-4-463 5233. Ground floor. x5144. Office of Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic).org. Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research). 14 Wai-te-ata Road. x6324.nz x6984. PhD Adviser Science. Deputy Dean Law.crews@vuwsa. Professor Neil Quigley PhD Convener. but users should refer to the website for any updates.org. these details are correct. Jon Everest.lastname@vuw. x8068. x5980 Other advice and support Senior Academic Policy Adviser. Associate Dean (Students) Managers. Dr Theresa Sawicka. x5192 Law.Staff Holding Administrative Positions At the time of publishing. Professor of Research Humanities and Social Sciences.nz or through VUW Students’ Association 0-4-463 6716 Contacting VUW staff All extension numbers beginning 5xxx or 6xxx may be dialled from outside the University by adding the prefix 463. x9598. Room 207 VUWSA Education Coordinator. x6231. Student Union Building. www.

Supervising and Examining Candidates Research Degrees Committee (a committee of the Academic Board) Student Computing Services School Research/Postgraduate Committee (the committee in each school responsible for advising the HoS on research and postgraduate matters) University Research Committee University Teaching Development Centre Victoria University of Wellington Victoria University of Wellington Students’ Association URC UTDC VUW VUWSA PhD Handbook 9 .Abbreviations AVC (Academic) CRI DVC (Research) HEC HoS PG Coordinator PGSA PhD Convener PhD Statute PhD Policy RDC SCS SRC Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic) Crown Research Institute Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) Human Ethics Committee Head of School Postgraduate Coordinator Postgraduate Students’ Association Convener of the University’s Research Degrees Committee Statute for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy PhD Policy: Approving. Enrolling.

each PhD candidate will have an Administrative Supervisor who is usually the head of the school of registration. and the first source of advice beyond the supervisors for the candidate. In Appendix 1 there is a summary of key tasks and responsibilities and Appendix 2 has a summary of key role responsibilities for quick reference.1.2.g. School Postgraduate Coordinators often fulfil this role and they also serve as the initial point of contact for potential PhD students. The supervisors may be appointed as ‘primary supervisor’ and ‘secondary supervisor’. for ensuring that six-monthly progress reports are provided). or both supervisors may ‘co-supervise’ a candidate. The Administrative Supervisor is normally the first source of advice for the supervisors.2. 1.2 Staff involved in the Management of PhDs Many staff are involved in the management of each PhD candidacy. The descriptions given here are introductory and more detailed information is provided later in the Handbook and in the appendices. The administrative responsibilities for PhD students are routinely delegated by the Head of School to the School Research/Postgraduate Committee or to another member of staff.nz/home/about/policy/research.victoria.aspx 1. • The Handbook is published every two years. The Administrative Supervisor is responsible for the School/Faculty paperwork involved in the candidacy (e. inform PhD candidates of the resources and services available at the University to support their research. 1. but the PhD Policy and Statute are updated more frequently.2 The Administrative Supervisor In addition to two academic supervisors.ac. The person who fulfils the role of the Administrative Supervisor varies from faculty to faculty. Each candidate works under the guidance of two supervisors. 10 PhD Handbook . PhD supervisors.1 The Supervisors Supervisors are the staff members appointed by the University to take academic responsibility for guiding a PhD candidate during the period of research and writing up. Heads of Schools and Associate Deans with guidelines for the academic management of the PhD degree. The appointment of supervisors is outlined in Chapter 5. and the role of supervisors is discussed more fully in Chapter 7. The most recent versions of these documents may have significant differences from the Handbook and should be referred to at www.1 Aims of the PhD Handbook The aims of this handbook are to: • provide PhD candidates.0 Introduction 1.

Roles include vetting thesis proposals and developing guidelines in addition to the University criteria for the movement from provisional to full registration. Regardless of whether the HoS has this role. responding to student queries and concerns. Schools appoint Postgraduate Coordinators (PG Coordinators) to manage postgraduate matters. which vets thesis proposals and provides advice on issues of postgraduate student management.1. Education and Science. providing candidates with university and additional school-specific criteria for progressing from provisional to full registration.5 The School Research/Postgraduate Committee The School Research/Postgraduate Committee (SRC) is responsible for management of PhD candidature in the School. they will have responsibility for making recommendations on supervisors to the Associate Dean and for approving the arrangements for access to school facilities for PhD candidates. liaising with the Associate Dean over progress. In some cases. ensuring that the candidate has a copy PhD Handbook. In the Faculties of Humanities and Social Sciences. In each school.2. 1. the HoS is assisted by a School Research/Postgraduate Committee.4 The Postgraduate Coordinator/Director The Postgraduate Coordinator in each school is responsible for providing information and guidance to prospective and enrolled PhD students and supervisors within a subject area. • • • • • • • • • • • • The PG Coordinator may also run research seminars and be a member of the SRC. ensuring that records are kept and six monthly progress reports are monitored. overseeing the transfer of a candidate from provisional to full registration. The HoS (or school administrator) will be able to direct students to the appropriate PG Coordinators. PhD Handbook 11 . ensuring that the candidate has two supervisors. referring prospective candidates to possible supervisors. providing advice and support for supervisors. and managing all administrative procedures with school administration staff. 1. the HoS will normally be the Administrative Supervisor.2. this task is delegated to another member of staff.2.3 The Head of School The Head of School (HoS) role varies from faculty to faculty and from one school to another. vetting initial research proposals in conjunction with the School Research Committee (SRC). overseeing acceptance of a candidate within a school. Specific responsibilities include: • discussing potential research projects with a candidate and making decisions about their suitability.

and official notification of results.2.2.victoria. and should normally be the first person to be approached with any matters relating to supervision. 1.9 The Research Degrees Committee The Research Degrees Committee (RDC) of the Academic Board has responsibility for ensuring that the processes concerning the PhD are appropriately consistent across the University.2. the appointment of Honorary Research Associates as external supervisors and chairs the University Research Committee.10 Research and Postgraduate Studies Office The Research and Postgraduate Studies office assists in the formulation of policy. Academic grievances concerning PhD candidacy are dealt with by the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic) who will consult with the DVC (Research). 1. In all faculties. The PhD Convener approves the examination arrangements for PhDs in consultation with the relevant Associate Dean. funding and grievances which have not been dealt with by the PG Coordinator. They may also be consulted about problems relating to PhD candidacy if matters cannot satisfactorily be resolved at the School or Faculty level. who is appointed by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research). Further information is available at http:// intranet.1. The areas of responsibility of the Faculty Office include the administration of registration.2. supports research administration in the University (including scholarships). receipt of the thesis.6 The Associate Deans In each faculty an Associate Dean or delegated authority is responsible for the approval of all administrative decisions and for all academic matters related to the PhD degree programmes of candidates within their faculty.11 The Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) The Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research)(DVC (Research) is responsible for the development of the University’s research policies. grants extensions and suspensions for candidates over five years and makes a decision concerning the examination result on behalf of the RDC. They also have an advisory role.ac. 12 PhD Handbook . The office can provide information and advice on university research policy and procedural matters that may arise in the course of a PhD candidature. Administrative Supervisor or the Head of School. the Associate Deans have responsibility for approving provisional registrations. 1. fees. The Associate Deans (see page 8 for contact details) will normally consult with supervisors and Administrative Supervisors on such matters. 1. extensions. liaises with schools and faculties and provides advice and assistance in support of staff and student research.7 The Faculty Office The appropriate Faculty Office is the central processing and service centre for all administrative details related to the PhD candidature.see page 8 for contact details. The Faculty Office should be able to provide any information required about these administrative processes .2. assesses examiners’ reports. The RDC approves the examination arrangements for PhDs in consultation with the relevant Associate Dean. suspensions. sending the thesis to examiners. receipt of six-monthly progress reports. considers examiners’ reports and makes a decision concerning the examination result.8 The PhD Convener The Research Degrees Committee (RDC) is convened by the PhD Convener.nz/research-office/ 1.2. confirming registrations and granting extensions and suspensions.

if the Library has adequate resources to support the research.2. The enhancement of research is recognised in the University as a vital element in its national and international responsibilities. A copy is held in the main collection of the Library. A candidate will only be accepted for a PhD if the School concerned is satisfied that it can provide adequate supervision and resources for the proposed topic.2 Academic Requirements of PhD Study Candidates for the PhD are normally expected to have obtained a first or second class pass in an Honours degree or a Master’s degree. only if the University can meet the candidate’s research needs will the relationship be mutually beneficial. ability to work independently. This includes taking an appropriate part in school or faculty PhD Handbook 13 . Experience shows that candidates are unlikely to succeed unless they have a strong interest in a substantial research project and a commitment to complete the project. to demonstrate proficiency in writing English.ac. but who are proposing to write their thesis in English. However. Heads of Schools hold copies of the Charter and the current Strategic Plan. It is particularly important for candidates whose first language is not English. Although it may seem obvious.0 Background to the PhD 2. These requirements are for the protection of both the candidate and the University. persistence in the face of setbacks. staff of other institutions. The University acknowledges a responsibility to ensure that candidates for the PhD degree work in an appropriate intellectual and academic environment. Other qualities which have been found to be important to success include the following: self-discipline (particularly in relation to work habits). and if the proposal meets the University’s ethical standards. and good writing ability. htm 2. Stable financial and personal circumstances are also important factors in success. Candidates are expected to demonstrate a capacity for independent research and an ability to make a substantial contribution to knowledge and understanding in their field.nz/council/publications.1 The Place of the PhD Degree in the University The PhD is the highest degree awarded by the University for research work carried out under the immediate supervision of its staff or. These documents are available on: www. ability to evaluate one’s own work. and are advised to develop strategies to minimise their impact. including the provision of an environment which fosters postgraduate students and postgraduate training. The PhD candidature involves a commitment from candidate. willingness to respond effectively to advice and criticism. willingness to work within the scholarly tradition. prospective candidates need to be aware of likely problems. A full description of the University’s mission and values is set out in the University Charter. Research is fundamental to the University. it is also necessary for a candidate to be sure that they have the time available to undertake the research. candidates may also be admitted on other criteria at the discretion of the Associate Dean on the recommendation of the School. The University has a commitment to build upon an already high national and international reputation in many fields of research through a range of strategies. thus enhancing the chances of success. It is also expected that candidates will make a contribution to the ongoing intellectual life of the School in which they are registered. supervisors and the University which extends over some years.victoria. the PhD degree is a key part of the University’s research activity and training. These are the standards which will be used in the examination of the thesis. While it is possible to succeed in spite of difficulties in some of these areas. in approved circumstances.

email and other forms of informal discussion. candidates are discouraged from attempting any other academic study together with a PhD because of the demands of a PhD thesis. of course.2 (b)).activities. For half-time candidates.20). Apart from such papers as the School may consider necessary. be longer. the total period for completion will. both formal and informal. to obtain background necessary to aspects of their PhD research. The results from such papers do not form part of the final assessment of the PhD. Candidates can expect that schools will make such opportunities for participation available. it takes at least 36 months to complete a satisfactory research project and write it up. or simply to attend certain lectures. Occasionally a school will ask a candidate to undertake certain papers. Permission is required to enrol in any additional papers (see 6. 14 PhD Handbook . The minimum period of enrolment is 24 months but in the majority of cases. and exchanging ideas with staff and other students through seminars. the PhD is assessed entirely on the presented thesis. At Victoria University of Wellington. The minimum period of enrolment for half-time candidates is 36 months (PhD Statute 4.

Students doing experimental work are also encouraged to keep log books documenting their work. six-monthly progress reports are required.1. 3.2 Developing a Proposal Once agreement has been reached that the project is likely to prove viable. This will enable the School to make an initial assessment of whether a candidate has a suitable academic background.4 The Research Period It is normal for supervisors to require sections of the research to be written up in the course of the research period. Prospective candidates should begin by making informal contact with the School concerned. for example. See Chapter 8 for information regarding ethical approval. Student Learning Support Services offer seminars to support postgraduate research students (see 16.victoria. the candidate will be registered provisionally for a period of 12 months.0 An Outline of the Process 3. staff and their research areas and contact details. PhD Handbook 15 . registration will be confirmed within 15 months (see 6. and details of any funding which has been obtained or which is being sought. Provided that satisfactory progress is made and that university requirements are met.12 and 6. These give candidates. their supervisors. Supervisors will then be nominated and any ethical approvals required will be sought. a curriculum vitae. as much detail as possible about the proposed area of research. and whether the School is able to provide adequate supervision and resources. the prospective candidate will be invited to submit an initial research proposal. They are encouraged to try to develop an organised work system.13). the opportunity to take stock of progress. At this stage. to maintain close contact with.nz is an excellent starting point for those interested in gathering information on what the University and each school has to offer. particularly showing evidence of prior research experience. but candidates should also prepare themselves for moments when they feel overwhelmed. candidates will need to supply: • • • • academic background information. Such written reports allow a better assessment of progress and can also serve as the basis for the final thesis. and above all to realise that most other students experience the same difficulties and are able to work effectively through these and progress to completion. scholarships.1 Initial Approach to the School and the University Potential candidates need to be accepted both by the University and the School in which they wish to enrol. 3.3 Provisional Registration When the proposal is accepted. and that the School is able to provide adequate supervision and resources. There are likely to be periods of great progress. and seek advice from. The VUW website www.ac. During the period of enrolment. 3. This may be backdated to include the time spent developing the proposal. industry sponsorship etc. Victoria University of Wellington (VUW) schools have web pages detailing degrees offered. as well as supervisors.10). unmotivated and unable to clearly map out the next step.3.

If the thesis requires substantial re-writing. If the supervisors are of the opinion that the thesis is incomplete. When the candidate indicates the thesis is complete. The procedure following the examination will depend on the result of the examination.6 Examination The thesis should then be printed. It is possible the thesis may be rejected completely. Candidates should consult section 4. then any necessary corrections will be made. This review period should not usually exceed four weeks. in which case the candidacy will be terminated. Where the Statute has changed. the candidate will decide that the research phase has proceeded to the point where writing-up should begin. The examination procedures are fully specified in Chapter 14. they may recommend to the Associate Dean that the thesis is not acceptable for examination. soft bound and submitted for examination. the thesis will be re-submitted and the examination process will begin again.3. the candidate may be offered a Master’s degree. While further research may be prompted by this process.14 of the PhD Policy for the regulations on submission. Two copies (one hard bound and one electronic) will then be deposited in the Library. 3. The agreement of the supervisors does not imply a successful result from the examination process. although it is usual for supervisors and candidate to reach mutual agreement on this. a timeframe will be set and the candidate will be given guidance on the required re-writing. 16 PhD Handbook . including word limits. A thesis should be presented in a form which is suitable for examination in the discipline concerned and it should conform to all other formal requirements of the University for presentation. If the thesis fails to meet the standard required of a PhD thesis. and the thesis hard bound. The agreement of the supervisors is not required. The writing-up process concludes when the candidate decides that the thesis is ready for examination. candidates may elect to complete under the regulations that existed at the time of enrolment subject to the conditions outlined in the Personal Courses of Study Statute section 22 (a) to (c). supervisors should review the thesis before application for examination is made. the candidate and supervisors should be focusing on writing-up. If the degree is to be awarded.5 Writing-Up and Submission In due course. in which case the candidate should continue working on the thesis until it is acceptable. In due course.

Process of submission of a PhD thesis at Victoria University of Wellington 3. Submission and examination of thesis Candidate submits thesis to Faculty Office Faculty Office sends out thesis to examiners Yes No Associate Dean makes recommendation to PhD Convener No Referee appointed Referee needed? Internal Examiner/Associate Dean seek compromise Internal Examiner signs off changes Candidate makes changes Yes Yes No Changes needed? Associate Dean makes recommendation to PhD Convener PhD Convener confirms award of degree Oral examination takes place if required 17 Candidate deposits thesis in the Library On seeing the library receipt.7 Flowchart Summary PhD Handbook School nominates examiners Associate Dean approves examiners PhD Convener confirms examiners Faculty Office monitors examiners’ progress Examiners send reports to Faculty Office Examiners agree? 1. Approval of examiners Candidate gives notice of intention to submit Supervisor suggests examiners and checks with candidate 2. the Faculty Office informs the PhD Convener of completion and arranges graduation .

The next step is to discuss the potential project with the Postgraduate Coordinator (PG Coordinator) of the relevant discipline. The initial research proposal (minimum one page) should detail the project. The School Research/ Postgraduate Committee (SRC) will then scrutinise the initial research proposal and Research Memorandum. The School must also ensure that the candidate will be offered supervision during periods when supervisors are on research and study leave or in the event that a supervisor may take up employment elsewhere.aspx 4.2 Research involving Confidential or Sensitive Material Candidates should be aware that theses are public documents and are subject to scrutiny not only by a community of scholars.4. See also Chapter 8 of this handbook. The School concerned must be satisfied that it is able to provide appropriate supervision and resources for the proposed topic.ac. Prospective candidates are advised to think carefully about the kind of research project to which they would like to commit themselves. If a candidate has not yet received the PhD Handbook the PG Coordinator will provide them with a copy.3 (b)).4. If a research proposal is likely to result in a request for the withholding of access to the thesis.nz/research-office/forms-and-templates.1 Initial Proposal The initiative in seeking PhD enrolment usually lies with the candidate. all the supervisors and the HoS complete the application form and then return the form. and make a recommendation to the HoS. An Outline of the Application Procedure for PhD Candidates can be found at http://intranet.nz/research%2Doffice/postgraduate/minimum-resources. If the HoS approves the recommendation from the SRC. may very well find that their topic is not a good choice. who will refer them to possible supervisors. this must be negotiated with the Head of School (HoS) when the student first enrols and recorded in a Research Memorandum.victoria. A request to withhold access to a thesis is a formal process and approval is not lightly given. Those who enter into a topic thinking they already know the answers to their central questions or who are emotionally committed to an outcome. 18 PhD Handbook . Further advice can be found in 13. the initial proposal. Candidates should always enter into their topic in a spirit of genuine enquiry. The minimum resources available to thesis students in all schools of the University are outlined in the Minimum Resources Agreement negotiated between the PGSA and Victoria University in 2006: see https://intranet. the applicant. but also the general public. and the SRC recommendation to the Faculty Office for final approval by the Associate Dean. Special care should be taken where a project requires access to confidential information from outside the University. the candidate should be directed to the University’s ethical guidelines. the Research Memorandum. the issues should be addressed at the outset of the project. If it is clear that ethical approval is required from the Human or Animal Ethics Committee. ac. the method of study and any ethical considerations. It is the HoS’s responsibility to approve the School taking on a PhD candidate.aspx Where students require additional resources for the project.0 Research Proposals 4. This document becomes part of the record of registration (see the PhD Policy section 4. The topic must be suitable to meet the academic requirements of a PhD. Candidates need to discuss the possibility with their supervisors.victoria.

candidates must be able to start work on their projects as soon as they arrive or they may be disadvantaged by the scholarship coming to an end before the project is completed. provision of data.victoria.4 External Party Involvement in the Support of Research Students External parties may include researchers from other universities.nz/research-office/forms-and-templates. support for research and support for the student. The guidelines for managing external party involvement are available at http://intranet. The holding of a scholarship is always conditional upon the scholarship recipient gaining enrolment as a PhD student at Victoria University.3 Research Proposals from Scholarship Holders Overseas candidates who are scholarship holders must formulate a proposal before enrolment is approved. This involvement may include cosupervision. from the day of the candidate’s arrival in New Zealand. Crown Research Institutes). The PhD Policy requires that the particular conditions governing sponsorship and supervisory arrangements between all parties are specified clearly in a written agreement at the outset of a candidature in order to reduce the risk of any future misunderstandings. 4. research institutions (e. in some instances. government bodies or the private sector.aspx PhD Handbook 19 . As scholarships may be paid.ac.g.4.

but who are already experienced supervisors. responsibility lies with the HoS with which the student is most closely associated. 5. in individually-argued cases. 5. Lecturers or. Two supervisors will be responsible for academic guidance and the third will be responsible for administration (Administrative Supervisor). In the case of an inter-disciplinary thesis involving more than one school/programme. people holding appointments such as research fellowships. Changes in supervision.1 The Appointment of Supervisors Each candidate will be assigned three supervisors. The changes take effect on the Administrative Supervisor’s receipt of the Associate Dean’s approval.0 Supervisors 5. it is the Head of School’s responsibility to ensure they attend a professional development programme for supervisors.3 Changes to the Supervisory Team If changes are required to the supervisory team. are expected to attend the training session dealing with Victoria University’s statutes and policies. which compromise the ability of the former supervisor to take any role in the assessment of the student. 5. Staff who are new to the University. The primary supervisor will normally be a full-time teacher at the University in the sense of the Victoria University of Wellington Act 1961.4 Supervisor Training If a staff member has not already acted as a primary supervisor or co-supervisor of at least one doctoral candidate or of three masters’ candidates. must be notified to the Research Degrees Committee by the Associate Dean. Supervisors are appointed by the Associate Deans or delegated authorities on behalf of the Academic Board. One reason for this could be that they are the primary supervisor. Only those staff who have a doctorate and/or appropriate experience and training can be appointed as primary supervisors. Readers and Associate Professors.2 The Administrative Supervisor The Administrative Supervisor is generally the Head of School (HoS) in which the student is enrolled. It is advisable that staff who have not previously supervised any candidate should act as secondary supervisor to a primary supervisor in order to gain experience. If the primary supervisor is absent from the University for any period longer than a month. the Administrative Supervisor seeks approval from the Associate Dean by providing a rationale for the change and the appointment of new supervisors. the supervisor and Head of School need to ensure that alternative supervision arrangements are in place. The role and responsibilities of supervisors are discussed in Chapter 7. 20 PhD Handbook . Senior Lecturers.5. organised by the Research and Postgraduate Studies office. candidates will be registered with only one school. One academic supervisor may be appointed as the primary supervisor (the other becomes the secondary supervisor) or both academic supervisors may ‘co-supervise’ a candidate. following nomination by schools. In such cases the responsibility should be delegated to another staff member. There will be some cases in which it will be inappropriate for the HoS to assume this role. A PhD may be interdisciplinary and in such cases it is desirable for supervisors to be appointed from each discipline. However. This includes Professors.

Responsibility lies with the Primary Supervisor to ensure that the candidate and all supervisors are fully aware of the agreed responsibilities. the candidate and the external party must be reached before the project commences.aspx#hra The recommendation must be accompanied by a curriculum vitae.victoria. including provisions for revisiting the agreed terms which should be monitored in the six-monthly reports. they will be invited to participate in a professional development programme or receive an information pack.nz/research-office/postgraduate/forms-and-templates. including the completion of six-monthly reports. an agreement between Victoria University. through the Associate Dean. ac. PhD Handbook 21 . If the external supervisor has not already acted as a primary supervisor or co-supervisor of at least one doctoral candidate or of three Masters’ candidates. External supervisors will also be given the contact details of the Postgraduate Coordinator in the candidate’s school and a PhD Handbook. If it is proposed that a scholar outside the University be appointed as a supervisor.5. These can be found on the policy database on the University website. It is also important that the Administrative Supervisor ensures that the primary supervisor accepts responsibility for seeing the PhD project to completion. If the HRA belongs to an external organisation. It will also establish the terms and conditions under which it is intended that the project proceed. Guidelines for supervisory arrangements with external parties outside the University can be obtained from the Research Office website.5 External Supervisors Other supervisors may include part-time teachers or other scholars and researchers from within New Zealand or overseas. for example a Crown Research Institute. to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) or their delegated authority for the appointment of this person as an Honorary Research Associate (HRA) see: https://intranet. the Administrative Supervisor must make an appropriate recommendation. Any agreement must also comply with the Intellectual Property Policy and the Management of External Research Consultancy and Related Contracts Policy. The Administrative Supervisor should convene a meeting with the supervisors and candidate to discuss and clarify these issues. The agreement will address issues relevant to the relationship including the expectations and obligations of the parties concerned.

1(a) (iii)). This degree need not have been in the subject area of the PhD research. This document will substitute for the initial research proposal in the application for a PhD.victoria.ac. who must be satisfied that the existing supervisor is appropriately qualified and experienced to supervise the student at the PhD level. The student and the three supervisors will agree in writing on the additional work required for the new degree. tel 0-4-463 5350.2 Conversion of a Master’s Degree to a PhD It is possible for a student who has not yet submitted the Master’s thesis to convert their enrolment from a Master’s degree into a PhD degree. as financial and accommodation guarantees must also be given before a visa is issued. could form the basis of a PhD thesis. Applications must be made through Victoria International. 22 PhD Handbook . www.1 Admissions Criteria Candidates will normally have a first or second class pass in an Honours or Master’s degree. 4.6.1.ac. Only when admission ad eundem statum has been granted can an application for registration be prepared and submitted. 6.3 International Students International students must be granted admission ad eundem statum before they can apply for a student entry visa. Candidates whose academic qualifications were gained outside New Zealand (including university staff) should apply through the appropriate Faculty Office for admission with graduate status (ad eundem statum) with the right to apply for registration for a PhD. Prospective candidates should therefore seek this admission at an early stage. but will still have to satisfy the requirements for full registration. provided candidates can demonstrate adequate competence to undertake the proposed research.nz. They should provide as much evidence as possible to permit the relevant school/ Faculty Office to evaluate their qualifications relative to the standard of a local Honours or Master’s degree. the student will be deemed to have been provisionally registered for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from the date of registration for the Master’s degree.ac. with modifications. the student and the supervisor must discuss the change of status with the School Research/Postgraduate Committee (SRC).nz/international/. 6. Victoria International staff are able to provide assistance to administrative staff or potential candidates with evaluating qualifications email victoria-international@vuw. The Associate Dean may also admit other persons who can show evidence of adequate training and ability (see the PhD Statute. email victoriainternational@victoria. who will seek advice from the Head of School.11. tel 0-4-463 5350. Admissions for a PhD can take place at any time of the year.0 Formal Admission and Registration Requirements 6. If the supervisor believes that the student enrolled in a Master’s degree has demonstrated the aptitude and level of competence required for PhD study and the research. Entry under this section of the PhD Statute requires candidates to satisfy the Associate Dean. If it is agreed to convert to a PhD. that they have demonstrated a level of ability and relevant experience equivalent to that necessary to obtain a first or second class Honours or Master’s degree. The SRC will also ensure that a second supervisor is available to be appointed. Please also refer to page 6 and section 16. the supervisor should discuss a conversion to a PhD with the student. If the application is approved by the Associate Dean.nz.

Students’ Association Fee. over the year. Students are deemed to be full-time when they are able to devote a minimum of 30 hours per week to the thesis. Any half-time student has to agree with the School on their period of attendance during each year and their minimum period of enrolment shall be determined by the Associate Dean in accordance with the PhD Statute 4. Permission will not normally be given for students to work away from the University until full registration has been achieved.victoria.aspx). but permission for absence from the University of up to one month may be granted to undertake fieldwork or library searches necessary for the preparation of the full proposal for the thesis during the period of provisional registration. Students who cannot work on the thesis for the amount of time specified above are enrolled as half-time students. 6. To pass from provisional to full registration the School Research/Postgraduate Committee and the supervisor must be confident that the student has demonstrated the aptitude and level of competence required for PhD study and that the project is viable. the candidate will be granted provisional registration. Candidates in other programmes may need to spend a great deal of time in the Library or field. In some programmes the nature of the research will require that candidates work in the School and in these cases laboratory and/or study space will be provided in the University. Refer also to 6. 6. The normal practice is that candidates will reside within reasonable PhD Handbook 23 . After two years. This excludes statutory holiday periods.8 Attendance at University and Study at a Distance The candidate is expected to maintain close contact with the School in which they are registered. they may also study at home. Student Services Levy and Student Assistance Scheme and Amenities Levy). and access to school-based services and resources. In the case of conversion from a Master’s to a PhD there is no provisional registration although candidates must still fulfil all requirements as set out in 6.6 Enrolment and Payment of Fees Candidates will be advised by the Faculty Office in writing to enrol and pay the necessary fees (tuition fees. re-enrolment may be carried out on a six-monthly basis.13. and either through choice or because of space limitations in the school. Enrolment entitles a candidate to: access to supervision.6. This form should be completed by the candidate once the School is satisfied with the viability of the project. It will then be forwarded to the Associate Dean.7 Annual Re-enrolment Candidates must re-enrol annually within one month of the expiry of the previous period of enrolment. 6.2. The Associate Dean will consult with the Head of School if any difficulties arise. and if approval is given.5 Approval of Provisional Registration The Associate Dean will consider the application. Where registered students are working away from the University a School memorandum for PhD Study at a Distance is required (go to: http://intranet. on average.4 Applications to Register Applicants for a PhD should obtain an application form from the appropriate Faculty Office. The form must be signed by the Head of School and supervisors and returned to the Faculty Office.nz/research-office/postgraduate/ forms-and-templates.ac. 6. International students may have to fulfil additional requirements.2(b). access to Library and Information Technology Services.

In all such cases. and contributions from the candidate to seminars etc while the candidate is working within the University are expected.9 Employment Half-time candidates whose normal place of work includes research facilities should not automatically assume that they might use these facilities rather than those at the University. Crown Research Institutes. the Administrative Supervisor must make an appropriate recommendation. The following guidelines should be addressed by supervisors and candidates when setting up such projects: • candidates who are working for a major part of their higher degree study in an institution other than the University should be supervised both by a university staff member who is the primary supervisor and a designated member of staff of the collaborating institution. fax and/or email) and schedule meetings at regular intervals in Wellington.11 Collaborating Institutions In some circumstances. if it is proposed that a scholar outside the University be appointed as a supervisor. give an assurance of regular contact (for example by phone. through the Associate Dean. 6.10 Period of Overseas Research Candidates who wish to pursue a period of research overseas must first acquire permission from the Associate Dean. some hospitals. Time spent in carrying out a candidate’s normal employment duties will not usually be regarded as part of the period of registration unless that employment is very highly specialised and relates directly and in detail to the thesis project. regular contact and reporting by the candidate is expected. to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) (DVC Research) for the appointment of this • 24 PhD Handbook . 6. PhD research can be successfully undertaken by candidates working in other institutions. Scholarship holders should also seek approval from the Scholarships Committee. and some industrial organisations have research facilities which complement those of the University. This rationale must take account of academic considerations. In such circumstances the following must be considered: • a minimum expectation is that students will spend one month per year of study (regardless of being full-time or half-time) attending the University or under equivalent supervision organised by VUW. a required period of writing-up within the University before submission of the thesis. a memorandum for PhD Study at a Distance must be approved by the School Research/ Postgraduate Committee. • • • • • 6. a required period of preparation within the University before the candidate departs for periods of data collection etc.proximity to the University. Candidates who are working away from an institution and regular supervision need to be highly motivated and thoroughly prepared. specific approval must be obtained from the Associate Dean and will be granted only if it is clear that the arrangement is in the interests of the research project and will not unnecessarily impede the candidate’s appropriate involvement in general school activities. Candidates and supervisors will be expected to provide the Associate Deans with a rationale for prolonged absence from the Wellington region.

.the candidate’s and the University’s share of income from discoveries is clearly set out. and approval for candidates to undertake research off campus is more likely to be given when the following criteria are satisfied: . able and qualified to assist the candidate.12. The recommendation must be accompanied by a curriculum vitae. • research institutions which wish. • • PhD Handbook 25 .person as an Honorary Research Associate.the rights of the University to examine the work of the candidate are protected. . placement of candidates into institutions which are doing commercial work should be covered by a contract in which: .the collaborating institution agrees that the candidate will have access to all suitable resources for completion of the higher degree.the staff who will provide day-to-day support to the candidate are willing. to provide resources and supervision for PhD candidates should be invited to enter into agreements for formal academic collaboration with the University so that collaboration is recognised by the Council and is seen as a long-term commitment which is of benefit to candidates. they will be invited to participate in a Research and Postgraduate Studies office professional development programme or receive an equivalent package. The appointment will be made for four years.data collection and examination of base materials can only be carried out off campus. • supervisors arranging for placement of a candidate off campus must refer the case to the Research and Postgraduate Studies office for advice about the appropriate form of agreement.the candidate is encouraged to present seminars both in the collaborating institution and in the University. . Any contract with the collaborating institution requires the approval of the DVC (Research) or nominee. . If the external supervisor has not already acted as a primary supervisor or co-supervisor of at least one doctoral candidate or of three Masters’ candidates.the collaborating institution is able to provide a stimulating research environment. to academic staff and to collaborating staff of the non-university institution.the intellectual property rights which may belong to the University. . . the candidate and the collaborating institution are recognised and apportioned between them.any agreement to withhold publication for purposes such as taking out patents must be approved by the Research Degrees Committee (see Library Statute section 4. .the resources of a collaborating institution or establishment have been inspected and found to be appropriate for the needs of the candidate. . and undertake. .the collaborating institution will provide ready access for supervising university staff to the candidate and to the research facilities used by the candidate.3 (c)).

13. Additional criteria may be required by the School or programme where the candidate is enrolled. Supervisors are required to give serious consideration to these matters.000 and 10. 6. ability to summarise. The School Research/Postgraduate Committee may terminate candidature if the student fails to meet the requirements within 15 months of first registration. the papers must generally be satisfactorily completed before the registration is confirmed. ability to summarise.000 words. PhD students achieve full registration if they demonstrate satisfactory progress of previously established and agreed upon performance standards. interpret. To achieve full registration the candidate must write a formal research proposal and may also be required to present the proposal orally. evaluate and critique data. Victoria University expects this to occur between six and 12 months after the initial registration date for full-time candidates. supervisors and schools that every effort is made to assist the candidate’s progress during the provisional registration period. Indicators of satisfactory progress may include: • • • • • • • knowledge of the literature in the field of study. satisfactory completion of any required course work. Regulations allow a total of 15 months provisional registration for full-time candidates (and 24 months for half-time candidates). To the extent appropriate in the discipline the proposal will contain the following elements: • • • an outline of the basic thesis/research question. It is in the best interests of candidates. any other abilities important in the field of study. 6. a demonstration that the methodology is appropriate.13.6. a statement as to whether ethical approval is required and.1 Full research proposal As a guide. a literature review.13 Confirmation of Full Registration The move from provisional to full registration requires candidates to meet University criteria (see 6. If the School requires the candidate to undertake certain papers as background for the PhD.12 Move from Provisional to Full Registration The confirmation of full registration is a milestone in PhD candidature. School or programme criteria can be obtained from the Postgraduate Coordinator or supervisor. ability to communicate research findings in formats appropriate to the discipline. ability to design and interpret research tasks. evaluate and critique that literature. if so. This is the appropriate way to show that the candidate has understood and can interpret the literature. interpret. the candidate is required to have the approval of the School Research/Postgraduate Committee. To progress from provisional to full registration. the proposal will be between 3. It is equally important that candidates should demonstrate an ability to process with doctoral level work before their full registration is confirmed.1). whether or not that has been • • 26 PhD Handbook . appropriate theoretical frameworks.

including any suggested revisions to the SRC. The report may: • • • • recommend approval of the candidate’s transfer to full registration. the SRC should provide clear and constructive guidance to the student and supervisor on the steps that are required to gain full registration. If this is part of a school or programme procedure. The proposal will establish preliminary goals for the next six months and will contain a tentative timetable for the completion of the thesis. The candidate may also be given the opportunity to respond to questions and feedback from the SRC and others in attendance. and the SRC has been delegated the authority to accept the proposal. PhD Handbook 27 .obtained from all required institutions. the candidate must indicate the reasoning for this. Schools/programmes are free to determine the format of the presentation and it is recommended that it include the following elements: the candidate’s summary of the material in the proposal highlighting key issues. If some of the suggested changes were not taken up.13. The SRC will scrutinise the proposal according to the following criteria: • • that the student has sufficient knowledge or understanding of the topic. and that the research can be placed into the existing body of knowledge (for this purpose a summary of the recent research literature relevant to the topic must be included). it is recommended that the presentation be announced in VicNews and open to all who may be interested. that the proposed research is original or adds value to existing knowledge. If approval has not been obtained the timetable for approval is to be noted. the SRC should recommend full registration of the candidate to the Associate Dean. 6. any problems anticipated in carrying out the research and the intended methodology. supervisors and the candidate). social or legal impediments to the successful completion and/or publication of the research. It must be submitted to the School’s Research/Postgraduate Committee (SRC).2 Presentation of the proposal Candidates may also be required to present their proposal. Where there are no changes to be made. the SRC should meet with the candidate and explain face-to-face why this action was taken. The SRC will assess the proposal and report to the Associate Dean (with copies to the Head of School. • • 6.3 Approval The candidate will send a copy of the proposal.13. recommend the candidate transfer to a Master’s degree. Where the decision is to terminate registration. the conceptual framework. Where registration is to be delayed. or terminate the candidate’s registration. require that full registration be delayed by up to six months. and • a statement that there are no foreseeable cultural. that the proposal outlines an appropriate theoretical framework which will lead to an original and defensible theory. along with a cover letter indicating where changes were made.

At the time of registration. the Associate Dean will specify a period during which candidates must be working under direct supervision. Half-time candidates are required to supply details of their other obligations on the enrolment form. The thesis is to be presented within four years of registration. If there are major difficulties in the early part of the project. If the research proceeds smoothly. 6. candidates must maintain direct contact with their supervisors and sustain satisfactory progress or the registration will be terminated. 6. If candidates have spent productive time in developing their research proposal. the date of provisional registration will become the date of registration. the candidate must be in direct contact with the supervisors. During this time. on receipt of the recommendation from the SRC. although he or she may be away from the University working in libraries and similar institutions.14 Date of Registration The date of provisional registration is the date on which the candidate begins work on the course of study for a PhD. The University expects that it will take between two and a half and three and a half years of work for a full-time candidate to achieve the necessary standard. even after completion of the minimum two year period of full-time research. but individual applications to the Associate Dean by supervisors are required for any extensive “time out” on the project. The same conditions apply to a registration of more than two years that allows for some other work at the same time as the PhD research. Longer periods in external laboratories or on fieldwork may also be approved. This date is shown on the registration form. One of the principal reasons for this requirement is that protracted research may be overtaken by other researchers working in the same field. A candidate’s progress during full registration continues to be monitored by six-monthly progress reports.2(b) for fulltime enrolment and 36 months for half-time enrolment. See 6.15 Duration of Registration The PhD Statute requires a minimum registration period of 24 months under clause 4. The Associate Dean will not usually expect to backdate a registration by more than about two months from the time of registration.19 for the implications of extensions and suspensions of registration. the date of provisional registration can be backdated to give credit for that time. 28 PhD Handbook .Full registration is confirmed by the Associate Dean. Candidates whose registration is terminated have the right of appeal to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) through the Postgraduate Research Coordinator in the Research and Postgraduate Studies office.16 Notification of Changes to Registration Candidates must notify the Associate Dean if the circumstances which have been taken into account in setting the period of registration change in any material way. the Associate Dean may terminate the provisional registration and request the candidate to consider the possibility of identifying a new research project. Throughout the candidature. 6. The Associate Dean must be satisfied that such candidates can reasonably be expected to complete a thesis within six years from the date of registration and will not normally accept candidates who are unable to devote regularly at least something close to half normal working hours to the PhD project.

All retrospective suspensions are approved by the Convener of the RDC. or vice versa. their registration must be maintained. 6. after consultation with the candidate. but it is recommended that students do not overload themselves with paid work outside the scholarly work in preparation for the thesis.18 Registration and Other Work It may be valuable for full-time students to undertake tutoring or other part-time jobs around the University. Note that this applies also to any change from full-time study. Periods of suspension are not included in calculations of total registration time.6. along with the candidate’s most recent sixmonthly progress report. Where.3(e)). 6. If the candidate wishes to take a break from research it must be approved by the Associate Dean who will revise the terms on which the candidate was registered and advise the new minimum duration of registration. An application for an extension or suspension is made in writing to the appropriate Faculty Office.19 Extensions and Suspensions of Registration The University discourages candidates from spending an undue length of time on thesis work and it is expected that theses will be submitted within four years of registration for full-time candidates or six years for candidates who have been enrolled exclusively half-time. where good cause is shown.21 Change of Title Any change to the provisional title of the thesis should be reported when registration is confirmed or at any later stage of the thesis prior to its submission. but is not entitled to receive supervision or to make use of the University’s facilities. and will not usually exceed twelve months” (PhD Statute. extensions will be granted “only in exceptional circumstances. which will forward it to the Associate Dean. for unexpected reasons. Applications must have the support of supervisors and Head of School and should be sent directly to the Faculty Office. clause 4. Such applications must have the written support of supervisors and Head of School and set out the reasons why permission is sought.20 Concurrent Study If candidates have a genuine reason for undertaking a paper other than any required by the School. 6. This permission is not readily given. Applications for variations in the conditions of registration are made through supervisors. During the period of suspension the candidate pays no fees. PhD Handbook 29 . If the registration lapses. they must apply to the Associate Dean for permission before enrolling in it. it can be resumed only with the permission of the Associate Dean. While the regulations state that the Research Degrees Committee (RDC) through the Associate Dean may grant an extension beyond the due date. The minimum period for a suspension is one month. 6. The supervisors. it appears that the candidate’s work on the thesis will be completely interrupted for a period application should be made to the Associate Dean for suspension of registration for that period. should recommend the change to the Associate Dean for approval.17 Maintenance of Registration The course of study for a PhD is best undertaken continuously and while candidates are working on PhD projects.

6. This option may also be taken if the supervisors believe a student has not demonstrated the aptitude and level of competence required for PhD study and that the thesis could. as is the agreement of the student. with modifications. This may occur at the end of 12 months of provisional PhD registration if no request for an extension of provisional enrolment is received or there is no endorsement of the candidate’s ability to progress to full registration. form the basis of a Master’s thesis. Written application for conversion to a Master’s degree must be made to the Associate Dean.22 Conversion of a PhD to a Master’s Degree It is possible for a thesis being prepared for a PhD to be converted to and submitted for a Master’s degree. 30 PhD Handbook . The written support of the Administrative Supervisor and supervisors is needed.

It is the Head of School’s responsibility to make sure that workload is allocated such that supervisors have enough time to carry out the supervisory role. 7. the undertaking of a literature review.7. Effective two-way communication is vital. the development and refinement of the proposal. 7. and the need to get approval from the relevant Ethics Committee if the research involves human or animal subjects or tissue. For this reason. The amount and frequency of academic contact between supervisors and candidates will vary. but regular discussions should be held and adequate records of meetings should be kept. 7. which is up to the candidate. the supervisors should assess the student’s academic and technical skills and be satisfied before confirmation of registration that appropriate skills do exist or will develop during the time of the enrolment for the degree. ensure the candidate is aware of the academic criteria to be met for award of the degree. and • • PhD Handbook 31 . the planning of the programme. the access to resources (technical and financial). One meeting per month is considered a minimum.2.1 The Role of Supervisors Supervisors undertake to guide the candidate through the academic and administrative requirements of the PhD. It is important to avoid the situation where candidates only see their supervisors when real difficulties arise. ensure that appropriate and timely advice is given on requirements regarding style. Supervisors should also: • identify with candidates the particular research skills that they will need to acquire to complete the programme of research. depending on the nature of the discipline and the stage of the project.2 Providing Academic Guidance Supervisors should provide guidance on: • • • • • • the nature of research. a supervisor should not have too many candidates at one time. They cannot guarantee the success of the project. Good communication and mutual trust and respect are essential for a productive working relationship with a satisfactory outcome.1 Assessing the Student Before provisional registration.2 The Responsibilities of Supervisors The overall responsibility of supervisors is to assist the student to complete their research successfully within an agreed time frame.0 Supervision Protocols 7.2. Supervisors need to have a sympathetic ear and sufficient time and energy to devote to the task of supervision. but they should have a close interest in the project and a commitment to facilitating its completion. The responsibilities of supervisors are outlined below. presentation and production of theses.

arrange regular supervisory meetings. Supervisors should help the student to plan for the writing up of the thesis and to schedule sufficient time for that purpose. One meeting per month is regarded as the minimum entitlement. Identified problems and proposed methods of addressing them should be discussed with the student before the report is finalised.2. Supervisors and students are required to keep a record of the dates of supervisory meetings and of any significant advice or transactions that are not dealt with in more formal written reports provided to students. must be reviewed by the Head of School (HoS) before being submitted to the Associate Dean.3 Scheduling Meetings Supervisors should. interim reports or research results. in close conjunction with the student. They should identify the problems and suggest ways of addressing them.• have a sense of the expectations of examiners throughout the research process and use that as a guide in supervising the student’s work. and a maximum of four weeks for substantial thesis drafts. If supervisors are absent from the University for any period longer than one month they must ensure that the Head of School knows that appropriate supervision arrangements will be provided during their absence.nz/research-office/postgraduate/forms-and-templates.6 Identifying Problems Supervisors should ensure that the student is made aware of inadequate progress or of standards of work below that generally expected. but more frequent meetings will usually be desirable. 7. Supervisors should encourage the candidate to make productive use of the available time. 7. Written comments should be made on work submitted by the student. The final version of the six-monthly report. The report will then be filed in the student’s file held by the relevant Faculty Office. the Associate Dean will not approve applications for re-enrolment unless one six-monthly report for the previous enrolment period is held in the student’s file. and monitor. A copy must be provided to the student.victoria.aspx While the Faculty Office initiates the six-monthly reporting process. Where there are major or continuing problems with a student’s performance. feedback should be provided within two weeks in the case of relatively short pieces of work. the proposed 32 PhD Handbook . ensuring that an appropriate timetable is set to allow the degree to be completed within the allotted timeframe. The report template is available at https://intranet.7 Six-monthly Progress Reports Six-monthly reports are required as part of the postgraduate supervision process in May and November in each year of enrolment. The HoS must agree to. which has been agreed to and signed by the student and supervisors. the six-monthly report should specify what action needs to be taken to rectify the problems and stipulate a time period within which such action is to be taken. As a guide.2. Except in exceptional circumstances. 7.5 Providing Feedback Supervisors should provide regular feedback on progress to the student.2. the report writing is the responsibility of the supervisors.4 Milestones Supervisors should reach agreement with the candidate on the indicators of progress and the dates for the submission of appropriate written work. 7.2. 7. ac. in consultation with the student.2.

help the candidate make contact with other scholars in related fields. supervisors should refer a student to student support services (see Chapter 16). 7.9 Encouraging Academic Contacts Supervisors should encourage the candidate at the appropriate stages in their course of study: • • • • • • • to extend their contacts within the School and elsewhere. the HoS must notify the Associate Dean who may then take action. encourage both attendance and presentation at seminars and conferences. as far as possible. and • • PhD Handbook 33 . supervisors should attempt to keep themselves informed of the range of factors that may have a bearing on the timely and successful completion of the thesis. Supervisors and Administrative Supervisors have a joint responsibility to advise the Associate Dean and Faculty Office as necessary. that the work submitted by candidates is their own and that the data is valid. Where necessary. Monitoring the completion of six-monthly reports occurs twice yearly and is the responsibility of the Associate Dean. the administrative requirements of supervision and advise the candidate as necessary (for example. to discontinue the student’s enrolment. ensuring. In the event that the student fails to take the required action so that problems persist. 7.10 Facilitating Administrative Compliance Supervisors should be knowledgeable about. 7. ensure that the candidate has the opportunity to participate in the life of the School. and comply with. changes to full-time status. applications for suspension or absences overseas. University-wide monitoring of compliance is the responsibility of the Research Degrees Committee and forms part of their Reports to the Academic Board. ensuring that candidates are aware of any requirements regarding the retention of data within schools. This includes advising candidates about: • • applicable governmental. The HoS must offer the student the opportunity to respond and then will monitor the proposed actions. upon the recommendation of the Administrative Supervisor. regarding six-monthly progress reports.2) is informed if any problems develop during the enrolment. etc). institutional or professional guidelines for the conduct of research.2. encouragement and support to further the candidate’s career in their chosen field. ensuring that candidates are aware of intellectual property rights.actions.2.8 Supporting the Student Without compromising a student’s privacy. Supervisors should ensure that the Administrative Supervisor (as defined in 5.2. provide assistance and information where appropriate on scholarships and financial support. and provide advice. encourage the candidate to publish. The HoS will also inform the student of their entitlement to representation via Victoria University of Wellington’s Students’ Association (VUWSA) and the Postgraduate Students’ Association (PGSA).

In most disciplines publications are increasingly necessary for entry into an academic profession. Supervisors are encouraged to discuss the publication process with students. 7. When students and supervisors pool their talents to publish research both benefit from increased research productivity.• ensuring that safe working practices are developed and maintained and that candidates are aware of the University’s Occupational Health and Safety Policies.e. including the differences between writing a thesis and preparing a manuscript for publication. Publication should be seen as part of PhD study rather than a barrier to timely completion of the thesis. Supervising and Examining Candidates and the guidelines of this handbook. The Associate Dean will scrutinise the recommendations and forward them to the Research Degrees Committee (RDC). Students should incorporate plans to write. and publications are the currency of success in research. They should endeavour to publish their research.ac. supervisors recommend suitable examiners and supply the Associate Dean with relevant documentation i.13 Support for Supervisors The Research and Postgraduate Studies office offers regular seminars/workshops for new and more experienced supervisors. the research process and administrative matters. Where joint authorship is contemplated.victoria. The goal for both parties is: • • • protection of the student’s interests promotion of understanding of the publishing process for the student recognition of the supervisor’s intellectual contribution to the process If a student and supervisor/s wish to co-publish. possibly in collaboration with their supervisor(s). In consultation with the Administrative Supervisor. and Victoria University’s Policy on Recognition of Authorship http://policy.2. submit and revise publishable manuscripts within the timetable for their PhD studies. or in other cases where issues of recognition arise.12 Encouraging Publication The PhD is a research degree. Supervisors should be available to discuss feedback from the written and/or oral examinations with their student. Enrolling. The RDC appoints the PhD examiners.2. All parties should agree in writing about issues concerning intellectual property and authorship. 7. supervisors should ensure that students are informed about: • • the conventions that apply in their discipline. a rationale for the choice of the particular examiners for the thesis and a brief curriculum vitae for the two external examiners. It is also the responsibility of the supervisor to discuss with students the possible exploitation of any invention or other intellectual property arising from their research.nz 7. and should therefore take steps to avoid misunderstandings that may arise as a result of inexperience. Topics include supervisory roles and responsibilities. in outlets valued by their discipline. 34 PhD Handbook . then this must be discussed early on in the process towards publication.2. Supervisors should forward their recommendations at least one month before the expected submission of the thesis.11 Assisting Examination Arrangements Supervisors assist the Associate Dean to arrange the examination in accordance with the PhD Policy: Approving. They should be mindful of the fact that emerging researchers are often unaware of most aspects of the publication process.

The responsibilities of candidates are outlined below.3.1 Planning the Research Candidates should plan and execute the research project under the guidance of the supervisors. Candidates.5 Facilitating Administrative Compliance Candidates should become familiar with. interim reports or research results. This includes: • becoming familiar with the administrative requirements of the Faculty Office (such as applying for the approval needed to spend time away from the University as part of the enrolment.6 Meeting Ethical Guidelines Candidates should become familiar with all relevant ethical guidelines for the conduct of research and ensure that the necessary approvals are obtained for research involving animal or human subjects. or tissue. and strive to achieve agreed milestones.3.4 Identifying Problems Candidates should take the initiative in raising with supervisors any problems or difficulties with the project or its supervision. 7. presenting their work and interacting with the staff and other postgraduate students. Alternatively. for example.3. Where appropriate candidates may also be involved in academic activities in their chosen research field. 7. adopting at all times safe working practices relevant to the field of research. within the expected time period.7. 7. be committed to the research and avoid activities which will interfere with its satisfactory completion within the time limit. PhD Handbook 35 . 7.3. 7. 7.3 Participating in University Intellectual Life Candidates are encouraged to participate in the School community by attending seminars. and participating in academic conferences (finances and resources permitting). with the guidance of their supervisors.3. attending relevant seminars in other schools or institutions. and suspension of enrolment). • • 7. competence and confidence.3. and complying with any institutional occupational health and safety policies. university.3 The Responsibilities of Candidates Completing a doctoral programme requires progressive development of skills. as agreed with supervisors. faculty and school statutes and policies and any other written guidelines and regulations for the degree. must take responsibility for developing their intellectual independence. and abide by. If the student is unable to discuss the matter with their supervisor/s.2 Actively Pursuing the Research Candidates should devote sufficient time to the course of study.7 Giving Notice of Submission Candidates should give three months’ notice to the primary supervisor of the expected submission date of the thesis in order to allow early selection of examiners. Candidates should reach agreement with supervisors about indicators of progress being made and about submission of appropriate written work. They should attend regular meetings. they should contact the Administrative Supervisor or the PG Coordinator. the Associate Dean (Students/Research) in the Faculty Office or VUWSA’s Education Coordinator are available to discuss areas of concern.3.

production and binding of the thesis that is finally submitted. the Research Degrees Committee will also use this information to monitor supervision across the University. with a copy to the Administrative Supervisor. the Associate Dean of the Faculty will also receive a copy of the student’s written comments with all identification removed (names. 36 PhD Handbook .3. 7.3. style.4 Evaluative Feedback on Research Supervision PhD students are encouraged to provide feedback about the quality of supervision by completing an Exit Questionnaire which is held by the Faculty Office until the thesis has been marked.7. course codes etc). In order to improve supervisory practices across the University. 7. and for promptly making any required amendments after examination.8 Submitting the Thesis Candidates are solely responsible for the content. The questionnaire is then returned to the supervisors. Once a year. Issues emerging from the Exit Questionnaires are passed to the Research and Postgraduate Studies office to be incorporated into workshops for postgraduate supervisors.9 Publishing Candidates should accept responsibility for the academic content of the thesis and for publishing any parts of it if appropriate. presentation.

ac.http://policy. The HEC recognises that individual researchers and teachers.2 (e) (iii)). It is important that PhD candidates read the Animal Ethics Policy carefully and ensure that they are familiar with basic ethical issues.3 Animal Ethics Committee If PhD research involves animal subjects.4 Authorship and Acknowledgement Guidelines It must be clearly understood that: • the thesis presented for the PhD degree is the candidate’s own work and must have been prepared specifically for this degree. Nevertheless. Application forms can be accessed via the Human Ethics Policy: http://policy.nz). In so doing. and • • • PhD Handbook 37 .nz 8. rights and freedoms. as well as to provide a degree of protection for the researcher or teacher.ac. 8. in order to ensure consistency and impartiality in considering the interests of potential subjects. Candidates must then discuss the ethical implications of their research with their primary supervisor to determine whether HEC approval is required. but the application must be approved and countersigned by the primary supervisor and the HoS. If either candidate or supervisors are in any doubt as to whether approval is required. either in research or teaching.http://policy. not prevent. all assistance which candidates have received in their research be clearly acknowledged in the thesis.1 Human Ethics Committee Where research activity involves human subjects the University has a responsibility to ensure it protects the privacy. The role of the University Human Ethics Committee (HEC) is to review and approve the adequacy of protection for human subjects in research projects (see HEC Guidelines.nz 8. certain categories of research (and teaching) activities must be approved in accordance with the Human Ethics Policy and HEC Guidelines (Appendix 1) before being conducted. further advice should be sought from the Head of School (HoS) or the Convener of the HEC. any material quoted from another author’s work (published or unpublished) must be clearly referenced and acknowledged in the main text of the thesis (attention is drawn to the statement on plagiarism in the Statute on Student Conduct (section 4.ac. The policy and application forms can be accessed via http://policy.victoria.2 Human Ethics Approval for Research If PhD research involves human subjects or human tissue or otherwise affects people’s privacy. it must be approved by the University’s Animal Ethics Committee. social and cultural sensitivities.victoria. it must not contain work extracted from a thesis. research and teaching.0 Research Ethics 8. working in and familiar with their own disciplines. principles and practice. are generally in the best position to assess their proposed activity. It is important that PhD candidates read the HEC Guidelines carefully and ensure that they are familiar with basic ethical issues.nz).victoria. Appendix 1 of the Human Ethics Policy . health.victoria. Responsibility for applying for HEC approval rests with the candidate.8. The purpose of the HEC is to promote. and welfare of such subjects. it is subject to Human Ethics Committee (HEC) Guidelines (see Appendix 1 of the Human Ethics Policy . dissertation or research paper already presented by the author for another degree or diploma at this or any other university.ac. principles and practice. it seeks to ensure that all researchers and teachers are aware of the ethical issues involving human subjects. safety.

This includes published and unpublished work. • • • • Note: Academic misconduct does not include honest errors or honest differences in the interpretation of data or conclusions drawn. plagiarism. cheating or other dishonest practices in relation to assessment. including claiming results where none have been obtained. or of other relevant professional practices and codes of ethics. and that candidates make it clear what. which is defined as follows in the Statute on Student Conduct: Academic misconduct includes: • • • fabrication of data.• it is the primary supervisor’s responsibility to ensure that the thesis as presented is the candidate’s own work. This will ensure that external examiners are in no doubt as to the fact that the work they are assessing is that of the candidate. if any. including fraudulent changing of records. Misconduct in research is unacceptable to the University. the falsification of data. organisation. and/or failing to acknowledge work primarily produced by a research student/trainee/associate. which is the copying of ideas. academically responsible and ethical manner. including listing as authors without their permission. All candidates will be asked to sign a statement that the above conditions have been satisfied when the thesis is submitted. and other academic or research practices which bring or are likely to bring the University into disrepute. attributing work to others who have not in fact contributed to the research. assistance they have received from other persons. 8.5 Appropriate Conduct in Research Candidates are expected to conduct all research in an honest. material on the Internet and the work of other students and staff. intentional infringements of the guidelines issues by the University’s Human Ethics Committee and Animal Ethics Committee. wording or anything else from another source without appropriate reference or acknowledgement so that it appears to be one’s own work. misleading ascription of authorship. 38 PhD Handbook . The University has provisions for dealing with cases of research misconduct.

the HoS will agree. All PhD candidates are advised of their obligation to observe the Information Systems Statute which can be found at: http://policy. Also. See also Chapter 11. Enquiries via email can be sent to: its-service@vuw.2. With reference to the Minimum Resources Agreement.1 School Resources to Support PhD Candidates 9.nz 9. source materials. OGB132 (Law). with the supervisors and the candidate. items of equipment like calculators.1 Introduction PhD candidates should email its-service@vuw. Candidates may visit these locations in person.ac. Research Funding and Financial Support.studentvuw.ac. ac. paper supplies. correspondence and so on. and WCE (T208). facilities.0 Research Resources 9.1 Responsibilities of the Head of School The Head of School (HoS) is responsible for ensuring that each PhD proposal is feasible in terms of time. Some schools are able to provide some financial assistance from school resources and this is a subject for negotiation within the School.2. It also contains some information about the faculty research grants and the protocol for addressing concerns about resources.1. Candidates should expect to spend some of their own money on travel. the candidate’s entitlements and document these in the Research Memorandum which becomes part of the record of registration.nz ITS have Help Desks located in five physical locations around the campus: RB205a (Library).aspx It includes information about orientation.nz • PhD Handbook 39 .9.victoria.vuw. Railway (RW 225).nz/research%2Doffice/ postgraduate/minimum-resources. x5050 for help with the services ITS provides. 9.1. electronic facilities and financial support.3 Financial Assistance The payment of research expenses varies from school to school. photocopying.2 Information Technology Resources 9. Further information on these services and others is available by consulting: www.victoria. Internet browsing and printing services are available for a small charge. or alternatively the ITS service desk can be contacted over the phone on x5050.2 Minimum Resources Agreement Minimum Resources Agreement (MRA) outlines the minimum resources for thesis students in all schools of the University and is available at https://intranet.2 Range of services ITS – Student Services currently provides the following range of computing resources and communication services for the University student community: • Access to web-based email. Candidates working from home can access the student environment via the myVictoria portal. 9. 9. This provides access to features such as personal storage and a large number of library databases.ac.nz or call Information Technology Services (ITS) service desk. MY223. equipment. and funding for the expected duration of the research. office space and furniture.1.ac.

3. There is no common data storage between the student domain and the staff domain. including a complete Staff Directory.victoria. students should refer to the Library website at www.9. Clients should always contact the Help Desk in the first instance with enquiries. the Lending and Reader Services Group will normally grant temporary borrowing privileges upon receipt of a supporting letter from the proposed primary supervisor.2. the Architecture and Design Library in Vivian Street. when connecting from a networked school desktop computer or via the Internet from home (requires a personal ISP) connect via the VUW Portal: www.nz~POLICY~000000000021. 9.nz/library/ Students are advised to check this site and the myVictoria portal regularly for updated information about the Library and its services. For further and more comprehensive information. This section contains information relevant to all PhD students. the Education Library at the Karori Campus and the Law Library in the Government Buildings. The Website is also a gateway to the online catalogue of Victoria University of Wellington Library.ac.2.ac. All PhD candidates are advised to consult the Library Statute at: http://policy. after validation at the Central Issue desk. will give postgraduate library privileges. Authorised students may use all of these libraries following registration. 9. Access to the network via the student domain requires a student computing account and depends on whether the connection is from an ITS terminal. For further information on your account username please check your Confirmation of Study form or contact an ITS Help Desk. Books from the 40 PhD Handbook .pdf 9. Note. the Commerce Library at Railway West Wing.Te Pataka Korero The University Library comprises the Central Library in the Rankine Brown Building on the Kelburn Campus. Access to the network via the staff domain requires students to contact their school administrator who will set them up as an ‘interested party’.1 Lending Services PhD research often necessitates heavy and specialised use of library services.3 Registration as an ITS Client All candidates will have a computer account on enrolment.nz/ Amphora!~~policy.4 Accessing the Network All postgraduate thesis students have the right to access Victoria’s network via the staff domain. If borrowing privileges are required prior to enrolment while a thesis proposal is being prepared.victoria.3 The University Library . candidates must choose access via either the staff domain or the student domain.nz 9. with reduced hours on weekends and during term breaks.ac. problems or complaints rather than other ITS staff so that the call is logged and is directed to the most appropriate support person for resolution. Following enrolment and payment of fees. However.studentvuw.vuw. otherwise their profiles will be affected. When connecting from an ITS computer log directly into the student domain.2.vuw.5 ITS Student Help Desk Service Help Desks are available specific hours that change from trimester to trimester. A range of printed information leaflets about specific library services and collections is available from service points in all libraries. PhD candidates will receive a student ID card which.ac. a networked school desktop computer or through an external Internet Service Provider (ISP).

In the Central Library student computing facilities are available on Levels 1 and 2. Subject-specific seminars and individual consultations are available from the Library throughout the year on request to a liaison librarian or the Reference Office. through both printed and electronic resources. Commerce and Law Libraries. Reference staff are always happy to give advice on suitable information resources as well as provide assistance with search techniques and strategies. Details of seminars will be given in library notices. The Interloans team process requests from the Central Library as well as the Architecture and Design. If candidates experience technical problems in accessing the University and Library websites or networked information resources they should discuss this with staff at the Student Computing Helpdesk. with some exceptions.4 Inter-Library Loan and Document Delivery Lending and Reader Services is responsible for requesting material from other libraries and information providers both in New Zealand and overseas. For further information about borrowing books and periodicals. on the Library website or through the Postgraduate Students’ Association (PGSA). teaching and research purposes only. The Reference Office and Library website can be consulted for the names of liaison librarians. Level 2 of the Central Library. The Architecture and Design.ac. The Closed Reserve Desk on Level 2 of the Central Library holds copies of the bibliographic management software ‘Endnote’. Requests may be sent electronically from the Library website at www.nz/library/ 9. Law. except for three-day-loan books.2 Reference and Research Services Reference and Liaison Services.ac. and library hours of opening.main collection are issued for eight weeks.aspx Printed request forms may also be collected from the Reference desk and the Reserves desk in the Central Library or from the Architecture and Design. Commerce and Law Libraries have similar facilities for subject-specific database searching. Candidates wishing to borrow this CD in order to install ‘Endnote’ on their personal computer should consult the Closed Reserve Desk staff.ac.victoria. 9. Commerce and Law Libraries. as well as scholarship guides and other directories related to further study.victoria. Requests must relate to study. Staff will give advice about electronic and print information resources in a range of subject areas.3.nz/library or by going directly to: www.3. Please note that all current issues of periodicals are reference-only items. 9. Most periodicals in the Central Library are issued for two weeks. Liaison library staff are assigned to each school in the Faculties of Science and Humanities and Social Sciences and can be consulted for assistance in particular subject areas. PhD Handbook 41 .victoria. Reference and Liaison Services have (in both print and electronic format) a range of University Calendars from New Zealand and overseas. The range of databases to which the Library provides access is very comprehensive and a continuously updated list will be found on the Library website. offer comprehensive information services.3 Research Seminars Postgraduate research seminars are offered at the beginning of the first trimester.nz/library/forms/interloan-request. candidates should refer to the Library website: www. request and renewal procedures.3. All items on issue are subject to recall if required by other borrowers. Architecture and Design library periodicals are not available for loan.

Reference and Liaison Services will be happy to give advice and help to facilitate such access. The Beaglehole Room holds collections of rare books. 42 PhD Handbook . archives and manuscripts and the VUW Authors’ collection. • 9.3.6 Other Libraries As a general principle. U.Further information may be obtained by contacting the Interloans staff or checking the Library website. Beaglehole Room. The Collection comprises material published by the United Nations and its associated agencies.5 Specialised Collections PhD candidates should be aware of the following collections at the Central Library: • J. PhD candidates should first and foremost rely on the resources of Victoria University of Wellington Library. 9.C.N. publications issued by other international organisations as well as statistics and yearbooks from New Zealand and many other countries. Reference staff can readily identify holdings of other libraries both in New Zealand and overseas and can advise students about electronic selfaccess to other collections. and Official Publications Collection. Level 1. Level 1. There is restricted access to some of the material. Material from other libraries can normally be accessed through interlibrary loan and document delivery services. If PhD candidates wish to access other libraries directly.3.

ac. in the first weeks of each trimester. and Thesis Writing. SLSS also facilitates a regular writing group. go to: www.10.mcs. Statistics and Computer Science. PhD candidates are strongly advised to discuss this with their supervisor at an early stage of planning their research – it may be impossible to extract useful information if your survey or experiment is not well designed.nz/stat/consulting 10. ac. The Ethical Approval Process.0 Research Advice While it is expected that most of the necessary research advice will be provided by supervisors and other members of schools.vuwvictoria. Specific information on the advice obtainable from these two sources follows. The University Research Committee also funds a consulting statistician. Statistics and Computer Science. based at the School of Mathematics.victoria.nz. ac.1 Statistical Packages Statistical packages such as SPSS (Statistical Product and Service Solutions) are available on all the SCS computers across the campus-wide network.1 Student Learning Support Service The Student Learning Support Service (SLSS) organises a series of seminars on issues of relevance to PhD candidates at both Kelburn and Pipitea campuses. Guest speakers cover topics such as: Writing a Research Proposal. and statistical advice may be sought from the School of Mathematics.1. It is the responsibility of supervisors to ensure that proper statistical advice is sought. Details are advertised on: www.nz/st_services/slss/ in the Postgraduate Students’ Association newsletter and on school notice boards. Managing Your Studies.2. For enquiries please contact a SCS Help Desk or email scs-help@vuw. runs intensive thesis writing workshops and provides one-to-one support throughout students’ candidature.ac. Some other packages are available within selected specialist school facilities. Qualitative and Quantitative Methodologies. Literature Reviews. Further information can be obtained by phoning x5908 or viewing PostgradLife. Statistics and Computer Science offers a number of undergraduate and graduate courses in Applied Statistics.nz/postgradlife see: 16.nz or by phone on (04) 463-6779. 10. a studentcentred website at www. You should consider whether any of them may meet your needs. 10. For further details. the Student Learning Support Service offers general advice on research.vuw. PhD Handbook 43 . You and your supervisor are welcome to discuss statistical aspects of your research with the consultant who can be contacted via email at: statsconsult@mcs. The School of Mathematics.ac. victoria.2 Statistical Advice Many research projects require statistical analysis of experimental or survey data.10.

or implications of. All Victoria PhD Scholarships are tenable for up to three years from first enrolment.org. but before agreements are reached with external funders. funding from outside enterprises are discussed with those responsible for external research income before any agreement is signed. including Commonwealth and Rhodes Scholarships. Applications for Vice Chancellor’s Strategic Research Scholarships must be submitted by 15 May – topics for these scholarships are advertised in February of the year of application. and offers of. 11.govt. the grant in question.nz/BreakOut/vuw/schols.0 Research Funding and Financial Support If PhD candidates are contemplating PhD study and would like to apply for a scholarship.2 PhD Submission Scholarships These scholarships enable students already enrolled for several years to bring their research to a successful completion.1 University Scholarships There are three rounds of PhD scholarships each year. The intent of these awards is to support PhD candidates in the period immediately following submission of their theses and enable them to prepare their research for eventual publication.nz] .ac.the Bright Future scheme.frst. It is therefore essential that applications for. those of research students.nzvcc. It is also important to ensure that agreements with funders are formulated in a way that protects their interests.nz].nz).ac. and the University. Unsuccessful applicants may apply again in the follow round after consultation with the Scholarships Manager. government funding through the Tertiary Education Commission [www. Successful applicants are expected to work full-time on their research during the tenure of the scholarship. Funds from these sources are usually of great benefit to research students.govt. This funding includes the growing range of scholarships administered by the New Zealand Vice-Chancellors’ Committee [www. the Foundation for Research.newzealandeducated. Information and application forms can also be downloaded from the University website: www.ac. 11.org.nz] and Education New Zealand [www.nz/scholarships 11. careful consideration must be given to any conditions attached to. phtml?detail+600532 or from the Scholarships Manager. 11. PhD Submission Scholarships are tenable for three months only and there is a closing date every two months starting in January each year. Information and documentation is available at: http://www. Applications for Victoria University PhD Scholarships must be submitted to the Scholarships Office by 15 June or 1 November.11.victoria.3 Doctoral Completion Awards Victoria Doctoral Completion Awards come into effect on 1 January 2008 and are available to doctoral candidates who submit their thesis for examination within 42 months from the date of first registration. Candidates must have the endorsement of their supervisor and Head of School to submit. they should consult the Scholarships Office (email Scholarships-Office@vuw.tec. The scholarships are awarded on the basis of academic merit and an assessment by the school of the applicant’s ability to complete the dissertation within the specified timeframe.nz]. If a grant imposes any obligations or restrictions upon the candidate or the 44 PhD Handbook .4 Externally-funded Scholarships and Grants Over the past years there has been an increase in the amount and range of contestable funding available to postgraduate students in New Zealand Universities in the form of grants and scholarships. Science and Technology [www. Some supervisors may also have contacts with businesses or enterprises through which other funding can be arranged.fis.

7 Tutoring and Demonstrating Many PhD students support their studies by tutoring or demonstrating. Candidates should consult their Head of School with questions concerning the availability of tutoring or demonstrating positions.6 Loans and Allowances Information on allowances and loans can be obtained from StudyLink. Tutors may complete a Tutor Training Certificate of Attendance through the UTDC. 11. in VicNews and on the tutor/demonstrator email list: tutors@vuw.nz/tutors Other courses are also available throughout the year and are advertised on the UTDC website.University. as in other cases of paid employment. If candidates are offered such work. For further information see the UTDC website: www.studylink. Tutors and demonstrators are employed by schools to teach undergraduate (usually first-year) classes and to do associated marking. Funds for scholarships or research expenses must be channelled through the University Scholarship Office and not paid directly to the candidate. PhD Handbook 45 .utdc. www. Candidates who wish to apply for a Research Grant should discuss their application with their supervisors.govt.5 Research Grants PhD candidates can seek advice and apply for Research Grants either through their faculty or school where available.nz or tel 0-4-463 5793. Candidates may like to seek assistance from the Victoria University of Wellington Students’ Association’s (VUWSA’s) Education Coordinators in this matter. Ministry of Social Development. it may be worth sacrificing income in order to facilitate the speedy and successful completion of the degree.victoria.ac. Tutor training is offered through the University Teaching Development Centre (UTDC) and some schools also provide discipline-specific training. Funds typically granted by faculty committees are used to cover identifiable expenditure on inter-library loan costs. costs incurred in securing research material and travel for field-work and conference attendance. ac. 11.nz. tel 0800 889 900. parties responsible for external research income will negotiate changes before the offer of a grant is accepted. they should be aware of the need to strike a balance between the demands placed on their time by the associated duties and their own study. In this. 11.

The University will expect all parties to the resolution process to conduct themselves with professionalism. however.2 General Principles It is essential that steps are taken to resolve any problems immediately. the goal is to allow the research to continue and to be completed within the scheduled timeframe. Where difficulties occur between a candidate and one supervisor. Candidates are also free to seek advice from other scholars. the Postgraduate Students Association (PGSA) and Victoria University of Wellington Students’ Association (VUWSA). with both candidate and supervisor seeking assistance as necessary and appropriate. preferably within the School.Rights and Obligations Regarding Conduct. differences of opinion may arise over questions that are related directly to the scope of the topic or to the investigation of it.nz Further information can be found in this Handbook in 15. It is assumed that the parties have attempted to resolve the difficulties themselves.vuw. and that the University will give every assistance that might be necessary to ensure productive supervisor-candidate relationships and to facilitate the timely completion of the research project. 12. 12. The following section indicates to both supervisors and candidates a general means of resolving difficulties arising in the supervisory relationship. In some cases. All parties must be sensitive to the needs of any candidate who has sought assistance.3 General Guidelines Candidates and supervisors might find the following process helpful in addressing problems. candidates and supervisors are urged to refer to these documents at http://policy. 46 PhD Handbook .12. Candidates can reasonably expect the University to actively seek prompt resolution of any problems. mindful of maintaining the reputation and standing of the University. Whatever process of conflict resolution is adopted. Both parties are advised that a variety of options are available for the resolution of difficulties.ac. In some instances both parties may need to accept that a change of supervisor may resolve the problem and ensure completion of the project. but have been unable to do so. supervisors and candidates encounter difficulties that may prevent fruitful co-operation. the other supervisor may be able to provide assistance. In the event of difficulties of a more personal nature that may involve a breach of the Policy on Staff Conduct or the Statute on Student Conduct. It is desirable that any problems that may arise are addressed and settled as quickly as possible. Candidates and supervisors should be able to discuss the issues involved and reach agreement on how any obstacles might be overcome. The University recognises the pressure candidates may be under to complete research and acknowledges that avoidable delays could have significant financial and academic implications for candidates.1 Introduction In the course of the research process.5 .0 Resolution of Problems 12.

For a list of people who can offer advice and support see page 8. If either candidate or supervisors feel that resolution is not being achieved to their satisfaction within the School. following consultation with the candidate and supervisor. while the Facilitator and Disputes Adviser deals with problems relating to matters covered by the Policy on Staff Conduct. The Associate Dean must be kept informed at all stages and copies of correspondence must be sent to the Manager.4 Lodging a Formal Grievance If. can raise the problem with appropriate people on their behalf. to the Associate Dean. formal grievance procedures can be invoked. Candidates may also wish to approach the Student Counselling Service. more formal procedures. Both Advisers will act as a sounding board to help explore a range of options and processes and can be a mediator or intermediary who can be consulted in place of. after trying the above channels.3. and the University Facilitator and Disputes Adviser. following consultation with the Administrative Supervisor. if candidates or supervisors do not wish to talk to anyone within the School they are free to seek assistance directly from the Associate Dean. This must be done in writing and should include information on what informal procedures have been followed.3.1 Seeking Assistance from the Administrative Supervisor In the first instance. Faculty Office. and if required. it is the responsibility of the Administrative Supervisor to inform the Associate Dean immediately in writing. outlining how the candidate and supervisor(s) are working towards the resolution of those difficulties. as necessary. with respect for all parties. 12. It is the responsibility of the Associate Dean to attempt prompt resolution of any difficulties. Such assistance might take the form of eliciting information.3. 12.3. Candidates may also approach the Senior Academic Policy Adviser for advice and assistance or the Facilitator and Disputes Adviser.2 Seeking Assistance from the Associate Dean If the Administrative Supervisors find themselves unable to resolve any difficulties.12. If research progress is being affected by difficulties. the Education Coordinator can deal with both academic and conduct issues. or before resorting to. Where this fails to resolve the problem. The Administrative Supervisor must be kept informed. It is the responsibility of the Administrative Supervisor to attempt prompt resolution of the difficulties. Academic grievances concerning PhD candidacy are dealt with by the PhD Handbook 47 . If required. with respect for all parties.3 Seeking Assistance outside the Faculty Victoria University of Wellington Students’ Association’s (VUWSA) Education Coordinator is available to offer advice and support to candidates experiencing difficulties. they are entitled to take the matter either separately or collectively to the Associate Dean. or where either the candidate or the supervisor(s) feel it is inappropriate to address their concerns to each other. The Senior Academic Policy Adviser deals with academic matters covered by the Academic Grievance Policy. Alternatively. The Education Coordinator is available where candidates may wish to sound out their concerns with someone outside the Faculty. a candidate is still dissatisfied. 12. The Associate Dean will liaise with the Manager of the Faculty Office. in writing. seeking clarification or providing guidance and/or mediation. any difficulties should be discussed between the candidate and the supervisor(s). Grievances relating to academic disadvantage are considered under the Academic Grievance Policy. they may approach the Administrative Supervisor for assistance in resolving their difficulties. as appropriate. they have a duty to refer the matter immediately.

The Manager will request appropriate action from Administrative Supervisors and supervisors if necessary.4 Resolving Administrative Difficulties If the difficulties are of an administrative or procedural nature.Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic) who will consult the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Research).nz/).victoria. 48 PhD Handbook . supervisors and Administrative Supervisors are encouraged to make direct contact with Faculty Office Managers. candidates. Policy/Statute Academic Grievance Policy Nature of Grievance Academic disadvantage regarding PhD candidacy Staff misconduct Submit to AVC (Academic) The relevant Pro ViceChancellor Policy on Staff Conduct 12. Grievances relating to staff misconduct are considered under the Policy on Staff Conduct (both documents can be viewed by searching for the relevant title on: http://policy. and then the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the Faculty if necessary. Formal grievances regarding staff misconduct normally are handled by the relevant manager. they are invited to discuss the matter with the Manager of the Faculty Office in the first instance. dissatisfied with the administrative performance of their Faculty Office.ac. If anyone is. for any reason. formal grievances beyond the levels described above should be submitted to the relevant Pro ViceChancellor. In each case.

2 Guide to the Presentation of Theses Candidates should secure a copy of Library Requirements for Deposit of Theses (available from the Library Reference desk) and ensure that their thesis meets these requirements. or in a separate companion volume or box. providing a summary of the methods of investigation and conclusions reached in a form suitable for publication. Candidates should check details of presentation and production with the primary supervisor before final preparation of the thesis. The precise interpretation of this varies from discipline to discipline. Table of contents: candidates should list chapters with relevant page numbers. candidates should show the contents of all volumes on the contents page of the first volume. Body of the text: relevant advice is provided in section 13.2. If the thesis consists of more than one volume. Schools may also specify distinct requirements bearing on style and presentation. but its transformation into the final draft for submission usually takes much longer than planned. 13. The following guidelines may assist candidates in preparing their theses for presentation. Preface: a preface may not be necessary as the abstract can state the scope of the study. • • • • • PhD Handbook 49 .1 Layout It is recommended that the contents of the thesis be presented in the following order: • • Title page: a specimen page is provided on page 53. A student may present a thesis in Te Reo Maori as outlined in The Use of Te Reo Maori for Assessment Policy. If the thesis contains a large quantity of folded material it may be advisable to place it in a special folder or pocket at the end of the volume. Acknowledgements: candidates are required to acknowledge all assistance that has been received with the research and production of the thesis.3.2. List of illustrations. and availability of the thesis. It may include published material. plates etc: all illustrations should be numbered and page references given.13.1 Introduction This section contains information on the presentation. the thesis must explain their relationship to one another. Prior approval is required and it is important that this is organised as early as possible and before examiners are appointed. Abstract: the regulations require that the thesis should include a short abstract.0 The Thesis 13. The preparation of a first draft may be the most difficult part of the work. The abstract must not exceed 500 words. The thesis structure is a matter for discussion between candidates and supervisors. but it must be a report on the work which has been carried out during a supervised course of research while the candidate was registered for the PhD degree. The only general requirement is that the thesis should be an integrated report. 13. Separate contents pages should also be included in subsequent volumes. binding. A length of about 300 words is recommended. Where the research project consists of a number of cases of more or less separate studies. Nearly all candidates find that the actual writing of a thesis takes much longer than expected.

Publication manual of the American Psychological Association.2 Citation style Particular disciplines often have individual citation conventions. University of Chicago Press. Basingston. Gibaldi. 6th ed. Rita S. M L A style manual and guide to scholarly publishing. The supervisors are able to advise on the appropriate forms. For specific examples of how to cite a book (single.• Appendices (if applicable): candidates may wish to include here any material that does not fit conveniently into the body of the text. How to write and publish a scientific paper. in cases of doubt the full form of any reference should be used rather than abbreviations. that these footnotes appear at the bottom of the page to which they refer. 2003. References and/or Bibliography: references in the text should be made in the form appropriate to the discipline concerned. and the listing in the References/Bibliography should reflect disciplinary norms. The Chicago manual of style. Turabian. (Also titled Style Book: a guide for New Zealand writers and editors. 1998. theses and dissertations.) Swales. Robert. New York: Modern Language Association of America. Be sure to conform consistently to the standards considered appropriate for the relevant discipline. 15h ed. (It is often inconvenient to refer to notes and references placed at the end of the chapter or at the end of the thesis.) Index: if candidates wish to include an index. New Zealand Government Printing Office. 50 PhD Handbook . Chicago: University Press. However. 5th ed. Achtert. Consult the Reference and Research staff for further guidance. 1996. especially if the thesis is later reproduced on microfiche. 2nd ed.2. London: Falmer Press. • • 13. Washington: the Association. 2003. the books listed below may be useful. it is preferable. 4th ed. draft. though not essential. Ann Arbor. If in-text references are in the form of footnotes. if the footnotes become very extensive it is acceptable to list them in a separate section at the end of the thesis. Joseph. Wellington: GP Publications. The MLA style manual. Brause. 2001. English in today’s research world: a writing guide. 1994. American Psychological Association. 1998. Walter S. Authoring a PhD: how to plan. multiple or corporate authorship) in part or as a whole. 2000. 2003. or how to cite journal articles. K. write and finish a doctoral thesis or dissertation. M L A handbook for writers of research papers. New York: Modern Language Association of America. The New Zealand Style Book. Joseph. John M. 2nd ed. Dunleavy. Phoenix: Oryx Press. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Gibaldi. Houndmills. please consult the Library Reference and Research staff for advice on its format and for guides on its preparation. These works are all available in the Library. L. University of Michigan Press. 1995. New York: Modern Language Association of America. 2000. Day. Writing your doctoral dissertation: invisible rules for success. 6th ed. 5th ed. A manual for writers of term papers. Patrick.

The main body of the text should be numbered in Arabic numerals but it is acceptable to assign Roman numerals in lower-case to preliminary pages (title page.000 words in length (including scholarly apparatus). maps or charts . • • 13. especially if the thesis is very long. Leave a margin of at least 4 cm on the left or binding side of the page.2. • 13.5 Paper • The physical appearance of the thesis is very important.13. The paper used should be of good quality and be in A4 format. • • • 13. It is recommended that photographs be mounted on heavier paper than that used for the main text. especially the footnotes. Printing on one side of the paper only is preferred.7 Length • A PhD thesis should be concise: examiners often criticise excessive length. Lines should be double spaced or at least one and a half spaces apart. On the other three sides of the page the margins should be not less than 1. Rankine Brown Building. Use single spacing for footnotes but double spacing between individual notes. The Victoria University PhD Statute stipulates that “the thesis shall not exceed a total of 100. email Image-Services@vuw.g. 115 (b) etc).6 Photographic and Colour Copy Illustrations • Photographs should be dry mounted where possible.2.3 Format • • Word-processing and 12-point type font is recommended. 115 (a).4 Pagination • Pages must be numbered consecutively and page numbers should appear on every page in a consistent position. diagrams and maps may be folded to conform to the A4 format. sub-numbering of pages/leaves (e.illustrations. which frequently indicates poor judgement. Larger material such as charts. Candidates may also wish to distinguish indented quotations from the main text by using single spacing or a smaller font size. The Library provides a self-service colour photocopier in the photocopying room on Level 2 of the Central Library. including diagrams and charts.2.2. provided the text is correctly imposed with uniform and sufficient margins. Candidates should be guided by their supervisors on an appropriate length for the thesis.should be included in the main numbering sequence. table of contents etc). abstract.2. • 13. or mounted on guard sheets. Candidates should discuss payment with supervisors. room 116.nz. New Kirk. In exceptional circumstances the • • PhD Handbook 51 . Avoid. Image Services may be contacted at: tel 0-4-463 5133.5 cm as the edges will be trimmed by the binders and there must be no danger of losing part of the text. Interpolated leaves . if possible. Candidates should contact University Image Services for information on available photographic and digital imaging services and current costs. but text on both sides is acceptable. except the title page which is normally counted but not numbered.ac. It is essential that all leaves be of the same size so that they may be readily bound together. uniform on all pages.

Also OOS Buster courses (I hour) are held regularly during term time. Information Technology Services staff may also be able to provide advice. Using the required guidelines from the outset will save a great deal of time and anxiety in the final stages of thesis preparation. regularly up-dated. If a draft printout from another printer is needed. One at home and one at the University. but close without saving changes. and a change in printer-driver can affect the layout significantly. 13.4 (b)).html describes how a computer workstation should be set up. for instance. Candidates should always back up their work. • • • 52 PhD Handbook . particularly for complex formats like tables. At the time of submission the candidate must certify that the thesis falls within this word limit. • Candidates should be aware of the dangers of developing occupational overuse syndrome (OOS) with prolonged computer use. Different drivers impose different page specifications. Candidates should consult the relevant thesis presentation guides before they begin. students should make a copy and print from that. Candidates should make sure that the printer-driver for the printer that will be used for the final printout is chosen during any formatting exercise. A supervisor or school administrator. is necessary insurance. The Health and Safety webpage: www.ac.2. or use the original. The following advice should help candidates make the most efficient use of their computers and avoid commonly-made mistakes. keeping the back-up in a different place from the original.nz/hr/heath_ safety/health-safety-training. might be prepared to hold a back-up copy.8 Computer Use Most PhD theses are produced by candidates using a computer.Research Degrees Committee may grant permission for a longer thesis to be submitted for examination” (PhD Statute 4.victoria. Permission should be sought well in advance of submission of the thesis for examination.

2.13.9 Specimen Layout of Title Page THE FULL TITLE OF THE THESIS By Candidate’s Full Name A thesis submitted to the Victoria University of Wellington in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in History Victoria University of Wellington 2008 PhD Handbook 53 .

4. • • • • 13. Theses are deposited with Collection Services on Level 1 of the Central Library. • • 54 PhD Handbook . and cased in cloth or buckram. A list of local commercial binders.1 Public Availability of Theses The University Human Ethics Committee (HEC) Guidelines (see Appendix 1 of the Human Ethics Policy: www. If in doubt. The thesis must be firmly bound within the temporary cover so that pages cannot become detached. to facilitate any revisions or corrections and/or re-submission. never stapled.2 Permanent Binding of the Thesis • The candidate is solely responsible for having the thesis bound after the examination to the satisfaction of the University Librarian.nz/home/about_victoria/policy. Care should be taken to ensure that the temporary binding does not produce a row of holes down the page. The Reference desk of the Library holds a list of approved binders.3. It is an important component of the University tradition that knowledge is openly available for examination and criticism by peers (see also 13. advice may be sought from library staff.4. provided the relevant information (as above) is visible when the item is shelved.13.ac.1 Temporary Binding for Examination • Candidates are encouraged to submit the three copies of their thesis for examination in temporary soft binding. who will soft bind theses for examination. 13. for deposit in the University Library.html) require that research results must be disseminated and not kept secret. • • 13. Works which do not fall within the usual A4 format.3 Binding 13. Law. The thesis must be fully bound.2 Deposit • Completed PhD theses are deposited in the University Library on the understanding that completed work becomes an important part of the Library resources and may be consulted by other researchers. may be bound or boxed in a fashion appropriate for their preservation. The binding must ensure that the thesis can later be permanently bound to conform to the Library requirements.3. Architecture and Design theses are deposited with the relevant campus library. The author’s last name and initials and the title/short title must be lettered on the spine.4 Availability and Withholding of Access to Theses 13.4). is available from the Reference desk in the Library. The degree will not be awarded until this has been done. such as musical scores. Lettering on the front cover is recommended but not essential.victoria. as this will interfere with the permanent binding. Authors are responsible for all binding charges. A receipt is issued at the time of deposit.4.

Students should consult the Victoria University Intellectual Property Policy at http://policy. 7 and 9 of the Act.• The Faculty Office is responsible for ensuring that the candidate deposits one hard-bound and one electronic copy of the thesis in the Library immediately upon receipt of advice from the Convener of the Research Degrees Committee that the degree is to be awarded. fall within the provisions of the Copyright Act 1994 and Amendments. 13. ac.3(c) of the Library Statute for a full description of the provisions regarding the Withholding of Access to Theses and see http://policy. 13.3 Copyright and Intellectual Property The author retains the copyright to the thesis after deposit in the Library and redress for plagiarism can be sought under the laws protecting copyright.nz It describes ownership and what is required should intellectual property issues arise from research undertaken while a student at the University. research students will be required to enter into an agreement assigning or apportioning intellectual property to the University. • • 13. For electronic deposit. however. The Library must always receive the original or “best” copy (and this includes the figures. A completed availability slip MUST accompany the deposit.nz/Amphora!~~policy. If application is delayed difficulties may arise if the RDC subsequently declines the application after the research has been completed. This should be done at the outset of research. or as soon as the need for an embargo becomes apparent. research students own the intellectual property originally created exclusively by them in the course of their studies. or comply with the terms of any agreement.4.e.victoria. The third bound copy is retained by the candidate. If making information available would be likely to prejudice the security or defence of New Zealand or international relations with New Zealand.pdf for the Withholding of Theses Procedure. Candidates should consult section 4. endanger the safety of any person.4 Withholding Access to Theses Where there are good reasons why a thesis should not be publicly available candidates must apply in writing to the Research Degrees Committee (RDC) for approval to withhold access for a given period. In general. or prejudice the maintenance of law and order.” A description of what constitutes a good reason for withholding information held by the University is dealt with principally in Sections 6.12. the use of any third party content must not be in breach of copyright. The Associate Dean can provide further advice. In certain circumstances. or it will not be accepted. or seriously damage the economy of New Zealand.vuw. it must be in the public domain. In some cases the candidate’s school will also request a copy.4. that likelihood is good reason for non-disclosure. PhD Handbook 55 . Availability slips are obtained from the Faculty Office at the time of enrolment. i.5 The Implications of Withholding Access All information held by the University is subject to the Official Information Act 1982 which operates on “the principle that the information shall be available unless there is good reason for withholding it.4.ac.vuw.nz~POLICY ~000000000034. graphs. Copyright in publications other than the thesis arising from supervised research is likewise owned by the creator(s). The application must also be supported by the supervisors and Head of School. Second or third copies are usually photocopies. and photographs included in the thesis).ac.

4. and the right to a fair trial. Among many possible reasons for withholding information mentioned there is specific reference to material of a sensitive personal or commercial nature. in the public interest.3(c).12. and its inclusion or exclusion from the research document as formally presented for examination. control and adjustment of prices of goods and services. It is important to note that although the section lists good reasons for withholding information. Conclusive reasons for withholding official information Good reason for withholding official information exists. or To damage seriously the economy of New Zealand by disclosing prematurely decisions to change or continue Government economic or financial policies relating to: i) exchange rates or the control of overseas exchange transactions. or ii) any international organisation. Where arrangements have been made under the Library Regulation 4. seek to withhold information in it under the Official Information Act 1982. iv) the stability.” It is for this reason that the University can give no guarantee that information held by it will not have to be made available under the Official Information Act 1982. as a matter of policy. rents and other costs. if the making available of that information would be likely: (a) To prejudice the security or defence of New Zealand or the international relations of the Government of New Zealand. disclosure may be required if “in the circumstances of the particular case. 13. (b) (d) (e) 56 PhD Handbook . ii) the regulation of banking or credit. investigation.Candidates should give particular attention to Section 9 of the Act. for the purpose of section 5 of this Act.3(c) for the withholding of a thesis or research paper from consultation. or To endanger the safety of any person. Sections 6 and 9 of the Official Information Act are reproduced here: Section 6. It will cite as the specific ground for withholding the document. including the prevention. or To prejudice the entrusting of information to the Government of New Zealand on a basis of confidence by: i) the government of any other country or any agency of such a government. making requests for research information from outside sources. the University will. the withholding of that information is outweighed by other considerations which render it desirable. and deciding how information will be handled in the examining of the thesis or research paper. the ground identified in the written request made by the author under the Library Regulation 4. Candidates and supervisors should bear these factors in mind in choosing topics for research.12. and detection of offences.6 Official Information Act 1982 For the information of candidates and supervisors. or (c) To prejudice the maintenance of the law. to make that information available. giving undertakings to the suppliers of information in respect of the maintenance of confidentiality. iii) taxation.

10. Subject to sections 6. and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied. or ii) Would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information. to make that information available. or (g) Maintain the effective conduct of public affairs through i) The free and frank expression of opinions by or between or to Ministers of the Crown or members of an organisation or officers and employees of any Department or organisation in the course of their duty. and only if. including that of deceased natural persons. the withholding of the information is necessary to – (a) Protect the privacy of natural persons. iv) The confidentiality of advice tendered by Ministers of the Crown and officials. unless. ii) Collective and individual ministerial responsibility. good reason for withholding official information exists. or (b) Protect information where the making available of the information i) Would disclose a trade secret. and 18 of this Act. or information from the same source. in the circumstances of the particular case. vi) the entering into of overseas trade agreements. or (ba) Protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment. v) the borrowing of money by the Government of New Zealand. or (2) PhD Handbook 57 . for the purpose of section 5 of this Act. Section 9. Other reasons for withholding official information: (1) Where this section applies. the withholding of that information is outweighed by other considerations which render it desirable. where the making available of the information i) Would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information. this section applies. or (d) Avoid prejudice to the substantial economic interests of New Zealand. or (e) Avoid prejudice to measures that prevent or mitigate material loss to members of the public. salaries and other incomes. or (f) Maintain the constitutional conventions for the time being which protect: i) The confidentiality of communications by or with the Sovereign or her representative. or ii) Would be likely otherwise to damage the public interest. iii) The political neutrality of officials. 7.and rates of wages. in the public interest. if. or (c) Avoid prejudice to measures protecting the health or safety of members of the public.

commercial activities. officers. or (i) Enable a Minister of the Crown or any Department or organisation holding the information to carry on. or (k) Prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage. or (j) Enable a Minister of the Crown or any Department or organisation holding the information to carry on. and employees from improper pressure or harassment. or (h) Maintain legal professional privilege. 58 PhD Handbook . negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations). without prejudice or disadvantage. members of organisations.ii) The protection of such Ministers. without prejudice or disadvantage.

The RDC approves the nominations and appoints the examiners. The availability and suitability of examiners should be established well in advance of the thesis being submitted so that the thesis can be sent to examiners as soon as it is received by the Faculty Office on behalf of the Associate Dean. but may not be told which examiners have been nominated or appointed. the Research Degrees Committee (RDC) should be consulted.1 Appointment of Examiners The PhD thesis is examined by three examiners who are people with standing in the field of the thesis being examined and who normally have experience of PhD supervision and examination. the Associate Dean will give favourable consideration to a request for early submission. The third examiner should be a member of the Victoria University staff (the internal examiner). Candidates can be consulted on potential examiners. Availability is normally established through informal contact and the Associate Dean is responsible for ensuring that this is done. e. Concerns with any aspect of the recommendation of examiners should be addressed to the Associate Dean. If it consists of several studies or cases. a member of the same teaching/research group.g. as long as the report constituting the thesis is written under supervision during the period of registration. or where a candidate who has transferred from a Master’s degree is able to complete their thesis in less than the predetermined period of registration. professional or contractual relationships with the candidate.0 The PhD Examination 14. their relationship to one another should be demonstrated. Only in exceptional circumstances will the internal examiner be the primary supervisor or cosupervisor. 14. In cases where the most qualified examiner has such a relationship with the candidate. Examiners must be in a position to provide a fair and impartial assessment of the thesis. At least one examiner is normally a member of the staff of an overseas university or similar institution (the overseas examiner). Supervisors. 14. The Associate Dean will scrutinise the recommendations and forward them to the RDC.. ‘Availability’ means willingness to accept appointment and agreement to examine the thesis and complete a report within eight weeks of receiving the thesis. If the candidate is a member of Victoria University staff. the internal examiner should not normally be a close working colleague. The intention behind this is to establish a common standard between New Zealand and overseas scholarship and to preserve the international standing of the Victoria PhD degree. The thesis may include the candidate’s previously published work or material based on previous research. Suitable examiners are those who have no significant personal. in consultation with the Administrative Supervisor.2 Early Submission In cases where a candidate makes exceptional progress with their research. recommend suitable examiners to the Associate Dean.3 Submission A thesis is an integrated report. Normally at least one examiner will be from another New Zealand University (the external New Zealand examiner). PhD Handbook 59 . The decision to make application for a thesis to be examined is one to be made by the candidate. and supply the Associate Dean with a brief curriculum vitae or other information which establishes the suitability of the proposed examiners.14.

the candidate retains the right to have the thesis examined. after appropriate consultation. the Faculty Office will provide the following documents to the candidate: • a Statement of Authorship form to confirm that the work of others has been acknowledged in the thesis and that the thesis has not been submitted previously for another degree.ac. 60 PhD Handbook . If the Associate Dean so decides the candidate shall be advised of the reasons for the decision and the changes necessary to make the thesis suitable for examination.However. A thesis is not complete unless it constitutes a complete scholarly work inclusive of all scholarly apparatus usual in the discipline. two Availability of Thesis forms providing consent for the thesis to be consulted. may decide that the thesis is not complete if the quality of the thesis submitted is such that no examiner could reasonably be expected to recommend that the candidate be awarded either a PhD or a Master’s degree.vuw.ac. Before submission. Should the Associate Dean decide that a thesis is not complete the candidate may appeal that decision to the Research Degrees Committee (RDC). including word limits. Where it is decided that a thesis is not complete for the reasons stipulated above and the candidate has followed the process set out in the PhD Policy.nz/ Amphora!~~policy. It should be presented in a form regarded as suitable for examination in the discipline concerned and it should conform to all other formal requirements of the University for presentation of a thesis. the primary supervisor may recommend to the Associate Dean that the thesis not be accepted for examination. • • • On submission of the thesis. it is expected that such decision will be made by agreement between the candidate and the supervisors. If a thesis is submitted in the grace period no extra fees will charged.nz~POLICY~000000000034. This requirement is delayed if the candidate has received the approval of the RDC to have access to the thesis withheld for a limited given period of time (see Withholding of Theses Procedure http://policy.pdf). The Associate Dean. Such a recommendation shall be accompanied by reasons and notified to the candidate who shall have the opportunity to make submissions to the Associate Dean. If the supervisors are of the opinion that the thesis is not complete. The University has an obligation to examiners to ensure that any thesis sent for examination is complete and suitable for examination. borrowed.000 words in length* a research supervision Exit Questionnaire to canvas PhD students for written comments about the supervision of their thesis. to submit without three months prior enrolment. A grace period starts on the last day for which fees are paid and covers the following 28 days. Students may appeal to the PhD Convener. it should be reviewed by at least the primary supervisor before application is made for examination. This review period should not usually exceed four weeks. The University expects that normally a candidate would be enrolled for the three months immediately preceding submission. When the candidate indicates the thesis is complete. the candidate shall submit three copies of the thesis to the Faculty Office and signed copies of the above statements (completion of the Exit Questionnaire is recommended but not compulsory) and apply for examination. in exceptional circumstances. a statement that the thesis does not exceed 100.vuw. copied or reproduced in accordance with the Library regulations.

* Note: The 100,000 words must include everything necessary to mark the thesis, and therefore includes scholarly apparatus such as bibliographies, foot and/or end-notes and essential appendices. Where the candidate wishes to provide extensive additional material it is suggested that this material should be attached in electronic format.

14.4 Examination
The examination comprises an expert review of the thesis by three examiners and may include an oral examination. In some faculties the requirement for an oral examination is waived unless specifically requested by an examiner, a supervisor, the candidate or the Research Degrees Committee (RDC). Candidates can normally expect the examination process to take approximately 4 months (including 8 weeks for the examiners to complete their reports). In exceptional circumstances the process may take several months longer. The RDC is responsible for reviewing all reports and deciding the outcome of the examination process.

14.5 Examination of the Thesis
Each examiner is supplied by the Faculty Office, on behalf of the Associate Dean, with a copy of the thesis, the relevant statute and policy and information detailing what is required from them. The information is specified in https://intranet.victoria.ac.nz/research-office/postgraduate/forms-andtemplates.aspx All examiners write an independent report on the thesis and make a recommendation on the result. Consultation between examiners before independent reports have been submitted to the Associate Dean is prohibited, as is any communication with either the candidate or the supervisors. After reports have been submitted however, in those cases where examiners make differing recommendations on the outcome of the examination, consultation is permitted. The recommendations of the examiners on the basis of their reading of the thesis should be one of the following: • • that the thesis meets the requirements of the PhD; that the thesis will meet the requirements of the PhD on completion of any minor amendments (defined in 14.9.1) to the thesis recommended by the examiners, to the satisfaction of the internal examiner;. that the thesis will meet the requirements of the PhD on completion of any revisions (defined in 14.9.2) to the thesis recommended by the examiners, to the satisfaction of the internal examiner; that the thesis does not meet the requirements of the PhD, but that the candidate be permitted to resubmit a revised thesis within a specified period. In this case the examiners should offer detailed advice to assist the candidate towards a successful re-submission; that the candidate be declined a PhD but offered a Master’s degree, subject to any minor amendments that may be required; that no degree be awarded and the candidate’s registration be terminated.

In the case that examiners make differing recommendations on the outcome of the examination, the Associate Dean may ask the internal examiner (or a New Zealand-based examiner) to co-ordinate consultation between examiners to see if the differing recommendations can be resolved. Where the examiners agree on a joint report on the outcome of the examination, this report will be submitted

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to the Associate Dean by the co-ordinating examiner. The PhD Convener and the Research Degrees Committee (RDC) is responsible for reviewing the reports of the Associate Dean and the examiners and making a decision on the outcome of the examination process. The Associate Dean sends a report of the examination of the thesis to the PhD Convener, including all the examiners’ reports and a recommendation on the outcome. On receipt of the report from the Associate Dean where the examiners are in agreement, the PhD Convener, on behalf of the RDC, will usually accept their recommendation. Where the examiners’ views of the thesis differ significantly or are in other ways controversial, the PhD Convener will consult with the academic members of the RDC, who may require an oral examination. In cases where there is significant disagreement between examiners, it may be appropriate to initiate a discussion between the examiners with the objective of achieving consensus. The discussion will be coordinated by the PhD Convener or their nominee. In cases where differences prevent the examiners agreeing on a joint recommendation, the RDC may elect to proceed on a majority report. Alternatively, the RDC may ask for further efforts to reconcile the examiners or seek a recommendation from a referee to whom the thesis and the anonymised examiners’ reports shall be referred. The referee will advise the RDC of their recommendation. Once approved by the RDC, the PhD Convener will inform the Associate Dean, who will convey the decision on the acceptability of the thesis in writing, and send copies of the examiners’ reports to the candidate, the primary supervisor, the Administrative Supervisor and the Head of School. If the supervisor, the candidate or the RDC requests an oral examination, the PhD Convener will ask the Associate Dean to arrange one. The candidate should receive the examiners’ reports at least five days before an oral examination. On receipt of the report on the oral examination from the Associate Dean, the RDC will reconsider all the reports and make a final decision on the acceptability of the thesis on behalf of the Academic Board.

14.6 Arrangement of Oral Examination
The purpose of the oral examination is to defend the thesis and determine the result. Additional purposes may include: checking the understanding of particular aspects; allowing the candidate to demonstrate the extent of work involved; clarifying the scope and detail of the revisions required, particularly where there are conflicting statements from examiners. In some faculties and schools an oral examination is always held as part of the PhD examination process and this is determined by faculty policy as approved by Faculty Boards. After consulting one another, a supervisor or the candidate may also request an oral examination within 10 days of receiving copies of the examiners’ reports. A request for an oral examination must be justified in terms of the statement of the purposes of the oral examination. Where an oral examination is required the following takes place. The oral examination is organised by the Associate Dean who will also chair it or appoint an appropriate person as chairperson. The examination will usually be conducted by the New Zealand examiner and the internal examiner, and questions provided by the overseas examiner will be presented by the internal examiner. The primary supervisor will normally be in attendance, but not as part of the examining panel, and other supervisors may also attend.

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Circumstances will occasionally make it necessary to depart from the normal examination procedure. The Convener of the Research Degrees Committee (RDC) should be consulted in all such circumstances; the RDC must approve any unusual procedure. If problems are foreseen they should be discussed with the Convener as early as possible. A common problem with arranging the oral examination occurs when both external examiners are overseas, or when the candidate has already taken up an overseas position. In such cases an examination by telephone or video conference may be approved. However, there should always be one examiner present with the candidate. If it is impractical for the candidate to meet with any of the examiners, some responsible person, for example an academic from another university, must be present with the candidate and must supply a written statement that the examination was conducted properly.

14.7 Conduct of Oral Examination
The length and format of the oral examination depends on the discipline being examined and the issues arising from the thesis. A two-hour examination would be fairly typical. Every effort will be made to involve all examiners in the oral examination, using technology where appropriate, particularly for overseas examiners. In cases where the overseas examiner is not present, questions from the overseas examiner will be presented at the oral examination. However, it is the examiners present who must decide whether the candidate’s responses are adequate, and whether the Faculty objectives of the oral examination have been met. If an oral is required as part of the examination process, then the examination process is not complete until the oral has taken place. Reports received before the oral are provisional. The final report after the oral determines whether or not the candidate will be granted a PhD. Where a thesis is clearly acceptable, the oral examination may become a reasonably informal discussion of ways in which the research might be developed or how the thesis could be prepared for publication. In other circumstances the examiners may need to clarify issues arising from the thesis or to evaluate the candidate’s understanding of the subject. Section 4.1(b) of The use of Te Reo Maori for Assessment Policy states that “Students may use Te Reo Maori in assessed oral presentations only with the prior agreement of the examiner.” If a student wishes to use Te Reo Maori in an oral examination, this should be cleared with the School before the appointment of examiners has taken place, so that consideration can be given to appointing examiners who can understand Te Reo Maori sufficiently well to undertake this task.

14.8 Report on the Oral Examination
All examiners present at the oral examination must reach agreement and sign a report on the oral examination. There is no objection to the examiners telling a candidate unofficially what their recommendation is likely to be at the conclusion of the oral examination. The Associate Dean must then make a report on the examination as a whole to the Research Degrees Committee (RDC). Where the overseas examiner’s report recommends an outcome which is acceptable to the examiners present at the oral examination, a simple statement may be produced immediately. In other cases, telephone conversations or correspondence with the overseas examiner may be needed before reporting. It is the responsibility of the Associate Dean to coordinate any such negotiations, and to report the results to the RDC. Following the completion of the oral examination, the examiners’ agreed recommendation to the RDC must take one of the following forms:

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The internal examiner (or primary supervisor) is responsible for ensuring that the candidate is fully informed of any corrections which must be made before the final submission of the thesis. In this case the examiners should offer detailed advice to assist the candidate towards a successful re-submission. and • 64 PhD Handbook . for example. that the degree not be awarded but that the candidate be permitted to re-submit a revised thesis within a specified period.9.9. After consultation with the candidate. but ‘minor’ can include slight changes or additions of substance. amendments that are ‘minor’ should be able to be completed within two weeks’ full-time work or equivalent.1) to the thesis recommended by the examiners. 14. such as making small corrections. the person responsible for overseeing the minor amendments or revisions will stipulate in writing the timeframe within which these must be completed. that although the thesis is acceptable (or acceptable with minor amendment/revision) the degree not be awarded but that the candidate be permitted to re-present himself/herself for oral or written examination within a specified period of time. to clarify an argument.9 Minor Amendments and Revisions The responsibility for overseeing the minor amendments or revisions is usually taken by the internal examiner. As a guide. then the primary supervisor will take this role.• • that the candidate be awarded the PhD. If the internal examiner is not available. Where examiners require ‘revision’ it is expected that: • the thesis is generally of the required standard and the changes required are such that it does not need to be re-examined as a whole. adding missing citations. the changes that the examiners require are such that it is reasonable for the internal examiner alone to assess the revised thesis. that the candidate be awarded the PhD subject to the completion of any minor amendments (defined in 14.9. to the satisfaction of the internal examiner.9. Generally minor amendments are formal only. When the candidate has completed the corrections they are inspected by the internal examiner who writes to the Associate Dean (with a copy to the Convener of the Research Degrees Committee) confirming that the requirements of the examiners have been met in full.1 Minor Amendments It is very common for examiners to ask candidates to make small corrections to the thesis before it is accepted.2) to the thesis recommended by the examiners. If the primary supervisor is not available then the Administrative Supervisor will take this role. or fixing typographical errors. to the satisfaction of the internal examiner. that the candidate be declined a PhD but offered a Master’s degree. 14. that no degree be awarded and the candidate’s registration be terminated. • • • • • 14. the candidate may be asked to revise aspects of their work and sometimes write new sections.2 Revisions Where more than minor amendments are required. that the candidate be awarded the PhD subject to the completion of any revisions (defined in 14.

Any candidate for whom the result of the first round of the examination process is that the thesis may be resubmitted. Re-enrolment is required for re-submission. or a restructuring of the thesis). 14. all copies of the thesis are returned to the candidate who is given the date by which re-submission must be made. Any such change must be notified to the relevant Faculty Office. a second oral may be necessary. at their discretion. a period of further supervision will be required. LLM) in place of the doctoral qualification. PhD Handbook 65 . If there is good reason why the internal examiner should not be the person to undertake this task.3 Disputes about Revision If there is substantial disagreement between the two external examiners and/or the internal examiner. The suggested revisions must be completed to the satisfaction of the SRC or nominee who will then notify the Associate Dean (with a copy to the Convener of the Research Degrees Committee) that the requirements of the examiners have been met. the examination process begins again. this option no longer applies. which will usually delegate this to the internal examiner and/or the primary supervisor. it is recommended that the internal examiner discuss the matter with senior researchers in the School or wider university. a formal Memorandum of Understanding should be agreed before entering into negotiations with the candidate as to the completion of these revisions. When the examiners recommend that the thesis be re-submitted after revision. Where re-submission is involved. it is desirable that the work is completed as soon as possible. the gathering of further data. 14. who will then appoint an appropriate substitute. in writing with a copy to the Convener of the RDC. It is the responsibility of the School Research/Postgraduate Committee (SRC). Only in exceptional circumstances will the RDC consent to a change of examiners.9.• the revisions are of a kind and scope that it would be reasonable to expect that they might be completed within six months’ full-time work. may. Following such discussions. When the thesis is re-submitted. to ensure that the candidate understands exactly what is required to meet the examiners’ concerns and to oversee the revision process. Any recommendation regarding a second oral examination requires confirmation by the RDC.10 Revision and Re-Submission of Thesis for Second Examination Where the examiners have recommended re-submission and the Research Degrees Committee (RDC) confirms that result. which parts of the thesis require revision and for what reasons. MCA. Where the problems are more fundamental (requiring. The Masters in such cases will be awarded at the Pass level. While candidates have a maximum of six months to make the suggested revisions. for example. an explanation should be given to the Research Degrees Committee. opt to make only minor editorial changes to the thesis and to accept the relevant general Masters qualification (MA. Once the thesis has been resubmitted. The revisions required will be notified to the candidate in writing. MMus. The internal examiner is responsible for explaining to the candidate. they may also recommend that a second oral examination is not required. It is the duty of the School Research Committee to organize this. MSc. This is appropriate when they consider that the candidate has performed satisfactorily in the oral examination and that the weaknesses are only in certain aspects of the writing of the thesis. and to change the primary supervisor if this is academically advisable.

The University. For PhD students in small schools. and a commitment to teaching and research that embraces both theory and practice.1 Introduction While engaged in PhD study. PhD students are expected to conduct themselves and their research in a manner which conforms to the University’s values and to assist the University in achieving its research goals. • • • • • • A full description of the University’s Mission and Values is set out in the University Charter.nz/home/about/newspubs/publications/Charter. ac. acknowledgement of the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi and recognition of the special relationship with the tangata whenua. and ultimately will be examined by the academic staff. intellectual openness and questioning of accepted wisdom. While PhD students are usually treated collegially by academic staff. and the principal rights and obligations of PhD students. acceptance of obligations as well as rights to enable all in the University community to develop their full potential. neither members of the main student body. Students should be aware that undertaking a PhD has the potential to be a solitary and isolating experience and should work to mitigate this. equity of educational and employment opportunity for those who are socially and economically disadvantaged. Like many transitional states. high ethical standards of accuracy. endeavours to maintain an environment which will foster and protect PhD students. place in the University system. in return. co-operation.3 Collegiality The University recognises that a vital aspect of the learning experience for PhD candidates is an environment of strong and supportive collegiality. a commitment to leadership in the community and an awareness of the needs of that community.15. although the Postgraduate Students’ Association (PGSA) can provide important social and academic contacts. teaching and research. at the same time they require guidance. a nurturing environment providing the atmosphere for growth and learning.victoria. PhD candidates’ status can be rather ambiguous. The University encourages candidates to get to know each other so that experiences can be shared 66 PhD Handbook . tolerance. and provide an academically exciting and intellectually stimulating environment. nor members of the academic staff.pdf 15. isolation can be a problem.2 Values and Ethos The guiding values of the University community are: • • excellence in learning. This document is also available at: www. A copy is available in the main collection of the Library. 15. candidates occupy a special albeit transitional. The sections that follow outline the principal values of the University community. During the time of study.0 The University Community 15.

The PGSA operates an electronic mailing list for all members which keeps postgraduate students informed about PGSA initiatives. The PGSA also coordinates the network of postgraduate representatives on university committees and bodies.nz/pgsa The PGSA’s office is in Room 202. it is expected that they will attempt to resolve any conflict themselves. The PGSA is always eager for postgraduates to get involved.victoria.aspx and fill in your details. Candidates are also encouraged to attend the appropriate faculty and school seminars. represents postgraduate students on a variety of university committees and arranges social activities. and welcomes enquiries.ac. relevant information for postgraduates and social events. learn. They are entitled to work. All PhD candidates are therefore reminded of their obligation to observe the Statute on Student Conduct. The PGSA also organises the University’s annual teaching awards (the Victorias) and offers a small postgraduate computing space in the Trinity Newman Postgraduate Centre. seminars. It lobbies on issues. The PGSA aims to create a vibrant postgraduate community at Victoria and to promote the value and role of postgraduate contributions to the University. 15. PhD Handbook 67 . co-operatively and in a professional manner. which can be a helpful means of ensuring contact with colleagues and avoiding isolation.ac. guiding values and standing and to regulate their own conduct so as not to impede or prejudice the work of other members of the community.4 The VUW Postgraduate Students’ Association The Postgraduate Students’ Association (PGSA) is an independent organisation that represents all postgraduate students and their interests at Victoria. The use of email is very helpful for this purpose.” If differences or disputes arise between members of the University community. training workshops and information. 20 Kelburn Parade. 15. elected each year and comprised of up to ten voluntary postgraduate students. financial and social needs of higher degree students. and provides advice and advocacy for individuals and groups of postgraduate students. The preamble to the Statute on Student Conduct states that: “Students are expected to contribute with reason and consideration to the University’s role.nz or www.victoria.victoria.5. It is expected that students will act with integrity and demonstrate respect for others and their confidences when given.nz/pgsa/resources/mailing-list. The PGSA sends out a monthly e-newsletter The Postgraduate News.1 The Statute on Student Conduct The supporting values and ethos of the University can only be sustained in an environment of safety and respect for all members of the University community.and problems jointly addressed. lobbying to foster the academic.nz The Statute on Student Conduct identifies unacceptable behaviour and provides processes by which people can seek to have concerns addressed. You can also contact the PGSA on tel 0-4-463 6973 or email pgsa-ea@vuw. ac. Recognised by the University and Victoria University of Wellington Students’ Association (VUWSA) as the lead representative body of all postgraduate students.5 Rights and Obligations Regarding Conduct 15. study and participate in the social aspects of the University’s life in an environment of safety and respect. which can be viewed by searching for ‘Statute on Student Conduct’ at: http://policy. The PGSA is run by the Executive.ac. To subscribe or unsubscribe to the list go to www. the PGSA is committed to maintaining and improving the conditions under which all postgraduates work at Victoria. It acts on behalf of postgraduates.

misuse of information. In particular. The Policy on Staff Conduct identifies misconduct as including: discrimination.nz/disputes-advice/ 68 PhD Handbook .2 The Policy on Staff Conduct The corresponding rights and obligations of supervisors and other University staff are dealt with in the Policy on Staff Conduct which can be viewed by searching for ‘Policy on Staff Conduct’ at: http:// policy. sexual harassment. causing racial disharmony. If differences or disputes arise between members of the University community. all defined in section 4. all defined in section 4. racial harassment. 15. co-operatively and in a professional manner. and other misconduct. the University has clearly defined procedures under the Policy on Staff Conduct for dealing with sexual harassment.3 Formal Procedures The University policy is that the formal procedures laid down in the Statute on Student Conduct and the Policy on Staff Conduct should only be used where other methods of resolving conflicts or controlling conduct would be ineffective or inappropriate. and other misconduct. contact the University Facilitator and Disputes Advisor.The Statute prohibits the following conduct: discrimination. misconduct in research. “ It is expected that members of the University community will act with integrity and in a professional manner and demonstrate respect for others and their confidences when given. misconduct involving a conflict of interest. vuw. racial harassment. They are entitled to work. misuse of information. causing racial disharmony. academic misconduct including plagiarism.ac. sexual harassment. Various procedures have been adopted in the Statute and the Policy to safeguard the rights of the individuals in this respect. misuse of University computer systems.5. Further information is available in the brochure Respect: Sex and Relationships: what’s OKAY and what’s not at http://www. study and participate in the social aspects of the University’s life in an environment of safety and respect. 15.5.2 of the Policy. learn.2 of the Statute. they should in the first instance. misuse of authority.nz/ The preamble to the Policy on Staff Conduct states: “Members of the University community are expected to contribute with reason and consideration to the University’s role. it is expected that they will attempt to resolve any conflict themselves. Those with seniority or authority have a particular responsibility to ensure that these standards are upheld and that sensitivity to unequal degrees of power is displayed. If any PhD candidate has been subjected to unwelcome and distressing behaviour and would like guidance as to whether it amounts to sexual harassment.victoria.ac. These definitions of misconduct are not intended to apply to reasonable comment by staff in the exercise of academic freedom. harassment. guiding values and standing and to regulate their own conduct so as not to impede or prejudice the work of other members of the community. It is also University policy that all disciplinary procedures conform to the principles of natural justice.

including the study break.ac.victoria.nz using your Student Computing account as your login. Feel free to come by for a casual visit during our drip-in times or call ahead to book an appointment. Staff are happy to advise students on any matters related to tenancy and flatting and have a wide range of information available from Tenancy Services. A comprehensive careers website also offers valuable advice. This can be accessed via Victoria CareerHub: http://careerhub.1 Student Services Group Victoria has an excellent support network for students.16.1. handles applications for Victoria’s Halls of Residence. 16. except Wednesday 10. They can help with a wide range of queries . There are career workshops for developing interview skills. The Letting Service can be accessed online at: www. Many of these services are run by the Student Services Group. The Service has three professionally-trained careers advisers available for informal. Victoria CareerHub is also your one-stop-shop for details on all career events. The Service is open all year.ac. 16. employer presentations. Student Union Building Hours: 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday tel 0-4-463 5896.e. Prospective postgraduate students are especially welcome to visit and use the Service. PhD Handbook 69 . i. identifying skills and other career-related matters. fax 0-4-463 5252. email careers-service@vuw.nz/st_services/careers/) provides information and guidance to students with career and course-related questions.1. employers and checking draft copies of resumes.0 University Student Services 16. The Service’s reference library has detailed information on occupations and employers.nz The Accommodation Service helps students find suitable accommodation in Wellington.ac.. A separate Law and Accounting Employment Programme is held early in the year. fax 0-4-463 5252.nz/st_services/ accommodation/ or on notice boards in the Accommodation Service.ac. confidential discussions.nz Career Development and Employment (www. in which a number of employers come to Victoria to offer informal career information sessions and conduct formal interviews with final-year students for specific vacancies. The Service provides an online jobs vacancy service which lists employment opportunities for graduates and for students seeking part-time or contract work related to their course of study. career fairs.from the general exploration of career ideas and the career implications of postgraduate courses. and operates a Letting Service of vacancies in the private market.2 Career Development and Employment 14 Kelburn Parade Hours: 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday. to details of specific jobs. A Graduate Recruitment Programme runs throughout most of the year. email Accommodation@vuw. preparation of CVs.30am-5 pm tel 0-4-463 5393.victoria.ac. workshops and seminars in addition to tips on career development and job search topics. and the computer database provides a useful checklist of career options and training.1 Accommodation Service Level 1.victoria. which is funded by the University and by students through a small levy paid upon enrolment.

and possibly to 6. 16. Robert Stout Building. Bookings can be made by contacting the Manager.nz/st_services/kaiwawao/ The Kaiwawao Maori Service’s main objective is to ensure all Maori students receive up-to-date information and assistance to participate and succeed at Victoria University. their relationships or their learning. Te Aro and Karori campuses.30pm on weekdays during term and examinations.6 Kaiwawao Maori/ Maori Student Services Adviser Hunter Courtyard.ac. fax 0-4-463 5104. mental health condition or chronic illness that may impact on their study. www. The Counselling Service is a free and confidential professional service for all Victoria students who would like to discuss personal or academic issues affecting their general sense of wellbeing. and Kea House at 2 Clermont Terrace. and is open 8. Room 007 tel 0-4. Students who wish to use any of the Crèches should register in person from the first Monday of November at 71 Fairlie Terrace. Group programmes are also available. Staff ECE Centres are Tui House at 4 Clermont Terrace. A range of services and support is available. regular workshops and a mentoring programme.victoria. 16. alternative print formatting. injury. including specialised computer software. The Law Crèche. and personal assistance where appropriate.ac.1. Students wishing to discuss their needs should contact a Student Adviser from Disability Support Services as early as possible. Room 103 Telephone for an appointment tel 0-4-463 6070.ac. Level 0. in the Government Buildings on Lambton Quay. at 67-71 Fairlie Terrace. Pasifika and First Nations’ PhD Candidates. This Crèche is on the Kelburn campus. fax 0-4-463 5028 Counselling Clinics are also held at Pipitea.nz/mai 70 PhD Handbook .3 Counselling Service 2 Wai-te-ata Road (Kelburn campus) Hours: 9am to 5pm throughout the year tel 0-4-463 5310.1.30pm email kaiwawao-maori@vuw. email Disability@vuw.1.1. The University Staff Early Childhood Education (ECE) Centres cater for the children of staff and postgraduate students.30am to 5. caters for 14 children up to three-and-a-half years of age. The Crèche’s fully trained and experienced staff provide care and education for children while parents are studying.nz www. and is open from 8am to 5. There are also active student support groups. either full-time or five half days. Bookings are on a permanent basis.victoria. hearing assistance technology.ac. places to study and rest.30pm weekdays.16. tel 0-4-463 5151 or email Childcare@vuw.7 MAI Ki Poneke MAI (Maori and Indigenous Postgraduate Students) is a national network for Maori.30am-4. which offers monthly regional meetings.1. or phone the Manager on 0-4-463 5151.ac.5 Disability Support Services Level 1. 16.nz 16. Trained and experienced staff provide care and education for children aged from three months to five years.4 Childcare The University Student Crèche is available to students with pre-school children (from birth to five years). Kirk Building.463 6001 or 027 563 6001 Monday to Friday 8.nz Disability Support Services are on campus to assist students who are deaf or have an impairment.00pm by special arrangement.

travel and nutrition advice.30am to 3. and structuring and formatting long documents. at both Kelburn and Pipitea campuses. Level 0 Hunter Courtyard Hours: 8. 16.ac.16. Faculty of Education tel 0-4-463 9537. for example. transport. fax (04)-463 5252.8 Financial Support and Advice 14 Kelburn Parade.1.nz The Student Finance Advisers help students to manage their personal finances by providing advice and individual budgets.nz The Student Learning Support Service (SLSS) runs regular seminars on topics of interest to postgraduate students.ac. 17 Adelaide Road. Rooms 106 and 107 Hours: 9am to 5pm weekdays (no appointments on Fridays) tel 0-4-463 6644 or 0-4-463 6658. in the first weeks of each trimester. email Student-learning@vuw. fax 04-463-5028 Pipitea: Student Services.10 Student Learning Support Service Kelburn: Kirk Building. minor surgery and more. fax 0-4-463 5252. oral presentations. Our Student Health Service will help you enjoy better health and an improved lifestyle. research costs not covered by grants. including time management.nz/postgradlife PhD Handbook 71 . 139 Vivian St tel 0-4-463-5308. phone 0800-611 116 to speak to a registered nurse. management of ongoing health problems.1. 16. fax 04-463-7475 Karori: Level 3. and Te Aro: Ground floor. contraception. email Student-hardship@vuw.victoria. For further information phone 0-4-463 5908. will help postgraduates set up and maintain a peer study/support group in their school and will organise workshops on request. West Wing. high course costs. PostgradLife is a student-centred website which provides links to important information for postgraduate students: www. An experienced team of doctors and nurses provides a wide range of medical care including treatment of acute illness and injury.victoria. dermatology and physiotherapy.ac.nz/st_services/health/ (for clinic times and fee structure) The Student Health Service offers low cost confidential quality healthcare. Railway Station. Experienced learning advisers are also available for one-to-one consultations on all aspects of postgraduate study. tel 0-4-384 4944 (there will a charge for this service). A number of specialist services are also available including psychiatry. They can also help students complete financial statements for scholarships applications. childcare. SLSS facilitates a regular postgraduate writing group (beginning with an intensive Saturday workshop in March).nz www.ac.9 Student Health Service Kelburn: 4 Wai-te-ata Rd. fax 0-4-463 9581 email Student-health@vuw.ac. Level 2 Hours: 8. After hours emergency care is shared with Wellington GPs at the Wellington Accident and Urgent Medical Centre.30pm Tuesdays and Fridays tel (04)-463 5999. They administer the Hardship Fund which provides short-term assistance for those facing financial difficulties. developing research questions. For free medical advice. accommodation etc.30am to 4pm Monday to Friday Pipitea: Railway Station. The Advisers have close links with StudyLink and can assist with problems associated with Student Allowance and Loan applications. Grey Block. Level 2.1. West Wing tel 0-4-463 7474. smears and sexual health checks.

1. There is also a National Bank branch and ATM.nz.ac. active and inactive. the Union Cafe. Court of Convocation. or have been enrolled since the penultimate election. 16.2.victoria. fax: 0-4-463 6698. which elects five members of the University Council. 16. They also deal with all insurance and visa-related issues and can help you settle into your new life in Wellington.1 Student Union Building tel: 0-4-463 6999. The Student Union Building is home to vicbooks. and through an affinity card it raises money to fund postgraduate scholarships. social and political activities.2 Student Union Complex The University’s ‘Community Centre’. PO Box 600. many of who have achieved distinction in a variety of fields in New Zealand and elsewhere. fax 0-4-463 5210: email alumni@vuw. the Recreation Centre. or have applied to the Secretary for transfer to the active roll. The register of members is in two parts.1. The Association also organizes informal social activities. email student-union@vuw. the Student Union Complex provides opportunities for students to participate in a wide variety of cultural. the only campus bookshop in New Zealand owned by its students.nz The Union Building houses the Student Union management and the Students’ Association. the Rutherford House Gym. the Kelburn Tennis Pavilion and the Boyd Wilson Field and clubrooms. Vicbooks is on the 3rd floor of the Student Union Building and 72 PhD Handbook . www.11 Victoria International The Victoria International Services Team is the first port of call for all International PhD students seeking assistance at the University. New graduates are automatically enrolled on the register. Graduates are encouraged to remain involved in the life of the University and to exercise their right to representation on the University Council. are placed on the active roll. which has an important role as a forum to discuss matters of relevance to the University and provide graduate input into University decision-making. It is a focus for many activities and features social and meeting rooms.1. Members wishing to participate in the election of the Court of Convocation representatives on the Council should ensure their names are on the active roll. the Mount Street Bar and Cafe and the Union Hall and Hunter Bar. New Zealand. Those who have voted in one of the previous two Council elections. Anyone who has studied or worked at Victoria may join. Wellington.nz/alumni The Alumni Relations Office provides a means for graduates and others who have had a close association with the University to remain in touch. Enquiries and applications for enrolment should be addressed to the Secretary.ac. Members of Victoria University College when it was part of the University of New Zealand and persons whose names were enrolled on the register of the Court of Convocation on 26 August 2002 are also eligible. 16. It coordinates activities of the Alumni Association. Alumni Relations Office Room 325. Victoria University of Wellington.ac.12 Alumni Association The University values its links with its former students. Hunter Building Tel 0-4-4636700. The Services Team act as a facilitator to help you find the assistance you need. the Karori Gym and Tennis Courts. through the VUWSA Trust. recreational.16.13 Court of Convocation All graduates of Victoria University are eligible to be enrolled as members of the Court of Convocation. Facilities include those offered by the Student Union Building. 16.

The Student Union also operates Student Notes on the Ground Floor. Vicbooks offers a student discount on academic textbooks.nz. indoor cricket and rock climbing are a sample of recreational activities which take place at Kelburn.ac. Tae Bo and Step to mention a few. basketball and indoor netball. If you are into social sport check out our Sports League competition.ac. Pump. table tennis and ultimate. and has postal and dry cleaning services.the ground floor of Rutherford House. Martial arts. which has recently been refurbished. volleyball. or even cocktail making. www. choose from indoor soccer.victoria. volleyball. The Group Exercise programme offers fantastic classes in Yoga. The Kelburn and Karori gymnasiums provide opportunities for indoor sports such as basketball.2. The Kelburn and Pipitea Fitness Studios offer a full range of cardio equipment and weights machines. to salsa. During trimesters 1 and 2 we run an Activities Programme giving you the opportunity to try everything from bridge swinging. email rec-cent@vuw. general books.2 Recreation Centre tel 0-4-463 6614. PhD Handbook 73 . Pilates. magazines and stationery. 16. and a second fitness studio and aerobics centre at the Pipitea Campus.nz/union/reccentre Recreation offers two main facilities: the recreation centre at the Kelburn Campus.

Enrolling.References Academic Grievance Policy Animal Ethics Policy Human Ethics Policy Information Systems Statute Intellectual Property Policy Library Statute Management of External Research Consultancy and Related Contracts Policy Minimum Resources Agreement PhD Policy: Approving. Supervising and Examining Candidates Policy on Recognition of Authorship Policy on Staff Conduct Statute for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy Statute on Student Conduct Strategic Plan University Charter Withholding Theses Procedure 74 PhD Handbook .

Faculty Office. payment of fees.Appendix 1: Summary of Tasks and Responsibilities Task Discussing initial proposal Ethical approvals Admission Determining conditions of registration Confirming registration Processing administrative requirements including registration. Facilitator and Disputes Advisor. possible supervisors Appropriate ethics committees. extensions. suspensions. through supervisors Associate Dean on recommendation of supervisors and Administrative Supervisor Associate Dean on recommendation of supervisors and Administrative Supervisor Associate Dean on recommendation of supervisors and Administrative Supervisor Faculty Office Associate Dean on recommendation of supervisors and Administrative Supervisor Supervisors Prepared by supervisors and candidate. content and shape of thesis Six-monthly progress reports Approving the use of school facilities and funding Approving research grants (where available) Responsibility PG Coordinator. extensions research away from the University Guidance on all matters pertaining to supervisors the research. Administrative Supervisor. forwarded to Administrative Supervisor and Faculty Office Head of School Faculty or School Research/Postgraduate Committees Supervisors. Senior Academic Policy Advisor Resolving problems PhD Handbook 75 . record of candidature in the ResearchMaster information management system etc Approving variations to conditions of study including suspensions. Associate Dean. Postgraduate Coordinator.

Examination Responsibilities Task Receipt of completed thesis Sending thesis to examiners Making examination arrangements Approving examination arrangements Organising and chairing oral examination Assessing examiners’ reports and deciding examination result Notifying results Checking that corrections to thesis have been made Notifying PhD Convener of the RDC that revisions or minor amendments have been made Deposit of thesis in Library Responsibility Faculty Office Faculty Office Associate Dean in consultation with supervisors and Administrative Supervisor Research Degrees Committee Associate Dean or nominee Research Degrees Committee Associate Dean through Faculty Office Internal Examiner Internal Examiner Candidate and Faculty Office 76 PhD Handbook .

Responsibilities as follows: PhD Handbook 77 . The Administrative Supervisor has responsibility for the School/Faculty paperwork involved in the candidacy. if the internal examiner or the principal examiner is not available. Most administrative responsibilities for PhD students are delegated to the School Research/Postgraduate Committee (SRC).0 Supervision Protocols) Administrative Supervisor In addition to two academic supervisors. Head of School The role of Head of School (HoS) varies from one school to another. be the Head of School (HoS) of registration. Responsibilities as follows: Enrolment/Registration • Ensures candidates and supervisors fulfil the regulations for the degree Supervision • Provides advice to the supervisors and is the first source of advice for candidates beyond the supervisors Assists in resolving any difficulties that may arise between candidates and their supervisor/s Informs the Associate Dean immediately in writing. which outlines the agreed responsibilities including the completion of sixmonthly reports Comes to agreement with the candidate and the supervisor/s on additional work required for a PhD if the candidate is converting from a Master’s degree Provides written support for applications for conversion from a PhD to a Master’s degree Recommends to the Associate Dean any nominations for external scholars to be part of the supervisory team (Honorary Research Associates) Seeks approval from the Associate Dean for any changes to the supervisory team Oversees the completion of the six-monthly report process Recommends to the Associate Dean that a candidate’s enrolment be discontinued if no action is taken by the candidate to rectify problems identified in the six-monthly reports • • • • • • • • • Examination • • Approaches prospective examiners in consultation with supervisors Oversees the minor amendments or revisions. the HoS will act as the Administrative Supervisor. candidates and internal supervisors sign a Memorandum of Understanding. In most cases. each PhD candidate will have an Administrative Supervisor who will in most cases. are hindering the research progress.Appendix 2: Summary of Role Responsibilities Supervisor/s (see Chapter 7. Information includes outlining how the candidate and supervisor/s are working towards the resolution of those difficulties Ensures that external supervisors. where difficulties which have arisen during supervision.

signs the completed application form (along with all the supervisors) and then returns the form.Enrolment/Registration • Writes an agreement (Research Memorandum) between the School. Responsibilities as follows: Enrolment/Registration • Discusses potential research projects with a candidate and makes decisions about their suitability Refers prospective candidates to possible supervisors Vets initial research proposals in conjunction with SRC Ensures that the candidate has two supervisors • • • 78 PhD Handbook . and monitors. Postgraduate Coordinator/Director The Postgraduate Coordinator (PG Coordinator) in each school is responsible for providing information and guidance to prospective and enrolled PhD students and supervisors within a subject area. proposed action to rectify problems specified in the six-monthly reports. are aware of VUW policies and practices and of training opportunities Reviews the six-monthly reports before their submission to the Associate Dean Agrees to. equipment. and the SRC recommendation to the FO for final approval by the Associate Dean Sends recommendations on full registration to Associate Dean • • Supervision • Ensures only qualified staff members gain approval as thesis supervisors and advises supervisors of the mandatory professional development programme Ensures supervision is included in the school workload formula Recommends supervisors to the Associate Dean Ensures appropriate supervision arrangements are in place if the primary supervisor is absent from the University for longer than one month Ensures all external supervisors are provided with a copy of the PhD Handbook. ensuring that the candidate has had the opportunity to respond Notifies the Associate Dean if the student fails to take the required action to rectify persistent problems and informs student of their entitlement to representation • • • • • • • Examination • Provides CVs for the New Zealand and overseas examiners plus a rationale for why the three proposed examiners make an appropriate examination panel to the Associate Dean for endorsement. source materials and funding) that the School will provide during the candidature and sends to the SRC Approves the recommendation from the SRC on the candidates acceptability. candidate and supervisor/s of the entitlements (facilities. the Research Memorandum. the initial proposal.

Responsibilities as follows: Enrolment/Registration • Scrutinises the initial research proposal for academic appropriateness. Revisions must be completed to the satisfaction of the SRC or nominee Organises the period of continued supervision if the thesis is required to be re-submitted. • PhD Handbook 79 .• • • Oversees the acceptance of a candidate within a school Ensures that the candidate and each supervisor has a PhD Handbook Provides candidates with University criteria and School-specific criteria determined by the SRC for progressing from provisional to full registration Oversees the transfer of a candidate from provisional to full registration • Supervision • • • Provides advice and support for supervisors Responds to student queries and concerns Keeps records and monitors six-monthly progress reports (may be delegated from the Head of School) Liaises with Associate Dean over student progress • Administration • • Organises school research seminars Manages all administrative procedures with school administration staff School Research/Postgraduate Committee The School Research/Postgraduate Committee (SRC) is responsible for the management of PhD candidature in the school. and the Research Memorandum to ensure appropriate resources are available for the research and then makes recommendations to the HoS on the acceptability of the candidate Approves memorandum of attendance Develops School-specific criteria (in addition to Victoria University criteria) as to what constitutes satisfactory progress for candidates to move from provisional to full registration Recommends a move to full registration once the committee has accepted the full research proposal and the student has met requirements and informs the Associate Dean • • • Supervision • Discusses possible conversion from a Master’s degree to a PhD with supervisors – must be satisfied existing supervisor/s are appropriately qualified/experienced and if necessary approve additional supervision Examination • Notifies the candidate of any required revisions to the thesis (usually delegate this to the internal examiner and/or the primary supervisor) to ensure that the candidate understands exactly what is required to meet the examiners’ concerns.

or delegated authority.Associate Dean (Students/Research) In each faculty an Associate Dean. where good cause is shown. or extensions beyond seven years (only granted in exceptional circumstances). a period during which candidates must be working under direct supervision Receives rationale from supervisors and candidates for any prolonged absence from the Wellington region Grants permission to candidates who wish to pursue a period of research overseas Approves backdates of provisional registration (up to two months) for candidates who have spent productive time in developing their research proposal before registration Approves requests for extensions of provisional enrolment Terminates provisional registration. is responsible for the approval of all administrative decisions and for all academic matters related to the PhD degree programmes of candidates within their faculty. on recommendation from the SRC and the HoS Approves applications for concurrent study while studying for a PhD (must have support from supervisors and HoS) Specifies. where the HoS is already the primary supervisor. or is unable to exercise the required administrative functions Approves applications to convert from a Masters to the PhD and vice versa Approves provisional enrolment. Responsibilities as follows: Enrolment/Registration • Approves admission of candidates who do not have the appropriate qualifications but who can demonstrate a level of ability and have relevant experience Appoints supervisors on behalf of the Academic Board. where major difficulties are experienced early on in the project and requests that the candidate consider the possibility of identifying a new research project Approves any additional SRC guidelines on what constitutes satisfactory progress for candidates to move from provisional to full registration Approves applications to move to full registration Receives notification from candidates if circumstances which have been taken into account in setting the period of registration change in any material way Approves. on rare occasions. the resumption of registration if it lapses Discontinues enrolment of a candidate where no action has been taken by the candidate to resolve problems outlined in the six-monthly reports Grants suspensions or extensions of enrolment beyond 5 years. Sends copies to the RDC for approval • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 80 PhD Handbook . at the time of registration. following nomination by schools including the Administrative Supervisor.

or appoints an appropriate person as chairperson Sends examiners’ reports to the candidate at least five days before the oral examination • • PhD Handbook 81 . Candidate may appeal that decision to the RDC Scrutinises recommendations for potential examiners and forwards them to the RDC for appointment Ensures examiners appointed to examine the thesis are available to do so within the eight weeks as specified in the PhD Policy Acts as a conduit for consultation between examiners and supervisors Asks the internal examiner (or a New Zealand based examiner) to coordinate consultation between examiners. where differing recommendations are made. If the Associate Dean so decides. funding and grievances which have not been dealt with by the Administrative Supervisor or the HoS Approves applications for a change in the supervisory team from the Administrative Supervisor and informs the RDC of any changes Forwards recommendations from the Administrative Supervisor for external scholars to be appointed as supervisors (Honorary Research Associates). that the quality of the thesis to be submitted is such that no examiner could reasonably be expected to recommend that the candidate be awarded either a PhD or a Master’s degree. after appropriate consultation. Supervisor must notify the candidate who will have the opportunity to make a submission to the Associate Dean Decides. to see if the differing recommendations can be resolved Reports on the examination of the thesis to the PhD Convener. sends all examiners’ reports and a recommendation on the outcome Receives written confirmation from the internal examiner that minor amendments and revisions have been satisfactorily completed Conveys the decision of the RDC (in writing) on the acceptability of the thesis and sends copies of the examiners’ reports to the candidate. to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) • • Examination • • Approves requests for early submission Receives recommendations from the primary supervisor where it is the supervisor’s opinion that the thesis is not of a sufficient standard for examination.Supervision • • Receives and monitors progress on the six-monthly reports Advises supervisors and candidates over matters relating to supervision. the primary supervisor. the candidate will be advised of the reasons for the decision and the changes necessary to make the thesis suitable for examination. the Administrative Supervisor and the HoS • • • • • • • • Oral Examinations: • Arranges an oral examination where appropriate (including requests to the PhD Convener for oral examination approval when required) Chairs the oral examination.

• Reports on the examination as a whole. borrowed. fees. primary supervisor. suspensions and extensions Receives and holds records of the six monthly reports Maintains accurate and up-to-date postgraduate data on candidature in the ResearchMaster information management system Submission • • Receives the completed thesis from the candidate Provides a Statement of Authorship form and requires the candidate’s signature to confirm that the work of others has been acknowledged in the thesis and that the thesis has not been submitted previously for another degree Provides two Availability of Thesis forms and requires the candidates signature to consent that the thesis may be consulted. • Faculty Office (Student and Academic Services Office) The appropriate Faculty Office is the central processing and service centre for all administrative details related to the PhD candidature. on behalf of the Associate Dean Ensures the candidate has deposited two copies of the final copy of the thesis in the library. • • PhD Convener The PhD Convener chairs the Research Degrees Committee (RDC). assesses examiners’ reports and makes a decision concerning the examination result on behalf of the RDC. copied or reproduced in accordance with the Library regulations. to the RDS.000 words in length (inclusive of scholarly apparatus) Ensures the candidate receives an Exit Questionnaire to evaluate their supervision upon thesis submission • • • Examination • Sends examiners a copy of the thesis and appropriate information detailing what is required from them Sends official notification of examination results to candidates. Responsibilities as follows: 82 PhD Handbook . This requirement is delayed if the candidate has received the approval of the RDC to have access to the thesis withheld for a limited period of time Receives a statement from the candidate that the thesis does not exceed 100. Sends the report of the oral examiner to the candidate. after any telephone conversations with the overseas examiner as appropriate. Administrative Supervisor and HoS. with a recommendation. The PhD Convener approves the examination arrangements for PhDs in consultation with the relevant Associate Dean. Responsibilities are: Enrolment/Registration • • • Administers candidates registration.

the recommendation from the examiners. on behalf of the RDC. candidate or RDC Approves requests for oral examinations via the Associate Dean. but excluding Honorary degrees Considers any changes to doctoral regulations or processes and makes recommendations to the Academic Board Reviews and monitors the allocation of resources to research students. any unusual procedures for the oral examination. on behalf of the RDC. in exceptional circumstances. Responsibilities as follows: Policy • Reviews policy related to Master’s Degrees by thesis (of 90 points and above). Where necessary. PhDs. where they are in agreement Consults with the RDC academic members where examiners’ views of the thesis differ significantly or are in other ways controversial Coordinates a discussion between examiners in order to achieve consensus where there is a significant disagreement between examiners Receives a recommendations from the referee in cases where a referee is consulted when the examiners can not agree on a joint recommendation Receives a copy of the letter from the Administrative Supervisor outlining any minor amendments that have been made Receives a copy of the notification where a thesis needs to be resubmitted outlining what parts of the thesis require revision and for what reasons Receives a copy of the notification that the revisions have been completed Informs the Associate Dean that the RDC has reached a decision on the acceptability of the thesis • • • • • • • • Oral Examination • Approves. • • Research Degrees Committee The Research Degrees Committee of the Academic Board has responsibility for ensuring that the processes concerning the PhD have an appropriate degree of consistency across the University. any other doctoral qualifications. including all the examiners’ reports and a recommendation on the outcome Approves.Submission • Grants permission. for a thesis larger then 100. consults with the RDC Asks the Associate Dean to arrange an oral examination where requested by the supervisor.000 words to be submitted for examination Examination • Receives a report from the Associate Dean of the examination of the thesis. including Higher Doctorates. the operation of supervision procedures and research student completion rates • • PhD Handbook 83 .

Enrolment/Registration • Approves suspensions/extensions of candidates beyond 5 years of full or part-time study, on the recommendation of the Associate Dean Considers requests for the Withholding of Theses

Supervision • Receives reports from Faculty Office on issues emerging from Exit Questionnaires so they can monitor supervision across the University

Examination • • • Approves and appoints three PhD examiners in consultation with the Associate Dean Considers appeals on the standard of a thesis for submission Reviews the reports of the Associate Dean and the examiners and makes a decision on the outcome of the examination process Receives a copy of the written confirmation from the internal examiner to the Associate Dean, that minor amendments and revisions have been satisfactorily completed Appoints a substitute for the internal examiner if they cannot fulfil the role of consulting senior academics where there are disputes over revision Consents in exceptional circumstances, to a change in examiners when a thesis is re-submitted Decides, in cases where differences prevent the examiners agreeing on a joint recommendation, to proceed on a majority report. Alternatively, the RDC may ask for further efforts to reconcile the examiners or seek a recommendation from a referee to whom the thesis and the anonymised examiners’ reports is referred Recommends award of the degree

• •

Oral Examination • Receives the oral examination report from the Associate Dean, reconsiders all the reports and makes a final decision on the acceptability of the thesis on behalf of the Academic Board Confirms any recommendation for a second oral after re-examination of a thesis.

Research and Postgraduate Studies Office
The Research and Postgraduate Studies office assists in the formulation of policy, supports research administration in the University (including scholarships), liaises with schools and faculties and provides advice and assistance in support of staff and student research. Responsibilities as follows: • • • Updates and publishes the PhD Handbook Provides information and advice on research policy Provides administrative support to the Research Degrees Committee and the University Research Committee Monitors and improves the administration of the PhD process Offers professional development programmes for supervisors

• •

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Offers support regarding problems relating to PhD candidacy if matters cannot satisfactorily be resolved at the School or Faculty level Receives reports from the Faculty Office on issues emerging from Exit Questionnaires to incorporate into supervisor training Provides advice to supervisors about the appropriate form of agreement for supervisors arranging for the placement of candidates off campus.

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research)
The Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) is responsible for the strategic direction of research in the University. Responsibilities as follows: • • • • • • Holds responsibility for the development of the University’s research policies Appoints the PhD Convener Chairs the University Research Committee Approves any supervisory contracts with collaborating institutions Appoints external supervisors as Honorary Research Associates Advises the AVC (Academic) on academic grievances concerning PhD candidacy.

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Appendix 3
Degree of Doctor of Philosophy Statute Research Policy Group

1.

Purpose:

The PhD Statute sets out the regulations governing the admission, enrolment, registration, supervision, and examination procedures for the PhD degree at Victoria University of Wellington. It also stipulates the criteria on which the award of the degree will be based. This Statute must be read in conjunction with the PhD Policy: Approving, Enrolling, Supervising and Examining PhD Candidates.

2.

Organisational Scope:

This is a University-wide statute.

3.

Definitions:

For purposes of this Statute, unless otherwise stated, the following definitions shall apply: Administrative Supervisor: The person in the School with responsibility for administering the candidacy. The Administrative Supervisor must ensure that the candidate and the supervisors follow the regulations for the PhD Degree. Associate Dean: The person designated by the Dean of the Faculty for the purpose of this Statute. Full-time PhD Student: Students are deemed to be full-time when they are able to devote a minimum of 30 hours per week to the thesis, on average, over the year. This workload excludes statutory holiday periods. Half-time PhD Student: Students who cannot work on the thesis for the amount of time specified above are deemed to be half-time students. PhD Convener: Convener of the Research Degrees Committee. Research Degrees Committee (RDC): The University body responsible for the oversight of the PhD and Master’s by Thesis. Supervisor: A supervisor is a person who is appointed to provide academic and administrative guidance to the candidate during their enrolment for the degree.

4.
(a)

Statute Content and Guidelines:
A candidate for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy shall, before enrolment: (i) have qualified for admission to a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree with First or Second Class Honours or a Master’s degree at an equivalent standard to First or Second class honours at a university in New Zealand; or

4.1 Admission

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PhD Handbook

the Associate Dean may. (b) (c) (d) (e) 4. This excludes any period(s) of suspension. the date of registration shall be deemed to be the date of first enrolment for the degree. Full registration must be confirmed by the Associate Dean on the advice of the Head of School within 15 months of first enrolment for full-time candidates and 24 months for half-time candidates. terminate the enrolment.1 (a) (ii). All calculations will exclude any periods of suspension. the submission times will be calculated on a pro rata basis. the candidate will be deemed to have first enrolled for the Doctor of Philosophy on the date of first enrolment for the Master’s degree.and half-time. (c) 4. Where a candidate is accepted under clause 4. the supervisors of a candidate shall submit a report on the progress of the candidate to the Administrative Supervisor and the Student and Academic Services Office. PhD Handbook 87 . otherwise the candidate’s enrolment will be terminated. (b) Candidates must not only show themselves to be qualified but must also be accepted by the Head of School and relevant Associate Dean. the minimum period of registration will be 36 months. In the case of candidates who have been permitted to change between full. Extensions shall be granted only in exceptional circumstances. and will not usually exceed twelve months. a candidate shall be provisionally registered as a candidate for the Doctor of Philosophy. Suspension and Extension (a) A candidate pursuing a course of study for the degree shall re-enrol within one month of the expiry of the period of previous enrolment. The thesis shall be presented within four years from the date of registration for candidates who have been enrolled full-time and within six years for candidates who have been enrolled exclusively half-time. or (iii) produce evidence to the satisfaction of the Associate Dean of adequate training and ability to proceed with the proposed course for the degree. Once full registration has been confirmed. During a student’s candidature. On application from a candidate. Every year of enrolment in May and November. subject to any submission or appeal a candidate may make. and not more than twelve months. the minimum period of registration will be 24 months and with halftime enrolment. through the Associate Dean. on application to the Research Degrees Committee.4 Course of Study (a) The course of study for a PhD consists of a programme of research and the writing of a thesis carried out under supervision.2 Conditions of Enrolment (a) Initially. Extensions to the due date of the thesis may be granted. Termination. measured in monthly increments. During suspension of enrolment the candidate will pay no fees and will have no access to university services. for a period of not less than one month. the total period of suspension shall not usually exceed twelve months.3 Re-enrolment. the Associate Dean may grant a suspension of enrolment. With full-time enrolment.(ii) be currently enrolled in a Master’s by thesis. where good cause is shown. including supervision and the library. If progress is reported to be unsatisfactory. (b) 4.

or on the recommendation of the examiners after the submission of the thesis. make a report on the whole examination to the RDC. a statement shall be included showing how the published work relates to the thesis. where the statute for such Master’s degree provides that the degree may be taken by thesis and where the candidate does not already hold that degree in the same subject in this university. The Associate Dean may on the application of the candidate or the supervisors at any time before the submission of the thesis. One of these examiners will normally be from outside New Zealand. part of the research programme may be carried out at locations outside the University. after consultation with the examiners. and constitutes a significant and original contribution to knowledge or understanding. (b) The thesis shall not exceed a total of 100. In exceptional circumstances the Research Degrees Committee may grant permission for a longer thesis to be submitted for examination.5 (b) is co-authored. as long as the report constituting the thesis is written under supervision during the period of registration.12 of the Library Statute). a candidate may submit their thesis and apply for examination. theoretical or creative components.5 Examination (a) At any time after the minimum period of enrolment. (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h) (i) 88 PhD Handbook . Where the decision has been made to award the degree. Where any work relevant to the thesis has been published. who will determine whether the degree be awarded. The principal supervisor or co-supervisor must not be an examiner.000 words in length (including scholarly apparatus). Any application for Withholding of Theses should be made as early as possible in the research project and well before submission. The thesis shall be examined by three examiners. but with permission of the Associate Dean. The format of the thesis is determined by the Library Statute (see Clause 4. appointed by the Research Degrees Committee (RDC). and contact details of co-authors (see the Recognition of Authorship Policy). or accepted for publication at the time of submission. The application for examination shall be accompanied by a statement from the supervisors that the candidate has pursued the course in accordance with the requirements of this statute. approve the enrolment of the candidate in a subject for an appropriate Master’s degree instead of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. experimental.(i) The research will normally be conducted at Victoria University of Wellington. Where any of the published material included in clause 4. (iii) The thesis may include the candidate’s previously published work or material based on previous research. (ii) The thesis must be a body of work that demonstrates the candidate’s ability to carry out independent research. but the end result must be a single integrated study. the candidate must provide a detailed statement of each author’s contribution to such work. it will be awarded upon the deposit of copies of the final thesis in the University Library in accordance with the Library Statute. (c) 4. The Associate Dean shall. This contribution may include critical.

(i) Where any thesis has been submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy that thesis may be accepted in fulfilment of the requirements for the Master’s degree. References: Library Statute PhD Policy: Approving. Statute Sponsor: Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) 10. (ii) In any other case. None Appendices: 7. Supervising and Examining PhD Candidates Recognition of Authorship Policy Withholding of Theses Procedure 6. Contact Person: The following person may be approached on a routine basis in relation to this statute: Dr. the candidate shall be deemed to have been enrolled in and to have followed a course of study for that Master’s degree for the appropriate minimum period. 5190 PhD Handbook 89 . 5. provided that the candidate has been enrolled for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy for that period. Enrolling. Approval Dates: Pre 1990 17 December 2007 17 December 2007 17 December 2010 This statute was originally approved on: This version was approved on: This version takes effect from: This statute will be reviewed by: 9. notwithstanding any other provision in the Statute for that Master’s degree. Approval Agency: University Council 8. Theresa Sawicka Research Manager Extn.

90 PhD Handbook .

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